Jakob Weil - (MahariV)

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R' Jakob ben Yehuda Weil (Weill)

Hebrew: R' Jakob ben Yehuda Weil (Weill), יעקב בן יהודה ווייל
Also Known As: "Mahari'v"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Weil, Upper Bavaria, Bavaria, Germany
Death: Died in Erfurt, Thuringia, Germany
Immediate Family:

Son of Rabbi Yehuda Weil and 3 rd generation maharam merottenburg weil
Husband of Descendant Meir von Rothenburg Yaakov Weil
Father of Weil Connection 1 Ha Levi; Maharam Meir MAHARA"M Weil; Yosef Weil and Yehuda Weil
Half brother of יעקב מאהאריב ואיל

Occupation: Rabbin, Rabbi, Rabbi of Neurinberg, תלמיד המהרי"ל
Managed by: Malka Mysels
Last Updated:

About Jakob Weil - (MahariV)

Talmudist, the Mahari"V; Rabbi in Nuernberg, Augsburg, Bamberg, Erfurt (1444); Student of Rabbi Jakob ben Moshe Moellin, ( the MAHARI"L), who lived in Mainz and Worms. Rosenthal mentions in his book, "Heimatsgeschichte der badische Juden", that Rabbi Jakob Weil was the most illustrious student of the MAHARI"L and that he compiled the prayers and practices of the times for the Jews along the Rhine. He also identifies the Weil Rabbinical family as one of the oldest Jewish families of Southern Germany.

He authored She'elot u'Teshuvot and Shechitot v' Bedikot, the latter a treatise that laid the basis for the ritual animal slaughtering laws. His books were printed in Venice in 1532.

It is said in Loewenstein's book that the Weil dynasty points back to famous Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg, The Mahara"m. According to Raymond M. Jung of Zurich, in Maajan, Rabbi Jacob married either a grandchild or great grandchild of the Mahara"m. This notion is also carried forth in Ernest Weill treatise on the Weil family. Thus we are left with a question as to the true connection between the Weils to the Mahara"m, be it direct or through the wife of Rabbi Jacob.

His birthyear is also given as 1375 in Mishpachot Atikot b'Yisrael which seems too early.

R. Jacob served as Rabbi first in Nuernberg, then 1412-1438 in Augsburg, till 1444 in Bamberg and finally, tlll his death in 1456 in Erfurt. (per Werner Frank)

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The Mahariv – Rabbi Jacob ben Yehuda Weil (1385 – 1456) was the last Rabbi of medieval Augsburg from 1413 to 1438 and a pupil of the Augsburg born Maharil. As leader of the Jews in the Reich he was a great authority on Talmud and Halacha and author of famous responses.Rabbi of Augsburg: the Mahariv Jacob Weil

Jacob ben Yehuda Weil (יעקב בן יהודה ווייל) was known as מהרי"ו - the acronym stands for "morenu Harav rabbi Yakov " was the most outstanding student of the Augsburg born Maharil (1360-1427). In 1407 Rabbi Jacob ben Yehuda Weil became rabbi in Nuremberg, and married Rivka, a daughter of Kalonymos from Augsburg family.

The Augsburg tax books from 1413 lists him (Kalonymos) as "Grand Master James', where he worked alongside another Rabbi Isaac (d. 1428) in the city. In 1438 Mahariv was among the first Jews who left the imperial city, although the city council of the Jews had been given time until 1440 to leave the city. From 1439 to 1442 he was a rabbi in Bamberg from 1443 until his death, including serving as a rabbi in Erfurt. Rabbi Jakob Weil was the spokesman and leader of the Jews in the kingdom, and was highly honored as a Talmudic and halakhic authority. The Mahariv was the last important rabbi in Augsburg and left to posterity his still often cited "she'elot u-t'schuvot"

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Jacob Weil, later known as MahariV יעקב בן יהודה ווייל was a German rabbi and Talmudist who flourished during the first half of the fifteenth century. Rabbi in Nuremburg, Rabbi of Augsburg from 1412 - 1438, Rabbi of Bamberg 1438 - 1444, Rabbi of Erfut, 1444 - 1456.

Of his life few details are known, but, according to Grätz, he died before 1456. He was one of the foremost pupils of Jacob Moelin (Maharil), who ordained him in the rabbinate, and authorized him to officiate in Nuremberg. Weil, however, did not avail himself of this permission lest he should offend an older scholar, Solomon Cohen, who had been appointed rabbi of that city long before. This despite the fact that Weil himself ruled that a rabbi had no lifetime tenure (Responsa, No. 151)! Indeed, this example illustrates two facets of Weil's personality - his deep humility and his deep felt desire to avoid unncessary confrontation and conflict. He generally signed his responsa "the little one, Jacob Weil".

Weil was later called to the rabbinate of Erfurt; and congregations far and near, recognizing him as an authority, addressed their problems to him. Among the rabbis who addressed questions to him are Rabbi Israel Isserlein (Maharil) and his student Rabbi Israel of Bruno. Weill approved of the pilpulistic method only as an aid to study, but rendered legal decisions purely on the basis of logic (Responsa, No. 164).

