Kenelm Winslow, I

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Kenelm Winslow, I

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire, England
Death: Died in Town of Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts Bay Colony
Cause of death: Died after a long illness.
Place of Burial: Salem, Essex, Ma
Immediate Family:

Son of Edward Winslow and Magdalene Winslow (Olyver)
Husband of Ellen Winslow; Susannah Fuller; Damaris Winslow and Patience Winslow
Father of Kenelm Winslow, Jr.; Eleanor Baker (Winslow); Captain Nathaniel Winslow; Sarah Payne; Governor Winslow and 1 other
Brother of Gov. Edward Winslow, "Mayflower" Passenger; John Winslow, Sr.; Eleanor Winslow; Magdalene Wake; Gilbert Winslow, "Mayflower" Passenger and 5 others
Half brother of Richard Winslow and Margaret Winslow

Occupation: Joiner, builder & planter
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Kenelm Winslow, I

  • Memorials of Marshfield, and guide book to its localities at Green Harbor (1854)
  • https://archive.org/details/memorialsofmarsh00thoma
  • https://archive.org/stream/memorialsofmarsh00thoma#page/27/mode/1up
  • Pg.27
  • Kenelm Winslow, b. at Droitwich, England, 1599, followed his brothers, Edward, Gilbert and John, to New England, about 1630; he m. Ellen, widow of John Adams, 1634, supposed to have been the Ellen Newton of the Pilgrims, (Mrs. Adams had two sons, John and James, and a dau. Susan, when she last married.) They settled on a gentle eminence by the sea, near the extremity of a neck of land lying between Green Harbor and South Rivers. This tract of the township was considered the Eden
  • https://archive.org/stream/memorialsofmarsh00thoma#page/28/mode/1up
  • Pg.28
  • of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of tangled shrubbery. A few of these groves were standing within the memory of man, but all have now fallen beneath the hand of the woodman.
  • The children of Kenelm and Ellen Winslow were, Kenelm, b. 1635, removed to Harwich, Cape Cod; Ellen, b. 1637, m. Samuel Baker; Nathaniel, b. 1639, m. Faith Miller, and succeeded to the homestead of his father; Job, b. 1691, removed to Swansea or Freetown. Kenelm Winslow often represented the town in the court of the colony. He died at Salem, and was buried there, 1672. His widow deceased 1681, aged 83 years.
  • Nathaniel Winslow and Faith Miller m. 1664; had Faith, b. 1665; Nathaniel, b. 1667, m. Lydia Snow; James, b. 1669; Gilbert, b. 1673, m. Mercy Snow; Kenelm, b. 1675; Eleanor, b. 1677, m. John Jones; Josiah, b. 1681, d. 1682. The homestead of Kenelm Winslow, sen., passed, after the decease of Nathaniel, his son, to Kenelm, his son, who m. Abigail Waterman ; then to their son Kenelm, who m. Abigail Bourn of Barnstable, whose son Kenelm was the last resident of the family name thereon. He removed to Kennebec County, Me., where he recently deceased. The families of this name, both in Lincoln and Waldo Counties, are, with perhaps others, descended from Kenelm Winslow, sen. On this estate remains, in fine preservation, one of the .... etc.
  • ___________________
  • WORDEN, Eleanor
  • b. 1598
  • d. 5 DEC 1681 Marshfield, Plymouth, Mass.
  • Parents:
  • Father: WORDEN, Peter
  • Mother: FARRINGTON, Ann
  • Family:
  • Marriage: 1624
  • Spouse: ADAMS, John
  • b. 1577 Stepney, Middlesex, England
  • d. 1633
  • Parents:
  • Father: ADAMS, Richard
  • Mother: STONE, Agnes
  • Children:
    • ADAMS, John
    • ADAMS, Susanna
    • ADAMS, James
  • Family:
  • Marriage: JUN 1634 Plymouth, Plymouth, Mass.
  • Spouse: WINSLOW, Kenelm
  • b. 29 APR 1599 Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
  • d. 13 SEP 1672 Salem, Essex, Mass.
  • Parents:
  • Father: WINSLOW, Edward
  • Mother: OLIVER, Magdaline
  • Children:
    • WINSLOW, Kenelm
    • WINSLOW, Eleanor
    • WINSLOW, Job
    • WINSLOW, Nathaniel
  • From: http://www.genealogyofnewengland.com/f_1.htm#220
  • _____________________
  • Kenelm Winslow1
  • M, #119560, b. 29 April 1599, d. 13 September 1672
  • Father Edward Winslow1 b. 7 Oct 1560, d. c 1630
  • Mother Magdalene Ollyver2,1 b. 4 Aug 1566
  • Kenelm Winslow was born on 29 April 1599 at Droitwich, Worchestershire, England.1 He married Eleanor Newton, daughter of John Newton, on 1 June 1634 at Marshfield, Plymouth, MA.2,1 Kenelm Winslow died on 13 September 1672 at Salem, Essex, MA, at age 73.1
  • Family Eleanor Newton b. c 1598, d. 5 Dec 1681
  • Child
    • Job Winslow+1 b. 1641, d. 14 Jul 1720
  • Citations
  • 1.[S14] Unknown author, New England Marriages Prior to 1700, by Clarence Almon Torrey., p. 829.
  • 2.[S61] Unknown author, Family Group Sheets, Family History Archives, SLC.
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p3981.htm#i119560
  • _________________________

Kenelm Winslow was born 29 Apr 1599, Droitwich, Worcester, England, and died 12 Sep 1672, Salem, Essex, MA. He migrated from England to Maine on the ship "White Angell" in 1630.

