Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel

Is your surname Heschel?

Research the Heschel family

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Rabbi Dr. Abraham Joshua Heschel

<span class='language-label'>Hebrew: אברהם יהושע השל</span>
Also Known As: "Leading Jewish Theologian"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Warsaw, Warszawa, Masovian Voivodeship, Poland
Death: December 23, 1972 (65)
New York, New York County, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Grand Rabbi Moshe Mordechai Heschel, Admur Novominsk-Warsaw and Grand Rebetzin Rivka Reizel Heschel
Husband of Sylvia Heschel
Father of Private User
Brother of Rebbitzen Sara Bracha Heschel; Esther Sima Heschel; R' Jacob Heschel; Gittel Heschel and Dvora Miriam Dermer

Occupation: Rabbi, Writer
Managed by: Malka Mysels
Last Updated:

About Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel

Abraham Joshua Heschel (January 11, 1907 – December 23, 1972) was a Warsaw-born American rabbi and one of the leading Jewish theologians of the 20th century.

Abraham Joshua Heschel was descended from preeminent European rabbis on both sides of the family. [1]. His father, Moshe Mordechai Heschel, died of influenza in 1916. His mother Reizel Perlow, was a descendant of Rebbe Avrohom Yehoshua Heshel of Apt and other dynasties. He was the youngest of six children. His siblings were Sarah, Dvora Miriam, Esther Sima, Gittel, and Jacob.

After a traditional yeshiva education and studying for Orthodox rabbinical ordination semicha, he pursued his doctorate at the University of Berlin and a liberal rabbinic ordination at the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft des Judentums. There he studied under some of the finest Jewish educators of the time: Chanoch Albeck, Ismar Elbogen, Julius Guttmann, and Leo Baeck. Heschel later taught Talmud there. He joined a Yiddish poetry group, Jung Vilna, and in 1933, published a volume of Yiddish poems, Der Shem Hamefoyrosh: Mentsch, dedicated to his father.

In late October 1938, when he was living in a rented room in the home of a Jewish family in Frankfurt, he was arrested by the Gestapo and deported to Poland. He spent ten months lecturing on Jewish philosophy and Torah at Warsaw's Institute for Jewish Studies.

Six weeks before the German invasion of Poland, Heschel left Warsaw for London with the help of Julian Morgenstern, president of Hebrew Union College, who had been working to obtain visas for Jewish scholars in Europe.

Heschel's sister Esther was killed in a German bombing. His mother was murdered by the Nazis, and two other sisters, Gittel and Devorah, died in Nazi concentration camps. He never returned to Germany, Austria or Poland. He once wrote, "If I should go to Poland or Germany, every stone, every tree would remind me of contempt, hatred, murder, of children killed, of mothers burned alive, of human beings asphyxiated."

Heschel arrived in New York City in March 1940. He briefly served on the faculty of Hebrew Union College (HUC), the main seminary of Reform Judaism, in Cincinnati. In 1946, he took a position at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS), the main seminary of Conservative Judaism, where he served as professor of Jewish Ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972.

Heschel married Sylvia Straus on December 10, 1946, in Los Angeles.

Their daughter, Susannah Heschel is a Jewish scholar in her own right.

Heschel saw the teachings of the Hebrew prophets as a clarion call for social action in the United States and worked for black civil rights and against the Vietnam War [

Heschel was an activist for civil rights in the United States.

His most influential works include Man is Not Alone, God in Search of Man, The Sabbath, and The Prophets.

He was chosen by American Jewish organizations to negotiate with leaders of the Roman Catholic church at the Vatican Council II. Heschel persuaded the church to eliminate or modify passages in its liturgy that demeaned the Jews, or expected their conversion to Christianity.[citation needed] His theological works argued that the religious experience was fundamentally human impulse, not just a Jewish one, and that no religious community could claim a monopoly on religious truth.[

Prophets

This work started out as his Ph.D. thesis in German, which he later expanded and translated into English. Originally published in a two-volume edition, this work studies the books of the Hebrew prophets. It covers their life and the historical context that their missions were set in, summarizes their work, and discusses their psychological state. In it Heschel forwards what would become a central idea in his theology: that the prophetic (and, ultimately, Jewish) view of God is best understood not as anthropomorphic (that God takes human form) but rather as anthropopathic — that God has human feelings.

The Sabbath

The Sabbath: Its Meaning For Modern Man is a work on the nature and celebration of Shabbat, the Jewish Sabbath. This work is rooted in the thesis that Judaism is a religion of time, not space, and that the Sabbath symbolizes the sanctification of time.

Man is Not Alone

Man Is Not Alone: A Philosophy of Religion offers Heschel's views on how man can apprehend God. Judaism views God as being radically different from man, so Heschel explores the ways that Judaism teaches that a person may have an encounter with the ineffable. A recurring theme in this work is the radical amazement that man experiences when experiencing the presence of the Divine. Heschel then goes to explore the problems of doubts and faith; what Judaism means by teaching that God is one; the essence of man and the problem of man's needs; the definition of religion in general and of Judaism in particular; and man's yearning for spirituality. He offers his views as to Judaism being a pattern for life.

God in Search of Man

God in Search of Man: A Philosophy of Judaism is a companion volume to Man is Not Alone. In this book Heschel discusses the nature of religious thought, how thought becomes faith, and how faith creates responses in the believer. He discusses ways that man can seek God's presence, and the radical amazement that man receives in return. He offers a criticism of nature worship; a study of man's metaphysical loneliness, and his view that we can consider God to be in search of man. The first section concludes with a study of Jews as a chosen people. Section two deals with the idea of revelation, and what it means for one to be a prophet. This section gives us his idea of revelation as a process, as opposed to an event. This relates to Israel's commitment to God. Section three discusses his views of how a Jew should understand the nature of Judaism as a religion. He discusses and rejects the idea that mere faith (without law) alone is enough, but then cautions against rabbis he sees as adding too many restrictions to Jewish law. He discusses the need to correlate ritual observance with spirituality and love, the importance of Kavanah (intention) when performing mitzvot. He engages in a discussion of religious behaviorism — when people strive for external compliance with the law, yet disregard the importance of inner devotion.

Prophetic Inspiration After the Prophets

Heschel wrote a series of articles, originally in Hebrew, on the existence of prophecy in Judaism after the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem in 70 CE. These essays were translated into English and published as Prophetic Inspiration After the Prophets: Maimonides and Others by the American Judaica publisher Ktav.

