Esau / Edom / עשו / אדום . (c.-1836 - c.-1689) MP

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Nicknames: "Esau", "Edom", "עשו", "אדום"
Birthplace: BC, Haran, Padan-Aram
Death: Died
Managed by: Zechariah Steiner
Last Updated:

About Esau / Edom / עשו / אדום .

Genealogies listed:

Wikipedia.: Esau & עשו

Rebekah's first-born twin son (Gen. 25:25). The name of Edom, "red", was also given to him from his conduct in connection with the red lentil "pottage" for which he sold his birthright (30, 31). The circumstances connected with his birth foreshadowed the enmity which afterwards subsisted between the twin brothers and the nations they founded (25:22, 23, 26). In process of time Jacob, following his natural bent, became a shepherd; while Esau, a "son of the desert," devoted himself to the perilous and toilsome life of a huntsman. On a certain occasion, on returning from the chase, urged by the cravings of hunger, Esau sold his birthright to his brother, Jacob, who thereby obtained the covenant blessing (Gen. 27:28, 29, 36; Heb. 12:16, 17). He afterwards tried to regain what he had so recklessly parted with, but was defeated in his attempts through the stealth of his brother (Gen. 27:4, 34, 38). At the age of forty years, to the great grief of his parents, he married (Gen. 26:34, 35) two Canaanitish maidens, Judith, the daughter of Beeri, and Bashemath, the daughter of Elon. When Jacob was sent away to Padan-aram, Esau tried to conciliate his parents (Gen. 28:8, 9) by marrying his cousin Mahalath, the daughter of Ishmael. This led him to cast in his lot with the Ishmaelite tribes; and driving the Horites out of Mount Seir, he settled in that region. After some thirty years' sojourn in Padan-aram Jacob returned to Canaan, and was reconciled to Esau, who went forth to meet him (33:4). Twenty years after this, Isaac their father died, when the two brothers met, probably for the last time, beside his grave (35:29). Esau now permanently left Canaan, and established himself as a powerful and wealthy chief in the land of Edom (q.v.). Long after this, when the descendants of Jacob came out of Egypt, the Edomites remembered the old quarrel between the brothers, and with fierce hatred they warred against Israel.

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 ESAV's WIVES:
     Esav's wife Mahalath /  Basemath was a daughter of Ishmael.
     Esav's other wives were the descendants of Canaan ben Ham, Hittites.
     There is disagreement whether Oholibamah was identical with Judith or a 4th wife.
     Esav's wives were idolators.

-------------------- Cuando Esaú nacio era pelirojo y cubierto de vello, y por tanto lo llamaron Esaú. (Gén. 25:25). La palabra hebrea que significa “vello” tiene un sonido parecido a “Seir”, que es otro nombre de Esaú. . . . Esaú, por ser un cazador, un hombre del campo, era el favorito de Isaac, su padre; mientras Jacob, por lo que era más de la casa y más tranquilo que su hermano, era el favorito de Rebeca, su madre. Pero pierde su derecho de primogenitura a su hermano menor al venderlos por un plato de lentejas que su hermano había cocinado; por tal razón, también se le conoce a Esaú como Edom, que significa rojo. (Gén. 25:29-34). . . A la edad de cuarenta años, toma por esposa a Judit, hija de Beeri, el hitita. También se casó con Basemat, que era hija de otro hitita llamado Elón. Ambas mujeres le amargaron la vida a Isaac y a Rebeca. -------------------- Esau married the daughter of Ishmael, and he and his father-in-law plotted to kill Isaac and Jacob and thereby inherit both families (Gen. Rabbah 67:8). This negative attitude to Esau is based on his not divorcing his two Hittite wives Adah and Judith when he married Mahalath, even though he knew that they were displeasing to his parents. If he had married Mahalath to fulfill his parents’ bidding, he should have divorced them; since he did not do so, he merely increased his parents’ pain and suffering (mahalah, literally, sickness). Indeed, Mahalath was as wicked as Esau’s first two wives (Midrash Aggadah, ed. Buber, 28:9).