His parents were Edward A. Winslow and Magdalene Oliver.

He married 1: Eleanor Newton Adams, widow of 1) unknown Newton and 2) John Adams June 1634, in ?. Her parents are not known.

Children of Eleanor Newton Adams and Kenelm Winslow:

1. Kenelm WINSLOW

2. Ellinnor (Ellen) WINSLOW

3. Nathaniel WINSLOW

4. Job WINSLOW

http://winslowtree.com/tree/getperson.php?personID=I58&tree=Winslow

Kenelm was of an old English family of Worcestershire, England. He probably lived in Droitwich.

His father Edward (1570-1620) married Magdaline Ollyver on Nov. 4, 1590. They had 5 sons (Edward, John, Kenelm, Gilbert and Josiah) all of who migrated to America immediately or not long after their father's death in 1620.

  Edward and Gilbert were Mayflower passengers in 1620.
  John came to Plymouth in 1621 on the ship "Fortune".
  Kenelm came to Plymouth with his brother, Josiah, in the ship White Angell which arrived in what is now Saco, ME, July of 1631. He later moved to Marshfield in 1641. He is said to have died and is buried in Salem, MA in 1672.
  Gilbert returned to England in 1627 and died there before 1650.

baptized 5/3/1599 in Droitwitch, Worcestershire, England, UK

From "Winslow Memorial" by David Parsons Holton and his wife, Frances Forward Holton; publisher D. P. Holton, vol. 1 1877, vol. 2 1888, New York

Kenelm Winslow, 3rd sone and 4th child of Edward Winslow and Magdalene (Ollyver) of Droitwitch, Worcestershire, England, was born at that place on Sunday, 4/29/1559, and baptized there the Thursday followiong, 5/3/1599. He died at Salem and was buried there 9/13/1672, at 73 years.

He came to Plymouth, probably in 1629 with his brother, Josiah; and was admitted freeman, 1/1/1632 or 1633. In 1640, he was chosen surveyor in Town of Plymouth, but neglecting highways is fined 10 shillings. (Plymouth Colony Record, II, p. 1). He removed to Marshfield about 1641, having previously received a grant of land at that place, then called Green's Harbor, 3/5/1637 or 1638. "All that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on the east side of the lands largely granted to Josiah Winslow at Green's Harbor, are granted to Kenelm Winslow and Love Brewster, to be divided betwixt them, provided that Kenelm Winslow have that part next adjoining to his brother, Josiah, upon the conditions the lands there are granted upon" (Plymouth Colony Record I, p. 78.

Miss Thomas, in her memorials of Marshfield, p. 27, says he "settled on a gentle eminence by the sea, near the extremity of a neck of land lying between Green Harbor and South River. This tract of the township was considered the Eden of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of tangled shrubbery. A few of these groves were standing within memory of persons now living (1845) but all have fallen beneath the hand of the woodman."

This homestead he gave to his 2nd son, Nathaniel, and at his death, it passed into the hands of his son, Kenelm, who married Abigail Waterman; their son Kenelm, who married Abigail Bourne, was obliged to sell the place in consequence of the failure in business of his younger brother, Joseph, of Boston, which also involved his ruin.

Other lands were granted to Kenelm Winslow at various times, and still others were purchased by him. He was one of 26 original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), MA, purchased from the Indians 4/2/1659, and received the 24th lot, a portion of which is still owned and occupied by (1873) Barnaby Winslow, his great, great, great grandson "to whom heirship, it has descended through successive generations of more than 200 years".

Kenelm Winslow was styled "joiner" 1/6/1633 or 1634 when Samuel Jenney was indented to him as an apprentice; but he is elsewhere and generally called a "planter" and was somewhat engaged in the shipping interest.

Besides serving his townsmen in minor offices, he was deputy or representative in the general court, 1642-44 and 1649-53, 8 years (Plymouth Colony Record).

There is among different branches of his descendants a tradition that he possessed a high spirit or temper which brought him into litigation. He is probably named in the suit tried in New York in 6/1665 (see Valentines Manual of 1852, p. 483), regarding the sale of a bark to Mr. Fatche; and in the suit of Doughty vs. Kenelm Winslow - same jury verdict, 26 gilders; also in suit Kenelm Winslow vs. Samuel Moore - same juries - "The juries do allow the plaintive cost and damages and no more approved".

