Lieutenant Thomas Pepsironemeh Rolfe

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Lieutenant Thomas Pepsironemeh Rolfe

Birthdate: (60)
Birthplace: Varina Plantation, Smiths Fort, Henrico County, Virginia, Colonial America
Death: April 16, 1675 (60)
Richmond, Virginia, Colonial America
Place of Burial: Hopewell, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Captain John Rolfe, Ancient Planter and Pocahontas
Husband of Elizabeth Rolfe and Jane Rolfe
Father of Anne Elwyn; John Rolfe; Jane Bolling and Thomas Rolfe
Half brother of Ka Okee "Jane" Pettus, of the Patawomeck; Bermuda Rolfe and Elizabeth Pierce Milner

Occupation: Lieutenant
Managed by: Noah Tutak
Last Updated:

About Lieutenant Thomas Pepsironemeh Rolfe

Thomas Pepsironemeh Rolfe was born in Virginia in 1615, the first recorded birth of a child born to a Virginia Indian princess and an English gentleman. The child was presumably named after the Governor, Sir Thomas Dale. His mother, Pocahontas, had converted to Christianity in 1614 and taken the name Rebecca before she married John Rolfe, an English gentleman planter in Virginia. He traveled to England as a small child. His mother died before the family could return to Virginia, and Thomas was left in England. He did not return to Virginia until he was 20 years old.

Thomas married Jane Poythress shortly after his return to Virginia. The date of the marriage is not known, but with land and a wife, Thomas Rolfe was established. Now, he looked to find his Powhatan relatives and establish family connections.

In 1622, John Rolfe died unexpectedly in Virginia. The explanation for his death is not fully known, although it may have been through sickness. Another prominent figure that died in these years of Thomas' absence was his grandfather, Powhatan. He was the chief of the Powhatan Indians and died of seemingly natural causes in 1618. At one point during Powhatan's sickness, it was rumored among the Indians that Thomas would be the heir to the Powhatan domain. Upon Powhatan's death, however, it was clear that this was not the case. Opechancanough, Thomas' uncle, took over in Powhatan's place. When Thomas returned to Virginia in 1635, he found that his grandfather did not forget him. Through John and Rebecca Rolfe, Powhatan left Thomas thousands of acres on the James River, some of which is directly across the James River from Jamestown Island. He was also left the plantation where he was born, Varina. John Rolfe had secured this land for Thomas by taking out a royal patent before his death in 1622.

In 1641, Thomas petitioned the Governor for permission to meet with his mother's people. The petition was accepted and Thomas met his uncle, Opechancanough. Unfortunately, there are no recordings of their meeting. Thomas evidently made the choice between his Powhatan and English heritages in 1646 when he became a lieutenant in the English military. The General Assembly in the colony granted Thomas the land called Fort James in return for his service. Thomas was now part of the English policy to dismantle and control the land of his Powhatan ancestors.

Around 1650, Thomas and Jane had their only child, Jane. Jane went on to marry Colonel Robert Bolling in 1675. The couple had one son, John, the third in line of descendants from Rebecca and John Rolfe, and from Bolling came seven children.

There are few documents that trace his life past the time of 1646, and records regarding his death are lacking. Most genealogists believe he died in Virginia, in either Richmond or at his plantation, Varina, where he had been born. It is clear that Thomas became a man of wealth, as can be seen through land patents and deeds. The last reference made to him is in a deed from 1698 by John Bolling. John inherited Fort James through his mother, Jane, and transferred the land to William Brown in this deed. Thomas' name was mentioned in the document as deceased, and it is the last known reference to him.

Although Thomas Rolfe's heritage was Powhatan and English, he lived as an Englishman. When Thomas cemented that by becoming a lieutenant for the colony, he decided the manner in which thousands of his descendants would live for years to come.

Other Wives and Children

                            

There are unproven theories that , when Jane Poythress died, after bearing an only daughter, Thomas Rolfe left Virginia and moved to North Carolina, where he is also reputed to have married again. With the laws of North Carolina so strict, both then and during the next century or so, it is understandable that Thomas would never have mentioned the fact that he was half Indian, nor would that information have likely been passed down in the family tales. If, in fact, Thomas did leave Virginia, and, if in fact, he did remarry, he could have sired a number of male children. If those events happened, it would be reasonable to assume that one or more of them returned to England, particularly if they knew of their ancestor's ethnic background and were therefore nervous about remaining in the colonies. These are theories, with no proofs yet found. None of the proposed later wives have been accepted by the Pocahontas Society [see Dubious Pocahontas Descendants at http://pocahontas.morenus.org/].