Weil was especially severe on contemporary rabbis who regarded themselves as having peculiar privileges transcending the rights of the laity, declaring in a responsum (No. 163) that no rabbis of his time had any such prerogatives, and that, moreover, no man could be regarded as a scholar (Talmid Ḥakam) in the Talmudic sense.

Despite his humility and his belief in the value of peace, when he felt that the need arose Weill did not spare his pen. After his father in law refused to repay the debt of a man who paid the ransom of his mother in law, Weill ruled that "since I am close to the case, it is my responsibility to take action and to nullify his evil decree (not to repay the debt) so that a mishap does not occur in Israel and the door is not closed on those who perform good deeds and the name of heaven is not desecrated ... and if he does not obey this strict ruling he is to be cursed and excommunicated and separated from all that is holy" (Resp. No. 148).

Of Weil's works only a collection of opinions and decisions, "She'elot u-Teshubot" (Venice, 1549), has been preserved. To this work was added an appendix entitled "Sheḥiṭot u-Bediḳot," containing regulations for slaughtering and for the examination of slaughtered cattle. These rules have been regarded as authoritative by later rabbis, have run through seventy-one editions, and have been the subjects of various commentaries and additions.

Descendant of Meir of Rothenburg,  R. Judah Minz was a relative according to some sources. 

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Rabbin de Nuremberg, Augsburg, Bamberg et Erfurt

né à Weil der Stadt, Allemagne

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/13125729

Sources: Olivier Cahen

Jewish life in Erfurt

With the oldest parts of the building dating from the 11th century, the Old Synagogue is Central Europe's oldest synagogue to survive including its roof.

http://alte-synagoge.erfurt.de/jle/en/oldsynagogue/

Alte Synagoge Erfurt, der wohl älteste synagogenbau Deutschlands

http://www.panoramio.com/photo/12299887

Augsburg

Jüdisches Kulturmuseum

Halderstraße 6

86150 Augsburg, Bay

Telefon: 0821/513658

Telefax: 0821/513626

http://www.jkmas.de/index.aspx

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JewishEncyclopedia.com

German rabbi and Talmudist; flourished during the first half of the fifteenth century. Of his life no details are known, but, according to Grätz, he died before 1456. He was one of the foremost pupils of Jacob Mölln (MaHaRIL), who ordained him in the rabbinate, and authorized him to officiate in Nuremberg. Weil, however, did not avail himself of this permission lest he should offend an older scholar, Solomon Cohen, who had been appointed rabbi of that city long before.

Weil was later called to the rabbinate of Erfurt; and congregations far and near, recognizing him as an authority, addressed their problems to him.

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=85&letter=W&search=weil

Arbre primitif

http://www.jewishgen.org/rabbinic/journal/weil6.gif

http://www.jewishgen.org/rabbinic/journal/weil1.jpg

Yaakov ben Moshe Levi Molin MaHaRIL

Maharil était le fils du rabbin Rabbi Mosche Levi Moelin et un élève de Reb Shalom Wiener Neustadt. Il a acquis sa réputation - en dépit de sa jeunesse - par Talmud études et la piété. Il était Rosh de Yechiva de Mayence, son élève plus célèbre etait Jacob Weil (Mahariv).

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jakob_ben_Moses_haLevi_Molin

References

  • Bernard Rosensweig Ashkenazic Jewry in Transition 1975 p11 "Chapter II THE LIFE OF R. JACOB WEIL R. Jacob Weil was one of the leading authorities of his age"
  1. • Steinschneider, Cat. Bodl. cols. 1258-1265;
  2. • Benjacob, Oẓar ha-Sefarim, No. 99, p. 558; No. 385, p. 570;
  3. • Fuenn, Keneset Yisrael;
  4. • Michael, Or ha-Ḥayyim, No. 1061;
  5. • Grätz, Gesch. viii. 309 et seq., 313 et seq.
  6. •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: "Weil, Jacob". Jewish Encyclopedia. 1901–1906.

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http://www.chuckxc.com/nodabyehuda/NOTEBOOK_with_your_messages_3

Date: 7/20/2001 9:04:04 AM

Name: Yisrael Asper

Email: yisraelasper@msn.com

I Have the Following Information: Rabbi Yehuda son of Rabbi Natan was known as the Rivan *R for Rabbi, Y for Yehuda, V for Ben,and N for Nathan.

R Yehuda of Paris was the paternal grandfather of Judah Sir Leon of Paris.In the introduction to the Noda Byehuda the Noda Byehuda himself writes that his mother was the daughter of Rabbi Elazar of Dubna or as commonly rendered in English Eleazer as opposed to Eliezer. He at least does not mention there his grandfather as being a Dayan. Rabbi Eliezer of Dubna was another person apparantly. Rabbi Elazar of Dubna been refered to as Eliezer but this has to be either a mistake or an added name. Sometimes like in my family history you could point to two people with the same name as anscestors but who were Machatunim. Here you have the names Eliezer and Elazar both from Dubna,it’s easy to picture how confusion could start there names are so similar and they were from the same place.