The publisher of this book states, "The standard Jewish view is that prophecy ended with the ancient prophets, somewhere early in the Second Temple era. Heschel demonstrated that this view is not altogether accurate. Belief in the possibility of continued prophetic inspiration, and in its actual occurrence appear throughout much of the medieval period, and even in modern times. Heschel's work on prophetic inspiration in the Middle Ages originally appeared in two Hebrew long articles. In them he concentrated on the idea that prophetic inspiration was possible even in post-Talmudic times, and, indeed, had taken place at various times and in various schools, from the Geonim to Maimonides and beyond."

Torah min HaShamayim

Many consider Heschel's Torah min HaShamayim BeAspaklariya shel HaDorot, (Torah from Heaven in the light of the generations) to be his masterwork. The three volumes of this work are a study of classical rabbinic theology and aggadah, as opposed to halakha (Jewish law.) It explores the views of the rabbis in the Mishnah, Talmud and Midrash about the nature of Torah, the revelation of God to mankind, prophecy, and the ways that Jews have used scriptural exegesis to expand and understand these core Jewish texts. In this work Heschel views the second century sages Rabbis Akiva and Ishmael as paradigms for the two dominant world-views in Jewish theology

Two Hebrew volumes were published during his lifetime by Soncino Press, and the third Hebrew volume was published posthumously by JTS Press in the 1990s. An English translation of all three volumes, with notes, essays and appendices, was translated and edited by Rabbi Gordon Tucker, entitled Heavenly Torah: As Refracted Through the Generations.

Quotations

"Racism is man's gravest threat to man - the maximum hatred for a minimum reason."

"All it takes is one person… and another… and another… and another… to start a movement"

"Wonder rather than doubt is the root of all knowledge."

"A religious man is a person who holds God and man in one thought at one time, at all times, who suffers harm done to others, whose greatest passion is compassion, whose greatest strength is love and defiance of despair."

"God is of no importance unless He is of utmost importance."

"Just to be is a blessing. Just to live is holy."

"Self-respect is the fruit of discipline, the sense of dignity grows with the ability to say no to oneself."

"Life without commitment is not worth living."

"In regard to cruelties committed in the name of a free society, some are guilty, while all are responsible."

"Remember that there is a meaning beyond absurdity. Be sure that every little deed counts, that every word has power. Never forget that you can still do your share to redeem the world in spite of all absurdities and frustrations and disappointments."

"When I was young, I admired clever people. Now that I am old, I admire kind people."

"Awareness of symbolic meaning is awareness of a specific idea; kavanah is awareness of an ineffable situation.

"A Jew is asked to take a leap of action rather than a leap of thought."

"Speech has power. Words do not fade. What starts out as a sound, ends in a deed."

[edit]Commemoration

Three schools have been named for Heschel, in the Upper West Side of New York City, Northridge, California, and Toronto.

References

^ a b "Dateline World Jewry", April 2007, World Jewish Congress

^ a b c d e http://home.versatel.nl/heschel/Susannah.htm Abraham Joshua Heschel

^ Scult, Mel . Kaplan's Heschel : a view from the Kaplan diary. In: Conservative Judaism, 54,4 (2002) 3-14

^ Gillman, Neil (1993). Conservative Judaism: The New Century. Behrman House Inc., 163.

[edit]Selected bibliography

Man Is Not Alone: A Philosophy of Religion. 1951. ISBN 0-374-51328-7

The Sabbath: Its Meaning for Modern Man. 1951. ISBN 1-59030082-3

Man's Quest for God: Studies in Prayer and Symbolism. 1954. ISBN 0684168294

God in Search of Man: A Philosophy of Judaism. 1955. ISBN 0-374-51331-7

The Prophets. 1962. ISBN 0-06-093699-1

Who Is Man? 1965.

Israel: An Echo of Eternity. 1969. ISBN 1-879045-70-2

A Passion for Truth. 1973. ISBN 1-879045-41-9

Heavenly Torah: As Refracted Through the Generations. 2005. ISBN 0-8264-0802-8

Torah min ha-shamayim be'aspaklariya shel ha-dorot; Theology of Ancient Judaism. [Hebrew]. 2 vols. London: Soncino Press, 1962. Third volume, New York: Jewish Theological Seminary, 1995.

The Ineffable Name of God: Man: Poems. 2004. ISBN 0-8264-1632-2

Kotsk: in gerangl far emesdikeyt. [Yiddish]. 2 v. (694 p.) Tel-Aviv: ha-Menorah, 1973. Added t.p.: Kotzk: the struggle for integrity. A Passion for Truth is an adaptation of this larger work.

Der mizrekh-Eyropeyisher Yid (Yiddish: The Eastern European Jew). 45 p. Originally published: New-York: Shoken, 1946.

Abraham Joshua Heschel: Prophetic Witness & Spiritual Radical: Abraham Joshua Heschel in America, 1940-1972, biography by Edward K. Kaplan

===============

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Apta_%28Hasidic_dynasty%29

Rabbi Avraham Yehoshua Heshel of Apt was the founder of the Apt-Mezhbizh-Zinkover Hasidic dynasty. In honor of the dynasty's founder, his descendants adopted the family name Heshel.

http://wiki.geni.com/index.php/Jewish_Dynasties


Abraham Joshua Heschel was descended from preeminent European rabbis on both sides of the family. [1]. His father, Moshe Mordechai Heschel, died of influenza in 1916. His mother Reizel Perlow, was a descendant of Rebbe Avrohom Yehoshua Heshel of Apt and other dynasties. He was the youngest of six children. His siblings were Sarah, Dvora Miriam, Esther Sima, Gittel, and Jacob.

