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Orange County, Indiana

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Profiles

  • Jonathan Lindley (1756 - 1828)
    Jonathan Lindley, legislator and Quaker leader, was born in Orange County, the son of Thomas and Ruth Hadley Lindley and the grandson of James and Elinor Parke Lindley and Simon and Ruth Miller Ke...
  • Leanna Easley (1830 - 1913)
    Leanna Naylor Easley BIRTH 24 Jun 1830 Kentucky, USA DEATH 28 Aug 1913 (aged 83) Orange County, Indiana, USA BURIAL Wesley Chapel Cemetery Orangeville, Orange County, Indiana, USA MEMORIAL ID 19526397...
  • Jacob Riley McDonnel (1921 - 1997)
    MUNCIE--Jacob R. McDonnel, 75, a former Muncie resident, died Saturday at Cookeville Hospital, Tenn.Mr. McDonnel was born in Orange County, Ind., attended school in that area and came to Muncie several...
  • Eugene Elsworth McDonnel (1915 - 1990)
  • Jacob Joel McDonnel (1909 - 1909)
    Jacob Joel McDonnel was stillborn at the home of his maternal grandparents, Joel and Permelia Newlin. He was buried on Joel Newlin's farm in Southeast Township, Orange County, Indiana.His grave is unma...

Please add profiles of those who were born, lived or died in Orange County, Indiana.

Orange County was formed by the Indiana Territorial Legislature, on December 26, 1815. The early settlers were mostly Quakers fleeing the institution of slavery in Orange County, North Carolina. Jonathan Lindley brought his group of Quakers from North Carolina to the area in 1811. They were the first to build a religious structure, the Lick Creek Meeting House in 1813. It was from this group that Orange County got its name. The name Orange derives from the Dutch Protestant House of Orange, which accessed the English throne with the accession of King William III in 1689, following the Glorious Revolution.

When the North Carolina Quakers came to Indiana, they brought several freed slaves. These free men were deeded 200 acres of land in the heart of a dense forest. Word of mouth soon spread the news, and this land became part of the "underground railroad" for runaway slaves. For many years, the freed slaves in this area farmed, traded, and sold their labor to others while living in this settlement. A church and cemetery were constructed.

Adjacent Counties

Villages, Townships & Communities

Abydel | Bacon | Bonds | Bromer | Chambersburg | Ethel | Fargo (formerly Pittsburgh) | French Lick | Greenbrier | Greenfield | Hindostan | Jackson | Leipsic (formerly Lancaster ) | Lost River | Mahan Crossing | Millersburg | Newton Stewart | Northeast | Northwest | Norton (formerly Dillon) | Orangeville | Orleans | Paoli (County Seat) | Pearsontown | Pine Valley | Prospect (formerly New Prospect) | Pumpkin Center | Rego | Roland | Scarlet | Southeast | Stampers Creek | Syria | Trotter Crossing | Turleys | Valeene | West Baden Springs | Woodlawn Grove | Youngs Creek (formerly Unionville)

Links

Wikipedia

Genealogy Trails

RAOGK

Find a Grave

Nat'l Reg. of Hist. Places

Hoosier National Forest (part)