He married 6/1634, Eleanor Adams, widow of John Adams, of Plymouth. She survived him and died at Marshfield, MA, where she was buried 12/5/1681, being 83 years old. He died 9/13/1672 at 73, in Salem, MA. where he had gone on business. According to Rev. L. R. Paige, he died there "apparently after a long sickness for in his will dated 5 weeks earlier, 8/8/1672, he describes himself as 'being very sick and drawing nigh unto death'. He may have been in Salem to visit Mrs. Elizabeth Corwin (Curwen), daughter of his brother Edward Winslow, or perhaps for the purpose of obtaining medical aid."

The following letter from Rev. Ed. C. Towne to John Winslow of Brooklyn, is interesting and suggestive as relating to the time of and circumstances attending his arrival in Plymouth. Mr. Towne had previously published a letter in the "N.Y. Tribune" enforcing the discrimmination that should be made between the Pilgrims and the Puritans, in studies of Colonial history.

  • _______________________

John Winslow

Dear Sir:

It gives me great pleasure to answer your note of May 6th. Of Gov. Edward Winslow's 4 brothers - John, born 4/1697; Kenelm, born 4/1599; Gilbert, born 10/1600; and Josiah, born 2/1605, Kenelm and Josiah arrived at Plymouth before 1632 and both settled in Marshfield. Kenelm died in Salem, 1672, but it was while on a visit there. He was from first to last, one of the Pilgrims, within the limits of the old colony. The exact date of his arrival from England is not known. If he came in 1629, in Puritan company, and perhaps made some stay at Salem before proceeding to Plymouth, it would still be consistent with his being an original Pilgrim with the Mayflower people and their delayed companions. Only about 1/3 of the Pilgrim Church of Leyden came over at first, and in 1629 a long hindered portion of the original number came by way of Salem, in Puritan Company, and proceeded thence to Plymouth. The Puritan ships, spoken of in my note to "The Tribune" - The Talbot, George and Lion were directly followed by 3 more - the Pilgrim, Four Sisters, and the Mayflower (the same than in 1620 came to Plymouth). It was in the Talbot and the Mayflower than 35 of the Leyden people smuggled themselves over. Gilbert had come with Edward in the Mayflower, 1620, and John the next year in the Fortune, with the 2nd detachment of original Pilgrims. It is likely than Kenelm followed in their track; however, he may have taken advantage of Puritan company. Possibly he came in the Mayflower itself in 1629, when it formed part of the Puritan expedition. The next year also the old Mayflower was one of the fleet which brought Winthrop and his large company, and your ancestor may hae taken advantage of that opportunity. But however he came, it was as a Pilgrim to join the Old Colony. Either he or his son Kenelm, got a tract of land in Rhode Island where many descendants lived and still live.

Of the two ships in 1629 which brought Pilgrims, it must have been the Mayflower rather than the Talbot on which your ancestor came; for the original record states that "some servants" of the Pilgrim company were sent in the Talbot, "but these (the Pilgrims) came in the Mayflower"; no doubt your ancestor made a point, if he had a chance to do so, of coming over on the original Pilgrim ship. The probability is very great that he also took advantage of the 1st good opportunity, that of 1629, and that he proceeded directly to Plymouth, and was not even transiently a resident of Salem. His name does not appear in the lists of freemen within the limits of the Puritan Colony.

In Bradford, it is mentioned that in 1631, Ed. Winslow sent from London by the White Angel his brother Josiah, and then began his employment with the Plymouth people. As Josiah was 6 years younger than Kenelm, it may be presumed that the latter had already come over and that Josiah was taken as the only brother left. This leaves it almost certain, with the previous probabilities that it was by the Mayflower in 1629 that your ancestor came over to join the Plymouth Pilgrims. He came to Marshfield on account, doubtless of his brother Edward's estate, and as Edward was a good deal engaged with Puritans, as well as Pilgrims, in the agencies he undertook in England, it is likely than Kenelm had more or less business and acquaintances among the Puritans, and that in this way he was on a visit to Salem at the time of his death. When I next see the Whitmans of Plymouth who are descendants of Ed. Winslow, I will make further inquiry and will also look at one or two books which I have not had on hand here. It is not likely however, that anything can be added to the probably conclusion that your ancestor, though not at 1st, yet came in the Mayflower.

  • ______________________

He was born in Driotshire England. The family resided in Worcestershire. He came to America in 1629 on the second voyage of the Mayflower. He settled in Marshfield, Ma. in 1641 near the Casswell estate of his brother, Edward, (governor of the Pilgrims). He married , 1634, Eleanor (or Helen) Adams who was born Ellen Newton, the Pilgrim, who had first married John Adams of Plymouth. He died in Salem, probably on a visit in 1672.

It is noted that Kenelm Winslow was the only fine furniture maker in the colony and that many pieces which he made are preserved in the Metropolitan Museum in NYC. 
  • __________________

Alternatly referred to as Kenelm or Kenelin in documents.

His occupation was "joiner" which was a type of carpenter that does not use nails, but uses joints, or pieces of wood that join together (such as in furniture). In 1633/4, Samuel Jenny was bound as apprentice to him.

