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Notable African Americans

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  • Shaun Livingston
    Shaun Patrick Livingston (born September 11, 1985) is an American professional basketball player for the Golden State Warriors of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Livingston entered the lea...
  • Dolly King (1916 - 1969)
    William "Dolly" King (November 15, 1916 – January 29, 1969) was an American professional basketball player. He was one of a handful of African Americans to play in the National Basketball League (NBL...
  • Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. (1943 - 1993)
    Arthur Robert Ashe Jr. was an American professional tennis player who won three Grand Slam titles. Ashe was the first black player selected to the United States Davis Cup team and the only black man ...
  • Floyd Mayweather Jr.
    . Floyd Joy Mayweather Jr. (born Floyd Joy Sinclair; February 24, 1977) is an American professional boxer and promoter. Widely considered to be one of the greatest boxers of all time, undefeated as a...
  • Floyd Mayweather, Sr.
    . Floyd Mayweather Sr. (born October 19, 1952) is an American former professional boxer who competed from 1974 to 1990, and has since worked as a boxing trainer. Fighting at welterweight during the 1...

African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans) are an ethnic group of Americans with total or partial ancestry from any of the Black racial groups of Africa. The term may also be used to include only those individuals who are descended from enslaved Africans. As a compound adjective the term is usually hyphenated as African-American.

Black and African Americans constitute the third largest racial and ethnic group in the United States (after White Americans and Hispanic and Latino Americans). Most African Americans are of West and Central African descent and are descendants of enslaved peoples within the boundaries of the present United States. On average, African Americans are of 73.2–80.9% West African, 18–24% European, and 0.8–0.9% Native American genetic heritage, with large variation between individuals. According to US Census Bureau data, African immigrants generally do not self-identify as African American. The overwhelming majority of African immigrants identify instead with their own respective ethnicities (~95%). Immigrants from some Caribbean, Central American and South American nations and their descendants may or may not also self-identify with the term.

African-American history starts in the 16th century, with peoples from West Africa forcibly taken as slaves to Spanish America, and in the 17th century with West African slaves taken to English colonies in North America. After the founding of the United States, black people continued to be enslaved, with four million denied freedom from bondage prior to the Civil War. Believed to be inferior to white people, they were treated as second-class citizens. The Naturalization Act of 1790 limited U.S. citizenship to whites only, and only white men of property could vote. These circumstances were changed by Reconstruction, development of the black community, participation in the great military conflicts of the United States, the elimination of racial segregation, and the Civil Rights Movement which sought political and social freedom. In 2008, Barack Obama became the first African American to be elected president of the United States.