Start My Family Tree Welcome to Geni, home of the world's largest family tree.
Join Geni to explore your genealogy and family history in the World's Largest Family Tree.

Presbyterian Church of Aoteraroa New Zealand (PCANZ)

« Back to Projects Dashboard

Top Surnames

view all

Profiles

  • Rev John Macky (1821 - 1891)
    Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jun 17 2018, 7:37:07 UTC * Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jul 1 2018, 1:07:08 UTC Age 70 years
  • Leonard Cameron Robson (1918 - 1970)
  • John Thomson Macky (1890 - 1946)
    Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jun 8 2018, 1:53:40 UTC * Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jun 17 2018, 7:31:49 UTC
  • Francis William Rutherford Nichol (1925 - 2008)
    Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jun 9 2018, 4:59:15 UTC * Reference: Find A Grave Memorial - SmartCopy : Jun 9 2018, 5:00:46 UTC NICHOL, Rev. Dr. Francis William Rutherford (Frank) M.A.,B.D...
  • Thomas Cameron Somerville (1919 - 1981)
    Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jun 17 2018, 5:25:43 UTC * Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : Jun 17 2018, 6:11:32 UTC

Presbyterian Church of Aoteraroa New Zealand

A project dedicated to tracing Presbyterian Ministers across new zealand in heritage.

The Presbyterian Church of New Zealand formed in October 1901 with the amalgamation of churches in the Synod of Otago and Southland (which had a largely Free Church heritage) with those north of the Waitaki River.

Presbyterians had by and large come to New Zealand as settlers from Scotland, Ireland and Australia. Dunedin (founded in 1848) and Waipu (founded in 1853) were specifically Presbyterian settlements, but significant numbers of Presbyterians settled in other parts of the country, including Christchurch, Port Nicholson (Wellington), and Auckland. Ministers came with the first European settlers to Wellington, Otago and Waipu, but generally nascent congregations called ministers from Scotland. Missions to the Māori people focused on the Tuhoe people and led to the establishment of the Māori Synod, now known as Te Aka Puaho.

In 1862 the Presbytery of Auckland had had support from the Presbyterian Church of Ireland and also applied for support from the United Presbyterian Church of Scotland.

Ethnic diversity grew after World War II with the arrival of Dutch and European settlers and more recent Pacific Island and Asian migrants. In 1969 the majority of Congregational churches joined the Presbyterian Church of New Zealand. The word "Aotearoa" became part of the title of the denomination in 1990, affirming the treaty partnership between the indigenous Māori and the subsequent settlers. As of 2014 PCANZ has 419 congregations

Sources: