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Noah .

Hebrew: נח, Arabic: نوح, Estonian: Noa
Also Known As: "Noah", "Nuh", "נח", "نوح", "Gabriel", "Noah /ˈnoʊ.ə/", "or Noé or Noach", "Hebrew: נֹחַ", "‎ נוֹחַ", "Modern Noaẖ", "Tiberian Nōăḥ; Syriac: ܢܘܚ‎ Nukh; Arabic: نُوح‎ Nūḥ; Ancient Greek: Νῶε"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mesopotamia, Iraq
Death: -1754 (949-951)
Mount Ararat, Turkey
Place of Burial: Mt. Lubar in the Land of Ararat
Immediate Family:

Son of Lamech . and Ashmua / Betnos .
Husband of Naamah .
Father of Japheth .; Shem and Ham .
Brother of Other Sons and Other Daughters

Occupation: Farmer/ark builder, he Built the ark that saved mankind, asked by God to build an ark; planted the first vinyard, farmer, prophet./ profeetta, Preacher of Righteousness, Carpenter; Builder of the Ark, The prophet, Farmer, Builder of the Ark
Managed by: Shmuel-Aharon Kam (Kahn / שמו...
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Noah .

Genesis 5:28-32

Wikipedia:

Don't mix with Noah / Magi

Noah's three sons were generally interpreted in medieval Christianity as the founders of the populations of the three known continents, Japheth/Europe, Shem/Asia, and Ham/Africa, although a rarer variation held that they represented the three classes of medieval society - the priests (Shem), the warriors (Japheth), and the peasants (Ham). In the 18th and 19th centuries the view that Ham's sons in general had been literally "blackened" by sin came to provide a religious justification for slavery. Shi'ah Muslims believe that Noah is buried next to Ali within Imam Ali Mosque, in Najaf, Iraq.

The story of Noah and the Great Flood is told in the Bible in Genesis 6:5 - 9:17. Also, according to Genesis 9:20, "...Noah, a man of the soil, was the first to plant a vineyard."

  • Source 6: The Book of Jubilees (or Little Genesis) says he is Noah. Pg421:IV, 28 (Noah's birth). Pg 422:IV, 33. And in the 25th jubilee Noah took to himself a wife, And her name was 'Emzara, the daughter of Rake'el, the daughter of his father's brother, in the first year in the fifth week: And in the third year thereof she bare him Shem, in the fifth year thereof she bare him Ham, and in the first year in the sixth week she bare him Japheth.
  • Source 7: The Epic of Gilgamesh (written abt the time of the Tower of Babel). Gilgamesh calls Noah, Utnapishtim (Old Babylonian), in Sumerian he was called Ziusudra. His home town was that of Shurrapak (still in existence, but now known as Farra). The Garden of Eden is referred to as Tammuz (Old Babylonian) and in the Syrian it is referred to as Dumuzi.

Part II of Irish Pedigrees, or The origin and stem of the Irish nation, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 44-55


The 3rd Prophet.

Born 126 years after Prophet Adam A.S died.

Age 1780 years.

He was famous with "The Big Flood" or "The Noah Arc" history.

Stated in the Holy Al-Quran surah: Al-Ankabut 14-15, Al-Mukminun 23-27, Al-A'raf 59-60, 64, 72, Asy-Syuraa 107-115, 118-120, Nuh 1, 5-6, Hud 26-27, 32, 37-38, 40-44, Al-Qamar 9-13, Asy-Syafaat 75, 79-81, Al-Haqqah 11-12, A-Qashash 59


Noah means 'Comfort, Rest or consolation'.


Gnostic

An important Gnostic text, the Apocryphon of John, reports that the chief archon caused the flood because he desired to destroy the world he had made, but the First Thought informed Noah of the chief archon's plans, and Noah informed the remainder of humanity. Unlike the account of Genesis, not only are Noah's family saved, but many others also heed Noah's call. There is no ark in this account. According to Elaine Pagels, "Rather, they hid in a particular place, not only Noah, but also many other people from the unshakable race. They entered that place and hid in a bright cloud."

Bahá'í

The Bahá'í Faith regards the Ark and the Flood as symbolic. In Bahá'í belief, only Noah's followers were spiritually alive, preserved in the ark of his teachings, as others were spiritually dead. The Bahá'í scripture Kitáb-i-Íqán endorses the Islamic belief that Noah had a large number of companions, either 40 or 72, besides his family on the Ark, and that he taught for 950 (symbolic) years before the flood.

Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton, in his religious works on the development of religion, wrote about Noah and his offspring. In Newton's view, while Noah was a monotheist, the gods of pagan antiquity are identified with Noah and his descendants. "Newton argues that Noah is ultimately deified as the god Saturn."

Newton thus traces all ancient political and religious history back to Noah and Noah's offspring and simultaneously gives an historical account of the rise of polytheism and idolatry in these gentile nations as the result of the posthumous deification of their leaders and heroes, a polytheistic process which thoroughly corrupts the core monotheistic truth ... in the original religion of Noah.


Comparative mythology


Many non-Middle-Eastern civilizations have flood myths, and some have very similar stories containing characters who are very like Noah. Some have argued that these similarities are evidence that Noah actually existed, being called different names by different peoples. Others argue that civilizations must have borrowed details of Noah's life for their own Noah-types, or that they all spring from the same source. Yet others say that these Noah-like stories are completely unrelated.

Mesopotamian

The Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh, composed about 2500 BC, contains a flood story almost exactly the same as the Noah story in the Pentateuch, with a few variations such as the number of days of the deluge, the order of the birds, and the name of the mountain on which the ark rests. The flood story in Genesis 6–8 matches the Gilgamesh flood myth so closely that "few doubt that [it] derives from a Mesopotamian account." What is particularly noticeable is the way the Genesis flood story follows the Gilgamesh flood tale "point by point and in the same order", even when the story permits other alternatives.

The earliest written flood myth is found in the Mesopotamian Epic of Atrahasis and Epic of Gilgamesh texts. "These mythologies are the source of such features of the biblical Flood story as the building and provisioning of the ark, its flotation, and the subsidence of the waters, as well as the part played by the human protagonist." The Encyclopedia Judaica adds that there is a strong suggestion that

an intermediate agent was active. The people most likely to have fulfilled this role are the Hurrians, whose territory included the city of Haran, where the Patriarch Abraham had his roots. The Hurrians inherited the Flood story from Babylonia.

The encyclopedia mentions another similarity between the stories: Noah is the tenth patriarch and Berossus notes that "the hero of the great flood was Babylonia’s tenth antediluvian king." However, there is a discrepancy in the ages of the heroes. For the Mesopotamian antecedents, "the reigns of the antediluvian kings range from 18,600 to nearly 65,000 years." In the Bible, the lifespans "fall far short of the briefest reign mentioned in the related Mesopotamian texts." Also the name of the hero differs between the traditions: "The earliest Mesopotamian flood account, written in the Sumerian language, calls the deluge hero Ziusudra."

Gilgamesh’s historical reign is believed to have been approximately 2700 BC,[30] shortly before the earliest known written stories. The discovery of artifacts associated with Aga and Enmebaragesi of Kish, two other kings named in the stories, has lent credibility to the historical existence of Gilgamesh.

The earliest Sumerian Gilgamesh poems date from as early as the Third dynasty of Ur (2100–2000 BC).[32] One of these poems mentions Gilgamesh’s journey to meet the flood hero, as well as a short version of the flood story. The earliest Akkadian versions of the unified epic are dated to ca. 2000–1500 BC. Due to the fragmentary nature of these Old Babylonian versions, it is unclear whether they included an expanded account of the flood myth; although one fragment definitely includes the story of Gilgamesh’s journey to meet Utnapishtim. The "standard" Akkadian version included a long version of the flood story and was edited by Sin-liqe-unninni sometime between 1300 and 1000 BC.

Sumerian

Utnapishtim, a character in The Epic of Gilgamesh, tells the story of a flood very similar to that of Noah. In this story, the gods are enraged by the noise that man has raised from the earth. To quiet them they decide to send a great flood to silence mankind. Various correlations between the stories of Noah and Utnapishtim (the flood, the construction of the ark, the salvation of animals, and the release of birds following the flood) have led to this story being seen as the inspiration for the story of Noah. However, his role in Gilgamesh is to provide the secret of everlasting life to the hero, who promptly falls asleep before Utnapishtim gives him the secret.

Ancient Greek

Noah has often been compared to Deucalion, the son of Prometheus and Pronoia in Greek mythology. Like Noah, Deucalion is warned of the flood (by Zeus and Poseidon); he builds an ark and staffs it with creatures – and when he completes his voyage, gives thanks and takes advice from the gods on how to repopulate the Earth. Deucalion also sends a pigeon to find out about the situation of the world and the bird returns with an olive branch. Deucalion, in some versions of the myth, also becomes the inventor of wine, like Noah. Philo and Justin equate Deucalion with Noah, and Josephus used the story of Deucalion as evidence that the flood actually occurred and that, therefore, Noah existed.

Hindu

A story involving Lord Vishnu and King Manu is found in the Hindu chronicle Matsya Purana. Lord Vishnu in his 'matsya' (fish) avatar ordered the virtuous king Manu to construct a huge boat with animal and plant specimens of all forms, to escape the Great Deluge, and finally when the water receded,the great boat was found atop the Malaya Mountains. Encyclopædia Britannica notes that "Manu combines the characteristics of the Hebrew Bible figures of Noah, who preserved life from extinction in a great flood, and Adam, the first man", which view is reflected in several other works. Indologist David Dean Shulman writes that borrowing between the myths of Manu and Noah "cannot be ruled out". For Christian apologist Krishna Mohan Banerjee, the names "Noah" and "Manu" "had the same etymological root: 'Manu' must have been the Indo-Aryan ideal of Noah." Philologist and founder of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, William Jones, "identifies Manu with Noah", along with whom, "the seven sages can be identified with the eight people aboard the Ark." Furthermore, researcher Klaus Klostermaier reports a Muslim writer who "identifies Brahma with Abraham .... and Manu with Noah." Others, however, would say that "the story is thoroughly Indian" and the "boat is not the equivalent of Noah's Ark, though it is still the symbol of salvation"

Source

  1. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~royalancestors/bi...
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_in_Islam

More About Noah

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genesis_flood_narrative
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covenant_(biblical)#Noahic_covenant
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curse_of_Ham
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generations_of_Noah
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flood_myth
  6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_in_rabbinic_literature
  7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noach_(parsha)

In the Abrahamic religions, Noah (/ˈnoʊ.ə/[1]), or Noé or Noach (Hebrew: נֹחַ, Modern Noaẖ, Tiberian Nōăḥ; Syriac: ܢܘܚ‎ Nukh; Arabic: نُوح‎‎ Nūḥ; Ancient Greek: Νῶε), was the tenth and last of the pre-flood Patriarchs. The story of Noah's Ark is told in the Torah in the Genesis flood narrative. The biblical account is followed by the story of the Curse of Canaan.