After a traditional yeshiva education and studying for Orthodox rabbinical ordination semicha, he pursued his doctorate at the University of Berlin and a liberal rabbinic ordination at the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft des Judentums. There he studied under some of the finest Jewish educators of the time: Chanoch Albeck, Ismar Elbogen, Julius Guttmann, and Leo Baeck. Heschel later taught Talmud there. He joined a Yiddish poetry group, Jung Vilna, and in 1933, published a volume of Yiddish poems, Der Shem Hamefoyrosh: Mentsch, dedicated to his father. [2]

In late October 1938, when he was living in a rented room in the home of a Jewish family in Frankfurt, he was arrested by the Gestapo and deported to Poland. He spent ten months lecturing on Jewish philosophy and Torah at Warsaw's Institute for Jewish Studies. [2] Six weeks before the German invasion of Poland, Heschel left Warsaw for London with the help of Julian Morgenstern, president of Hebrew Union College, who had been working to obtain visas for Jewish scholars in Europe.[2]

Heschel's sister Esther was killed in a German bombing. His mother was murdered by the Nazis, and two other sisters, Gittel and Devorah, died in Nazi concentration camps. He never returned to Germany, Austria or Poland. He once wrote, "If I should go to Poland or Germany, every stone, every tree would remind me of contempt, hatred, murder, of children killed, of mothers burned alive, of human beings asphyxiated."[2]

Heschel arrived in New York City in March 1940. [2]He served on the faculty of Hebrew Union College (HUC), the main seminary of Reform Judaism, in Cincinnati for five years. In 1946, he took a position at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS), the main seminary of Conservative Judaism, where he served as professor of Jewish Ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972.

Heschel married Sylvia Straus, a concert pianist, on December 10, 1946, in Los Angeles. Their daughter, Susannah Heschel, is a Jewish scholar in her own right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Abraham_Joshua_Heschel&oldid=344431955 https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Joshua_Heschel

About Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (עברית)

אברהם יהושע הֶשל

'

(ביידיש: העשל; ובאנגלית: Abraham Joshua Heschel) (כ"ה בטבת תרס"ז, 11 בינואר 1907 – י"ח בטבת תשל"ג, 23 בדצמבר 1972) היה מההוגים החשובים של יהדות ארצות הברית במחצית השנייה של המאה ה-20, מרצה בבית המדרש לרבנים של התנועה הקונסרבטיבית, חוקר מחשבת ישראל ופילוסוף.

תוכן עניינים 1 קורות חייו 2 הגות 3 פעילות ציבורית 3.1 התנועה לזכויות האזרח 3.2 נגד מלחמת וייטנאם 3.3 שיח בין-דתי 4 חיבורים מרכזיים 4.1 הנביאים 4.2 השבת 4.3 תורה מן השמים באספקלריה של הדורות 4.4 אלוהים מבקש את האדם 5 מחיבוריו 5.1 חיבורים מתורגמים 5.2 חיבורים ביידיש 5.3 חיבורים באנגלית 6 לקריאה נוספת 7 קישורים חיצוניים 8 הערות שוליים

קורות חייו השל נולד בשנת 1907 בוורשה, לרב משה מרדכי אדמו"ר ממז'יבוז', נצר למשפחת רבנים חסידיים מיוחסת – מצד אביו היה צאצא של רבי אברהם יהושע השל מאפטא (ה"אוהב ישראל") ומצד אמו - של הבעל שם טוב[1] ושל רבי לוי יצחק מברדיצ'ב[2]. הבן הצעיר מבין שישה ילדים. כשהיה בן עשר התייתם מאביו ועבר לחסותו החינוכית של דודו, רבי אלתר פרלוב, הרבי מנובומינסק. לפני שמלאו לו 16 קיבל סמיכה מרבי מנחם זמבה. בעקבות כישלון שידוך עם בת דודו, נשלח השל לאבחון פסיכותרפי אצל פישל שניאורסון, אשר אמר שהשל זקוק לאווירה פתוחה יותר, ואמו הסכימה שיישלח ללמוד בברלין.

כדי להתקבל לאוניברסיטה, היה השל צריך ללמוד קודם לכן בגימנסיה מוכרת ולקבל תעודת בגרות. בגיל 18 החל ללמוד בגימנסיה הריאלית היהודית-חילונית בניהולו של לייב טוּרבּוֹביץ' בווילנה, ובמקביל הצטרף לקבוצת משוררים והחל לפרסם שירים. בגיל 20 נרשם ללימודי פילוסופיה, היסטוריה של האומנות ופילולוגיה שמית באוניברסיטת ברלין.

בברלין הצטרף השל לבית המדרש הגבוה ללימודי יהדות, מוסד ליברלי שבו לימדו באותה תקופה חנוך אלבק, ליאו בק, יוליוס גוטמן ואחרים. שם החל לעבוד על הדוקטורט שלו בנושא הנבואה, וזכה בסמיכה רבנית נוספת מטעם מוסד זה. עד מהרה הפך גם לאחד המורים לתלמוד במוסד. בנובמבר 1936 הציע לו ידידו הקרוב מרטין בובר, למלא את מקומו כמנהל הסמינר היהודי בפרנקפורט.

בסוף אוקטובר 1938 נעצר השל על ידי הנאצים וגורש לפולין במסגרת גירוש זבונשין. הוא הגיע לוורשה, ולימד בה במכון למדעי היהדות. ביולי 1939, כחודש וחצי לפני פלישת גרמניה לפולין, עקר ללונדון, ובמרץ 1940 היגר לארצות הברית, שם קיבל את פניו קרוב משפחתו האדמו"ר מבויאן, שאשתו הייתה בת דודתו. בארצות הברית החל השל את דרכו בהיברו יוניון קולג' שבסינסינטי.

השל לא היה מרוצה מהזלזול במצוות המעשיות שמצא בבית המדרש הרפורמי. בשנת 1945 עבר ללמד בבית המדרש לרבנים של התנועה הקונסרבטיבית (JTS), והחל לשמש כפרופסור לאתיקה יהודית ולקבלה. השל החזיק בתפקיד זה עד מותו, אף שסבל מביקורת ראשי המוסד על דרכו החסידית ומעורבותו החברתית.

השל נישא לפסנתרנית סילביה שטראוס ב-10 בדצמבר 1946, בלוס אנג'לס. נולדה להם בת אחת, שושנה (סוזנה), שהייתה לחוקרת יהדות, הוציאה מחדש את כתבי אביה ומשמשת כיום פרופסור להיסטוריה בדארטמות' קולג'.

בשנות ה-50 ביקש השל לעלות לישראל. שמואל אבידור הכהן, ידידו של השל, טען כי האוניברסיטה העברית סירבה לתת לו משרה בארץ, בהמלצתו של פרופ' אפרים אלימלך אורבך. לטענת ידידה אחרת, פרופ' רבקה הורביץ, מי שעמד למעשה מאחורי הסירוב היה פרופסור גרשום שלום, שאולי נעזר לשם כך באורבך, ומעמדו הרם גרם לכך שהשל לא התקבל בשום מוסד אקדמי בישראל.