He held many different offices including; Plymouth Colony Assessor, 1634. Deputy for Mrshfield to Plymouth General Court, 1642-51. he was the Marshfield constable in 1647. He was on several committees (on laborors wages, 1635, on provisions for the governor, 1657. on highways 1638/9) and jurys (coroners jury 1653 and grand jury 1636/7 and 1654). He did not attend the surveyor of the highways and was fined 10s. He also was a lieutenant....He is listed in several documents, such as tax documents and lists of men able to bear arms.

He attended the Plymouth church and was admitted as a freemen in 1623/3.

He was educated enough to read and to sign his name to his will, whose inventory included 1 bible and 7 other books.

His brother Edward was Govenor of Massachusetts and a Mayflower passenger.

On 8 January 1632/3 "Francis Eaton acknowledgeth that he hath sold to Kanelm & Josias Wynslow the now dwelling house of the said Francis" . Granted mowing ground, 14 March 1635/6, 20 March 1636/7. Granted "threescore acres of land lying upon the south side of the Eele River, above the great swamp.... This grant was made void upon a grant made to him at Green's Harbor," 6 January 1636/7. On 5 February 1637/8 "Kenelme Winslow requesteth a grant of lands at Green's Harbor", and on 5 March 1637/8 he received, in partnership with Love Brewster, "all that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on the east side of the lands lately granted to Josias Winslow, at Greene's Harbor".

On 26 October 1647 "Mr. Hatherley here in Court acknowledgeth that Helene, the wife of Kanelme Winslow, acknowledgeth her free assent and consent to the sale of all such lands as her husband had sold unto Samuell Sturdevant. Captain Miles Standish" deposed the same regarding her consent to sales to Henry Sampson.

Granted one hundred acres at Teticutt, 4 March 1673/4 (pursuant to an order of June 1662).

In his will, dated 8 August 1672 and proved 5 June 1673, "Kanelme Winslow Senior" ordered that "what estate I have formerly settled on my eldest son Kanelme ... shall remain unaltered" and bequeathed to "my son Nathaniel ... the half of my farm that I last lived upon ... as I gave him by a former deed of gift"; "and the other half of the farm to my wife, for the term of her natural life" and "after the decease of my wife Ellinor Winslow the said half of the farm shall return unto my son Nathaniel"; to "my son Job ... half of my land at Namassakett which is about fifty acres ... and the other fifty acres or thereabouts unto Kanelme Baker my grandchild"; to "my daughter Ellinor" £5; "my wife shall at her decease give unto Mary Addams an equal portion of the goods and moveables as to the rest of my grandchildren"; wife to be sole executrix and "Major Josias Winslow and my son Kanelme Winslow" to be overseers.

The inventory of the estate of Kenelm Winslow, taken 25 September 1672, totalled £87 15s. 4d.; the real estate, unvalued, followed: "one half of the dwelling house and housings and meadow lands and uplands belonging to the said farm he had lived on and now died possessed of in the town of Marshfield"; "one half of all the lands granted him by the Court with the ancient freemen which lieth on the west side of Taunton River either divided or to be divided hereafter"; and "one half of the portion of land granted by the court to him and his brother Josias Winslow upon the account of their brother Gilbert Winslow as he was a first comer".

On 4 June 1645 "Kenelme Winslow complained that he had injustice, in that he could not be heard in the suit betwixt John Mynard and himself"; after investigation by the court, he "was committed to prison and fined £10," whereupon he reversed himself and was released from prison and the fine was eventually remitted.

On 5 May 1645/6 "upon hearing of the cause betwixt Roger Chaundler and Kenelme Winslow, for his daughter's clothes, which the said Kenelme detaineth, upon pretense of some further service which he required of her, whereunto the said Roger utterly refused to consent, it is ordered by the Court, that the said Kenelme Winslow shall deliver the maid her clothes without any further delay".

On the same day "Kenelme Winslow, for opprobrious words against the church of Marshfeild, saying they were all liars, &c., was ordered by the Court to find sureties for his good behavior, which he refusing to do, was committed to prison, where he remained until the General Court following".

Despite this bad year, Kenelm Winslow continued to hold important town and colony offices for another decade. His last year as deputy was 1653, and he virtually disappears from public view at that time, although he lived for another two decades. This was about the time that his two elder and more prominent brothers, Edward and John, left Plymouth Colony; perhaps Kenelm owed his limited success to the presence of these brothers, and once they were gone his own abilities were not sufficient to maintain himself at this level.

  • ______________________

KENELM1 WINSLOW.