Besides the Book of Genesis, Noah is also mentioned in 1st Chronicles, Tobit, Wisdom, Sirach, Isaiah, Ezekiel, 2 Esdras, 4 Maccabees, the Gospel of Matthew, the Gospel of Luke, the Epistle to the Hebrews, 1st Peter and 2nd Peter. He was the subject of much elaboration in the literature of later Abrahamic religions, including the Quran (Sura 71).

Noah was the tenth of the pre-flood (antediluvian) Patriarchs. His father was Lamech and his mother is unknown. When Noah was five hundred years old, he begat Shem, Ham and Japheth (Genesis 5:32).

Genesis flood narrative The Genesis flood narrative makes up chapters 6–9 in the Book of Genesis, in the Bible.[3] The narrative, one of many flood myths found in human cultures, indicates that God intended to return the Earth to its pre-Creation state of watery chaos by flooding the Earth because of humanity's misdeeds and then remake it using the microcosm of Noah's ark. Thus, the flood was no ordinary overflow but a reversal of creation. The narrative discusses the evil of mankind that moved God to destroy the world by the way of the flood, the preparation of the ark for certain animals, Noah, and his family, and God's guarantee (the Noahic Covenant) for the continued existence of life under the promise that he would never send another flood.

After the flood, Noah offered burnt offerings to the LORD, who said: "I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake; for the imagination of man's heart [is] evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done." (8:20–21)

"And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth." (9:1) They were also told that all fowls, land animals, and fishes would be afraid of them. Furthermore, as well as green plants, every moving thing would be their food with the exception that the blood was not to be eaten. Man's life blood would be required from the beasts and from man. "Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man." (9:6) A rainbow, called "my bow", was given as the sign of a covenant "between me and you and every living creature that [is] with you, for perpetual generations", (9:2–17) called the Noahic covenant or the rainbow covenant.

Noah died 350 years after the flood, at the age of 950,[6] the last of the extremely long-lived antediluvian Patriarchs. The maximum human lifespan, as depicted by the Bible, diminishes rapidly thereafter, from almost 1,000 years to the 120 years of Moses. (Genesis 6:3; Deuteronomy 31:22; 34:37)

Noah's drunkenness After the flood, Noah became a husbandman and he planted a vineyard: and he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and was uncovered within his tent. Noah's son Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father and told his brethren, which led to Ham's son Canaan being cursed by Noah. As early as the Classical era, commentators on Genesis 9:20–21 have excused Noah's excessive drinking because he was considered to be the first wine drinker; the first person to discover the soothing, consoling, and enlivening[tone] effects of wine. John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople, and a Church Father, writes that Noah's behaviour is defensible: as the first human to taste wine, he would not know its effects: "Through ignorance and inexperience of the proper amount to drink, fell into a drunken stupor".

Philo, a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher, also exonerates Noah by noting that one can drink in two different manners: to drink wine in excess, a peculiar sin to the vicious evil man or to partake of wine as the wise man, Noah being the latter.

In Jewish tradition and rabbinic literature, rabbis blame Satan for the intoxicating properties of the wine.

Curse of Ham In the field of psychological biblical criticism, J. H. Ellens and W. G. Rollins address the narrative of Genesis 9:18–27 that narrates the unconventional behavior that occurs between Noah and Ham. Because of its brevity and textual inconsistencies, it has been suggested that this narrative is a "splinter from a more substantial tale". A fuller account would explain what exactly Ham had done to his father, or why Noah directed a curse at Canaan for Ham's misdeed, or how Noah came to know what occurred. The narrator relates two facts: Noah became drunken and "he was uncovered within his tent", and Ham "saw the nakedness of his father, and told his two brethren without". Thus, these passages revolve around sexuality and the exposure of genitalia as compared with other Hebrew Bible texts, such as Habakkuk 2:15 and Lamentations 4:21.

The dispersion of the descendants of Shem, Ham, and Japheth (see a map from the 1854 Historical Textbook and Atlas of Biblical Geography)

or

http://www.bible-history.com/geography/helpful_maps.html

Genesis 10 sets forth the descendants of Shem, Ham, and Japheth, from whom the nations branched out over the earth after the flood. Among Japheth’s descendants were the maritime nations. (10:2–5) Ham’s son Cush had a son named Nimrod, who became the first man of might on earth, a mighty hunter, king in Babylon and the land of Shinar. (10:6–10) From there Asshur went and built Nineveh. (10:11–12) Canaan’s descendants – Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgashites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hamathites – spread out from Sidon as far as Gerar, near Gaza, and as far as Sodom and Gomorrah. (10:15–19) Among Shem’s descendants was Eber. (10:21)

These genealogies differ structurally from those set out in Genesis 5 and 11. It has a segmented or treelike structure, going from one father to many offspring. It is strange that the table, which assumes that the population is distributed about the Earth, precedes the account of the Tower of Babel, which says that all the population is in one place before it is dispersed.

Acerca de Noah . (Español)

Y se corrompió la tierra delante de Dios, y estaba la tierra llena de violencia. Y miró Dios la tierra y he aquí que estaba corrompida; porque toda carne había corrompido su camino sobre la tierra. Dios entonces decide ponerle fin a todo ser sobre la tierra y manda a Noé a construir un arca para salvar asi dos animales de cada especie junto con su esposa, sus hijos y sus esposas. Y, a los diecisiete días, del mes segundo, . . . hubo lluvia sobre la tierra cuarenta días y cuarenta noches. (Gén 7:11-12). Y prevalecieron las aguas sobre la tierra por ciento cincuenta días. . . y murió toda carne que se mueve sobre la tierra. . . Y en el mes segundo, a los veitisiete días del mes, se secó la tierra. Entonces habló Dios a Noé diciendo: Sal del arca tú, y tu mujer, y tus hijos, y las mujeres de tus hijos contigo. Y todos los animales. . . salieron del arca. (Gén. 8:14-19). Y edificó Noé un altar a Jehová, y tomó de todo animal limpio y de toda ave limpia, y ofreció holocausto en el altar. . . Bendijo Dios a Noé y a sus hijos, y les dijo: Fructificad y multiplicaos, y llenad la tierra. (Gén. 8:20 y 9:1). Noé fue uno de los patriarcas más longevos, a excepción de Matusalén y de Jared que vivieron novecientos sesenta y nueve y novecientos sesenta y dos años respectivamente. Noé murió cuando tenía novecientos cincuenta años. Vivió seiscientos años antes del diluvio y trescientos cincuenta años después! . . . Calculando que el diluvio haya ocurrido alrededor del año 2348 a. de J.C., Noé habría nacido alrededor del año 2956 y habría muerto en el año 2006 a.de J.C. (c. 2956-2006).


''' reddede Guds skabninger på hans Ark , `trøst"; 1:a Ulul Azmi for Islam; 3:e Prophet af seglet, (evt. samme som Tubal-Kain, qv); Eventuelt. aka Uta-Napishtim (Neptun)'''

Poss. Jullus for Roms 8-oldefar.

HM George I s 108-oldefar.

HRE Ferdinand I s 104-oldefar.

Osawatomie 'Browns 114-oldefar.

--

poss. Wives / Partnere:       Emzara (Coba)   ,   Titea (Emzara kælenavn eller søster)   ,   Naamah den Charmer   ,   Titea 
Børn:       Japhet (Iaphet)   ,   Sem (Sceaf Sam Sem) ibn NOAH   ;   Ham

--

 Hans (evt.) Børnebørn:       Prometheus Titan   ,   Epimetheus TITAN   ,   Hekateros   ,   Ankhiale   ,   Atlas TITAN   ,   Javan (Jaran Iauan Juuan Juuin Japhan)   ,   Magog   ,   Meshech ben Jafet   ,   Gomer (Cymry)   ,   Madai (Medai Madian) ben Jafet   ,   Thubal af Ancient SPANIEN   ,   Samothes (1. King) i Celtica   ,   Joham   ,   Tiras   ,   Aram (stamfader & eponym) af aramæerne   ,   Lud   ,   Arphaxad (King) i ARRAPACHTIS   ,   Assyrien (eponym) af Gesjur   ,   Elam ben Shem   ,   Bedwig (Bedvig , af SCEAF)   ,   (NN), stamfader FOMORIANS   ,   Kanaan (eponym af Kanaan)   ,   Mizrajim (1. PHARAOH af ZOANITE Dynasty)   ,   Cush ben HAM   ,   Put (Phut Punt Phuth)   ,   Isis, gudinden for Egypten 

--

Fra http://fabpedigree.com/s092/f406641.htm


The 3rd Prophet.

Born 126 years after Prophet Adam A.S died.

Age 1780 years.

He was famous with "The Big Flood" or "The Noah Arc" history.

Stated in the Holy Al-Quran surah: Al-Ankabut 14-15, Al-Mukminun 23-27, Al-A'raf 59-60, 64, 72, Asy-Syuraa 107-115, 118-120, Nuh 1, 5-6, Hud 26-27, 32, 37-38, 40-44, Al-Qamar 9-13, Asy-Syafaat 75, 79-81, Al-Haqqah 11-12, A-Qashash 59


The 3rd Prophet.

Born 126 years after Prophet Adam A.S died.

Age 1780 years.

He was famous with "The Big Flood" or "The Noah Arc" history.

Stated in the Holy Al-Quran surah: Al-Ankabut 14-15, Al-Mukminun 23-27, Al-A'raf 59-60, 64, 72, Asy-Syuraa 107-115, 118-120, Nuh 1, 5-6, Hud 26-27, 32, 37-38, 40-44, Al-Qamar 9-13, Asy-Syafaat 75, 79-81, Al-Haqqah 11-12, A-Qashash 59


lived to be 950.
In Abrahamic religions, Noah (/ˈnoʊ.ə/[1]), or Noé or Noach (Hebrew: נֹחַ,‎ נוֹחַ, Modern Noaẖ, Tiberian Nōăḥ; Syriac: ܢܘܚ Nukh; Arabic: نُوح‎ Nūḥ; Ancient Greek: Νῶε), was the tenth and last of the pre-flood Patriarchs. The story of Noah's Ark is told in the Torah in the Genesis flood narrative. The biblical account is followed by the story of the curse of Canaan. Besides the book of Genesis, Noah is also mentioned in 1st Chronicles, Isaiah, Ezekiel, the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, the book of Hebrews, and the 1st and 2nd Epistles of Peter. He was the subject of much elaboration in later Abrahamic religions, including the Qur'an (Sura 71).