במנהטן פועל בית ספר יהודי-פלורליסטי הנושא את שמו של השל ומחנך ברוחו. ב-1997 נקרא על שמו "מרכז השל לחשיבה ומנהיגות סביבתית" בישראל, העוסק בחינוך לתודעה אקולוגית. השל לא הרבה לעסוק בו, אבל לדברי מקימי המוסד הוא מתאים לרוחו. על שמו רחוב בחיפה.

הגות

השל עם מרטין לותר קינג, 7 בדצמבר 1965 השל התמחה בחסידות, פילוסופיה יהודית וקבלה, ועסק רבות בניסיון להחזיר את הפאתוס ומוסר הנביאים ליהדות ההלכתית. כתביו אינם מנוסחים בלשון פילוסופית אלא משלבים גם סגנון פיוטי. הוא אינו מרבה לצטט מקורות כסימוכין לדבריו, מעבר לחז"ל. הוא הרבה לבקר את האקדמיה על הקור והאדישות המאפיינים את יחסה לתחומים שברוח.

יש הרואים את השל כשייך לדור של הוגים יהודים בארצות הברית שחווה את הזוועות של מלחמת העולם השנייה, התייאש מהפילוסופיה ומהערכים המודרניים שיוצגו על ידי המדע והרציונליזם[%D7%93%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%A9 מקור]. בני דור זה החלו להראות סימנים של חזרה למסורת הדתית האותנטית. בהגותו, מנסה השל לשלב את היהדות שגדל עליה עם אלמנטים מודרניים מהפילוסופיה הקיומית שאותם ספג באקדמיה, כגון הפנומנולוגיה של אדמונד הוסרל.

אחרים רואים את הגותו של השל כמהפכה רדיקלית יותר. לדעתם הוא מנסח באופן פילוסופי את רוח התנ"ך ואת הנבואה כעמידה לפני הסובייקט האלוהי[%D7%93%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%A9 מקור]. הגותו של השל עוסקת בדיאלוג שבין האל הטרנסצנדנטי, המתגלה בשאלות מוחלטות, ובין האדם המסוגל למענה ולתשובה. אף שהאדם כבר אינו עומד במרכז, ערכו עולה שכן הוא עומד במרכזה של האכפתיות האלוהית. בהגותו של השל משתלבות דתיות חריפה הנענית להתגלות האל ותביעה מוסרית מוחלטת לאכפתיות לאחר.

ספרו הראשון של השל ב-1933 היה ספר שירה ביידיש שעסק בזיקה בין האל ושמו המפורש לבין האנושות. הספר נוגע בסבל האנושי וביחסו של האל לאנושות הסובלת. גם הגותו בהמשך עוסקת במעמדו של האדם לפני האל. הוא מדגיש שלא רק האדם זקוק לאל אלא גם האל מחפש את האדם. אחת מהאמרות שאותן אהב לצטט מיוחסת לרבי מקוצק ואומרת כי אלוהים נמצא במקום אליו בני האדם נותנים לו להיכנס.

פעילות ציבורית השל שאף להחזיר את הפתוס האלוהי והמוסר הנבואי אל מחוזות היהדות ההלכתית ורצה להשתמש בנביאי ישראל כדגם למהפך חברתי-סוציאלי בימינו.

התנועה לזכויות האזרח השל היה פעיל נלהב של התנועה לזכויות האזרח של ארצות הברית. פעל למען השגת שוויון לשחורים באמריקה ורקם ידידות עמוקה עם מנהיג המאבק, מרטין לותר קינג. תמונה מפורסמת מ-1965, שבה נראה השל צועד יד ביד עם קינג בהפגנה הגדולה בסלמה, הפכה לסמל לשיתוף הפעולה האפשרי בין יהודים לשחורים בארצות הברית. השל אמר לאחר אותה הפגנה שחש כי רגליו הצועדות "מתפללות", כלומר מקיימות פעולה דתית. קינג נרצח באפריל 1968, ימים ספורים לפני שעמד לחגוג את ליל הסדר בביתו של השל. קינג עצמו אמר על השל: "אני חש שהרב השל הוא אחד האנשים הרלוונטיים לכל הזמנים, שניצבים תמיד בתובנה נבואית להדריך אותנו בימים קשים אלה"[3].

נגד מלחמת וייטנאם השל היה מתנגד חריף של מלחמת וייטנאם. הוא טען כי למד מנביאי ישראל את החובה המוסרית להיות אכפתי ללא גבול לסבלם של בני אנוש[4]. בראיון לטלוויזיה אז אמר: "כיצד אוכל להתפלל, בידעי כי בשעה זאת נרצחים אלפי אנשים חפים מפשע?״[5].

שיח בין-דתי השל פעל רבות לקידום דו-שיח ושיתוף פעולה בין-דתי, בעיקר יהודי-נוצרי, והשתתף בכנס ההיסטורי שעסק בנושא ב-1963, על רקע המושב השני של ועידת הוותיקן השנייה, עבודה משותפת שתוצאתה הקתולית נוסחה בהצהרת נוסטרה אטאטה. היה חבר קרוב של ההוגה הנוצרי, ריינהולד ניבור. ציטוט מפורסם של השל בנושא הוא גם כותרת לאחד מהספרים עליו: "אף דת איננה אי".

חיבורים מרכזיים הנביאים עבודת הדוקטורט של השל בגרמנית בחנה את תופעת הנבואה בישראל בקונטקסט הפסיכולוגי-פנומנולוגי. השל אינו עוסק בה בשאלת אמיתות תופעת הנבואה אלא מנתח אותה בהקשר של החוויה הנבואית. העבודה הפכה מאוחר יותר לספר בן שני כרכים באנגלית. במבוא לספר כותב השל שהוא חורג בו מגבולות הפנומנולוגיה. על תהליך כתיבת העבודה שלו, כתב השל: "ככל שהעמקתי לשקוע במחשבתם של הנביאים, כך הלך והתבהר לי ביתר תוקף המסר שעלה מחיי הנביאים: מבחינה מוסרית, אין גבול לאכפתיות שאדם מוכרח להרגיש כלפי סבלו של בן אנוש"[6].