1. KENELM1 Winslow, third son and fourth child of Edward Winslow and Magdalene (Ollyver) of Droitwich, Worcestershire, Eng., was born at that place, on Sunday, 29 April, 1599, and baptized the Thursday following, 3May, 1599; he "dyed at Salem and was buried there 13 Sept., 1672," '. 73 years. He came to Plymouth, probably in 1629 with his brother Josiah1, and was admitted freeman, 1 Jan. 1632-3. In 1640, he was chosen Surveyor in Town of Plymouth, but neglecting highways is fined ten shillings [Ply. Col. Rec.,II, p. 1]. He removed to Marshfield about 1641, having previously received agrant of land at that place, then called Green's Harbor, 5 Mar. 1637-8: "all that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on the east side of the lands lately granted to Josias Winslow, at Green's Harbor, are granted to Kenelme Winslow and Love Brewster, to be divided betwixt them, provided that Kenelme Winslow have that part next adjoining to his brother Josias,upon the conditions the lands there are granted upon" [Plym. Col. Rec., I,78]. Miss Thomas, in her memorials of Marshfield, p. 27, says: he "settledon a gentle eminence by the sea, near the extremity of a neck of land lying between Green Harbor and South Rivers. This tract of the township was considered the Eden of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of tangled shrubbery. A few of these groves were standing within the memory of persons now living(1854) but all have fallen beneath the hand of the woodman." This homestead he gave to his second son, Nathaniel2, and at his death it passed into the hands of his son, Kenelm3, who m. Abigail Waterman; their son Kenelm4, whom. Abigail Bourne, was obliged to sell the place in consequence of the failure in business of his younger brother Joseph4, of Boston, which also involved his ruin. Other lands were granted to Kenelm1 Winslow at various times, and still others were purchased by him. He was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), Mass., purchased from the Indians 2 April, 1659, and received the 24th lot, a portion of which is still owned and occupied (1873) by Barnaby4 Winslow, his gr. gr. gr. grandson "to whom, by heirship, it has descended through successive generations of more than two hundred years." Mr. Winslow was styled "joiner," 6 Jan. 1633-4, when Samuel Jenney was indented to him as an apprentice; but he is elsewhere and generally called a "planter" and was somewhat engaged in the shipping interest. Besides serving his townsmen in minor offices, he was deputy, or representative, in the general court, 1642-44, and 1649-53, eight years.[Plym. Col. Rec.]

There is, among different branches of his descendants, a tradition that he possessed a high spirit or temper which brought him into litigation.

  • _________________
  1. Emigration: ABT 1629 From England to Salem
  2. Occupation: Master carpenter - cabinet maker, coffin maker
  3. Event: Fact Only builder of fine furniture in early colony of Plymouth, with many pieces preserved in museums
  4. Residence: 1641 Moved to Marshfield
  5. Burial: 13 SEP 1672 Massachusetts

References:

"Pioneers of Massachusetts"

Charles Henry Pope;

Bowie, MD, 1991; p. 508

"Abridged Compendium of American Genealogy"

Frederick A. Virkus; Chicago, 1925

Vol 1, Appendix: "Immigrant Ancestors"

"A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England"

James Savage

Pub. Boston, 1860-1862, Vol. 4, pp. 598-603

(Savage has entries for Kenelm and all three sons.)

  • __________________

Kenelm Winslow was born 30 Apr 1599, Droitwich, Worcester, England, and died 12 Sep 1672, Salem, Essex, MA. He migrated from England to Maine on the ship "White Angell" in 1630.

His parents were Edward A. Winslow and Magdalene Oliver.

He married 1: Eleanor Newton Adams, widow of 1) unknown Newton and 2) John Adams June 1634, in ?. Her parents are not known.

Children of Eleanor Newton Adams and Kenelm Winslow:

1. Kenelm WINSLOW

2. Ellinnor (Ellen) WINSLOW

3. Nathaniel WINSLOW

4. Job WINSLOW

http://winslowtree.com/tree/getperson.php?personID=I58&tree=Winslow

Kenelm was of an old English family of Worcestershire, England. He probably lived in Droitwich.

His father Edward (1570-1620) married Magdaline Ollyver on Nov. 4, 1590. They had 5 sons (Edward, John, Kenelm, Gilbert and Josiah) all of who migrated to America immediately or not long after their father's death in 1620.

 Edward and Gilbert were Mayflower passengers in 1620.
 John came to...

read more

Kenelm Winslow was born 30 Apr 1599, Droitwich, Worcester, England, and died 12 Sep 1672, Salem, Essex, MA. He migrated from England to Maine on the ship "White Angell" in 1630.

His parents were Edward A. Winslow and Magdalene Oliver.

He married 1: Eleanor Newton Adams, widow of 1) unknown Newton and 2) John Adams June 1634, in ?. Her parents are not known.

Children of Eleanor Newton Adams and Kenelm Winslow:

1. Kenelm WINSLOW

2. Ellinnor (Ellen) WINSLOW

3. Nathaniel WINSLOW

4. Job WINSLOW

http://winslowtree.com/tree/getperson.php?personID=I58&tree=Winslow

Kenelm was of an old English family of Worcestershire, England. He probably lived in Droitwich.

His father Edward (1570-1620) married Magdaline Ollyver on Nov. 4, 1590. They had 5 sons (Edward, John, Kenelm, Gilbert and Josiah) all of who migrated to America immediately or not long after their father's death in 1620.