There is a possible wife and child BEFORE Thomas Rolfe returned to Virginia. The Pocahontas Society has accepted this theory. [see again the link to Dubious Descendants, above]. The proponents of this theory claim the birth of a first daughter, Anne Rolfe, by what would have been Thomas' first wife in England. Recent discussion on this marriage claims that young Thomas could not inherit until age 21 UNLESS he was married. It is inferred that he married to obtain that inheritance.

The most likely candidate for the first wife is Elizabeth Washington. A church record shows the following: Thomas ROLFE married Elizabeth WASHINGTON in Sep 1632 at St.James Church, Clerkenwell, London, England. Thomas, son of Pocahontas, would have been 17 at marriage and Elizabeth would have been 18. Let us not forget that Thomas had been left in England to be raised by family. The Thomas who married Elizabeth could have been a cousin. The Elizabeth Washington who married a Thomas Rolfe died giving birth to a daughter Anne Rolfe. Some claim that there was also a son of this marriage. Anne Rolfe, daughter of Elizabeth Washington, married an Elwyn and had numerous descendants. Some items said to have belonged to Pocahontas, such as her earrings, were passed down in the family for generations.

Recently I have been pointed to another website (http://www.robertoharder.com/pocahontas.htm) that claims Rolfe must have had more wives/liaisons, as it was unusual to have a single child in colonial Virginia. This website asserts that Thomas Rolfe must have had several children, perhaps as many as twelve according to some reports, and they almost certainly issued from more than one wife or mistress. Specifically, it discusses the merits of one Ann/Anne/Anna Rolfe Barnett, born circa 1648, according to her family's oral tradition, and a specific reference to her in the bible of John Perry Barnett (1764-1828). The story is compelling but no documents are linked to the site, and one of the articles mentioned has since been debunked. See http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/POCAHONTAS/2004-12/1103428136.

Capt. John Smith

John Smith DID NOT not marry Pocahontas. John Rolfe did. Rolfe's descendents all come from the Bollings, the family into which Jane Rolfe, the only child of Pocahontas and John Rolfe's son Thomas "Pepsironemeh" Rolfe, married. There was no son to carry on the Rolfe name. Though other Rolfes who were related to the family may claim to be related to John Rolfe; they cannot, however, claim to be related "by blood" to Pocahontas and the Powhattan clan. And, although they are not properly kin of Pocahontas herself or her Native American forebears, they are kin to her child Thomas Rolfe and his daughter Jane Rolfe and to her Bolling descendants. 


Links to additional material:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14873513


Thomas Pepsironemeh Rolfe was born in Virginia in 1615, the first recorded birth of a child born to a Virginia Indian princess and an English gentleman. The child was presumably named after the Governor, Sir Thomas Dale. His mother, Pocahontas, had converted to Christianity in 1614 and taken the name Rebecca before she married John Rolfe, an English gentleman planter in Virginia. He traveled to England as a small child. His mother died before the family could return to Virginia, and Thomas was left in England. He did not return to Virginia until he was 20 years old.

Thomas married Jane Poythress shortly after his return to Virginia. The date of the marriage is not known, but with land and a wife, Thomas Rolfe was established. Now, he looked to find his Powhatan relatives and establish family connections.

In 1622, John Rolfe died unexpectedly in Virginia. The explanation for his death is not fully known, although it may have been through sickness. Another prominent figure that died in these years of Thomas' absence was his grandfather, Powhatan. He was the chief of the Powhatan Indians and died of seemingly natural causes in 1618. At one point during Powhatan's sickness, it was rumored among the Indians that Thomas would be the heir to the Powhatan domain. Upon Powhatan's death, however, it was clear that this was not the case. Opechancanough, Thomas' uncle, took over in Powhatan's place. When Thomas returned to Virginia in 1635, he found that his grandfather did not forget him. Through John and Rebecca Rolfe, Powhatan left Thomas thousands of acres on the James River, some of which is directly across the James River from Jamestown Island. He was also left the plantation where he was born, Varina. John Rolfe had secured this land for Thomas by taking out a royal patent before his death in 1622.