השבת "השבת" היא מסה קצרה שבה מחפש השל אחר משמעות רוחנית עבור האדם בן ימינו במהות השבת ובהלכותיה הרבות. התזה המרכזית בספר עוסקת בחשיבות הקדושה שבזמן, ששיאה השבת, בניגוד לקדושת המרחב, אותה השל רואה כהקדשה אנושית. הספר תורגם לעברית על ידי יהודה יערי בשנת 1980. בשנת 2003 יצא הספר בתרגום של אלכסנדר אבן-חן בסדרת "יהדות כאן ועכשיו" של ידיעות אחרונות, ובשנת 2012 במהדורה חדשה ומתוקנת.

תורה מן השמים באספקלריה של הדורות חיבור זה נחשב בעיני רבים ליצירת המופת של השל, אך גם בוקרה בחריפות בעולם האקדמי. בשלושת הכרכים של הספר מנתח השל את שיטת חז"ל באגדה ובמחשבה בנושא "תורה מן השמים". הוא מוצא ברבי עקיבא וברבי ישמעאל בני פלוגתא עקביים המייצגים עמדות מנוגדות לגבי אופי ההתגלות האלוקית, נבואה, והתפתחות תורה שבעל פה.

החיבור יצא במקורו בעברית. שני כרכים הופיעו בהוצאת שונצינו ב-1972 וכרך שלישי יצא לאחר מותו על ידי JTS בשנות ה-90. הרב גורדון טוקר הוציא תרגום לאנגלית של שלושת הכרכים בתוספת הערות, מבואות ואפילוג.

בספר הוטחה ביקורת רבה מכיוון האקדמיה והמחלקות לחקר התלמוד, בפרט זו של האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים. נטען כי למרות חזותו האקדמית לכאורה, הספר אינו עומד בסטנדרטים של המחקר המקובל והשוו אותו לדרשות חסידיות.

אלוהים מבקש את האדם "אלוהים מבקש את האדם: פילוסופיה של היהדות", נכתב כבן זוג לספר "האדם אינו לבד: פילוסופיה של הדת". בספר מנתח השל את תהליך הבשלת מחשבה דתית ראשונית אל אמונה שלמה ומבוססת. הוא בוחן דרכים שבהן יכול האדם למצוא את נוכחותו של אלוהים בעולם, ואת הפליאה העזה שהוא חש כשהוא פוגש אותו. השל מדגיש שגם האלוהים מבקש וצריך את האדם, שמצידו צריך רק לפתוח את הלב כדי לפגוש בו.

חלקו הראשון של הספר - "אלוהים" - מבקש לחדור לתודעת האדם הדתי הניצב לפני נוכחות האל ולהצביע על תקפותה של האמונה בממשות האל. החלק השני - "התגלות" - מבקש לחדד את המשמעות והממשות של היות האדם לנביא ולגלות את נוכחות האל בתנ"ך. החלק השלישי - "מענה" - עוסק במשמעותו העמוקה של קיום מצוות ובשאלות אתיות. השל מדגיש כי קיום מצוות כולל קוטביות של פנים-חוץ, אגדה-הלכה, וכוונה-מעשה, שאין לטשטשה. הוא דן בערכה של ה"כוונה" בקיום המצוות ובחוסר הפשר של "ביהייביוריזם" דתי, שבו יהודים מקיימים את האות הכתובה של ההלכה ללא ניסיון לרדת לעומק הרוחני מאחורי החוק.

מחיבוריו "תורה מן השמים באספקלריה של הדורות", לונדון 1962, הוצאת שונצינו על מהות התפילה, בתוך: תפלה, הוצאת "אמנה", תשל"ד . נדפס לראשונה ב-בצרון, 346 שנה ג' (תש"א) . חיבורים מתורגמים "אלהים מבקש את האדם" (God in Search of Man), הוצאת מאגנס 2003 "השבת: משמעותה לאדם המודרני", (תרגום: אלכסנדר אבן-חן), הוצאת ידיעות ספרים, 2004. ובמהדורה מתוקנת ב-2012. "ישראל, הווה ונצח", תרגם דוד בר-לבב, הספרייה הציונית, ירושלים תשל"ג. על ההתרגשות הדתית לאחר מלחמת ששת הימים והיחס הראוי לפלסטינים. "שמים על הארץ: על החיים הפנימיים של היהודי במזרח אירופה", תורגם: פנחס פלאי ויהודה יערי, ערך: פנחס פלאי, מוסד אברהם יהושע השל : הוצאת אוניפרס, 1975. "אלוהים מאמין באדם - היהדות, הצדק החברתי והציונות של אברהם יהושע השל", ערך ותרגם: דרור בונדי, הקדמה מאת מיכה גודמן, הוצאת דביר, אור יהודה תשע"ב. אוסף חדש של מבחר נאומים ופרסומים, מתורגמים ועבריים, תשע"ב/2011. "התפילה: תשוקת האדם לאלוהים" (תרגם והוסיף מבוא: דרור בונדי; פתח-דבר מאת סוזנה השל), הוצאת ידיעות ספרים, 2016[7] חיבורים ביידיש "קאצק - אין געראנגל פאר אמתדיקייט" (ביידיש), הוצאת מנורה, ירושלים, תשל"ג. כרך א' תורגם לעברית בידי דניאל רייזר ואיתיאל בארי, ויצא לאור בשם קוצק: במאבק למען חיי אמת, הוצאת מגיד, 2015. חיבורים באנגלית The Circle of the Baal Shem Tov: Studies in Hasidism נערך על ידי שמואל דרזנר, שיקגו 1985. כולל 4 חיבורים שיצאו מוקדם יותר - ר' פנחס מקוריץ, ר' אברהם גרשון מקיטוב - חייו ועלייתו לארץ ישראל, ר' נחמן מקוסוב - בן לויה של הבעש"ט, יצחק מדרוהוביץ. "Man Is Not Alone" "A passion for truth", השוואה בין הרבי מקוצק לקירקגור, 1973, יצא מחדש בהוצאת Jewish Lights. "Who is Man" "The Insecurity of Freedom" "Man's Quest for God" לקריאה נוספת אלכסנדר אבן חן, קול מן הערפל - אברהם יהושע השל בין פנומנולוגיה למיסטיקה, הוצאת עם עובד ומכון שכטר "'Spiritual Radical: Abraham Joshua Heschel in America, 1940-1972" ו-"Abraham Joshua Heschel: Prophetic Witness", ביוגרפיה של השל באנגלית בת שני חלקים מאת אדוארד קפלן. דרור בונדי, איכה? - שאלתו של אלוהים ותרגום המסורת בהגותו של אברהם יהושע השל, הוצאת מרכז שלם, ירושלים 2008 פינחס פלאי (עורך), חמש שיחות עם אברהם יהושע השל, מוסד אברהם יהושע השל, 1975 עמיחי חסון, אמונה אלון (עורכים) אדם מהלך בעולם – שיחות עם אברהם יהושע השל, הוצאת ידיעות ספרים, 2019 קישורים חיצוניים מיזמי קרן ויקימדיה ויקיציטוט ציטוטים בוויקיציטוט: אברהם יהושע השל ויקיציטוט ציטוטים בוויקיציטוט: השבת ויקיציטוט ציטוטים בוויקיציטוט: אלוהים מבקש את האדם ויקישיתוף תמונות ומדיה בוויקישיתוף: אברהם יהושע השל הקלטות וידאו ואודיו:

