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Joanna Hyde (Unknown)

Also Known As: "Ann", "Abell"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Probably England
Death: after 1682
Norwich, New London County, Connecticut Colony
Place of Burial: Norwich, New London County, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Wife of Robert Abell and William Hyde of Norwich
Mother of Abraham Abell; Mary Luther; Cuthbert Abell; Lt. Preserved Abell; Richard Abell and 12 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Joanna Hyde

William Hyde married as his second wife on June 4, 1667, Mrs. Joanna (----) Abell, widow of Robert Abell of Rehoboth, Connecticut. The Rehoboth marriage record lists William as “William Hide of New Norwich”.

The information says that she died sometime after 1682. (Please post information and source.)

  • 'Joanna1,2
  • 'F, d. after 1682
  • ' Joanna married Robert Abell, son of George Abell, Gent. and Frances Cotton, circa 1638; There were 8 children born to this marriage: 5 known sons (Abraham, Preserved, Caleb, Joshua, & Benjamin) and 2 known daughters (Mary, wife of Rev. Samuel Luther and Experience, wife of John Baldwin).1,2 Joanna married Wllliam Hyde, son of William Hyde and Ellen Stubbs, on 4 June 1667 at Rehoboth, Bristol, MA.2 Joanna died after 1682 at Norwich, New London, CT.1
  • 'Family 1 Robert Abell b. c 1605, d. 20 Jun 1663
  • Child
    • ◦Caleb Abell+ b. Apr 1646, d. 17 Aug 1731
  • 'Family 2 Wllliam Hyde b. c 1615, d. 6 Jan 1681
  • Citations
  • 1.[S5] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p. 34.
  • 2.[S16] Douglas Richardson, Magna Carta Ancestry, 2nd Edition, Vol. I, p. 2.
  • http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p1557.htm#i46791
  • __________________
  • 'Robert was the second son of George Abell (1561–1630)[7] and Frances Cotton (b. abt. 1573-d. by 1646).[8] On his mother’s side, he was descended from a long line of English, Norman and French aristocrats and royalty.[9]
  • 'His maternal grandfather, “Rt. Hon. Sir George Cotton,” was “Vice-Chamberlain of the Household to the Prince of Wales, (later King Edward VI) . . . a Privy Counsellor . . . [and] Esquire of the Body to King Henry VIII.”[10] Henry knighted him before or in 1542.[11]
  • 'Robert’s father, George Abell, at the age of 17 enrolled in Oxford University’s Brasenose College (8 December 1578).[12] By November of 1580, he had become a barrister and a member of the Inner Temple.[13] Before June 1630, he arranged an apprenticeship in London for his son, but Robert decided to try his luck in the New World, instead. This was a move that his father disapproved of, but, nevertheless, financed.
  • 'In his will, dated 8 September 1630, George Abell states (original spelling retained), “I bequeath unto my second sonne Robert Abell onelie a Twentie shilling peece for his childs parte in regard of ye charges I have beene at in placeing him in a good trade in London wch hee hath made noe use of and since in furnishing him for newe England where I hope he now is.”[14]
  • New Life in America
  • Robert Abell’s first recorded act in America (19 October 1630) was to apply to be a freeman in the recently founded village of Weymouth.[15] On 18 May 1631, he took the freeman’s oath. “This act endowed him with full privileges and responsibilities of citizenship in the new colony, including ownership of lands, in the exercise of which he continued to acquire holdings.”[16]
  • Most of the early settlers of Massachusetts Bay Colony had at least two major preoccupations: (1) helping build Winthrop’s “City upon a Hill,” a model Christian society, and (2) surviving and prospering in the New World. It is not known exactly how committed Abell was to the first objective, but municipal and court records show him participating in the life of his community, slowly building up his land holdings and eventual establishing a business.
  • During his time as a resident of Weymouth (1630–1643), his civic duties included serving on various types of juries (grand, petit and coroner’s), and records indicate that he accumulated a small amount of land (about 7 acres).[17] Like many immigrants, Robert Abell did not stay indefinitely in the first place he landed. In 1643, when the opportunity to join a newly founded town presented itself, he followed Reverend Samuel Newman (and the majority of his congregation) to a place the local Wampanoag tribe called Seekonk (a portion of which was later renamed “Rehoboth”).[18] Some of Abell’s activities while living there can be found in the following extracts from the minutes of various Rehoboth town meetings and Plymouth colonial records:
  • 18 February 1646: “At a meeting of the towne it was agreed to draw lots for the new meadow, and to be divided according to person and estate, only those that were under £150 estate to be made up 150. They were drawn as followeth: [Robert Abell was number 41 on a list of 46 people].”[19]
  • 26 February 1651: “It was agreed that Robert Abell and Richard Bullock should burn the commons round about, from the Indian fence, all the neck, to the new meadow near, and so far about the fresh meadows as may be convenient; and they are to have 20s. for their pains.”[20]
  • 28 March 1653: “It was concluded and agreed upon, that Robert Abell should have three acres of meadow on the north side of the line, next the town, next the line that parteth the land of the purchasers and the town of Rehoboth. This meadow was given by Mr. Prince, Captain Standish and Mr. Winslow.”[21]
