Stephen Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger

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Stephen Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger

Nicknames: "Stephen Hopkins"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Hursley, Hampshire, England
Death: Died in Plymouth, Plymouth Colony
Place of Burial: Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Immediate Family:

Son of Captain John Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins
Husband of Mary Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger
Father of Elizabeth Hopkins; Constance Snow, "Mayflower" Passenger; Giles Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger; Infant Hopkins; John Hopkins and 7 others
Half brother of William Hopkins, of Ribbesford; Alice Hopkins and Susanna Hopkins

Occupation: Glass seller; tanner, Signer of the Mayflower Compact, Mayflower
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About Stephen Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger

From Mayflower History - Stephen Hopkins

1. Stephen Hopkins was christened in Apr 1581 in Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England. He died on 6 Jun 1644 in Plymouth, MA.

Stephen married (1) Mary in 1604. Mary died in 1613 in Hursley, Hampshire, England.

They had the following children:

  1. F Elizabeth Hopkins was christened in 1604 in Hursley, Hampshire, England. She died in 1613/1620.
  2. F Constance Hopkins
  3. M Giles Hopkins

Stephen married (2) Elizabeth Fisher on 19 Feb 1617/1618 in St. Mary, White Chapel, London, England. Elizabeth died before 6 Jun 1644 in Plymouth, MA.

They had the following children:

  • 5 F iv Damaris Hopkins was born in 1618 in England. She died in 1628 in Plymouth, MA.
  • 6 M v Oceanus Hopkins was born on 16 Sep 1620 in aboard Mayflower on the Atlatic Ocean. He died on 22 May 1627.
  • 7 M vi Caleb Hopkins was christened in 1623 in Plymouth, MA. He died - 3 Apr 1651 in Barbados.
  • + 8 F vii Deborah Hopkins
  • + 9 F viii Damaris Hopkins
  • 10 F ix Ruth Hopkins was christened in 1630 in Plymouth, MA. She died unmar. after 30 Nov. 1644 and prob. bef. 3 April 1651.
  • 11 F x Elizabeth Hopkins was christened in 1632 in Plymouth, MA. She died after Oct 1657.

Biographical Summary

Stephen Hopkins was from Hampshire, England. He married his first wife, Mary, and in the parish of Hursley, Hampshire; he and wife Mary had their children Elizabeth, Constance, and Giles all baptized there. It has long been claimed that the Hopkins family was from Wortley, Gloucester, but this was disproven in 1998. For more information on the true English origins of Stephen Hopkins, see the "Published Research" section at the bottom of this page.

Stephen Hopkins went with the ship Sea Venture on a voyage to Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 as a minister's clerk, but the ship wrecked in the "Isle of Devils" in the Bermudas. Stranded on an island for ten months, the passengers and crew survived on turtles, birds, and wild pigs. Six months into the castaway, Stephen Hopkins and several others organized a mutiny against the current governor. The mutiny was discovered and Stephen was sentenced to death. However, he pleaded with sorrow and tears. "So penitent he was, and made so much moan, alleging the ruin of his wife and children in this his trespass, as it wrought in the hearts of all the better sorts of the company". He managed to get his sentence commuted.

Eventually the castaways built a small ship and sailed themselves to Jamestown. How long Stephen remained in Jamestown is not known. However, while he was gone, his wife Mary died. She was buried in Hursley on 9 May 1613, and left behind a probate estate which mentions her children Elizabeth, Constance and Giles.

Stephen was back in England by 1617, when he married Elizabeth Fisher, but apparently had every intention of bringing his family back to Virginia. Their first child, Damaris, was born about 1618. In 1620, Stephen Hopkins brought his wife, and children Constance, Giles, and Damaris on the Mayflower (child Elizabeth apparently had died). Stephen was a fairly active member of the Pilgrims shortly after arrival, perhaps a result of his being one of the few individuals who had been to Virginia previously. He was a part of all the early exploring missions, and was used almost as an "expert" on Native Americans for the first few contacts. While out exploring, Stephen recognized and identified an Indian deer trap. And when Samoset walked into Plymouth and welcomed the English, he was housed in Stephen Hopkins' house for the night. Stephen was also sent on several of the ambassadorial missions to meet with the various Indian groups in the region.

