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  • Rev. William Skepper, of Lynn (1597 - 1646)
    1. William Skepper (Rev) was christened 27 Nov 1597 in Boston, Lincoln, England, died between 1640 and 1650 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, intestate. He was the son of 2. Edward Skepper , Gent, an...
  • Rev. John Warham (1595 - 1670)
    John Wareham , the son of Richard and Agnes (Cook alias Howper) Warham, was baptized in Crewkerne, Somersetshire on 9 October 1595. He died in Windsor, Connecticut Colony, on 1 April 1670. Oxford gra...
  • Rev. William Knight, of New Meadows & Ipswich (c.1611 - 1694)
    Reverend William Knight, M.A., was born say 1611, of St. Olave's Parish, Southwark, Surrey, England, and was buried January 6, 1694, in St. Mary-at-Elms, Ipswich, Suffolk, England, where he was the cur...
  • Rev. Ward Cotton (1711 - 1768)
    From page 240 of The New England Historical & Genealogical Register and ..., Volume 19 (j) Rev. Ward Cotton, a great-grandson of Rev. John Cotton, of Boston, was born at Sandwich, Mass., 1711 or 17...
  • Rev. John Cotton, of Newton (1693 - 1757)
    Rev. John Cotton, 1693-1757, "of Newton, Massachusetts," was named after his grandfather, the first Rev. John Cotton, 1585-1652. From page 298 of Letter-book: 1712-1729 By Samuel Sewall Novbr 3, ...

Particularly in the years after 1630, Puritans left for New England, supporting the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and other settlements. The large-scale Puritan emigration to New England then ceased, by 1641, with around 21,000 having moved across the Atlantic. This English-speaking population in America did not all consist of colonists, since many returned, but produced more than 16 million descendants. This so-called "Great Migration" is not so named because of sheer numbers, which were much less than the number of English citizens who emigrated to Virginia and the Caribbean during this time. The rapid growth of the New England colonies (~700,000 by 1790) was almost entirely due to the high birth rate and lower death rate per year.

List of New England Puritans