The primary account of Noah in the Bible is in the book of Genesis.

Noah was the tenth of the pre-flood (antediluvian) Patriarchs. His father Lamech "called his name Noah, saying, This [same] shall comfort us concerning our work and toil of our hands, because of the ground which the LORD hath cursed."[2] When Noah was five hundred years old, he begat Shem, Ham and Japheth (Genesis 5:32).

Genesis chapter six speaks of the conditions before the flood, that led to the decision by the LORD to destroy the earth – but there was a delay – for "Noah found grace in the eyes of the LORD." (6:1-8) A new section, "the generations of Noah", is begun in verse 9, and a repeat mention of the birth of Shem, Ham and Japheth appears in verse 10, providing a fixed time reference for what follows. (6:9-10) After these things, Noah was instructed by God to "make an ark", and fill it with two of every sort of living thing, and gather "all food that is eaten" for provisions for them all. (Genesis 6:11-22) The chapter ends with Noah's ark loaded with two of every sort, and fully provisioned, "according to all that God commanded him".

Genesis chapters seven and eight detail events related to the Genesis flood narrative.

After the Flood, Noah offered burnt offerings to the LORD, who said: "I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake; for the imagination of man's heart [is] evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done." (8:20-21)

"And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth." (9:1) They were also told that all fowls, land animals, and fishes would be afraid of them. Furthermore, as well as green plants, every moving thing would be their food with the exception that the blood was not to be eaten. Man's life blood would be required from the beasts and from man. "Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man." (9:6) A rainbow, called "my bow", was given as the sign of a covenant "between me and you and every living creature that [is] with you, for perpetual generations", (9:2-17) called the Noahic covenant.

After this, Noah became a husbandman and he planted a vineyard: and he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and was uncovered within his tent. Noah's son Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father and told his brethren, which led to Ham's son Canaan being cursed by Noah.[3]

Noah died 350 years after the Flood, at the age of 950,[4] the last of the extremely long-lived antediluvian Patriarchs. The maximum human lifespan, as depicted by the Bible, diminishes rapidly thereafter, from almost 1,000 years to the 120 years of Moses. (Genesis 6:3; Deuteronomy 31:22; 34:37)


Born: cir 2270 BCE, East Eden. Died: cir 1320 BCE, Salem, Cannan.
NOTES

Noah means 'Comfort, Rest or consolation'. According to the Old Testament, Noah is the son of Lamech and tenth in descent from Adam.

Genesis 5:32: And Noah was five hundred years old: and Noah begat Shem, Ham, and Japheth.

During the time of Noah, the earth had become wicked and filled with violence. Every thought of men's heart was always bad and the earth was ruined because men's flesh was ruined. Noah, however, was not corrupt and God described him as a righteous man. Noah had proved himself faultless among men as he walked with the true God.

Genesis 6:1-3 'When men (refers to men of Cain) began to increase in number on the earth and daughters were born to them, the sons of God saw that the daughters of men (Cain) were beautiful, and they married any of them they chose. Then the Lord said "My Spirit will not contend with man forever, for he is mortal, his days will be a hundred and twenty years."

Genesis 6:8 - Noah and his wife and three sons and their wives were survivors of the Big Flood. Noah and his family were spared from the flood because "But Noah found graced in the eyes of the Lord" Genesis 6:9 - and "Noah was a just man and perfect in his generations, and Noah walked with God".

Genesis chapters 6-9, God was angry with the corruption of the world and he destroyed it with a flood in which rained for 40 days and 40 nights. God had told Noah to build an ark. God gave him the plans for this big ship. When it was finished, God told Noah to take on board the ark: himself and his wife; his three sons and their wives; and a mated pair of each kind of animal on earth.

THE FLOOD

Genesis 7:16 - '....Then the Lord shut him in.' God shut the door to the ark. The flood waters covered the entire earth and there was nothing left living. Only those in the ark survived.

Genesis 7:24: 'And the waters prevailed upon the earth an hundred and fifty days.'

Genesis 8:3-4: 'And the waters returned from off the earth continually; and after the end of the hundred and fifty days the waters were abated. And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat.

The ark rested for 40 days and then Noah opened a window and sent a raven which went to and fro until the waters were dried up. Noah also sent out a dove but 'the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot and she returned unto him into the ark, for the waters were on the face of the whole earth' - Genesis 8:9.

After another seven days, Noah sent out the dove again and it returned in the evening with an olive leaf in her mouth, so Noah knew that the waters were abated.

Noah stayed in the ark another seven days and then sent the dove out again. It did not return. Noah took the covering off the ark and looked, and behold, the face of the ground was dry.

Genesis 8:15-17: 'And God spoke unto Noah, saying, Go forth from the ark, though, and thy wife, and thy sons, and thy sons' wives with thee. Bring forth with thee every living thing that is with thee, of all flesh, both of fowl, and of cattle, and of every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth; that they may breed abundantly in the earth, and be fruitful, and multiply upon the earth.'

NOAH BUILDS AN ALTAR

Genesis 8:20 - 'Then Noah built an altar to the Lord and taking some of all the clean animals and clean birds, he sacrificed burnt offerings on it. The Lord smelled the pleasing aroma and said in his heart: Never again will I curse the ground because of man, even though every inclination of his heart is evil from childhood.'

Genesis 8:22 - "As long as the earth endures, seedtime and harvest, cold and heat, summer and winter, day and night will never cease."

Genesis 9:1-2: 'And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and fill the earth. And the fear of you and the dread of you shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air, upon all that moveth upon the earth, and upon all the fish of the sea; into your hand are they delivered.'

THE COVENANT

Genesis 9:ll-16: 'And I will establish my covenant with you; neither shall all flesh be cut off any more by the waters of a flood; neither shall there any more be a flood to destroy the earth. And God said, This is the token of the covenant which I make between me and you and every living creature that is with you, for perpetual generations. I do set my bow in the cloud and it shall be for a token of a covenant between me and the earth. And it shall come to pass, when I bring a cloud over the earth, that the bow shall be seen in the cloud; And I will remember my covenant, which is between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh. And the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that is upon the earth.'

Genesis 9:18-19: 'And the sons of Noah, that went forth of the ark, were Shem, and Ham, and Japheth: and Ham is the father of Canaan. These are the three sons of Noah, and of them was the whole earth overspread.

NOAH PLANTED A VINEYARD

Genesis 9:20 -'Noah, a man of the soil, proceeded to plant a vineyard.' Noah drank the wine from the fruit of the vineyard and became drunk. He lay down in his tent and became uncovered. Ham went in a saw him and went out and told his brothers, Japheth and Shem. They went in the tent backwards with a cover and covered their father without looking upon him.

Genesis 9:24-25 -'When Noah awoke from his wine and found out what his youngest son had done to him, he said, "Cursed! be Canaan! the lowest of slaves will he be to his brothers.'

LENGTH OF LIFE

Genesis 9:28-29: And Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years. And all the days of Noah were nine hundred and fifty years: and he died.'


Noah in Islam (Arabic: نوح‎, translit. Nūḥ)


He is a highly important figure in Islamic tradition, as he is counted amongst the earliest prophets sent by God to mankind. According to Islam, Noah's mission was to save a wicked world, plunged in depravity and sin. God charged Noah with the duty of preaching to his people to make them abandon idolatry and to worship only the One Creator and to live good and pure lives. Although he preached the Message of God with immense zeal, his people refused to mend their ways, leading to his building of the Ark and the famous event of the Deluge, the Great Flood in which all the evil people of his time perished. The influence of Noah's preaching and prophet-hood spanned 950 years according to Quran.

Noah's mission had a double character: he had to warn his people, asking them to call for repentance and, at the same time, he had to preach about God's mercy and forgiveness, promising them the glad tidings God would provide if they led righteous lives. References to Noah are scattered throughout the Qur'an, and there is even an entire sura carrying his name, Noah.

Background

Little is known of Noah's personal history before his call to prophecy. However, tradition records him to have been the son of Lamech and grandson of Methuselah, one of the patriarchs from the Generations of Adam. Noah was neither the leader of the tribe nor a very rich man but, even before being called to prophecy, he worshiped God faithfully and was, in the words of the Qur'an, "a devotee most grateful".

He was a prophet, sent to warn mankind of that region and his people to change their ways. He conveyed the message for over 950 years.

Noah was married to a woman whose name is not mentioned in the Qu'ran. Some Islamic historians such as Al-Tabari have suggested that the name of Noah's wife was Umzrah bint Barakil but this cannot be confirmed. Most Muslims simply call her by her biblical name Naamah. Islamic scholars agree that Noah had four sons whose names were Ham, Shem, Yam and Japheth. According to the Quran, one of Noah's sons was a disbeliever who refused to come aboard the Ark, instead preferring to climb a mountain, where he drowned. It is agreed among most Islamic scholars that Yam was the one who drowned; the other three remained believers.

Noah's wife was not a believer with him so she did not join him; neither did one of Noah's sons (Yam), who was secretly a disbeliever but had pretended faith in front of Noah. The sons of Noah are not expressly mentioned in the Qur'an, except for the fact that one of the sons was among the people who did not follow his own father, not among the believers and thus was washed away in the flood.[9] Also the Qur'an indicates a great calamity, enough to have destroyed Noah's people, but to have saved him and his generations to come.

Historical narrative in Islam

Islamic literature recounts that in the Generations of Adam, many men and women continued to follow Adam's original teachings, worshiping God alone and remaining righteous.[11] Among Adam's descendants there were many brave and pious men, greatly loved and revered by their respective communities. Exegesis goes on to narrate that, upon the death of these elders, people felt enormous grief and some felt prompted to make statues of these people in remembrance of them. Gradually, however, generations after generations many forgot what such statues were for and began to worship them, (as the shaytan (satan) slowly deceived each generation) along with many other idols. It was to guide the people that God raised up Noah to be the next prophet to mankind.