In 1641, Thomas petitioned the Governor for permission to meet with his mother's people. The petition was accepted and Thomas met his uncle, Opechancanough. Unfortunately, there are no recordings of their meeting. Thomas evidently made the choice between his Powhatan and English heritages in 1646 when he became a lieutenant in the English military. The General Assembly in the colony granted Thomas the land called Fort James in return for his service. Thomas was now part of the English policy to dismantle and control the land of his Powhatan ancestors.

Around 1650, Thomas and Jane had their only child, Jane. Jane went on to marry Colonel Robert Bolling in 1675. The couple had one son, John, the third in line of descendants from Rebecca and John Rolfe, and from Bolling came seven children.

There are few documents that trace his life past the time of 1646, and records regarding his death are lacking. Most genealogists believe he died in Virginia, in either Richmond or at his plantation, Varina, where he had been born. It is clear that Thomas became a man of wealth, as can be seen through land patents and deeds. The last reference made to him is in a deed from 1698 by John Bolling. John inherited Fort James through his mother, Jane, and transferred the land to William Brown in this deed. Thomas' name was mentioned in the document as deceased, and it is the last known reference to him.

Although Thomas Rolfe's heritage was Powhatan and English, he lived as an Englishman. When Thomas cemented that by becoming a lieutenant for the colony, he decided the manner in which thousands of his descendants would live for years to come.

Other Wives and Children

There are unproven theories that , when Jane Poythress died, after bearing an only daughter, Thomas Rolfe left Virginia and moved to North Carolina, where he is also reputed to have married again. With the laws of North Carolina so strict, both then and during the next century or so, it is understandable that Thomas would never have mentioned the fact that he was half Indian, nor would that information have likely been passed down in the family tales. If, in fact, Thomas did leave Virginia, and, if in fact, he did remarry, he could have sired a number of male children. If those events happened, it would be reasonable to assume that one or more of them returned to England, particularly if they knew of their ancestor's ethnic background and were therefore nervous about remaining in the colonies. These are theories, with no proofs yet found. None of the proposed later wives have been accepted by the Pocahontas Society [see Dubious Pocahontas Descendants at http://pocahontas.morenus.org/].

There is a possible wife and child BEFORE Thomas Rolfe returned to Virginia. The Pocahontas Society has accepted this theory. [see again the link to Dubious Descendants, above]. The proponents of this theory claim the birth of a first daughter, Anne Rolfe, by what would have been Thomas' first wife in England. Recent discussion on this marriage claims that young Thomas could not inherit until age 21 UNLESS he was married. It is inferred that he married to obtain that inheritance.

The most likely candidate for the first wife is Elizabeth Washington. A church record shows the following: Thomas ROLFE married Elizabeth WASHINGTON in Sep 1632 at St.James Church, Clerkenwell, London, England. Thomas, son of Pocahontas, would have been 17 at marriage and Elizabeth would have been 18. Let us not forget that Thomas had been left in England to be raised by family. The Thomas who married Elizabeth could have been a cousin. The Elizabeth Washington who married a Thomas Rolfe died giving birth to a daughter Anne Rolfe. Some claim that there was also a son of this marriage. Anne Rolfe, daughter of Elizabeth Washington, married an Elwyn and had numerous descendants. Some items said to have belonged to Pocahontas, such as her earrings, were passed down in the family for generations.

Recently I have been pointed to another website (http://www.robertoharder.com/pocahontas.htm) that claims Rolfe must have had more wives/liaisons, as it was unusual to have a single child in colonial Virginia. This website asserts that Thomas Rolfe must have had several children, perhaps as many as twelve according to some reports, and they almost certainly issued from more than one wife or mistress. Specifically, it discusses the merits of one Ann/Anne/Anna Rolfe Barnett, born circa 1648, according to her family's oral tradition, and a specific reference to her in the bible of John Perry Barnett (1764-1828). The story is compelling but no documents are linked to the site, and one of the articles mentioned has since been debunked. See http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/POCAHONTAS/2004-12/1103428136.