R. Jacobke Landau writing in Kontras Divri Yedidut, that his grandfather was Judah Landau and his grandmother was the daughter of R. Eleazar and saying that "also both of them were descendants of the great luminary of the exile, R. Heschel, A.B.D. Cracow, who until this day is called Our Master Rebbi Heschel" was not irecoveribly vague.It seems to me we would assume if someone talked like that that he or she would mean that the grandparents are refered to because the main topic of conversation is them. It also seems improbable that he would’nt have rather have said more simply "my grandmother was the daughter of R. Eleazar a descendant of the great luminary of the exile, R. Heschel, A.B.D. Cracow, who until this day is called Our Master Rebbi Heschel."

Also regarding Rabbi Nathanel Weil assuming that the Noda Byehuda knew he had common anscestry with him from being descended from Rabbi Heschel,and even assuming there’s no other explanation we can think of at the moment, maybe he had some closer kinship to him on his mother’s side, which could cause anyone to emphasize more his relationship through one side than another.The Noda Byehuda’s connection to the Weil family does go way back.

Noda Byehuda's Connection to the Weil Family

Rabbi Heschel’s father was Rabbi Yaakov son of Rabbi Ephraim Naphtali Hirsch(son-in-law of Rabbi Yaakov son of Rabbi Moshe Halevi and husband of Buna daughter of the Maharam of Padua) son of Rabbi Yoseph Yonah (soninlaw of Rabbi Naphtali Hirsch known as Rabbi Hirsch Elzisher) son of Rabbi Klonymos Kalman (son of Rabbi Yonah son of Rabbi Klonymos Kalman son of Rabbi Yonah HaAshkenazi author of Issur V’Heter Ha’arukh) soninlaw of Rabbi Yaakov Weil son of Rabbi Yonah Weil son of Rabbi Yaakov Yokel Weil who was known because of his deeds as a Chasid, son of Rabbi Meir Weil son of Rabbi Yaakov ben Rabbi Yehudah Weil, descendant of the Maharam of Rottenberg.

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http://www.jewishgen.org/rabbinic/journal/weil_chart2.htm

Generation No. 2

2. R. JAKOB BEN YEHUDA2 WEIL (R. YEHUDA1) was born Abt. 1385 in Weil der Stadt, and died Abt. 1456 in Erfurt. He married FNN XXX, daughter of 3 TO 4 GENERATION CONNECTION TO THE MAHARA"M.

Notes for R. JAKOB BEN YEHUDA WEIL:

Talmudist, the Mahari"v; Rabbi in Nuernberg, Augsburg, Bamberg, Erfurt (1444); Student of Rabbi Jakob ben Moshe Moellin, (the Mahari"l), who lived in Mainz and Worms. Rosenthal mentions in his book, "Heimatsgeschichte der badische Juden", that Rabbi Jakob Weil was the most illustrious student of the Mahari"l and that he compiled the prayers and practices of the times for the Jews along the Rhine. He also identifies the Weil Rabbinical family as one of the oldest Jewish families of Southern Germany.

He authored She'elot u'Teshuvot and Shechitot v' Bedikot, the latter a treatise that laid the basis for the ritual animal slaughtering laws. His books were printed in Venice in 1532.

It is said in Loewenstein's book that the Weil dynasty points back to famous Rabbi Meir of Rothenburg, The Mahara"m. According to Raymond M. Jung of Zurich, in Maajan, Rabbi Jacob married either a grandchild or great grandchild of the Mahara"m. This notion is also carried forth in Ernest Weill treatise on the Weil family. Thus we are left with a question as to the true connection between the Weils to the Mahara"m, be it direct or through the wife of Rabbi Jacob.

His birth year is also given as 1375 in Mishpachot Atikot b'Yisrael which seems too early.

R. Jacob served as Rabbi first in Nuernberg, then 1412-1438 in Augsburg, till 1444 in Bamberg and finally, until his death in 1456 in Erfurt.

Notes for FNN XXX:

Wife was probably from Nuernberg, and most likely the descendant of the Mahara"m;

Children of R. WEIL and FNN XXX are:

3. i. R. Meir (MAHARA"M)3 Weil, b. Abt. 1420, /wlf.

ii. R. Josel Weil, m. Bas Israel of Bruenn.

Notes for R. Josel Weil:

Son-in-law of Israel of Bruenn; cited in L. Loewenstein article on Nathanael Weil; lived in Regensburg according to Rosensweig.

4. iii. Connection #1 to Halevi Branch, b. Abt. 1420, /wlf.

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http://wiki.geni.com/index.php/Jewish_Dynasties

view all 13

Jakob Weil - (MahariV)'s Timeline

1385
1385
Weil, Upper Bavaria, Bavaria, Germany
1407
1407
Age 22
Nurnberg, Germany
1420
1420
Age 35
1420
Age 35
Ulm, Tübingen, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany
1456
1456
Age 71
Erfurt, Thuringia, Germany
????
????
????
????
- present
Augsburg, Germany
????
- present
Erfurt, Germany