Early preaching

Noah began preaching to his people both verbally and by example. He would praise God consistently and he urged his people to do the same, warning his tribe of the punishment they would face if they did not mend their ignorant ways. The Qur'an states that Noah repeatedly told his people:

"O my people, worship Allah; you have no deity other than Him. Indeed, I fear for you the punishment of a tremendous Day!" [al-Quran, 7:59]

Early on, a few were moved by Noah's words but the powerful and wealthy members of the tribe refused to hear his call. The unbelievers at the time were impelled to rebel by various evil motives. Firstly, they were extremely envious and jealous of men superior to them in any way. Secondly, the people were ignorant of the weak and lowly, who were frequently superior intellectually, morally and spiritually. As a result of their ignorance, they were arrogant and mocked all who they felt were inferior to them. When Noah preached the faith of God to them, all they did was revile the messenger, abuse the message and call the whole warning a lie. He then went on to explain the Message in greater depth, ensuring them that it was not a message of destruction but it was a message with the mercy from God, and that their acts would lead to destruction if they did not accept the faith. He questioned them, asking why they would not accept what would benefit them in the near future. Noah went onto further, and told his community that he asked of no reward from them, telling them his only reward would be from God.


Accusation

As time passed, Noah became firmer in his preaching.[11] When the unbelievers began insulting those who accepted God's message, believing that Noah would send those faithful away to attract the wealthy unbelievers, Noah revealed that they - the arrogant and ignorant rich - were the wicked and sinful ones. His people accused him of being soothsayer or diviner. Noah declared that he was by no means a mere fortune-teller, pretending to reveal secrets which are not worth revealing. Noah also denied accusations claiming Noah was an angel, always maintaining that he was a human messenger. When the people refused to acknowledge their sinfulness Noah told them that it was not Noah, but God that would punish them - however God pleased.

Noah's prayer

Noah prayed to God,[2] telling Him that his preaching only made his people disbelieve further. Noah told God how they had closed their minds to accepting the message, so that the light of the truth should not affect their thinking. Noah told God how he had used all the resources of the classical preacher, conveying the message both in public places and with individuals in private. Noah spoke of how he had told the people the rewards they would receive if they became righteous, namely that God would supply plentiful rain as a blessing, and that God would also guarantee them an increase in children and wealth.

Building of the Ark

One day, Noah received a revelation from God, in which he was told that no one would believe the message now aside from those who have already submitted to God. Noah's frustration at the defiance of his people led him to ask God to not leave even one sinner upon earth. Although there is no proof that God accepted his prayer (as there is many examples of accepted prayers, such as in case of Yunus, Lut (Lot), Suleyman (Solomon), etc, even Noah's prayer in some other shape was accepted God decreed that a terrible flood would come (and yet, Qur'an doesn't say it came to cover whole Earth) and He ordered Noah to build a ship (Safina) which would save him and the believers from this dreadful calamity. Ever obedient to God's instructions, Noah went out in search of material with which to build the vessel. When Noah began building the Ark, the people who saw him at work laughed at him even more than before. Their conclusion was that he was surely a madman – they could not find any other reason why a man would build a huge vessel when no sea or river was nearby. Although Noah was now very old, the aged patriarch continued to work tirelessly until, at last, the Ship was finished.

Once flood started God ordered Noah to bring in "two of each pair of a man and a woman" to the ship and leave behind all non-believers, including his own son who defied God. Embarking of any other kind of creatures into the ship isn't mentioned in Qur'an.

Praise of Noah in the Qur'an

Noah is praised by God in the Qur'an, which shows his great status amongst the prophets. In sura 17 (Al-Isra), ayah 3, God states: "Verily he was a devotee most grateful." Also, from the Qur'an which states:

(In the days of old), Noah cried to Us, and We are the best to hear prayer. And We delivered him and his people from the Great Calamity, And made his progeny to endure (on this earth); And We left (this blessing) for him among generations to come in later times: "Peace and salutation to Noah among the nations!" — Qur'an sura 37 (As-Saaffat) ayat 75-79"

And also in sura 3 (Al-i-Imran) ayah 33, it states: "Allah did choose Adam and Noah, the family of Abraham, and the family of 'Imran above all people,-"

The story of Noah, as told by Qur'anic verses

The Qu'ran states that Noah was inspired by God, like other prophets such as Ibrāhīm (Abraham), Ismā'īl (Ishmael), Ishaq (Isaac), Ya'qub (Jacob), Isa (Jesus), Ilyas‘ (Elijah), Ayub (Job), Harun (Aaron), Yunus (Jonah), Daud (David) and Muhammad (Mohammed), and that he was a faithful messenger. Noah had firm belief in the oneness of God, and preached Islam (literally "submission," meaning submission to God). He continuously warned the people of the painful doom that was coming and asked them to accept one God instead of worshipping idols such as Wadd, Suwa', Yaghuth, Ya'uq and Nasr. He called the people to serve God, and said that nobody but God could save them. He said that the time of the deluge was appointed and could not be delayed, and that the people had to submit to God.

God commanded Noah to build a ship, the Ark, and as he was building it, the chieftains passed him and mocked him. Upon its completion, the ship is said to be loaded with pairs of every animal available that time, and Noah's household, and a group of believers who did submit to God. The people who denied the message of Noah, including one of his own sons, drowned. The final resting place of the ship was referred to as Mount Judi. Noah is called a grateful servant. Both Noah and Abraham were taught the prophethood and the scripture.

Noah's family

Noah's wife (Naamah) is referred to in the Qur'an as an evil woman. When God emphasizes upon the notion that everyone is for themselves on the Day of Judgement and that marital relations will not be to your aid when the judgement takes place, the Qur'an says:

Allah sets forth, for an example to the Unbelievers, the wife of Noah and the wife of Lut: they were (respectively) under two of our righteous servants, but they were false to their (husbands), and they profited nothing before Allah on their account, but were told: "Enter ye the Fire along with (others) that enter! — Qur'an, sura 66, (At-Tahrim), ayah 10

In contrast, the wife of the Pharaoh of the Exodus, Asiya, and Mary, the mother of Jesus, are referred to as among the best of women. This adds to the notion that, on the Last Day, everyone will be judged according to their own deeds.

"Stories of The Prophets" explain that the son who declined to embark non believer.


References to Noah in the Qur'an

  • As one of the first messengers: 4:163, 6:84, 11:25, 26:107, 29:14, 37:75, 57:26, 71:1–2, 71:5
  • Noah's preaching: 4:163, 7:59, 7:61–64, 10:71–72, 11:25–26, 11:28–31, 11:42, 23:23, 26:105–106, 26:108, 26:110, 71:1–3, 71:8–20
  • Challenges for Noah: 7:60–61, 10:71, 11:27, 11:32, 14:9, 23:24–26, 25:37, 26:105, 26:111–113, 26:116–118, 38:12, 40:5, 50:12, 53:52, 54:9–10, 66:10, 71:6–7, 71:21–24, 71:26–27
  • "The Thankful" Noah: 17:3
  • Noah's wishes granted: 21:76–77, 26:119, 37:75, 54:11–12
  • God destroyed Noah's people: 7:64, 9:70, 10:73, 11:37, 11:43–44, 11:89, 23:27, 25:37, 26:120, 29:14, 37:82, 40:31, 51:46, 53:52, 54:11–12, 71:25
  • Noah was saved on the Ark: 7:64, 10:73, 11:37–38, 11:40–44, 11:48, 23:27–29, 26:119, 29:15, 37:76, 54:13–15, 69:11
  • Appraisal for Noah: 17:3, 37:78–81, 66:10

Others Religious views


Gnostic

An important Gnostic text, the Apocryphon of John, reports that the chief archon caused the flood because he desired to destroy the world he had made, but the First Thought informed Noah of the chief archon's plans, and Noah informed the remainder of humanity. Unlike the account of Genesis, not only are Noah's family saved, but many others also heed Noah's call. There is no ark in this account. According to Elaine Pagels, "Rather, they hid in a particular place, not only Noah, but also many other people from the unshakable race. They entered that place and hid in a bright cloud."

Bahá'í

The Bahá'í Faith regards the Ark and the Flood as symbolic. In Bahá'í belief, only Noah's followers were spiritually alive, preserved in the ark of his teachings, as others were spiritually dead. The Bahá'í scripture Kitáb-i-Íqán endorses the Islamic belief that Noah had a large number of companions, either 40 or 72, besides his family on the Ark, and that he taught for 950 (symbolic) years before the flood.

Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton, in his religious works on the development of religion, wrote about Noah and his offspring. In Newton's view, while Noah was a monotheist, the gods of pagan antiquity are identified with Noah and his descendants. "Newton argues that Noah is ultimately deified as the god Saturn."

Newton thus traces all ancient political and religious history back to Noah and Noah's offspring and simultaneously gives an historical account of the rise of polytheism and idolatry in these gentile nations as the result of the posthumous deification of their leaders and heroes, a polytheistic process which thoroughly corrupts the core monotheistic truth ... in the original religion of Noah.


Comparative mythology


Many non-Middle-Eastern civilizations have flood myths, and some have very similar stories containing characters who are very like Noah. Some have argued that these similarities are evidence that Noah actually existed, being called different names by different peoples. Others argue that civilizations must have borrowed details of Noah's life for their own Noah-types, or that they all spring from the same source. Yet others say that these Noah-like stories are completely unrelated.

Mesopotamian

The Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh, composed about 2500 BC, contains a flood story almost exactly the same as the Noah story in the Pentateuch, with a few variations such as the number of days of the deluge, the order of the birds, and the name of the mountain on which the ark rests. The flood story in Genesis 6–8 matches the Gilgamesh flood myth so closely that "few doubt that [it] derives from a Mesopotamian account." What is particularly noticeable is the way the Genesis flood story follows the Gilgamesh flood tale "point by point and in the same order", even when the story permits other alternatives.

The earliest written flood myth is found in the Mesopotamian Epic of Atrahasis and Epic of Gilgamesh texts. "These mythologies are the source of such features of the biblical Flood story as the building and provisioning of the ark, its flotation, and the subsidence of the waters, as well as the part played by the human protagonist." The Encyclopedia Judaica adds that there is a strong suggestion that

an intermediate agent was active. The people most likely to have fulfilled this role are the Hurrians, whose territory included the city of Haran, where the Patriarch Abraham had his roots. The Hurrians inherited the Flood story from Babylonia.

The encyclopedia mentions another similarity between the stories: Noah is the tenth patriarch and Berossus notes that "the hero of the great flood was Babylonia’s tenth antediluvian king." However, there is a discrepancy in the ages of the heroes. For the Mesopotamian antecedents, "the reigns of the antediluvian kings range from 18,600 to nearly 65,000 years." In the Bible, the lifespans "fall far short of the briefest reign mentioned in the related Mesopotamian texts." Also the name of the hero differs between the traditions: "The earliest Mesopotamian flood account, written in the Sumerian language, calls the deluge hero Ziusudra."