 Edward and Gilbert were Mayflower passengers in 1620.
 John came to Plymouth in 1621 on the ship "Fortune".
 Kenelm came to Plymouth with his brother, Josiah, in the ship White Angell which arrived in what is now Saco, ME, July of 1631. He later moved to Marshfield in 1641. He is said to have died and is buried in Salem, MA in 1672.
 Gilbert returned to England in 1627 and died there before 1650.
  • ______________________

37 Group Sheet


Notes

   * He immigrated about 1631 to Plymouth, Plymouth Co., MA. He was a Joiner & Cabinetmaker between 1650 and 1670 in Duxbury, Plymouth Co., MA. Kenelm was a younger brother of Gov. Edward Winslow of the Plymouth Colony, America. Their father, Edward, was born in England, 17 October 1560, and was probably a descendant of the Winslow family which existed in Kempsey, Worcestershire, England, before 1500. To support this assumption, we find that the Winslow estate in Kempsey, England, was called "Kerswell" and the Winslow estate in Plymouth, MA, was called "Careswell".
     Kenelm Winslow came to America with his brother, Josias, in the ship White Angell which arrived in what is now Saco, ME, July of 1631. Other brothers had come earlier, John who came in the Fortune in 1621, and Edward and Gilbert who came in the Mayflower in 1620.
     At the time of his marriage to Ellen, Kenelm put up security to pay James Adams, son of his new wife and her deceased husband, John Adams, 5 pounds when he became of age. Plymouth County records show that this sum was paid on 26 December 1651.
     Kenelm became a "freeman" in Plymouth on 1 January 1632-33. In 1633, Kenelm and his brother, Josias, bought a dwelling from Francis Eaton with the records showing that Josias sold his half in 1634. After their marriage in June, 1634, Kenelm and Ellen lived in Marshfield and he received various land grants, including one in Yarmouth in 1640 where he participated in the settlement of that town. In 1642, and often later, he was a representative from Marshfield. On 1 June 1647, he was chosen constable in Marshfield and from 1649 onward was frequently a deputy in Marshfield.
     Kenelm was a carpenter and a cabinet maker and the official coffin maker of the colony. According to my notes, source unknown to me and not verified by a personal visit or inquiry to any museums, he was the designer and maker of fine furniture, many pieces of which have been preserved in the Metropolitan and other museums.
     According to Plymouth Colony, Its History and Peoples by Stratton, p 376 and 377, Kenelm was involved in several disputes which were settled by the courts:
     "On Dec. 1, 1640, he was fined for neglecting his duty as an elected highway surveyor ( PCR 2 :4 )." "On June 4, 1645, a committee consisting of Myles Standish and six other men reported that a complaint of injustice about a court case made by Kenelm was untrue and the committee found the Bench and jury were without fault. The court ordered Kenelm imprisoned and fined 10 pounds. On his petition the same day in which he acknowledged his offence and sorrow for same, he was released from imprisonment and his fine suspended for one year to be remitted at the end of that time if he showed good behavior (PCR 2:85)." "On May 5, 1646, Kenelm was sued by Roger Chandler for keeping his daughter's clothes on the pretense that she owed Kenelm further service. The court ordered Kenelm to return the clothes (PCR 2:98)." "On the same day, May 5, 1646, the court ordered Kenelm to find 'sureties' for his good behavior for uttering 'opprobrious' words against the Marshfield Church. Kenelm evidently claimed that several members were 'lyers' etc. Kenelm refused to do so and he was sentenced to prison, where he remained until the next court (PCR 2:98)." "On March 7, 1653-54, Kenelm made a complaint against John Soule for speaking falsely against Kenelm's daughter and 'scandalizing' her in carrying false reports between her and Josias Standish (PCR 3:46)." Kenelm Winslow's will, dated 8 August 1672, proved 5 June 1673, named his wife, his four children, his grandchild Kenelm Baker, and asked his wife to give Mary Adams (child of James Adams, I assume) an equal share of his personal property with the rest of his grandchildren. [3, 4]
   * (Research):Initial sources: A family group sheet in the FGRA collection of the Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, compiled by Huberta F. Robison, 1806-A Bonita, Berkely, Calif. Her source: "Winslow Memorial" p71.
     Another FGRA family group sheet, submitted by Geneva D. Mitchell of Long Beach, Ca., probably in 1957, (source: Family Records) said his mother was Eleanor Pelham, whereas the other sheet said she was Magdalene Ollyver. (See further discussion on this in notes for her.) It also said he married (2) Patience Brockmorton, and yet it has Kenelm's death 1672 and Eleanor's 1681. (See notes for his wife.)
     "Winslow Memorial", by David P. and Frances K. Holton, 1887, 1888, says he was born "Sunday 29 Apr 1599 at Droitwitch, Worcestershire, England, and baptized the Thursday following, 3 May 1599; he 'dyed at Salem and was buried there 13 Sept., 1672,' ae. 73 years. ... He m. June, 1634, Elen Adams, widow of John Adams, of Plymouth." Further on it says he died at Salem "where he had gone on business [Hon. Luther Hatch, of Marshfield]."