ארכיון אברהם יהושע השל

באתר אוניברסיטת דיוק

סרטונים ראיון שנערך עמו בטלוויזיה האמריקנית בליווי כתוביות לעברית , סרטון באתר יוטיוב מכתביו:

רשימת המאמרים של אברהם יהושע השל

באתר רמב"י

אברהם יהושע השל על השבת, אי שקט במים סוערים , פאזל ההאמין הרמב"ם שזכה לנבואה?

ספר היובל לכבוד לוי גינצבורג, למלאת לו שבעים שנה (עורכים: שאול ליברמן, שניאור זלמן צייטלין, שלום שפיגל, אלכסנדר מרקס, יו"ר), חלק עברי, נוירק: האקדמיה האמריקנית למדעי היהדות, תש"ו, עמ' קנ"ט - קפ"ח, באתר "מסורתי".

קטעים מהספר 'אלוהים מאמין באדם': תוכן העניינים ועמודי הפתיחה ; הקדמתו של מיכה גודמן והנאום הראשון כנגד הגזענות אהבה או אמת: הבעש"ט או הרבי מקוצק , מקור ראשון, מוסף "שבת", 25 בדצמבר 2011 - קטעים מתרגום לעברית של הספר היידי 'קאצק', כולל פתח-דבר מאת דרור בונדי הערות לנוסח ולאמונה , דבר, 14 באוגוסט 1970 על דמותו והגותו:

יאיר שלג, הרב האוניוורסלי , באתר הארץ דרור בונדי, מאמין בשאלה , באתר הארץ אסתי אהרונוביץ, דרור בונדי מנסה להחזיר אלוהים אחר לחיינו , באתר הארץ, 26 בינואר 2012 אדמיאל קוסמן, מעין 'שיוויתי' , מקור ראשון, מוסף "שבת", 16 בפברואר 2011 השל – האדם ומשנתו , מרכז השל ראיון מצולם עם אברהם יהושע השל דרור בונדי, "אברהם יהושע השל: זהות יהודית או יהודיות דיאלוגית" , אקדמות דרור בונדי, "על 'מות אלוהים' ותחיית המתים בהגותו של השל" , אקדמות דרור בונדי, איכה? - פתח דבר

ומבוא

, בהוצאת מרכז שלם דרור בונדי, "אלטרנטיבה רוחנית לזהות - שאלת הזהות המגזרית ואברהם יהושע השל", דעות דרור בונדי, "הפנומנולוגיה של מעשה המצווה בהגותו של השל", הרצאה מצולמת מתוך כנס של ון-ליר (דקה 44:44) דרור בונדי, "השבת של אברהם יהושע השל", נוסף כדברי סיום למהדורה המתוקנת של ספרו של השל, השבת (2012) דרור בונדי, שיחת מבוא להגותו של השל בישיבת ההסדר בפ"ת אביחי צור, 'ואירא כי עירם אנכי ואחבא' , ביקורת על ספרו של דרור בונדי - איכה - שאלתו של אלוהים ותרגום המסורת בהגותו של אברהם יהושע השל, בתוך: מבוע, קיץ תשס"ט (נ), עמ' 93–100. יובל אלבשן, "אלוהים מאמין באדם": יש נביא בעיר , באתר הארץ, 19 ביוני 2012 ערוץ השל בישראל

המרכז קטעי וידאו של השל ועל הגותו בעברית, ביוטיוב

מיכה גודמן, תכירו: הרבי של הרבי של אובמה , באתר ynet, 22 בינואר 2012, ynet אביה הכהן, נביא אהבה ותוכחה , מקור ראשון, מוסף "שבת", 2 במרץ 2012, על הספר 'אלוהים מאמין באדם' א. ח. אלחנני, היחיד והציבור במשנתו של פרופ' אברהם יהושע השל , דבר, 1 בספטמבר 1957 רנה לי, ראשי פרקים למשנתו של א. י. השל , דבר, 12 בינואר 1973, המשך רועי הורן, ‏אין נביא בעירו , בעיתון מקור ראשון, 7 בפברואר 2019 בנימין איש שלום ודרור בונדי, לך לך - עיונים ביצירתו של אברהם יהושע השל, אדרא, תשע"ט 2019 הערות שוליים

https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%90%D7%91%D7%A8%D7%94%D7%9D_%D7%99%D7%94%D7%95%D7%A9%D7%A2_%D7%94%D7%A9%D7%9C

--------------------------------

Joshua Heschel"], Essay by Susannah Heschel

Abraham Joshua Heschel (January 11, 1907 – December 23, 1972) was a Warsaw-born American rabbi and one of the leading Jewish theologians of the 20th century.

Abraham Joshua Heschel was descended from preeminent European rabbis on both sides of the family. [1]. His father, Moshe Mordechai Heschel, died of influenza in 1916. His mother Reizel Perlow, was a descendant of Rebbe Avrohom Yehoshua Heshel of Apt and other dynasties. He was the youngest of six children. His siblings were Sarah, Dvora Miriam, Esther Sima, Gittel, and Jacob.

