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Slavery in the United States

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Profiles

  • Alex Anderson (1842 - 1893)
  • Unknown Female Cox Slave (1845 - d.)
    Update 8/13/2022 (CLM): Child of Unknown Cox Slaves. Unable to locate. 1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules View1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules View blank form Gender: Female Race:...
  • Unknown Male Cox Slave (1840 - d.)
    Update 8/13/2022(CLM): Son of Unknown Cox Slaves. Unable to locate. 1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules View1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules View blank form Gender: Male Race: Blac...
  • Unknown Female Cox Slave (1835 - d.)
    Update 8/13/2022(CLM): Child of Unknown Cox Slaves. Owned by Samuel H. Cox. Unable to locate. 1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules View1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules View blank fo...
  • Unknown Male Cox Slave (1812 - d.)
    Update 8/13/2022 (CLM): May have been one of the original seven slave brought from Virginia by Sam's Father James. Unable to find. 1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules View1860 U.S. Federal C...

Slavery in the United States was a form of slave labor which existed as a legal institution from the early colonial period. After the American Revolution, the northern states all abolished slavery, and Congress prohibited slavery in the Northwest Territory. However slavery gained new life with the cotton industry after 1800, and expanded into the Southwest. The import or export of slaves became illegal in 1807. By the 1850s the South was vigorously defending slavery and its expansion into the territories. In the North a small number of abolitionists denounced it as sinful, and a large number of anti-slavery forces rejected it as detrimental to the rights of free men. Compromises were attempted and failed, and in 1861 eleven slave states broke away to form the Confederate States of America. To defeat the Confederacy the Union in 1862 made abolition of all slavery a war goal, which was achieved in 1865. All the slaves were free and the owners received no compensation.

External links

Slavery and Religion

placed here temporarily re: Society for the Propagation of the Gospel minutes

SPG XII American Colonies
MARYLAND

https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/browse/r/h/84b04d17-6794-...

3-4. Testimonial to John Sharpe from clergymen of Maryland, Annapolis, 26 Apr. 1704.

5-6. Extract from Maryland act of 3 Oct. 1704 declaring that slaves are not manumitted by baptism.

7. Testimonial of several residents of Somerset County, Maryland, that price of tobacco there has been low for the past five years.

Slavery Researcher

NYT Sep. 11, 2022: Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, 93, Dies; Created Database of Enslaved People
"A historian of colonial-era Louisiana, she dug deep into the archives to transform our understanding of the roots of American culture." see: “Africans in Colonial Louisiana: The Development of Afro-Creole Culture in the Eighteenth Century,” published in 1992.; "a tribute , the Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall is a memorial in which the names of each of the 107,000 people in her database are inscribed in granite blocks"