  • 1 February 1654: “Robert Abell was ordered to keep the Ordinary.”[22]An "ordinary” is variously defined as a tavern or an inn. An establishment of this type was an important social institution in a small New England community and vital to the town’s economy.
  • 3 July 1656 (Plymouth): “Robert Abell is allowed to keep an ordinary at Rehoboth.” [Bliss, Leonard.[23]
  • 1657: Abell’s name appears in a list of persons who “have taken oath of fidelities.”[24]
  • 22 February 1658: “At a town meeting lawfully warned, lots were drawn for the meadows that lie on the north side of the town, in order as followeth, according to person and estate: [Abell’s name is third on the list of 49 people]”[25]
  • 'At the time of his death, Abell’s estate “amounted to £354 17s. 9d. of which ‘an house and land’ accounted for £130.”[26]
  • Second Generation of Robert Abell’s Family
  • 'Robert Abell and his wife Joanna Hyde (d. aft. 1682) [Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 43] had ten children: Abraham (d.1639), Mary (1642–1724), Preserved (b. ca. 1644), Caleb (b. ca. 1647), Joshua (b. ca. 1649), Benjamin (b. ca. 1651), Experience (b. ca. 1660), Samuel (1650-1698), James (1656-1724), and Mehitalbe (b. ca. 1655).[27]
  • Circa 1662, their daughter Mary married Reverend Samuel Luther (1636–1716), son of an adventurous mariner named Captain John Luther (d.1645),[28] “a focal figure in the colonies mentioned several times in Winthrop's Journal and other colonial accounts.”[29] Robert Abell’s new son-in-law was already famous in New England for having survived a massacre and kidnapping by a small group of Lenape tribesmen when he was only nine years old (1645) and went on to become (1685) the highly respected “settled pastor” of the First Baptist Church (still extant) of Swansea, Massachusetts for 31 years.[30]
  • Mary’s sister Experience married (1680) Deacon John Baldwin (1654–1705), an early settler of Lebanon, Connecticut, with whom she had five children.[31]
  • Robert’s son Lieutenant Preserved Abell (d. 1724) was among those soldiers listed as having not only “served under Major [William] Bradford (1624-1703)” in King Philip’s War, but also “advanced money to sustain it.” (£7, 15s, 1d.)[32]
  • Sergeant Caleb Abell (d. 1731) moved to Norwich, Connecticut in 1668 and was a selectman in 1682, constable in 1684 and 1706, townsman in 1689 and was Sergeant of the Norwich Train Band in 1701. “In the book of Grants in Norwich, there are 38 or more items to Caleb Abell.”[33]
  • Joshua Abell (d. 1725) “was constable in Dedham, Massachusetts and frequently chosen townsman there. He moved to Norwich, Connecticut in 1667 and became a ‘considerable landowner,’ with 44 grants listed in his name.”[34]
  • Benjamin Abell (d.1699) also held substantial property adjacent to or near his older brothers in Norwich.[35]
  • All of the Abell brothers had sizable families (seven to ten children each), helping to perpetuate the family name in New England. Writing in 1940, genealogist Horace Abell claimed that “probably all the present day Abells of New England stock are descended from Robert’s three sons, Preserved, Caleb and Benjamin Abell. His fourth son, Joshua, did not leave any male descendants.”[36]
  • Notes
  • 1.^ Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, p. 66
  • 2.^ Arnold, James N. Vital Record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896. p.789
  • 3.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 11
  • 4.^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
  • 5.^ Banks, Charles Edward. The Winthrop Fleet of 1630. p. 57
  • 6.^ Pope, Charles Henry. The Pioneers of Massachusetts, p. 4
  • 7.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 41
  • 8.^ Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, p. 66
  • 9.^ Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700
  • 10.^ Mosley, Charles, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, Vol. 1, p. 871
  • 11.^ Boyer, Carl. Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell, p. 71
  • 12.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 41
  • 13.^ Cooke, William Henry. Students admitted to the Inner Temple, 1571-1625, p. 35
  • 14.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 42
  • 15.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p.43
  • 16.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, pp. 14-15
  • 17.^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
  • 18.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 43
  • 19.^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, pp. 38-39
  • 20.^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, pp. 42-43
  • 21.^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 43
  • 22.^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 45
  • 23.^ The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 47
  • 24.^ Arnold, James N. Vital Record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896, p. 917
  • 25.^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 48
  • 26.^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
  • 27.^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins
  • 28.^ Luther, Leslie L. and George A. Luther. The Luther genealogy, p. 30
  • 29.^ Luther, Leslie L. and George A. Luther. The Luther genealogy, p. 29
  • 30.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 47
  • 31.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 56
  • 32.^ Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts, p. 117
  • 33.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 50
  • 34.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 52
  • 35.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, pp. 54-55
