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  • Henry Sherwood (1807 - 1855)
  • The Rt. Hon. Sir Francis Hincks, KCMG PC (1807 - 1885)
    Updated from WikiTree Genealogy by SmartCopy : Dec 4 2015, 17:50:35 UTC The Rt. Hon. Sir Francis Hincks, KCMG PC (December 14, 1807 – August 18, 1885) was a Canadian politician and British Govern...
  • John Sandfield Macdonald (1812 - 1872)
    John Sandfield Macdonald, QC (December 12, 1812 – June 1, 1872) was the first Premier of the province of Ontario, one of the four founding provinces created at the confederation of Canada in 1867. He s...
  • Sir George Brown (1818 - 1880)
    George Brown Canadian Statesman, Journalist. In 1837 he emigrated from his native Scotland to New York City, New York, where after a five year stay he settled in Toronto, Ontario. In 1844 he founde...
  • Denis-Benjamin Papineau (1789 - 1854)
    Dans ses lettres à Julie, L-J Papineau l'appelle Angelle et non pas Angélique Louis comme dans l'acte de mariage ?* Updated from MyHeritage Family Trees by SmartCopy : Jun 15 2015, 22:58:47 UTC

Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada were the leaders of the Province of Canada, from the 1841 unification of Upper Canada and Lower Canada until Confederation in 1867.

Following the abortive Rebellions of 1837, Lord Durham was appointed governor in chief of British North America. In his 1839 Report on the Affairs of British North America, he recommended that Upper and Lower Canada be united under a single Parliament, with responsible government. As a result, in 1841, the first Parliament of the Province of Canada was convened.

Although Canada East (the former Lower Canada, now Quebec) and Canada West (the former Upper Canada, now Ontario) were united as a single province with a single government, each administration was led by two men, one from each half of the province. Officially, one of them at any given time had the title of Premier, while the other had the title of Deputy. Despite this, however, the titular premier could not generally invoke unilateral authority over his deputy if he wanted to maintain his government's stability; in practice, both men had to agree on virtually any political course of action. As a result, this form of government proved to be fractious and difficult, leading to frequent changes in leadership — in just 26 years, the joint premiership changed hands eighteen times, with twenty different people holding the office over its history.

This project has been laid out in the following format:

Term of Office

  • Canada West Premier (Title) (Term number if more than one term in office as Premier)
  • Canada East Premier (Title) (Term number if more than one term in office as Premier)

Joint Premiers

5 February 1841 to 12 January 1842

  • William Draper (Deputy Premier) (1st of 2 terms)
  • Samuel Harrison (Premier)

12 January 1842 to 14 September 1842

  • William Draper (Premier) (1st of 2 terms)
  • Charles Richard Ogden (Deputy Premier)

26 September 1842 to 27 November 1843

27 November 1843 to 12 December 1843

  • Sir Dominick Daly (Acting Premier)
  • Sir Dominick Daly (Acting Premier)

12 December 1843 to 17 June 1846

  • William Draper (Premier) (2nd of 2 terms)
  • Denis-Benjamin Viger (Deputy Premier)

17 June 1846 to 28 May 1847

  • William Draper (Premier) (2nd of 2 terms)
  • Denis-Benjamin Papineau (Deputy Premier)

28 May 1847 to 11 March 1848

Joint Premiers after the introduction of Responsible Government

11 March 1848 to 28 October 1851

28 October 1851 to 11 September 1854

11 September 1854 to 27 January 1855

  • Sir Allan Napier MacNab (Premier)
  • Augustin-Norbert Morin (Deputy Premier)

27 January 1855 to 24 May 1856

  • Sir Allan Napier MacNab (Premier)
  • Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché (Deputy Premier)

24 May 1856 to 26 November 1857

  • Sir John A. Macdonald (Deputy Premier) (1st of 3 terms)
  • Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché (Premier) (1st of 2 terms)

26 November 1857 to 2 Auggst 1858

  • Sir John A. Macdonald (Premier) (1st of 3 terms)
  • Sir George-Étienne Cartier (Deputy Premier) (1st of 2 terms)

2 August 1858 to 6 August 1858

  • George Brown (Premier)
  • Antoine-Aimé Dorion (Deputy Premier) (1st of 2 terms)

6 August 1858 to 24 May 1862

  • Sir John A. Macdonald (Deputy Premier) (2nd of 3 terms)
  • Sir George-Étienne Cartier (Premier) (2nd of 2 terms)

24 May 1862 to 15 May 1863

15 May 1863 to 30 May 1864

30 May 1864 to 30 July 1865

  • Sir John A. Macdonald (Deputy Premier) (3rd of 3 terms)
  • Sir Étienne-Paschal Taché (Premier) (2nd of 2 terms)

30 July 1865 to 30 June 1867

Joint Premiers of the Province of Canada were the leaders of the Province of Canada, from the 1841 unification of Upper Canada and Lower Canada until Confederation in 1867.

Following the abortive Rebellions of 1837, Lord Durham was appointed governor in chief of British North America. In his 1839 Report on the Affairs of British North America, he recommended that Upper and Lower Canada be united under a single Parliament, with responsible government. As a result, in 1841, the first Parliament of the Province of Canada was convened.

Although Canada East (the former Lower Canada, now Quebec) and Canada West (the former Upper Canada, now Ontario) were united as a single province with a single government, each administration was led by two men, one from each half of the province. Officially, one of them at any given time had the title of Premier, while the other had the title of Deputy. Despite this, however, the titular premier could not generally invoke unilateral authority over his deputy if he wanted to maintain his government's stability; in practice, both men had to agree on virtually any political course of action. As a result, this form of government proved to be fractious and difficult, leading to frequent changes in leadership[1] — in just 26 years, the joint premiership changed hands eighteen times, with twenty different people holding the office over its history.