Gilgamesh’s historical reign is believed to have been approximately 2700 BC,[30] shortly before the earliest known written stories. The discovery of artifacts associated with Aga and Enmebaragesi of Kish, two other kings named in the stories, has lent credibility to the historical existence of Gilgamesh.

The earliest Sumerian Gilgamesh poems date from as early as the Third dynasty of Ur (2100–2000 BC).[32] One of these poems mentions Gilgamesh’s journey to meet the flood hero, as well as a short version of the flood story. The earliest Akkadian versions of the unified epic are dated to ca. 2000–1500 BC. Due to the fragmentary nature of these Old Babylonian versions, it is unclear whether they included an expanded account of the flood myth; although one fragment definitely includes the story of Gilgamesh’s journey to meet Utnapishtim. The "standard" Akkadian version included a long version of the flood story and was edited by Sin-liqe-unninni sometime between 1300 and 1000 BC.

Sumerian

Utnapishtim, a character in The Epic of Gilgamesh, tells the story of a flood very similar to that of Noah. In this story, the gods are enraged by the noise that man has raised from the earth. To quiet them they decide to send a great flood to silence mankind. Various correlations between the stories of Noah and Utnapishtim (the flood, the construction of the ark, the salvation of animals, and the release of birds following the flood) have led to this story being seen as the inspiration for the story of Noah. However, his role in Gilgamesh is to provide the secret of everlasting life to the hero, who promptly falls asleep before Utnapishtim gives him the secret.

Ancient Greek

Noah has often been compared to Deucalion, the son of Prometheus and Pronoia in Greek mythology. Like Noah, Deucalion is warned of the flood (by Zeus and Poseidon); he builds an ark and staffs it with creatures – and when he completes his voyage, gives thanks and takes advice from the gods on how to repopulate the Earth. Deucalion also sends a pigeon to find out about the situation of the world and the bird returns with an olive branch. Deucalion, in some versions of the myth, also becomes the inventor of wine, like Noah. Philo and Justin equate Deucalion with Noah, and Josephus used the story of Deucalion as evidence that the flood actually occurred and that, therefore, Noah existed.

Hindu

A story involving Lord Vishnu and King Manu is found in the Hindu chronicle Matsya Purana. Lord Vishnu in his 'matsya' (fish) avatar ordered the virtuous king Manu to construct a huge boat with animal and plant specimens of all forms, to escape the Great Deluge, and finally when the water receded,the great boat was found atop the Malaya Mountains. Encyclopædia Britannica notes that "Manu combines the characteristics of the Hebrew Bible figures of Noah, who preserved life from extinction in a great flood, and Adam, the first man", which view is reflected in several other works. Indologist David Dean Shulman writes that borrowing between the myths of Manu and Noah "cannot be ruled out". For Christian apologist Krishna Mohan Banerjee, the names "Noah" and "Manu" "had the same etymological root: 'Manu' must have been the Indo-Aryan ideal of Noah." Philologist and founder of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, William Jones, "identifies Manu with Noah", along with whom, "the seven sages can be identified with the eight people aboard the Ark." Furthermore, researcher Klaus Klostermaier reports a Muslim writer who "identifies Brahma with Abraham .... and Manu with Noah." Others, however, would say that "the story is thoroughly Indian" and the "boat is not the equivalent of Noah's Ark, though it is still the symbol of salvation"

Source

  1. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~royalancestors/bi...
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_in_Islam

More About Noah

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genesis_flood_narrative
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Covenant_(biblical)#Noahic_covenant
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curse_of_Ham
  4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generations_of_Noah
  5. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flood_myth
  6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_in_rabbinic_literature
  7. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noach_(parsha)

In the Abrahamic religions, Noah (/ˈnoʊ.ə/[1]), or Noé or Noach (Hebrew: נֹחַ, Modern Noaẖ, Tiberian Nōăḥ; Syriac: ܢܘܚ‎ Nukh; Arabic: نُوح‎‎ Nūḥ; Ancient Greek: Νῶε), was the tenth and last of the pre-flood Patriarchs. The story of Noah's Ark is told in the Torah in the Genesis flood narrative. The biblical account is followed by the story of the Curse of Canaan.

Besides the Book of Genesis, Noah is also mentioned in 1st Chronicles, Tobit, Wisdom, Sirach, Isaiah, Ezekiel, 2 Esdras, 4 Maccabees, the Gospel of Matthew, the Gospel of Luke, the Epistle to the Hebrews, 1st Peter and 2nd Peter. He was the subject of much elaboration in the literature of later Abrahamic religions, including the Quran (Sura 71).

Noah was the tenth of the pre-flood (antediluvian) Patriarchs. His father was Lamech and his mother is unknown. When Noah was five hundred years old, he begat Shem, Ham and Japheth (Genesis 5:32).

Genesis flood narrative The Genesis flood narrative makes up chapters 6–9 in the Book of Genesis, in the Bible.[3] The narrative, one of many flood myths found in human cultures, indicates that God intended to return the Earth to its pre-Creation state of watery chaos by flooding the Earth because of humanity's misdeeds and then remake it using the microcosm of Noah's ark. Thus, the flood was no ordinary overflow but a reversal of creation. The narrative discusses the evil of mankind that moved God to destroy the world by the way of the flood, the preparation of the ark for certain animals, Noah, and his family, and God's guarantee (the Noahic Covenant) for the continued existence of life under the promise that he would never send another flood.

After the flood, Noah offered burnt offerings to the LORD, who said: "I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake; for the imagination of man's heart [is] evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done." (8:20–21)

"And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth." (9:1) They were also told that all fowls, land animals, and fishes would be afraid of them. Furthermore, as well as green plants, every moving thing would be their food with the exception that the blood was not to be eaten. Man's life blood would be required from the beasts and from man. "Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man." (9:6) A rainbow, called "my bow", was given as the sign of a covenant "between me and you and every living creature that [is] with you, for perpetual generations", (9:2–17) called the Noahic covenant or the rainbow covenant.

Noah died 350 years after the flood, at the age of 950,[6] the last of the extremely long-lived antediluvian Patriarchs. The maximum human lifespan, as depicted by the Bible, diminishes rapidly thereafter, from almost 1,000 years to the 120 years of Moses. (Genesis 6:3; Deuteronomy 31:22; 34:37)

Noah's drunkenness After the flood, Noah became a husbandman and he planted a vineyard: and he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and was uncovered within his tent. Noah's son Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father and told his brethren, which led to Ham's son Canaan being cursed by Noah. As early as the Classical era, commentators on Genesis 9:20–21 have excused Noah's excessive drinking because he was considered to be the first wine drinker; the first person to discover the soothing, consoling, and enlivening[tone] effects of wine. John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople, and a Church Father, writes that Noah's behaviour is defensible: as the first human to taste wine, he would not know its effects: "Through ignorance and inexperience of the proper amount to drink, fell into a drunken stupor".

Philo, a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher, also exonerates Noah by noting that one can drink in two different manners: to drink wine in excess, a peculiar sin to the vicious evil man or to partake of wine as the wise man, Noah being the latter.

In Jewish tradition and rabbinic literature, rabbis blame Satan for the intoxicating properties of the wine.

Curse of Ham In the field of psychological biblical criticism, J. H. Ellens and W. G. Rollins address the narrative of Genesis 9:18–27 that narrates the unconventional behavior that occurs between Noah and Ham. Because of its brevity and textual inconsistencies, it has been suggested that this narrative is a "splinter from a more substantial tale". A fuller account would explain what exactly Ham had done to his father, or why Noah directed a curse at Canaan for Ham's misdeed, or how Noah came to know what occurred. The narrator relates two facts: Noah became drunken and "he was uncovered within his tent", and Ham "saw the nakedness of his father, and told his two brethren without". Thus, these passages revolve around sexuality and the exposure of genitalia as compared with other Hebrew Bible texts, such as Habakkuk 2:15 and Lamentations 4:21.

The dispersion of the descendants of Shem, Ham, and Japheth (see a map from the 1854 Historical Textbook and Atlas of Biblical Geography)

or

http://www.bible-history.com/geography/helpful_maps.html

Genesis 10 sets forth the descendants of Shem, Ham, and Japheth, from whom the nations branched out over the earth after the flood. Among Japheth’s descendants were the maritime nations. (10:2–5) Ham’s son Cush had a son named Nimrod, who became the first man of might on earth, a mighty hunter, king in Babylon and the land of Shinar. (10:6–10) From there Asshur went and built Nineveh. (10:11–12) Canaan’s descendants – Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgashites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hamathites – spread out from Sidon as far as Gerar, near Gaza, and as far as Sodom and Gomorrah. (10:15–19) Among Shem’s descendants was Eber. (10:21)

These genealogies differ structurally from those set out in Genesis 5 and 11. It has a segmented or treelike structure, going from one father to many offspring. It is strange that the table, which assumes that the population is distributed about the Earth, precedes the account of the Tower of Babel, which says that all the population is in one place before it is dispersed.

Isikust Noa . (eesti)

Genesis 5:28-32

Wikipedia:

Kui Lemek oli elanud sada kaheksakümmend kaks aastat, siis sündis temale poeg

ja ta pani sellele nimeks Noa ning ütles: „See trööstib meid meie töös ja käte vaevas maa pärast, mille Issand on neednud!”

Ja Lemek elas pärast Noa sündimist viissada üheksakümmend viis aastat, ja temale sündis poegi ja tütreid (1Ms 5:28-30)

Ja kui Noa oli viissada aastat vana, siis sündisid Noale Seem, Haam ja Jaafet. (1Ms 5:32)

Don't mix with Noah / Magi

Noah's three sons were generally interpreted in medieval Christianity as the founders of the populations of the three known continents, Japheth/Europe, Shem/Asia, and Ham/Africa, although a rarer variation held that they represented the three classes of medieval society - the priests (Shem), the warriors (Japheth), and the peasants (Ham). In the 18th and 19th centuries the view that Ham's sons in general had been literally "blackened" by sin came to provide a religious justification for slavery. Shi'ah Muslims believe that Noah is buried next to Ali within Imam Ali Mosque, in Najaf, Iraq.

The story of Noah and the Great Flood is told in the Bible in Genesis 6:5 - 9:17. Also, according to Genesis 9:20, "...Noah, a man of the soil, was the first to plant a vineyard."