  • 36.^ Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America, p. 15
  • Bibliography
  • Abell, Horace A. The Abell family in America: Robert Abell of Rehoboth, Mass., his English ancestry and his descendants, other Abell families and immigrants, Abell families in England. Rutland, VT: Tuttle Pub. Co., 1940.
  • Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-1633. Vol. 1-3. Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995.
  • Anderson, Virginia DeJohn. New England's Generation: The Great Migration and the Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK: 1991. ISBN 052144764X
  • Arnold, James N. Vital Record of Rehoboth, 1642-1896. Providence, RI: Narragansett Historical Publishing, 1897.
  • Banks, Charles Edward. The Winthrop Fleet of 1630: An Account of the Vessels, the Voyage, the Passengers and their English Homes, from Original Authorities. 1930. ISBN 0806300205
  • Bliss, Leonard. The History of Rehoboth, Bristol County, Massachusetts: Comprising a History of the Present Towns of Rehoboth, Seekonk, and Pawtucket, from Their Settlement to the Present Time; Together with Sketches of Attleborough, Cumberland, and a Part of Swansey and Barrington, to the Time that They Were Severally Separated from the Original Town. Boston, MA: Otis, Broaders, & Co., 1836
  • Boyer, Carl. Medieval English ancestors of Robert Abell: Who died in Rehoboth, Plymouth Colony, 20 June 1663: with English ancestral lines of other colonial Americans. C. Boyer, 2001.
  • Cooke, William Henry. Students admitted to the Inner Temple, 1571-1625. London: F. Cartwright, 1868.
  • Finley, R. Mainwaring. A Short History of the Mainwaring Family. London: Griffith, Farran, Okeden & Welsh, 1890.
  • Fischer, David Hackett. Albion's Seed: Four British Folkways in America. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1989. ISBN 0195069056
  • Rider, Fremont. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, CT, USA: Godfrey Memorial Library.
  • Luther, Leslie L. and George A. Luther. The Luther genealogy: a history of the descendants of Captain John Luther who arrived in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1630-1635. Lakeland, FL: G.A. Luther, 2001.
  • Mosley, Charles, editor, Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th Edition, 3 Volumes. Wilmington, DE: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003.
  • Pope, Charles Henry. The Pioneers of Massachusetts: A Descriptive List, Drawn from Records of the Colonies, Towns, and Churches, and Other Contemporaneous Documents. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1998. Originally published in 1900. ISBN 0806307749
  • Richardson, Douglas, and Kimball G. Everingham, Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub. Co., 2005. ISBN 0806317590
  • Richardson, Douglas, Kimball G. Everingham, and David Faris. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Pub. Co., 2004. ISBN 0806317507
  • Roberts, Gary Boyd. The Royal Descents of 600 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States Who Were Themselves Notable or Left Descendants Notable in American History. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004. ISBN 0806317450
  • Roberts, Gary Boyd, Julie Helen Otto, and New England Historic Genealogical Society. Ancestors of American Presidents. 3rd Edition. Boston, MA: C. Boyer, 1989. ISBN 0936124148
  • Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England: Showing Three Generations of Those who Came Before May, 1692, on the Basis of Farmer's Register. Vol. 1-4. Boston, MA: Little, Brown & Co., 1862.
  • Thompson, Neil D. "Abell-Cotton-Mainwaring: Maternal Ancestry of Robert Abell of Weymouth and Rehoboth, Mass," The Genealogist, Vol 5, No 2 (Fall 1984): 158-71, 9 (1988): 89
  • Weis, Frederick Lewis and Walter Lee Shepard, Jr.; William R. Beall and Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700: Lineages from Alfred the Great, Charlemagne, Malcolm of Scotland, Robert the Strong, and other Historical Individuals. Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004. ISBN 0806313676
  • Winthrop, John. Winthrop's Journal, "History of New England" 1630-1649. Vol. 1 & 2. New York, NY: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1908.
  • External links
  • Great Migration Study Project [1]
  • Luther Family Association [2]
  • Winthrop Society [3]
  • Order of the Crown of Charlemagne in the United States of America [4]
  • The National Society Magna Charta Dames and Barons [5]
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Abell
  • __________________

Source: Ancestors of American Presidents - (1989) p. 296 Source: Burke's American Families, pg. 2529. Source: Medieval English Ancestors of Robert Abell by Carl Boyer, 3rd (2001) Source: Royal Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families (Douglas Richardson); 2013; Vol. 1:107 Source: AFN: CGJ0-00

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Joanna Hyde's Timeline

1610
January 11, 1610
Probably England
1639
November 14, 1639
Age 29
Weymouth, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States
1642
April 11, 1642
Age 32
Weymouth, Suffolk County (Present Norfolk County), Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
August 1642
Age 32
St. Mary's, Maryland, United States
1644
April 11, 1644
Age 34
Weymouth, Suffolk County (Present Norfolk County), Massachusetts Bay Colony, (Present USA)
1645
1645
Age 34
Maryland, United States
1646
April 1, 1646
Age 36
Rehoboth, (Present Bristol County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts), (Present USA)
1646
Age 35
Bristol County, Massachusetts, United States
1647
1647
Age 36
Leicestershire, England