Stephen was an assistant to the governor through 1636, and volunteered for the Pequot War of 1637 but was never called to serve. By the late 1630s, however, Stephen began to occasionally run afoul of the Plymouth authorities, as he apparently opened up a shop and served alcohol. In 1636 he got into a fight with John Tisdale and seriously wounded him. In 1637, he was fined for allowing drinking and shuffleboard playing on Sunday. Early the next year he was fined for allowing people to drink excessively in his house: guest William Reynolds was fined, but the others were acquitted. In 1638 he was twice fined for selling beer at twice the actual value, and in 1639 he was fined for selling a looking glass for twice what it would cost if bought in the Bay Colony. Also in 1638, Stephen Hopkins' maidservant got pregnant from Arthur Peach, who was subsequently executed for murdering an Indian. The Plymouth Court ruled he was financially responsible for her and her child for the next two years (the amount remaining on her term of service). Stephen, in contempt of court, threw Dorothy out of his household and refused to provide for her, so the court committed him to custody. John Holmes stepped in and purchased Dorothy's remaining two years of service from him: agreeing to support her and child.

Stephen died in 1644, and made out a will, asking to be buried near his wife, and naming his surviving children.

Children of Stephen1 and Elizabeth (Fisher) Hopkins (second wife)

Damaris2 Hopkins (Stephen1), a Mayflower Passenger with her parents, died young. (See next Damaris.) Oceanus2 Hopkins (Stephen1) Born at sea on the Mayflower voyage, died by 1627. Caleb2 Hopkins (Stephen1), died without issue in Barbadoes bet. 1644 and 1651. Deborah2 Hopkins (Stephen1), married Andrew Ring. Children of Andrew and Deborah Ring Deborah Ring3.

Eleazer Ring3, married Mary Shaw. 
Elizabeth Ring3, married William Mayo. 
Mary Ring3, married John Morton. 
Susanna Ring3. 
William Ring3, married Hannah Fisherman3 (Desire2 Doty, Edward1).

Damaris2 Hopkins (Stephen1) second of the name, married Jacob2 Cooke (Francis1). The children of this couple will be found under Jacob2 Cooke (Francis1). Ruth2 Hopkins, (Stephen1), died unmarried. Elizabeth2 Hopkins (Stephen1), left Plymouth by 1659, when the process of settling her estate began, no further record, died unmarried according to Bowman.

Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower

Mayflower passenger Stephen Hopkins may have been the same Stephen Hopkins who was on board the Sea Venture, which was shipwrecked in Bermuda in 1609. The Sea Venture was part of a fleet of 9 ships under the command of Sir George Somers and Sir William Gates. Scattered by a hurricane, some of the ships made their way to Jamestown. The Sea Venture, however, was wrecked off Bermuda. The Stephen Hopkins of the Sea Venture (and possibly the Mayflower) was a minister’s clerk who fomented a mutiny on the grounds that the authority of the governor ceased when the ship was wrecked. This Stephen Hopkins was sentenced to death, but pardoned, with reference made to his [unnamed] wife and children. This Stephen Hopkins spent a further two years in the English colonial settlement at Jamestown, Virginia.

Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower had two wives. The name of his first wife is unknown. His second wife was named Elizabeth Fisher, she and Stephen were married in London in 1618. Elizabeth died in Plymouth in 1639. Stephen Hopkins had two children by his first wife, and 7 by his second.

Elizabeth Hopkins accompanied her husband Stephen on the Mayflower. With them were Stephen’s two children by his first marriage (Giles and Constanta), and Elizabeth and Stephen’s daughter Damaris. Their son, Oceanus, was born while the Mayflower was at sea.

Stephen Hopkins had positions of responsibility in the Colony. Hopkins and Edward Winslow were chosen to approach Massasoit and Hopkins repeated this duty as emissary. He nevertheless ran afoul of the law several times, for assault, for not properly regulating other people’s alcohol intake, and for overpricing.

Stephen Hopkins died between 6 June 1644, when his will was made, and 17 July 1644, when the inventory of his estate was taken.