  • Source 6: The Book of Jubilees (or Little Genesis) says he is Noah. Pg421:IV, 28 (Noah's birth). Pg 422:IV, 33. And in the 25th jubilee Noah took to himself a wife, And her name was 'Emzara, the daughter of Rake'el, the daughter of his father's brother, in the first year in the fifth week: And in the third year thereof she bare him Shem, in the fifth year thereof she bare him Ham, and in the first year in the sixth week she bare him Japheth.
  • Source 7: The Epic of Gilgamesh (written abt the time of the Tower of Babel). Gilgamesh calls Noah, Utnapishtim (Old Babylonian), in Sumerian he was called Ziusudra. His home town was that of Shurrapak (still in existence, but now known as Farra). The Garden of Eden is referred to as Tammuz (Old Babylonian) and in the Syrian it is referred to as Dumuzi.

Part II of Irish Pedigrees, or The origin and stem of the Irish nation, by John O'Hart, published 1892, pages 44-55


Y se corrompió la tierra delante de Dios, y estaba la tierra llena de violencia. Y miró Dios la tierra y he aquí que estaba corrompida; porque toda carne había corrompido su camino sobre la tierra. Dios entonces decide ponerle fin a todo ser sobre la tierra y manda a Noé a construir un arca para salvar asi dos animales de cada especie junto con su esposa, sus hijos y sus esposas. Y, a los diecisiete días, del mes segundo, . . . hubo lluvia sobre la tierra cuarenta días y cuarenta noches. (Gén 7:11-12). Y prevalecieron las aguas sobre la tierra por ciento cincuenta días. . . y murió toda carne que se mueve sobre la tierra. . . Y en el mes segundo, a los veitisiete días del mes, se secó la tierra. Entonces habló Dios a Noé diciendo: Sal del arca tú, y tu mujer, y tus hijos, y las mujeres de tus hijos contigo. Y todos los animales. . . salieron del arca. (Gén. 8:14-19). Y edificó Noé un altar a Jehová, y tomó de todo animal limpio y de toda ave limpia, y ofreció holocausto en el altar. . . Bendijo Dios a Noé y a sus hijos, y les dijo: Fructificad y multiplicaos, y llenad la tierra. (Gén. 8:20 y 9:1). Noé fue uno de los patriarcas más longevos, a excepción de Matusalén y de Jared que vivieron novecientos sesenta y nueve y novecientos sesenta y dos años respectivamente. Noé murió cuando tenía novecientos cincuenta años. Vivió seiscientos años antes del diluvio y trescientos cincuenta años después! . . . Calculando que el diluvio haya ocurrido alrededor del año 2348 a. de J.C., Noé habría nacido alrededor del año 2956 y habría muerto en el año 2006 a.de J.C. (c. 2956-2006).


''' reddede Guds skabninger på hans Ark , `trøst"; 1:a Ulul Azmi for Islam; 3:e Prophet af seglet, (evt. samme som Tubal-Kain, qv); Eventuelt. aka Uta-Napishtim (Neptun)'''

Poss. Jullus for Roms 8-oldefar.

HM George I s 108-oldefar.

HRE Ferdinand I s 104-oldefar.

Osawatomie 'Browns 114-oldefar.

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poss. Wives / Partnere:       Emzara (Coba)   ,   Titea (Emzara kælenavn eller søster)   ,   Naamah den Charmer   ,   Titea 
Børn:       Japhet (Iaphet)   ,   Sem (Sceaf Sam Sem) ibn NOAH   ;   Ham

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 Hans (evt.) Børnebørn:       Prometheus Titan   ,   Epimetheus TITAN   ,   Hekateros   ,   Ankhiale   ,   Atlas TITAN   ,   Javan (Jaran Iauan Juuan Juuin Japhan)   ,   Magog   ,   Meshech ben Jafet   ,   Gomer (Cymry)   ,   Madai (Medai Madian) ben Jafet   ,   Thubal af Ancient SPANIEN   ,   Samothes (1. King) i Celtica   ,   Joham   ,   Tiras   ,   Aram (stamfader & eponym) af aramæerne   ,   Lud   ,   Arphaxad (King) i ARRAPACHTIS   ,   Assyrien (eponym) af Gesjur   ,   Elam ben Shem   ,   Bedwig (Bedvig , af SCEAF)   ,   (NN), stamfader FOMORIANS   ,   Kanaan (eponym af Kanaan)   ,   Mizrajim (1. PHARAOH af ZOANITE Dynasty)   ,   Cush ben HAM   ,   Put (Phut Punt Phuth)   ,   Isis, gudinden for Egypten 

--

Fra http://fabpedigree.com/s092/f406641.htm


The 3rd Prophet.

Born 126 years after Prophet Adam A.S died.

Age 1780 years.

He was famous with "The Big Flood" or "The Noah Arc" history.

Stated in the Holy Al-Quran surah: Al-Ankabut 14-15, Al-Mukminun 23-27, Al-A'raf 59-60, 64, 72, Asy-Syuraa 107-115, 118-120, Nuh 1, 5-6, Hud 26-27, 32, 37-38, 40-44, Al-Qamar 9-13, Asy-Syafaat 75, 79-81, Al-Haqqah 11-12, A-Qashash 59


The 3rd Prophet.

Born 126 years after Prophet Adam A.S died.

Age 1780 years.

He was famous with "The Big Flood" or "The Noah Arc" history.

Stated in the Holy Al-Quran surah: Al-Ankabut 14-15, Al-Mukminun 23-27, Al-A'raf 59-60, 64, 72, Asy-Syuraa 107-115, 118-120, Nuh 1, 5-6, Hud 26-27, 32, 37-38, 40-44, Al-Qamar 9-13, Asy-Syafaat 75, 79-81, Al-Haqqah 11-12, A-Qashash 59


lived to be 950.
In Abrahamic religions, Noah (/ˈnoʊ.ə/[1]), or Noé or Noach (Hebrew: נֹחַ,‎ נוֹחַ, Modern Noaẖ, Tiberian Nōăḥ; Syriac: ܢܘܚ Nukh; Arabic: نُوح‎ Nūḥ; Ancient Greek: Νῶε), was the tenth and last of the pre-flood Patriarchs. The story of Noah's Ark is told in the Torah in the Genesis flood narrative. The biblical account is followed by the story of the curse of Canaan. Besides the book of Genesis, Noah is also mentioned in 1st Chronicles, Isaiah, Ezekiel, the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, the book of Hebrews, and the 1st and 2nd Epistles of Peter. He was the subject of much elaboration in later Abrahamic religions, including the Qur'an (Sura 71).

The primary account of Noah in the Bible is in the book of Genesis.

Noah was the tenth of the pre-flood (antediluvian) Patriarchs. His father Lamech "called his name Noah, saying, This [same] shall comfort us concerning our work and toil of our hands, because of the ground which the LORD hath cursed."[2] When Noah was five hundred years old, he begat Shem, Ham and Japheth (Genesis 5:32).

Genesis chapter six speaks of the conditions before the flood, that led to the decision by the LORD to destroy the earth – but there was a delay – for "Noah found grace in the eyes of the LORD." (6:1-8) A new section, "the generations of Noah", is begun in verse 9, and a repeat mention of the birth of Shem, Ham and Japheth appears in verse 10, providing a fixed time reference for what follows. (6:9-10) After these things, Noah was instructed by God to "make an ark", and fill it with two of every sort of living thing, and gather "all food that is eaten" for provisions for them all. (Genesis 6:11-22) The chapter ends with Noah's ark loaded with two of every sort, and fully provisioned, "according to all that God commanded him".

Genesis chapters seven and eight detail events related to the Genesis flood narrative.

After the Flood, Noah offered burnt offerings to the LORD, who said: "I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake; for the imagination of man's heart [is] evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done." (8:20-21)

"And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth." (9:1) They were also told that all fowls, land animals, and fishes would be afraid of them. Furthermore, as well as green plants, every moving thing would be their food with the exception that the blood was not to be eaten. Man's life blood would be required from the beasts and from man. "Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man." (9:6) A rainbow, called "my bow", was given as the sign of a covenant "between me and you and every living creature that [is] with you, for perpetual generations", (9:2-17) called the Noahic covenant.

After this, Noah became a husbandman and he planted a vineyard: and he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and was uncovered within his tent. Noah's son Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father and told his brethren, which led to Ham's son Canaan being cursed by Noah.[3]

Noah died 350 years after the Flood, at the age of 950,[4] the last of the extremely long-lived antediluvian Patriarchs. The maximum human lifespan, as depicted by the Bible, diminishes rapidly thereafter, from almost 1,000 years to the 120 years of Moses. (Genesis 6:3; Deuteronomy 31:22; 34:37)


Born: cir 2270 BCE, East Eden. Died: cir 1320 BCE, Salem, Cannan.

About נח . (עברית)

https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A0%D7%97

נֹחַ הוא דמות מקראית, בנו של למך בן מתושלח והדמות הראשית בסיפור המבול בספר בראשית פרקים ו' עד ט'. קורותיו מסופרות בפרשה הקרויה על שמו, פרשת נח וצאצאיו מפורטים בלוח העמים. לפי הבנה פשוטה של הפרשה, במבול לא נותר איש מלבד נח ובניו כך שהוא אבי כל האנושות.

לנח היו שלשה בנים: שם, חם ויפת. הוא חי 950 שנה, שלפי הכרונולוגיה המקראית והמסורתית החלו בשנת א'נ"ו (2705 לפנה"ס) והסתיימו בשנת ב'ו' (1755 לפנה"ס).

תוכן עניינים מהות שמו המקרא מפרש את מהות שמו, מלשון נחמה או מלשון מנוחה, וזאת לאור הציפייה שהוא יקל על קללת האדם והאדמה שאירעה עקב חטא עץ הדעת.

"וַיִּקְרָא אֶת שְׁמוֹ נֹחַ לֵאמֹר: זֶה יְנַחֲמֵנוּ מִמַּעֲשֵׂנוּ וּמֵעִצְּבוֹן יָדֵינוּ, מִן הָאֲדָמָה אֲשֶׁר אֵרֲרָהּ ה'."