Capt. John Smith

John Smith DID NOT not marry Pocahontas. John Rolfe did. Rolfe's descendents all come from the Bollings, the family into which Jane Rolfe, the only child of Pocahontas and John Rolfe's son Thomas "Pepsironemeh" Rolfe, married. There was no son to carry on the Rolfe name. Though other Rolfes who were related to the family may claim to be related to John Rolfe; they cannot, however, claim to be related "by blood" to Pocahontas and the Powhattan clan. And, although they are not properly kin of Pocahontas herself or her Native American forebears, they are kin to her child Thomas Rolfe and his daughter Jane Rolfe and to her Bolling descendants. 


Links to additional material:

http://www.smokykin.com/tng/getperson.php?personID=I43234&tree=Smokykin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Rolfe http://pocahontas.morenus.org/poca_gen.html http://genforum.genealogy.com/rolfe/messages/1156.html http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.cCavaliers and Pioneers. Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants, 1623-1666, Vol. I, Patent Book 4: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14873513


Colonial American Figure. His mother was Pocahontas whose father was Chief Powhatan of a federation of the Algonquian Indian tribes of the tidewater region of Virginia The father of Thomas Rolfe was John Rolfe, a member of the House of Burgess & credited with establishing the planting of tobacco in Virgina Colony.

Thomas was born in the Virginia Colony, probably on Smith's plantation at Jamestown. His mother, Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, gave up her native birth name and took the Christian name of Rebecca when she married John Rolfe.

Thomas' parents' marriage was as much a political action as an action of affection. In John's petition to the Governor for permission to marry Pocahontas, he stated both reasons.

When still an infant, Thomas went to England with his parents, where his mother died about seven months later. His father left him there to be raised in guardianship, while he returned to business interests in Virginia.

Since Thomas spent his childhood in the white society of England and the Virginia Colony, he thought of himself as an Englishman. When he reached adulthood, history recorded that the Virginia Governor granted Thomas permission to meet his Native American uncle, Opechancanough. Nothing was noted of the outcome of this meeting, however.

He served as a lieutenant in the English military, and was granted land at Fort James. By the time he died, his estate showed he held more than one deed and land grant, so he was a man of means in Colonial Virginia.

He married Jane Poythress, and their only child, Jane, married Colonel Robert Bolling. The Bollings had a son, John. He had seven children.

Some researchers suggest Thomas died at age 61 in 1674/75; However a property event dating 23 Apr 1681, lands of Thomas Rolfe, deceased, known as "the Fort Land" were divided and sold - so he was clearly gone before 23 Apr 1681; His only grandson, John Bolling, signed over some of his land in 1698 to a William Brown.

Bibliography:

The Association for the Preservation of Virginia, copyright 1997,2000 at website antiquitieshttp://www.apva.org/history/jrolfe.html

Colonial National Historic Park Jamestown, Historic Briefs: Thomas Rolfe by Megan Snow, NPS Intern from William and Mary May 2003 at website http://www.nps.gov/colo/Jthanout/ThomasRolfe.htm

Brown, Stuart E., Lorraine F. Myers, and Eileen M. Chappel. Pocahontas' Descendants. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1994.

Stanard, William. Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 21. New York: Kraus Reprint Corporation, 1968.

Early Virginia Families Along the James River: Their Deep Roots and Tangled Branches, Volume III, page 73 (distribution of lands after 1680)

Thomas Rolfe was the only child of Pocahontas and her English husband, John Rolfe. His maternal grandfather was Wahunsunacock, the chief of the Powhatan tribe in Virginia.

Thomas Rolfe was born in Virginia on January 30, 1615. Governor Sir Thomas Dale accompanied Thomas Rolfe and his parents on their trip to England aboard the Treasurer in 1616. He was a year old during this voyage, and was not necessarily immune to the diseases and hardships of the voyage. Thomas survived, but a year later in spring 1617 was stricken with a severe fever, as was his mother.