     "The Great Migration Begins", by R. C. Anderson, 1995 (FHL929.1 W893) doesn't mention the birth date but gives the baptism date and place, from "NEHGR" 4:297, 21:210. It says he married "Plymouth in June 1634 'Elen Adams' [PCR 1:30]; she was Ellen Newton, widow of John Adams [TAG 55:212-13];...." and was buried at Salem 13 Sep 1672, from Marshfield Vital Records 427. In his will he calls both his wife and daughter, "Ellinor".
     LDS proxy temple ordinances are in the 1997 IGI except the 1930 sealing of marriage is only in the British section and gives temple film 458322 which is Los Angeles temple, not built until the 1950s. There are many with proxy sealing dates 1980 to 1996.
     "Winslow Memorial" says "He came to Plymouth, probably in 1629 with his brother Josiah, ("The Great Migration..." says Josiah was known to have arrived in 1631 - see below) and was admitted freeman 1 Jan 1632-3. In 1640 he was chosen Surveyor in the Town of Plymouth, but neglecting highways is fined ten shillings. [Plym. Col. Rec. II, p. 1]. He removed to Marshfield about 1641, having previously received a grant of land at that place, then called Green's Harbor, 5 Mar 1637-8: 'all that parcel of land remaining of that neck of land lying on the east side of lands lately granted to Josias Winslow, at Green's Harbor, are granted to Kenelme Winslow and Love Brewster, to be divided betwixt them, provided that Kenelme Winslow have that part next adjoining to his brother Josias, upon the conditions the lands there are granted upon' [Plym. Col. Rec., I, 78]. Miss Thomas, in her memorials of Marshfield, p. 27, says: he 'settled on a gentle eminence by the sea near the extremity of a neck of land lying between Green Harbor and South River. This tract of the township was considered the Eden of the region. It was beautified with groves of majestic oaks and graceful walnuts, with the underground void of tangled shrubbery. A few of these groves were standing within the memory of persons now living (1854) but all have fallen beneath the hand of the woodman.' The homestead he left to his son Nathaniel, and at his death it passed into the hands of his son, Kenelm, who m. Abigail Waterman; their son Kenelm, who md Abigail Bourne, was obliged to sell the place in consequence of the failure in business of his younger brother Joseph of Boston, which also involved his ruin. "Other lands were granted to Kenelm Winslow at various times, and still others were purchased by him. He was one of the twenty-six original proprietors of Assonet (Freetown), Mass., purchased from the Indians 2 Apr 1659 and received the twenty-fourth lot, a portion of which is still or was lately owned and occupied (1873) by Barnabas Winslow, his gr. gr. gr. grandson 'to whom, by heirship, it has descended through successive generations of more than two hundred years.' "Mr. Winslow was styled 'joiner', 6 Jan 1633-4, when Samuel Jenney was indented to him as an apprentice; but he is elsewhere and generally called a 'planter' and was somewhat engaged in the shipping interest. There is, among different branches of his descendants, a tradition that he possessed a high spirit or temper which brought him into litigation. He is probably the person named in the suit tried at New York,June, 1665, [see "Valentine's Manual of 1852" p. 483] regarding the sale of a Bark to Mr. Fatche; and in the suit of Doughty vs. Kenelm Winslow--same jury--verdict, twenty-five gilders; also in the suit, Kenelm Winslow vs. Samuel Moore--same juries--'The juries do allow the plaintive cost and damages of the court and no more--approved.' [We are indebted to Mr. Charles B. Moore, Life Member of the New York Genealogcal and Biographical Society, for a copy of this suit.] ......
     "According to Rev. L. R. Paine he died (Salem) 'apparently after a long sickness; for in his will dated five weeks earlier, 8 Aug 1672, he describes himself as 'being very sick and drawing nigh unto death.' He may have been in Salem on a visit to Mrs. Elizabeth corwin, daughter of his brother Edward Winslow, or perhaps, for the purpose of obtaining medical aid.' [See p. 275, Young's Chronicles].
     "The following letter from Rev. Edward C. Towne to John Winslow, of Brooklyn, is interesting and suggestive, as relating to the time of and circumstances attending his arrival at Plymouth. Mr. Towne had previously published a letter in the New York Tribune, endorcing the discrimination that should be made between the Pilgrims and Puritans, in studies of colonial history.
     "John Winslow, Dear Sir: It gives me pleasure to answer your note of May 6th. Of Gov. Edward Winslow's four brothers--John,born April, 1597; Kenelm, born April, 1599; Gilbert, born October 1600; and Josiah, born February, 1605; Kenelm and Josiah 'arrived at Plymouth before 1632, and both settled at Marshfield' (Young's Chronicles of the Pilgrims, p. 275). Kenelm died at Salem, 1672, but was while on a visit there. He was from first to last one of the Pilgrims, within the limits of the Old Colony. The exact date of his arrival from England is not known. If he came in 1629, in Puritan company, and perhaps made some stay at Salem before proceeding to Plymouth, it would still be consistent with his being an original Pilgrim with the Mayflower people and their delayoed companions. Only about one-third of the Pilgrim Church of Leyden came over at first, and in 1629 a long hindered portion of the original number came by way of Salem, in Puritan company, and proceeded thence to Plymouth. The Puritan ships, spoken of in my note to the Tribune--the Talbot, George, and Lion--were