— בראשית, ה', כ"ט רש"י, פרשן המקרא, מתאר את מנוחת האדמה שאירעה בימי נח, על ידי המצאת המחרשה על ידי נח, ובכך שבימיו הפכה הארץ לפוריה יותר. "עד שלא בא נח לא היה להם כלי מחרישה, והוא הכין להם. והייתה הארץ מוציאה קוצים ודרדרים כשזורעים חטים מקללתו של אדם הראשון, ובימי נח נחה." (רש"י בביאורו לפסוק)

על נח נכתב כי הוא "מצא חן בעיני ה'". המילה "חן" היא היפוך אותיות של המילה נח. זהו אחד משני מקרים בתנ"ך שבהם שם האדם והיפוך אותיות המעיד על אופיו מוזכרים בפסוק אחד. (המקרה השני הוא ער בן יהודה, שעליו נאמר כי "עשה את הרע בעיני ה'").[1]

יש המפרשים את דבריו של למך עם לידת נח (ספר בראשית, פרק ה', פסוק כ"ט) כהולמים את תפקידו של נח ככורם וכמגלה היין. זאת בשל העובדה שנכתב: "וַיָּחֶל נֹחַ אִישׁ הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּטַּע כָּרֶם." (בראשית, ט', כ'). דמותו כאן בעצם מוצגת כאבי שושלת ומייסד מלאכה. היין ידוע כדבר מנחם. ולפיכך, ישנה התאמה בין תפקידו של היין לנחם ובין דבריו של למך. הסמכת הפסוק לדמותו של נח בתור גיבור המבול אפשרית לפי התחייבות אלוהים שלא יוסיף לקלל עוד את האדמה ולא יוסיף עוד להכות את כל חי (ספר בראשית, פרק ח', פסוק כ"ב). אולם, לדעת פרשנים, היא כרוכה בקושי. לפיהם הקושי הוא בחיבור התקווה לנחמה בכאוס האיום של המבול, שהשמיד כמעט את כל האנושות. אין גם קשר מובהק בין המבול והצלתו של נח לבין ביטול הקללה. יתרה מזאת, על-פי הפסוק מסתמן שנח עצמו הוא זה שינחם את האנושות ("זה ינחמנו"). זאת בעוד שבסיפור המבול, אלוהים הוא זה שהציל את האנושות. בעיצבון ובעבודת פרך קוללו, וביין משכיח הכאב והעמל נוחמו. ומסתבר שכינויו של נח – "איש האדמה" (ט' 20) קשור במוטיב הזה. המוטיב שראשיתו היא קללת האדמה בגלל החטא של האדם הראשון וסופו הוא ביטול קללת האדמה על ידי איש האדמה באמצעות היין.

נח והמבול Postscript-viewer-shaded.png ערך מורחב – המבול האירוע העיקרי בחייו של נח היה המבול. בסוף פרשת בראשית ובתחילת פרשת נח מסופר על התנהגותם הבלתי מוסרית של אנשי הדור, כאשר "מלאה הארץ חמס". אלוהים החליט להשמיד אותם במבול, ולהשאיר את נח ואת בני משפחתו בחיים, בגלל צדקותו של נח, יחד עם חיות, בהמות ועופות מכל מין (שבעה זכרים ושבע נקבות מן המינים הטהורים, וזוגות מן המינים הטמאים). לשם מטרה זו, אלוהים ציווה על נח לבנות את תיבת נח.

התיבה Postscript-viewer-shaded.png ערך מורחב – תיבת נח על פי תיאור התורה, בתיבה היו שלוש קומות. המדרש מסביר את תפקידיהן: קומה עבור בני אדם, קומה עבור בהמות חיות ועופות, וקומה עבור הזבל. לפי דעות מסוימות בחז"ל, בתיבה הייתה קבועה מרגלית שהאירה ליושבי התיבה. לדיעות אחרות, חלון היה פתוח החוצה. בניית התיבה ארכה 120 שנה, על מנת להזהיר את יושבי הארץ מפני העונש הצפוי אם לא יחזרו בתשובה. לאחר שהם מיאנו לשוב, נכנס נח וכל אשר איתו אל התיבה בבוא המועד הנקוב. וכעבור שנה - עם תום המבול - יצא אל הארץ החריבה.

אחרי המבול

"וַיִּבֶן נֹחַ מִזְבֵּחַ לַה' וַיִּקַּח מִכֹּל הַבְּהֵמָה הַטְּהוֹרָה וּמִכֹּל הָעוֹף הַטָּהֹר וַיַּעַל עֹלֹת בַּמִּזְבֵּחַ. וַיָּרַח ה' אֶת רֵיחַ הַנִּיחֹחַ וַיֹּאמֶר ה' אֶל לִבּוֹ לֹא אֹסִף לְקַלֵּל עוֹד אֶת הָאֲדָמָה בַּעֲבוּר הָאָדָם כִּי יֵצֶר לֵב הָאָדָם רַע מִנְּעֻרָיו וְלֹא אֹסִף עוֹד לְהַכּוֹת אֶת כָּל חַי כַּאֲשֶׁר עָשִׂיתִי." (ספר בראשית, פרק ח', פסוקים כ'-כ"א) ברית הקשת Postscript-viewer-shaded.png ערך מורחב – ברית הקשת לאחר היציאה מהתיבה, כורת ה' ברית עם נח ובניו. בברית זו מבטיח ה' שגם כאשר ישובו בני האדם לחטוא, הוא לא ישחית את העולם שנית במבול. הסימן לברית יהיה היראות הקשת בענן לאחר ירידת גשמים. יש אומרים[2] שכנגד התחייבותו של ה' שלא להביא מבול לעולם, התחייבו בני האדם שלא להרוג זה את זה, ואף בעלי החיים התחייבו שלא לטרוף אדם.[3] אך אם תופעת הרצח תפשוט בקרב כלל אנשי העולם, ובכך יפרו את הברית, לא יהיה ה' מחויב לחלקו בברית, שלא להביא מבול.

מעשה חם לאחר יציאתו, נטע נח כרם והקריב קרבנות לאלוהים על כך ששרד. בהמשך מסופר על שכרותו של נח - נח שתה והשתכר, ובנו חם גילה את ערוותו ושם ויפת עמדו וכיסוה. לאחר שנח התפכח, הוא קילל את כנען, בנו של חם, כי "עבד עבדים יהיה לאחיו", ואת שם ויפת - בירך. הקטע המתאר את השפעת היין על ממציאו, נח, הוא מעין משל המדגיש את ההשלכות של שתיית היין, השיכרון ואובדן החושים, והתוצאות המרות העלולות לנבוע מאובדן זה.

האל כורת ברית מחודשת עם בני האדם בדומה לברית או הברכה שכרת עם אדם הראשון. ההבדלים המהותיים בין שתי הבריתות הם היתר אכילת בשר, למעט אבר מן החי ואיסור רצח אדם. חז"ל צירפו את הציווי כלפי אדם הראשון ואת הציוויים שהצטווה נח לשבע מצוות בני נח. על פי מדרש תנחומא נח המציא את המחרשה ובכך שחרר את בני דורו מהקללה שהוטלה על אדם הראשון, כפי שחזה אביו בקריאת שמו.

נח חי אחרי המבול עוד 350 שנה, ונפטר בגיל 950 שנה.

שאלת צדקותו של נח בתורה אין תיאור לאופיו של נח ואין פרטים עובדתיים על התנהגותו אך מן הכתוב ניתן לפרש פרטים מסוימים על אישיותו וצדקותו. יש המפרשים לחיוב ויש המפרשים לשלילה. הפסוק המרכזי המעיד על אופיו של נח הוא: "נח איש צדיק תמים היה בדורותיו" (ספר בראשית, פרק ו', פסוק ט') המילה "בדורותיו" מפורשת על ידי פרשנים בדרכים שונות: רבי יוחנן שפט את נח לשלילה וטען כי צדיק היה "בדורותיו ולא בדורות אחרים" כלומר, אם היה נמצא בדור בו היו צדיקים ולא בדור בו הרוב המוחלט היו פושעים כנראה לא היה נחשב לצדיק על כך רש"י אמר כי אילו היה בדורות של צדיקים לא היה נחשב לכלום. למול טענה זו קם ריש לקיש דן את נח לחיוב ואמר: "צדיק בדורותיו וכל שכן בדורות אחרים" כלומר, אם בחברה נפשעת היה צדיק, בחברת צדיקים היה צדיק עוד יותר. על כך אמר רש"י: " כל שכן שאילו היה בדור של צדיקים היה צדיק יותר". על אותו הפסוק קיים גם ויכוח על משמעות המילה תמים. המפרשים את הפסוק לחיוב טוענים כי תמים הוא תואר נוסף לצדיק הנועד לחזק את היות נח צדיק ולמולם המפרשים את הפסוק לגנאי טוענים כי המילה תמים מנותקת מהמילה צדיק ועל כך נכתב בגמרא: " צדיק-במעשיו, תמים- בדרכיו". המילה תמים מופיעה גם כשה' אמר לנח לפני כניסתו לתיבה : "כי אֹתך ראיתי צדיק לפני בדור הזה" (ספר בראשית, פרק ז', פסוק א'). לפי מ"ר (לב, ג) לא אמר "צדיק תמים", משום שאומרים מקצת שבחו של אדם בפניו, ובאשר למילה 'תמים' הנעדרת כאן- בדור המבול נח אינו מוגדר כ"תמים", משום שתכונת התמימות מתייחסת לדורות אחרים- דורות שלפני המבול או דורות שאחריו. מכאן ניתן להבין שלפני פירוש "תמים" כעניו וסבלן (רש"י) בדור המבול פקעה סבלנותו של נח לטפל בבהמות. מהפסוק הנ"ל מועלה השאלה על אילו דורות מדובר ישנן שתי דרכים לחלוקה לדורות: חלוקה לשני סוגי דורות-הדורות שלפני המבול כולל דור המבול והדורות שלאחר המבול (לפי "משך החכמה") ועפ"י הדרך הזאת נח חי בשני סוגי הדורות ולכן המילה "בדורותיו" אינה מפחיתה מצדיקותו. חלוקה לשלושה סוגי דורות- העולם שלפני המבול, העולם שאחרי המבול (עד אברהם) והעולם של אברהם. בחלוקה הזו נח לא חי בעולם השלישי (של אברהם) ולכן המילה בדורותיו במקרה זה מציינת שביחס לדורות אברהם לא היה נחשב נח לצדיק ובכך מאמינים הדנים את נח לגנאי. ישם שני סוגי צדיקות: פסיבית ואקטיבית. ההבדל בין צדיקות פסיבית- צדיקות שמשמעותה היא לא ללמוד ממעשי רשעים שבדור וצדיקות אקטיבית היא לא רק שלא ללמוד ממעשי הרשעים שבדור אלא גם ללמד את הרשעים כיצד לנהוג. כלומר ההבדל בין צדיקות פסיבית לאקטיבית הוא שצדיקות פסיבית אינה דואגת לאחר ואינה פועלת על מנת לעזור לאחר. על נח נאמר שצדיקותו הייתה פסיבית, נח הציל את עצמו אך לא דאג לאחרים ועל כך נשפט במאמר לגנאי. מושווה נח לאברהם ונאמר עליו כי נח אינו היה צדיק בעצמו וכי היה צריך את עזרת ה' על מנת להיות צדיק, התבודד מן החברה ונזקק לעזרה וסעד מה' להבדיל מאברהם שהלך לפני ה' והיה צדיק ללא עזרת ה'.