The Rolfe family was preparing to re-embark on the George ship commanded by Samuel Argall when Rebecca (Pocahontas) died, possibly of consumption, at Gravesend Kent. The voyage continued but Thomas was left in Plymouth, England with Sir Lewis Stukley, and was later transferred into the care of his uncle, Henry Rolfe. His father, however, sailed to Virginia without him after being persuaded by Admiral Argall and other members of the journey that he was too sick to continue the voyage; this was the last time the two ever saw each other. Thomas remained in his uncle's care until he reached roughly 21 years of age, by which time his father had already died.[5] As Henry raised Thomas, he felt he deserved compensation from his brother's estate, and therefore petitioned the Virginia Council in October 1622, claiming entitlement to a portion of John Rolfe's land. It is assumed that Thomas returned to Virginia in 1635, and there is no further mention of his whereabouts or doings until 1641.

Once established in Virginia again, Thomas fostered both his reputation as a plantation owner, and as a member of his mother's lineage.

As Rolfe was a child of an Englishman and a Native American woman, some aspects of his life were particularly controversial. He expressed interest in rekindling relations with his Native American relatives, despite societal ridicule and laws that forbade such contact. In 1641, Rolfe petitioned the governor for permission to visit his "aunt, Cleopatra, and his kinsman Opecanaugh".

Thomas Rolfe later married a woman named Jane Poythress, who was the daughter of Captain Francis Poythress, a prosperous landowner in Virginia. They had one daughter together, who was also named Jane, after her mother.

In 1698 his grandson, John Bolling (Jane's son), released to William Browne his rights in land, in a deed in which Bolling is identified as "...son and heir of Jane, late wife of Robert Bolling of Charles City County, Gent., which Jane was the only daughter of Thomas Rolf, dec'd..."[9] As confirmed by the 1698 deed quoted above, his daughter Jane married Robert Bolling. Robert Bolling and Jane Rolfe Bolling had one child; their son John was born January 26, 1676.

According to his father's will, both Thomas and Elizabeth, his half-sister, received named land. There is no extant proof that some land came from the Native Americans. However Native Americans did not 'hold' land in the English way. There is no mention of former Indian land in John Rolfe's will, however, John Rolfe names Thomas as the rightful heir of all his land, profits and any royalties pertaining to such land. There were rumors in 1618 that when Thomas came of age, he would inherit a sizable portion of Powhatan territory; this information was transmitted through Argall to London, stating, "'Opechanano and the Natives have given their Country to Rolfe's Child and that they will reserve it from all others till he comes of yeares...." (Mossiker). There is no extant documentation that when Thomas arrived in Virginia in 1640, the land was recorded as "Varina," his patrimonial property sixteen miles below Richmond.

Thomas's step-grandfather, named Captain William Peirce, received a grant of 2000 acres of land on June 22, 1635, for the "transportation of 40 persons among whom was Thomas Rolfe". He then listed Thomas as heir to his father's land. Prior to March 1640, Thomas took possession of this land which was located on the lower side of the James River.

Thomas also inherited a tract of some 150 acres on June 10, 1654, in Surry County, across from Jamestown; the land was described in a later deed as "Smith's Fort old field and the Devil's Woodyard swamp being due unto the said Rolfe by Gift from the Indian King".

The year after the 1644 Indian attack on the colony, four forts were established to defend the frontier: Fort Henry, Fort Royal, Fort James, and Fort Charles. Fort James was to be under the command of Thomas Rolfe as lieutenant as of October 5, 1646. He was given six men, and was instructed to fight against the Native Americans—his own people.

And it is further enacted and granted, That left.[Lieutenant] Thomas Rolfe shall have and enjoy for himselfe and his heires for ever fort James alias Chickahominy fort with fowre hundred acres of land adjoyning to the same, with all houses and edifices belonging to the said forte and all boats and ammunition at present belonging to the said fort; Provided that he the said Leift. Rolfe doe keepe and maintaine sixe men vpon the place duringe the terme and time of three yeares, for which tyme he the said Leift. Rolfe for himselfe and the said sixe men are exempted from publique taxes.

Then, on October 6, 1646, Thomas was put in charge of building a fort at Moysonec, for which he received 400 acres (160 ha) of land. This fort was located on the west side of Diascund Creek.

Several years later, Rolfe patented 525 acres on August 8, 1653, "...lying upon the North side of Chickahominy river commonly called and known by the name of James fort...", apparently including the 400 acres he had received in 1646. This James Fort land was re patented by William Browne on April 23, 1681. The tract was described in the patent as "formerly belonging to Mr Thomas Rolfe, dec'd", thus establishing that Rolfe had died before that date.