After a traditional yeshiva education and studying for Orthodox rabbinical ordination semicha, he pursued his doctorate at the University of Berlin and a liberal rabbinic ordination at the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft des Judentums. There he studied under some of the finest Jewish educators of the time: Chanoch Albeck, Ismar Elbogen, Julius Guttmann, and Leo Baeck. Heschel later taught Talmud there. He joined a Yiddish poetry group, Jung Vilna, and in 1933, published a volume of Yiddish poems, Der Shem Hamefoyrosh: Mentsch, dedicated to his father.

In late October 1938, when he was living in a rented room in the home of a Jewish family in Frankfurt, he was arrested by the Gestapo and deported to Poland. He spent ten months lecturing on Jewish philosophy and Torah at Warsaw's Institute for Jewish Studies.

Six weeks before the German invasion of Poland, Heschel left Warsaw for London with the help of Julian Morgenstern, president of Hebrew Union College, who had been working to obtain visas for Jewish scholars in Europe.

Heschel's sister Esther was killed in a German bombing. His mother was murdered by the Nazis, and two other sisters, Gittel and Devorah, died in Nazi concentration camps. He never returned to Germany, Austria or Poland. He once wrote, "If I should go to Poland or Germany, every stone, every tree would remind me of contempt, hatred, murder, of children killed, of mothers burned alive, of human beings asphyxiated."

Heschel arrived in New York City in March 1940. He briefly served on the faculty of Hebrew Union College (HUC), the main seminary of Reform Judaism, in Cincinnati. In 1946, he took a position at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS), the main seminary of Conservative Judaism, where he served as professor of Jewish Ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972.

Heschel married Sylvia Straus on December 10, 1946, in Los Angeles.

Their daughter, Susannah Heschel is a Jewish scholar in her own right.

Heschel saw the teachings of the Hebrew prophets as a clarion call for social action in the United States and worked for black civil rights and against the Vietnam War [

Heschel was an activist for civil rights in the United States.

His most influential works include Man is Not Alone, God in Search of Man, The Sabbath, and The Prophets.

He was chosen by American Jewish organizations to negotiate with leaders of the Roman Catholic church at the Vatican Council II. Heschel persuaded the church to eliminate or modify passages in its liturgy that demeaned the Jews, or expected their conversion to Christianity.[citation needed] His theological works argued that the religious experience was fundamentally human impulse, not just a Jewish one, and that no religious community could claim a monopoly on religious truth.[

Prophets

This work started out as his Ph.D. thesis in German, which he later expanded and translated into English. Originally published in a two-volume edition, this work studies the books of the Hebrew prophets. It covers their life and the historical context that their missions were set in, summarizes their work, and discusses their psychological state. In it Heschel forwards what would become a central idea in his theology: that the prophetic (and, ultimately, Jewish) view of God is best understood not as anthropomorphic (that God takes human form) but rather as anthropopathic — that God has human feelings.

The Sabbath

The Sabbath: Its Meaning For Modern Man is a work on the nature and celebration of Shabbat, the Jewish Sabbath. This work is rooted in the thesis that Judaism is a religion of time, not space, and that the Sabbath symbolizes the sanctification of time.

Man is Not Alone

Man Is Not Alone: A Philosophy of Religion offers Heschel's views on how man can apprehend God. Judaism views God as being radically different from man, so Heschel explores the ways that Judaism teaches that a person may have an encounter with the ineffable. A recurring theme in this work is the radical amazement that man experiences when experiencing the presence of the Divine. Heschel then goes to explore the problems of doubts and faith; what Judaism means by teaching that God is one; the essence of man and the problem of man's needs; the definition of religion in general and of Judaism in particular; and man's yearning for spirituality. He offers his views as to Judaism being a pattern for life.

God in Search of Man

God in Search of Man: A Philosophy of Judaism is a companion volume to Man is Not Alone. In this book Heschel discusses the nature of religious thought, how thought becomes faith, and how faith creates responses in the believer. He discusses ways that man can seek God's presence, and the radical amazement that man receives in return. He offers a criticism of nature worship; a study of man's metaphysical loneliness, and his view that we can consider God to be in search of man. The first section concludes with a study of Jews as a chosen people. Section two deals with the idea of revelation, and what it means for one to be a prophet. This section gives us his idea of revelation as a process, as opposed to an event. This relates to Israel's commitment to God. Section three discusses his views of how a Jew should understand the nature of Judaism as a religion. He discusses and rejects the idea that mere faith (without law) alone is enough, but then cautions against rabbis he sees as adding too many restrictions to Jewish law. He discusses the need to correlate ritual observance with spirituality and love, the importance of Kavanah (intention) when performing mitzvot. He engages in a discussion of religious behaviorism — when people strive for external compliance with the law, yet disregard the importance of inner devotion.

Prophetic Inspiration After the Prophets

Heschel wrote a series of articles, originally in Hebrew, on the existence of prophecy in Judaism after the destruction of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem in 70 CE. These essays were translated into English and published as Prophetic Inspiration After the Prophets: Maimonides and Others by the American Judaica publisher Ktav.

The publisher of this book states, "The standard Jewish view is that prophecy ended with the ancient prophets, somewhere early in the Second Temple era. Heschel demonstrated that this view is not altogether accurate. Belief in the possibility of continued prophetic inspiration, and in its actual occurrence appear throughout much of the medieval period, and even in modern times. Heschel's work on prophetic inspiration in the Middle Ages originally appeared in two Hebrew long articles. In them he concentrated on the idea that prophetic inspiration was possible even in post-Talmudic times, and, indeed, had taken place at various times and in various schools, from the Geonim to Maimonides and beyond."

Torah min HaShamayim

Many consider Heschel's Torah min HaShamayim BeAspaklariya shel HaDorot, (Torah from Heaven in the light of the generations) to be his masterwork. The three volumes of this work are a study of classical rabbinic theology and aggadah, as opposed to halakha (Jewish law.) It explores the views of the rabbis in the Mishnah, Talmud and Midrash about the nature of Torah, the revelation of God to mankind, prophecy, and the ways that Jews have used scriptural exegesis to expand and understand these core Jewish texts. In this work Heschel views the second century sages Rabbis Akiva and Ishmael as paradigms for the two dominant world-views in Jewish theology

Two Hebrew volumes were published during his lifetime by Soncino Press, and the third Hebrew volume was published posthumously by JTS Press in the 1990s. An English translation of all three volumes, with notes, essays and appendices, was translated and edited by Rabbi Gordon Tucker, entitled Heavenly Torah: As Refracted Through the Generations.