דמותו של נח בעיני המדרש ובעיני הפרשנים במקרא מתוארת דמותו של נח באור חיובי ביותר. בספרים החיצוניים ובמדרשי חז"ל שונים ישנה מחלוקת האם להתייחס אל נח בצורה חיובית או שלילית. במקרים רבים הדגישו המפרשים את ההבדל בין נח ובין אברהם אבינו כדי לעשות זאת:

רש"י, למשל, מביא על הפסוק "איש צדיק תמים היה בדורותיו" שני פירושים תוך הסתמכות על התלמוד בבלי מסכת סנהדרין דף ק"ח עמוד א'. הראשון בשם ריש לקיש, שאם היה נח בתקופת אברהם היה לצדיק יותר גדול. הפירוש השני בשם רבי יוחנן, לגנותו של נח: "בדורותיו היה צדיק, ואילו היה בדורו של אברהם, לא נחשב היה לכלום". פרשנים נוספים מדגישים את ההבדל בין הכתוב על נח "את האלוהים התהלך נח", לבין הכתוב על אברהם "אשר התהלכתי לפניו". כלומר, נח היה צריך סיוע מאלוהיו, לא כן אברהם שהתהלך בכוחות עצמו. המדרש גם מדגיש את השוני בין השניים בכל הנוגע לעזרה לאחר. כאשר נח מקבל את הידיעה על המבול, לא נכתב על ניסיון להציל אחרים או להזהירם. אברהם, לעומתו, יוצא מגדרו כדי לנסות ולהציל אחרים, ודוגמה קיצונית לכך היא סיפור סדום ועמורה. מטרת פרשנים אלה שמנמיכים מערכו של נח הוא להדגיש את כישלונם של הקודמים לאברהם בניסיון ליצור עם סגולה הקרוב לאל. לפי המפרשים, רק אברהם, אבי האומה, מצליח בצדיקותו לעשות זאת, וכל הקודמים לו (אדם ונח) לוקים בחסר.

מדרש תנחומא, המובא ברש"י, דורש את שמו של נח ומייחס לנח את המצאת המחרשה, ובכך את שחרור בני דורו מהקללה שהוטלה על אדם הראשון - "וקוץ ודרדר תצמיח לך".[4]

מדרש תנחומא מביא אגדה על נסיבות השתכרותו של נח:

כשבא נח ליטע כרם בא שטן ועמד לפניו, א"ל מה אתה נוטע, א"ל כרם, א"ל מה טיבו, פירותיו מתוקים בין לחים בין יבשים ועושין מהן יין המשמח לבבות דכתיב ויין ישמח לבב אנוש (תהלים קד) א"ל שטן בא ונשתתף שנינו בכרם זה, א"ל לחיי, מה עשה שטן הביא כבש והרגו תחת הגפן, אחר כך הביא ארי והרגו, ואחר כך הביא חזיר והרגו, ואחר כך הביא קוף והרגו תחת הכרם והטיפו דמן באותו הכרם והשקוהו מדמיהן, רמז לו שקודם שישתה אדם מן היין הרי הוא תם ככבש זו שאינה יודעת כלום וכרחל לפני גוזזיה נאלמה, שתה כהוגן הרי הוא גבור כארי ואומר אין כמותו בעולם, כיון ששתה יותר מדאי נעשה כחזיר מתלכלך במי רגלים ובדבר אחר נשתכר נעשה כקוף עומד ומרקד ומשחק ומוציא לפני הכל נבלות הפה ואינו יודע מה יעשה, וכל זה אירע לנח הצדיק מה נח הצדיק שהקדוש ברוך הוא פירש שבחו כך, שאר בני אדם על אחת כמה וכמה.

— מדרש תנחומא, פרשת נח, סימן י"ג צאצאיו של נח לאחר שאלוהים השמיד את כל החי מלבד נח ואשתו נעמה ומשפחתם והחיות בתיבה, נח הפך לאבי האנושות כולה. בניו ייצגו את אבות אבותיהם של העמים אשר באו לאחר מכן. אלו הם:















נח











































































שם




חם



















יפת



































































































































עילם אשור לוד


מצרים


כוש


פוט


כנען


מגוג מדי תבל משך
















































ארפכשד


ארם




לודים


סבא





צידון


גמר


יון


תירס

















ענמים


חווילה





חת













שלח



עוץ


להבים


סבתה





יבוסי




אשכנז


אלישה














חול


נפתחים


סבתכא





אמורי




ריפת


תרשיש






עבר



גתר


פתרוסים


נמרוד





גרגשי




תגרמה


כתים
















מש


כפתורים


רעמה





חיווי








דודנים









פלג יקטן






כסלוחים










ערקי






















שבא



סיני










אלמודד


עובל


פלשתים


דדן



ארוודי









שלף


אבימאל












צמרי





חצרמות


שבא












חמתי








ירח


אופיר




הדורם


חווילה







אוזל


יובב




דקלה


נח בספרים החיצוניים על פי הספרים החיצוניים, שמה של אמו היה "בת-אנוש". שמה זה נשתמר רק במגילה החיצונית לבראשית[5] ובספר היובלים:[6] "וביובל החמשה עשר, בשבוע השלישי, לקח לו למך אשה ושמה בת אנוש אחות ברכאל, בת אחות אביו, ובשבוע הזה ילדה לו בן, ויקרא את שמו נח".[7]

בספר חנוך א' נח מתואר כתינוק מיוחד:

"וכאשר נולד הבן, היה גופו לבן מן השלג ואדום מן הורד ושערו כולו לבן וכצמר לבן ומסולסל ומפואר. וכאשר פקח את העיניים האיר הבית כשמש. ויקם מידי המילדת ויפתח את פיו ויברך את ה'. ויירא למך מפניו וינס ויבוא אל מתושלח אביו ויאמר לו: נולד לי בן מוזר, אינו דומה לבני אדם כי אם לבני מלאכי השמיים ומראהו מוזר, אינו דומה לנו: עיניו כקרני השמש ופניו מפוארים. ואני חושב כי לא ממני הוא כי אם ממלאך".[8] מקבילות לסיפורו של נח מבול קדמון הוא מוטיב חוזר במסורות קדומות של תרבויות אנושיות רבות ברחבי העולם.[9]

חוקרי ספרות רבים מוצאים דמיון רב בין סיפורו של נח לבין סיפור המופיע באגדת גילגמש השומרי, שם מסופר על אותנפישתים - האדם היחיד ששרד את המבול שהביאו האלים על הארץ, ובשל כך העניקו לו האלים חיי אלמוות. אותנפישתים הוא מקבילו האכדי לזיאוסודרה השומרי, מהגרסה הכתובה הקדומה ביותר שנמצאה לסיפור המבול. גרסה מסופוטמית נוספת לסיפור המבול מופיעה באפוס אתרחסיס. במיתולוגיה היוונית מופיע סיפורם של דאוקליון ופירה. אף הם בנו כלי שיט בהוראת האלים, שרדו מבול ומהם יצאו כל בני האדם. במיתולוגיה המצרית, האל נו מגלם את התהום המימי הקדמוני, ובמיתולוגיה הסינית מסופר על נו'וה, אישה בדמות דרקון ששורדת שיטפון גדול. לקריאה נוספת זקוביץ יאיר ושנאן, אביגדור, גם כך לא כתוב בתנ"ך. תל אביב: ידיעות ספרים 2004. פרק ו' 'הנה אז חשבתי בלבי כי מן עירים ההריון מן הקדושים': סיפור לידת נח עלפי מגילה חיצונית לבראשית. עמ' 78–85. חיים חיון, ותצא דינה:קריאה המקראי ועיון בזיקותיו, ירושלים: הוצאת מאגנס,2011. בתוך פרק שלישי מעשה דינה וסיפורי התורה: נח ובניו, ברא' ט' 20–27. עמ' 75–77. אפי זיו, הצופן הנוצרי באמנות, אור יהודה: כנרת, זמורה-ביתן, 2015, עמ' 88–89, ISBN 978-965-566-137-8 קישורים חיצוניים ויקישיתוף מדיה וקבצים בנושא נח בוויקישיתוף פרשנויות וביאורים על סיפור נח באתר 929 - תנ"ך ביחד דמותו של נח בראי המדרש, מתוך הספרייה הווירטואלית של מטח נח איש האדמה מחבר :יונתן כהן מתוך מקראנט-מאגר מידע. ד"ר רפאל ירחי "נח איש צדיק – יש מרבותינו הדורשים אותו לגנאי" דף שבועי מאת הפקולטה ללימודי יהדות אוניברסיטת ב"א, תשס"ב נח, באתר אנציקלופדיה בריטניקה (באנגלית) הערות שוליים

Asher Sabag, Chicago Kollel, 2008
ספורנו על בראשית פרק ט', פסוק ט', ועוד.
האיסור לאדם ולבהמה להמית אדם מופיע בסוף הפרשיה שלפני ברית הקשת. ולדעת חלק מפרשני המקרא איסור זה הוא חלק בלתי נפרד מברית הקשת. וכדרכן של כל הבריתות במקרא, בהן כל צד מתחייב התחייבות כלפי רעהו.
מדרש תנחומא, בראשית, יא, ורש"י בפירושו על בראשית ה, כט ד"ה "זה ינחמנו"
המגילה החיצונית לבראשית, עמוד ב, שורות 3, 8.
יגאל ידין, המגילות הגנוזות ממדבר יהודה, הוצאת שוקן, תשי"ח, 1958; חלק רביעי, מגילה חיצונית ל'בראשית', עמ' 183-182.
ספר היובלות, פרק ד, פסוק כח.
ספר חנוך א, פרק קו, פסוקים ב-ו.
ראו רשימת אגדות אודות הצפות קדומות במהדורה האנגלית של ויקיפדיה.
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Noah .'s Timeline

-2791
-2791
Shulon, East Eden
-2704
-2704
Iraq
-2452
-2452
Shulon, East Eden
-2202
-2202
Shulon, East Eden

32 Y siendo Noé de quinientos años, engendró a Sem, a Cam y a Jafet.

-1754
-1754
Age 949
Turkey