The last recorded mention of Thomas Rolfe exists in a land patent from September 16, 1658. While some sources claim that Thomas died in 1680, others claim that the exact year is unknown. Some evidence purports that Thomas Rolfe died in James City County, Virginia, however the records of the county were destroyed in 1685 during a fire.

The birth of Thomas Rolfe, as he was both white and Native American, reinstated peace between the Powhatans and the European settlements. Early in his career as deputy governor, Argall reported in a letter published within the Virginia Company Records that Powhatan "goes from place to place visiting his country taking his pleasure in good friendship with us laments his daughter's death but glad her child is living so doth opachank".


Birth: Jan. 30, 1615 Jamestown James City County Virginia, USA Death: 1680 Richmond Richmond City Virginia, USA

Colonial American Figure. His mother was Pocahontas whose father was Chief Powhatan of a federation of the Algonquian Indian tribes of the tidewater region of Virginia The father of Thomas Rolfe was John Rolfe, a member of the House of Burgess & credited with establishing the planting of tobacco in Virgina Colony.

Thomas was born in the Virginia Colony, probably on Smith's plantation at Jamestown. His mother, Pocahontas, daughter of Chief Powhatan, gave up her native birth name and took the Christian name of Rebecca when she married John Rolfe.

Thomas' parents' marriage was as much a political action as an action of affection. In John's petition to the Governor for permission to marry Pocahontas, he stated both reasons.

When still an infant, Thomas went to England with his parents, where his mother died about seven months later. His father left him there to be raised in guardianship, while he returned to business interests in Virginia.

Since Thomas spent his childhood in the white society of England and the Virginia Colony, he thought of himself as an Englishman. When he reached adulthood, history recorded that the Virginia Governor granted Thomas permission to meet his Native American uncle, Opechancanough. Nothing was noted of the outcome of this meeting, however.

He served as a lieutenant in the English military, and was granted land at Fort James. By the time he died, his estate showed he held more than one deed and land grant, so he was a man of means in Colonial Virginia.

He married Jane Poythress, and their only child, Jane, married Colonel Robert Bolling. The Bollings had a son, John. He had seven children.

Some researchers suggest Thomas died at age 61 in 1674/75; However a property event dating 23 Apr 1681, lands of Thomas Rolfe, deceased, known as "the Fort Land" were divided and sold - so he was clearly gone before 23 Apr 1681; His only grandson, John Bolling, signed over some of his land in 1698 to a William Brown.

Bibliography:

The Association for the Preservation of Virginia, copyright 1997,2000 at website antiquitieshttp://www.apva.org/history/jrolfe.html

Colonial National Historic Park Jamestown, Historic Briefs: Thomas Rolfe by Megan Snow, NPS Intern from William and Mary May 2003 at website http://www.nps.gov/colo/Jthanout/ThomasRolfe.htm

Brown, Stuart E., Lorraine F. Myers, and Eileen M. Chappel. Pocahontas' Descendants. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1994.

Stanard, William. Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Volume 21. New York: Kraus Reprint Corporation, 1968.

Early Virginia Families Along the James River: Their Deep Roots and Tangled Branches, Volume III, page 73 (distribution of lands after 1680)


Family links:

Parents:
 John Rolfe (1585 - 1622)
  Pocahontas (1595 - 1617)

Spouse:
 Jane Poythress Rolfe (1630 - 1676)*

Children:
 Jane Rolfe Bolling (1650 - 1676)*

Siblings:
 Bermuda Rolfe (1610 - 1610)**
 Ka Okee Jane Powhatan Pettus (1612 - ____)**
 Thomas Rolfe (1615 - 1680)
 Elizabeth Pierce Rolfe Milner (1620 - 1635)**
  • Calculated relationship
    • Half-sibling

Note: Some researchers question why his daughter, Mrs. Bolling, is memorialized next to him instead of his last wife. Since the marker notes blood relationships only, the group erecting it was likely noting his historical significance - not wives


Burial: Kippax Plantation Hopewell Hopewell City Virginia, USA


Created by: L Pritchett Record added: Jul 10, 2006 Find A Grave Memorial# 14873513