Quotations

"Racism is man's gravest threat to man - the maximum hatred for a minimum reason."

"All it takes is one person… and another… and another… and another… to start a movement"

"Wonder rather than doubt is the root of all knowledge."

"A religious man is a person who holds God and man in one thought at one time, at all times, who suffers harm done to others, whose greatest passion is compassion, whose greatest strength is love and defiance of despair."

"God is of no importance unless He is of utmost importance."

"Just to be is a blessing. Just to live is holy."

"Self-respect is the fruit of discipline, the sense of dignity grows with the ability to say no to oneself."

"Life without commitment is not worth living."

"In regard to cruelties committed in the name of a free society, some are guilty, while all are responsible."

"Remember that there is a meaning beyond absurdity. Be sure that every little deed counts, that every word has power. Never forget that you can still do your share to redeem the world in spite of all absurdities and frustrations and disappointments."

"When I was young, I admired clever people. Now that I am old, I admire kind people."

"Awareness of symbolic meaning is awareness of a specific idea; kavanah is awareness of an ineffable situation.

"A Jew is asked to take a leap of action rather than a leap of thought."

"Speech has power. Words do not fade. What starts out as a sound, ends in a deed."

[edit]Commemoration

Three schools have been named for Heschel, in the Upper West Side of New York City, Northridge, California, and Toronto.

References

^ a b "Dateline World Jewry", April 2007, World Jewish Congress

^ a b c d e http://home.versatel.nl/heschel/Susannah.htm Abraham Joshua Heschel

^ Scult, Mel . Kaplan's Heschel : a view from the Kaplan diary. In: Conservative Judaism, 54,4 (2002) 3-14

^ Gillman, Neil (1993). Conservative Judaism: The New Century. Behrman House Inc., 163.

[edit]Selected bibliography

Man Is Not Alone: A Philosophy of Religion. 1951. ISBN 0-374-51328-7

The Sabbath: Its Meaning for Modern Man. 1951. ISBN 1-59030082-3

Man's Quest for God: Studies in Prayer and Symbolism. 1954. ISBN 0684168294

God in Search of Man: A Philosophy of Judaism. 1955. ISBN 0-374-51331-7

The Prophets. 1962. ISBN 0-06-093699-1

Who Is Man? 1965.

Israel: An Echo of Eternity. 1969. ISBN 1-879045-70-2

A Passion for Truth. 1973. ISBN 1-879045-41-9

Heavenly Torah: As Refracted Through the Generations. 2005. ISBN 0-8264-0802-8

Torah min ha-shamayim be'aspaklariya shel ha-dorot; Theology of Ancient Judaism. [Hebrew]. 2 vols. London: Soncino Press, 1962. Third volume, New York: Jewish Theological Seminary, 1995.

The Ineffable Name of God: Man: Poems. 2004. ISBN 0-8264-1632-2

Kotsk: in gerangl far emesdikeyt. [Yiddish]. 2 v. (694 p.) Tel-Aviv: ha-Menorah, 1973. Added t.p.: Kotzk: the struggle for integrity. A Passion for Truth is an adaptation of this larger work.

Der mizrekh-Eyropeyisher Yid (Yiddish: The Eastern European Jew). 45 p. Originally published: New-York: Shoken, 1946.

Abraham Joshua Heschel: Prophetic Witness & Spiritual Radical: Abraham Joshua Heschel in America, 1940-1972, biography by Edward K. Kaplan

===============

http://wapedia.mobi/en/Apta_%28Hasidic_dynasty%29

Rabbi Avraham Yehoshua Heshel of Apt was the founder of the Apt-Mezhbizh-Zinkover Hasidic dynasty. In honor of the dynasty's founder, his descendants adopted the family name Heshel.

http://wiki.geni.com/index.php/Jewish_Dynasties


Abraham Joshua Heschel was descended from preeminent European rabbis on both sides of the family. [1]. His father, Moshe Mordechai Heschel, died of influenza in 1916. His mother Reizel Perlow, was a descendant of Rebbe Avrohom Yehoshua Heshel of Apt and other dynasties. He was the youngest of six children. His siblings were Sarah, Dvora Miriam, Esther Sima, Gittel, and Jacob.

After a traditional yeshiva education and studying for Orthodox rabbinical ordination semicha, he pursued his doctorate at the University of Berlin and a liberal rabbinic ordination at the Hochschule für die Wissenschaft des Judentums. There he studied under some of the finest Jewish educators of the time: Chanoch Albeck, Ismar Elbogen, Julius Guttmann, and Leo Baeck. Heschel later taught Talmud there. He joined a Yiddish poetry group, Jung Vilna, and in 1933, published a volume of Yiddish poems, Der Shem Hamefoyrosh: Mentsch, dedicated to his father. [2]

In late October 1938, when he was living in a rented room in the home of a Jewish family in Frankfurt, he was arrested by the Gestapo and deported to Poland. He spent ten months lecturing on Jewish philosophy and Torah at Warsaw's Institute for Jewish Studies. [2] Six weeks before the German invasion of Poland, Heschel left Warsaw for London with the help of Julian Morgenstern, president of Hebrew Union College, who had been working to obtain visas for Jewish scholars in Europe.[2]

Heschel's sister Esther was killed in a German bombing. His mother was murdered by the Nazis, and two other sisters, Gittel and Devorah, died in Nazi concentration camps. He never returned to Germany, Austria or Poland. He once wrote, "If I should go to Poland or Germany, every stone, every tree would remind me of contempt, hatred, murder, of children killed, of mothers burned alive, of human beings asphyxiated."[2]

Heschel arrived in New York City in March 1940. [2]He served on the faculty of Hebrew Union College (HUC), the main seminary of Reform Judaism, in Cincinnati for five years. In 1946, he took a position at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (JTS), the main seminary of Conservative Judaism, where he served as professor of Jewish Ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972.

Heschel married Sylvia Straus, a concert pianist, on December 10, 1946, in Los Angeles. Their daughter, Susannah Heschel, is a Jewish scholar in her own right.

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Abraham_Joshua_Heschel&oldid=344431955

view all

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel's Timeline

1907
November 16, 1907
Warsaw, Warszawa, Masovian Voivodeship, Poland
1972
December 23, 1972
Age 65
New York, New York County, New York, United States