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Saint Bernard's Cemetery, Indiana, Indiana County, Pennsylvania

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This project is for those buried in Saint Bernard's Cemetery, Indiana, Indiana County, Pennsylvania.

Located on 60 Shryock Avenue and is also known as Saint Bernard's of Clairvoux Catholic Cemetery.

In 1890, the parish purchased lots on the south side of East Oak Street and began selling plots in what became known as the Old St. Bernard Cemetery. Those buried in a small cemetery next to the old frame church were disinterred and reburied in the Oak Street cemetery. Father Tonner made sure that upkeep was kept on the cemetery, by planting trees and flowers, building walls and a new arch, and making plans to install a fountain.

In 1958, a shrine to Our Lady of Fatima was erected on the northern edge of the cemetery.

The cemetery began to undergo renovations in 2000, which included: paving the road, building a stone wall around the cemetery's two main entrances, removal of old trees and planting of new ones, a new storage building, a new water pump, purchasing a truck, and adding six acres adjoining the cemetery.
By Sept. 1, 2002, the renovations were complete, and a special Labor Day Mass was celebrated at the cemetery to show off the hard work. Msgr. Charnoki said a blessing at the grotto of the Blessed Virgin Mary and dedicated the new cemetery flagpole in honor of those who served and were serving in the military. He also dedicated a statue of St. Michael the Archangel, patron saint of soldiers and police officers. Another flagpole received a dedication and blessing, this one outside of the church entrance. It was dedicated to the victims and heroes of 9/11.

One more special item was blessed and dedicated following this Mass. A black, granite monument was placed on the site of a mass grave, where 13 unidentified miners were buried, following an explosion at the Ernest Mine in 1916.

The refurbished cemetery enjoyed just six short years of cleanliness. In February 2008, the cemetery was vandalized. Groundskeepers estimated thousands of dollars in damage. Sixty-three headstones were toppled, two statues were smashed, and others damaged, along with lights and glass candle fixtures. Some headstones were destroyed beyond repair, and others were able to be righted again with minimal damage sustained.

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