Thomas was the only child of John and Rebbeca (Pocahontas) Rolfe. When she died he was left in England to be raised by family there. He then returned to Virginia to claim his parents property upon his majority. Birth 1615 Smith's Plantation, Virginia Also found Birth Place Varina, Henrico, Virginia, Residence 1616, raised by family in England Thomas grew up in England where he became a lieutenant in the English Army. He came to America when he was about 25 years old (c. 1640). Marriage 1640 Richmond, Henrico, Virginia or in 1644 Jamestown, James City, Virginia Husband: Thomas Rolfe married, supposedly, only once to Wife: Jane Poythress, and they only had one child : Child: Jane Rolfe who married BOLLING. Death AFT 1658 James City, County, Virginia Death 1675 James River, Buckingham, Virginia[1] "Some researchers suggest Thomas died at age 61 in 1674/75; However a property event dating 23 Apr 1681, lands of Thomas Rolfe, deceased, known as "the Fort Land" were divided and sold - so he was clearly gone before 23 Apr 1681; His only grandson, John Bolling, signed over some of his land in 1698 to a William Brown." [2]. A theory about Thomas's birth A possible unproven legend states that Mattaponi oral history is adamant that Thomas was born out of wedlock, prior to the marriage ceremony between Pocahontas and Rolfe.[3] Wanted : [citation needed] for marriage to Elizabeth Washington in England. Most early sources ( See The Descendants of Pocahontas: An Unclosed Case"[4] and Pocahontas' Descendants by Stuart Brown et al (1995) which is the most updated version of POCAHONTAS' DESCENDANTS: A Revision, Enlargement and Extension of the List as Set out by Wyndham Robertson in His Book Pocahontas and Her Descendants (1887) that he was only married once "to possibly the daughter of Francis Poytress, a Virginia colonist" . If there was a first marriage in England before he moved to Viriginia to claim his inheritance & land, the first wife was listed as " unknown". Disputation Whether Anne Rolfe actually existed as a daughter of Thomas Rolfe "The Elwyn family of Thurning, Norfolk, England, claims that Anne Rolfe, “cousin and adopted” daughter of Anthony Rolfe of Tuttington, Norfolk, and wife of Peter Elwyn of Thurning (1623-1695/6) was also a daughter of Thomas Rolfe, Pocahontas’s son, by an early English wife. Brown, Myers, and Chappel accept this claim; Moore and Slatton do not, and I am skeptical also. Margaret Wake, a great-granddaughter of Peter and Anne, married William Tryon (1729-1788), colonial Governor of North Carolina and New York. English sources for the Elwyn progeny include R. T. and A. Gunther, Rolfe Family Records, Vol. 2 (1914): 289-91, and Patrick Palgrave-Moore and Michael J. Sayer, A Selection of Revised and Unpublished Norfolk Pedigrees (Norfolk Genealogy, Vol. 6, 1974, published by the Norfolk and Norwich Genealogical Society), 56-59 (Elwyn); and The Ancestor 2 (1902): 183-84 and 4 (1904): 256-57 (Wake, Tryon)."[5].[6] Residence: 1652 Thomas Rolfe House, Surry Co., VA: story-and-a-half homes with chimneys at both ends and a more nearly symmetrical facade, as in the Thomas Rolfe House (1652), in Surry County, Virginia.[7] Sources ↑ Pg.12. Magazine of Virginia Genealogy.http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/15024057/person/1201/mediax/d894b735-4047-4845-a3fb-766388ca50e8 ↑ Bibliography: The Association for the Preservation of Virginia, copyright 1997,2000 at website antiquitieshttp://www.apva.org/history/jrolfe.html ↑ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/national-museum-of-the-american-indian/pocahontas-first-marriage_b_5664891.html ↑ The Descendants of Pocahontas: An Unclosed Case", by Elizabeth Vann Moore and Richard Slatten, Magazine of Virginia Genealogy, XXIII, no.3, pp.3-16, cited by John Frederick Dorman, Adventurers of Purse and Person, 4th ed., Vol. 3, p.26, fn23-24. Moore and Slatten traced the suggestion that his wife was a Poythress back to a comment by W. G. Stanard in "Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents", Virginia Historical Magazine(I, 1894, 446-447): "His wife is said to have been a Miss Poythress (if so, doubtless a daughter of Francis Poythress." According to Moore and Slatten, Stanard cited as evidence handwritten