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Colonial American Tree Cleanup

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Profiles

  • Sarah Ann MacGehee (1738 - 1779)
    GEDCOM Note ===This individual was found on GenCircles at:
  • Col. Sir Thomas Gerard (bef.1608 - 1673)
    IMMIGRANT From the book, "The Baronetage of England, printed for John Stockdale, published 1806: Sir Thomas Gerard married Frances, daughter of Sir Richard Molineaux, Baronet. they had six sons and o...
  • Mary Briggs (1635 - 1681)
    Mary Flood (daughter of John Flood and Margaret ?) was born 1635, and died 1678. She married (1) Richard Blunt on 1655. She married (2) Charles Ford on 1657. She married (3) John Washington on 1658. Sh...
  • William Tune (1777 - 1830)
  • Benedict Grossman (1749 - 1839)

Find and merge Colonial American duplicate profiles

  • The first generation to settle in North America was born no later than say 1580.
  • Their ancestors for a generation or two are in project scope also.
  • Colonial America became the United States in 1776, so profiles born later are out of scope.
  • if you have trouble merging them together, post links to BOTH profiles in the discussion: https://www.geni.com/discussions?discussion_type=project-49093

Did You Know:

  • As a rule of thumb, it's probable that if you have a profile born before 1700, it's in the Geni tree already.
  • Geni uses blue boxes (& blue circles on tree view) to let you know that there may be a duplicate of the profile you've created.
  • It can be difficult to find duplicates on Geni, because often the spelling of a profile from before 1700 can have several variant spellings. If you have trouble finding duplicates for early profiles, please contact one of the Colonial American Curators. The list of curators, by geographic area, is here: https://www.geni.com/projects/Geni-Curators/9960.
  • Hint: use Geni Advanced Search to identify possible matches and then use the results of the search to make a targeted Google search, which may capture spelling variations in results, and let you click right through to examine.
  • Instead of creating duplicates of the historical profiles on the Colonial American part of the tree, just use the top right pop-down menu to Request Management. Or, if you have information that differs from what you are seeing in the tree, you can contact the managers -- or the curator, if it is a Master Profile -- or start a public discussion from the profile itself. (Please be aware, though, that the quality of your sources will matter to your argument! There is an enormous amount of misinformation on the web, and personal trees that are on the web, without sources to back them up, are not in themselves reliable sources.)
  • Remember however, that if you're in the World Tree, & Geni shows a relationship line between you & that profile, it is already part of your tree Once you connect the nearest ancestors you can into the World tree, you are connected to all the early ancestors who are already on the Geni World Tree.
  • If the historical area interests you, there is usually a project that you can join to participate in research & help keep the line correct.

Page contact: Erica Howton