directly followed by three more--the Pilgrim, Four Sisters and the Mayflower (the same that in 1620 came to Plymouth). It was in the Talbot and the Mayflower that 35 of the Leyden people smuggled themselves over. Gilbert had come with Edward in the Mayflower, 1620, and John the next year in the Fortune, with the second detachment of the Pilgrims. it is likely that Kenelm followed in their track, however he may have taken passage of Puritan company. Possibly he came in the Mayflower itself in 1629 when it formed part of the Puritan Expedition. The next year also the old Mayflower was one of the fleet which brought over Winthrop and his large company and your ancestor may have taken advantage of the opportunity. But however he came it was as a Pilgrim to join the Old Colony. Either he or his son Kenelm got a tract of land in Rhode Island where many of his descendants lived and died.
     "Of the two ships of 1829 which brought Pilgrims, it must have been the Mayflower rather than the Talbot on which your ancestor came; the record states that 'some servants' of the Pilgrim company were sent in the Talbot, 'but these [the Pilgrims] come in the Mayflower.' No doubt your ancestor made a point , if he had a chance to do so, of coming over in the original Pilgrim ship. The probability is very great also that he took advantage of the first good opportunity, that of 1629, and that he proceeded dirctly to Plymouth, and was not even transiently a resident at Salem. His name does not appear in the lists of freemen within the limits of the Puritan Colony.
     "In Bradford it is mentioned that in 1631, Edward Winslow sent from London by the White Angel his brother Josiah, and that then began his employment with the Plymouth people. As Josiah was six years younger than Kenelm, it may be presumed that the latter had already come over, and that Josiah was taken as the only brother left. This leaves it almost certain, with the previous probabilities, that it was by the Mayflower, in 1629, that your ancestor came over to join the Plymouth pilgrims. He came to Marshfield on account, doubtless, of his brother Edward's estate, and as Edward was a good deal engaged with Puritans a well as Pilgrims, in the agencies which he undertook in England, it is likely that Kenelm had more or less business and acquaintance among the Puritans and that in this way he was on a visit to Salem at the time of his death. When I next see the Whitmans of Plymouth, who are descendants of Edward Winslow, I will make further inquiry, and will also look at one or two books which I have not at hand here. It is unlikely however, that any thing can be added to the probable conclusions that your ancestor, though not at first, yet came in the Mayflower."
     "Massachusetts Genealogies" by Cutter and Adams, says he was a joiner by trade, as well as a planter. He filled various town offices; was deputy to the general court 1642 to 1644 and from 1649 to 1653, eight years in all. He had considerable litigation, as the early court records show. He died at Salem, whither he had gone on business ... apparently after a long illness, for his will was dated five weeks earlier, 8 Aug 1672, and in it he describes himself as "being very sick and drawing nigh unto death." He may have been visiting his niece, Mrs. Elizabeth Corwin, daughter of Edward Winslow.
     "The Great Migration..." mentions another court record, 4 June 1645, in a suit between him and John Marynard, after which he was committed to prison and fined 10 pounds, whereupon he reversed himself and was released from prison and the fine remitted. [PCR 2:85] Also, another suit "betwixt Roger Chaundler and Kenelme Winslow, for his daughter's clothes, which the said Kenelme detaineth, upon pretense of some further service which he required of her, whereunto the said Roger utterly refused to consent, it is ordered by the Court, that the said Kenelme Winslow shall deliver the maid her clothes without any further delay" [PCR 2:98].
     "On the same day 'Kenelme Winslow', for opprobrious words against the church of Marshfield,saying they were all liars, etc, was ordered by the Court to find sureties for his good behavior, which he refusing to do, was committed to prison, where he remained until the General Court following' [PCR 2:98].
     "Despite this bad year, Kenelm Winslow continued to hold important town and colony offices for another decade. His last year as deputy was 1653, and he virtually disappears from public view at that time, although he lived for another two decades. ....
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Deputy to the General Court for 8 yrs.

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Helpful References

Two helpful webpages on Kenelm Winslow are found at the website Winslow Tree: a forum post and an extensive profile. This site presents the argument that Kenelm came to the colony in 1629, not 1631.

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Kenelm Winslow, I's Timeline

1599
April 29, 1599
Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire, England
May 3, 1599
May 23, 1599
Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
May 23, 1599
Droitwich, Worcester, Eng, Eng
May 23, 1599
Droitwich,Worcester,Eng,Eng
May 23, 1599
Droitwich, Worcester, Eng, Eng
May 23, 1599
Droitwich, Worcester, Eng, Eng
May 23, 1599
Droitwich, Worcester, Eng, Eng
May 23, 1599
Droitwich, Worcester, Eng, Eng
May 23, 1599
Droitwich, Worcester, Eng, Eng