notes on the flyleaf of a copy of A Complete Collection of All the Laws of Virginia Now in Force Carefully Copied from the Assembled Records (London, 168[?], now in the Library of Virginia. Moore and Slatten state: "Interestingly, Thomas Rolfe here is recorded as married to a 'Miss Payers'. We recall that in John Rolfe's will the name of his third wife is spelt Pyers (Peirce) and that it was John who married a "Jane". Here again a Bolling descendant confused the son with his father. Not recognizing the name 'Payers' as another variant of Peirce, someone searched the records for a name beginning with 'P' and having a 'y' in the first syllable. Francis Poythress lived in adjacent Charles City County and his name ended in s! Stanard wrote, 'His wife is said to have been a Miss Poythress (if so, doubtless a daughter of Francis Poythress).' (VMHB I, 446) Wyndham Robertson, a Bolling descendant, wrote in Pocahontas Alias Mataoke and Her Descendants (Richmond, 1887), 'I adopt "Jane Poythress" (not "Poyers") whom he is stated in the Bolling Memoirs to have married in England.' He added in justification of his charming adoption of an ancestress, '...no such name as "Poyers" is anywhere known ... the family of Poythress was already settled in Virginia.' ... The result has been the acceptance of a non-existent personage, 'Jane Poythress', in the Bibles of Virginia genealogy, as the bona fide ancestress of many illustrious Virginians. Who the wife (or wives) of Thomas Rolfe may have been remains an unanswered question. ↑ copied from Notable Kin: Some Descendants and Kinsmen of Descendants of Pocahontas: An Excursion into Southern GenealogybyGary Boyd Roberts.Published Date : April 1986 at www.americanancestors.com. ↑ : Note: Thomas Rolfe and Pocahontas http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=7577a841-decd-4ce2-8a14-2ba9cc100a6d&tid=15024057&pid=1201 Note: Bolling http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=d894b735-4047-4845-a3fb-766388ca50e8&tid=15024057&pid=1201 Note: Col Robert Bolling http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=0e1dd168-3368-4b5b-9390-c479f00a3a9e&tid=15024057&pid=1201 Note: Thomas Rolfe Home http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=image&guid=d5905a25-134c-4857-8b11-d3aef4954b98&tid=15024057&pid=1201 Note: Col. Robert Bolling http://trees.ancestry.com/rd?f=document&guid=88bc4982-2713-4a12-b67a-eed0c36ff272&tid=15024057&pid=1201 ↑ Microsoft Encarta 98, "American Art and Architecture". See Also: Copied from Notable Kin: Some Descendants and Kinsmen of Descendants of Pocahontas: An Excursion into Southern GenealogybyGary Boyd Roberts.Published Date : April 1986 at www.americanancestors.com. David Morenus. Pocohantas Descendants. Accessed by Michael Boynton on December 22, 2015 at 3:30 PM. http://pocahontas.morenus.org/poca_gen.html#.VnmzM-w8LCQ Virginia County Records Surname Index. The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 1999; Gale Research, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2010; Godfrey Memorial Library, comp., American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 1999 Virginia, Find A Grave Index, 1607-2012 Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2012 Marcus Abbott Haskins, Brøderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree Vol. 2, Ed. 1, (Release date: November 29, 1995), "CD-ROM," Tree #1060, Date of Import: Jan 16, 1999. (1995), "Electronic," Date of Import: Jan 31, 1999. E. Jay Stith, Brøderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree Vol. 1, Ed. 1, (Release date: November 29, 1995), "CD-ROM," Tree #5156, Date of Import: Jan 16, 1999. (1995), "Electronic," Date of Import: Feb 2, 1999. Robert Gale LaMaster, LaMaster/LeMaster Home Page, (1998, http://www.infocom.com/~lamaster/), "Electronic." Pocahontas Descendants web page, (1998, http://www.rootscomputing.com/howto/pocahn/pocahn.htm), "Electronic."

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Lieutenant Thomas Pepsironemeh Rolfe's Timeline

1615
January 30, 1615
Varina Plantation, Smiths Fort, Henrico County, Virginia, Colonial America
1643
1643
Age 27
1650
October 10, 1650
Age 35
Varina, Henrico County, Province of Virginia
1655
October 10, 1655
Age 40
Varina, Henrico County, Virginia