The Last Will and Testament of Stephen Hopkins

"The sixt of June 1644 I Stephen Hopkins of Plymouth in New England being weake yet in good and prfect memory blessed be God yet considering the fraile estate of all men I do ordaine and make this to be my last will and testament in manner and forme following and first I do committ my body to the earth from whence it was taken, and my soule to the Lord who gave it, my body to be buryed as neare as convenyently may be to my wyfe Deceased And first my will is that out of my whole estate my funerall expences be discharged secondly that out of the remayneing part of my said estate that all my lawful Debts be payd thirdly I do bequeath by this my will to my sonn Giles Hopkins my great Bull wch is now in the hands of mris Warren Also I do give to Stephen Hopkins my sonn Giles his sonne twenty shillings in mrs Warrens hands for the hire of the said Bull Also I give and bequeath to my daughter Constance Snow the wyfe of Nicholas Snow my mare also I give unto my daughter Deborah Hopkins the brodhorned black cowe and her calf and half the Cowe called Motley Alsoe I doe give and bequeath unto my daughter Damaris Hopkins the Cowe called Damaris heiffer and the white faced calf and half the cowe called Mottley And I give to my daughter Ruth the Cowe called Red Cole and her calfe and a Bull at Yarmouth wch is in the keepeing of Giles Hopkins wch is an yeare and advantage old and half the curld Cowe Also I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth the Cowe called Symkins and her calf and thother half of the Curld Cowe with Ruth and an yearelinge heiffer wth out a tayle in the keepeing of Gules Hopkins at Yarmouth Also I do give and bequeath unto my foure daughters that is to say Deborah Hopkins Damaris Hopkins Ruth Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins all the moveable goods the wch do belong to my house. as linnen wollen beds bedcloathes pott kettles pewter or whatsoevr are moveable belonging to my said house of what kynd soever and not named by their prticular names all wch said mooveables to bee equally devided amongst my said daughters foure silver spoones that is to say to eich of them one, And in case any of my said daughters should be taken away by death before they be marryed that then the part of their division to be equally devided amongst the Survivors. I do also by this my will make Caleb Hopkins my sonn and heire apparent giveing and bequeathing unto my siad sonn aforesaid all my Right title and interrest to my house and lands at Plymouth wth all the Right title and interrest wch doth might or of Right doth or may hereafter belong unto mee, as also I give unto my saide heire all such lande wch of Right is Rightly due unto me and not at prsent in my reall possession wch belongs unto me by right of my first comeing into this land or by any other due Right, as by such freedome or otherwise giving unto my said heire my full & whole and entire Right in all divisions allottments appyntments or distributions whatsoever to all or any pt of the said lande at any tyme or tymes so to be disposed. Also I do give moreover unto my foresaid heire one paire or yooke of oxen and the hyer of them wch are in the hands of Richard Church as may appeare by bill under his hand Also I do give unto my said heire Caleb Hopkins all my debts wch are now oweing unto me, or at the day of my death may be oweing unto mee either by hooke bill or bills or any other way rightfully due unto me ffurthermore my will is that my daughters aforesaid shall have free recourse to my house in Plymouth upon any occation there to abide and remayne for such tyme as any of them shall think meete and convenyent & they single persons And for the faythfull prformance of this my will I do make and ordayne my aforesiad sonn and heire Caleb Hopkins my true and lawfull Executor ffurther I do by this my will appoynt and make my said sonn and Captaine Miles Standish joyntly supervisors of this my will according to the true meaneing of the same that is to say that my Executor & supervisor shall make the severall divisions parts or porcons legacies or whatsoever doth appertaine to the fullfilling of this my will It is also my will that my Executr & Supervisor shall advise devise and dispose by the best wayes & meanes they cann for the disposeing in marriage or other wise for the best advancnt of the estate of the forenamed Deborah Damaris Ruth and Elizabeth Hopkins Thus trusting in the Lord my will shalbe truly prformed according to the true meaneing of the same I committ the whole Disposeing hereof to the Lord that hee may direct you herein June 6th 1644 By me Steven Hopkins Witnesses hereof Myles Standish, William Bradford

-------------------- Of Mayflower.

Married twice. Not sure what order. Other wife unknown.

Stephen Hopkins (born about 1582 – 1644), was a tanner and merchant who was one of the passengers on the Mayflower in 1620, settling in Plymouth Colony. Hopkins was recruited by the Merchant Adventurers to provide governance for the colony as well as assist with the colony's ventures. He was a member of a group of passengers known to the Pilgrims as "The Strangers" since they were not part of the Pilgrims' religious congregation. Hopkins was one of forty-one signatories of the Mayflower Compact and was an assistant to the governor of the colony through 1636.

Marriages: 1. Mary: She may have died while Hopkins was on his first attempt to reach New World.

2. Elizabeth Fisher: married Hopkins at St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechapel, London, on 19 February 1617/8, and was a Mayflower passenger who died in Plymouth, 1639.

Children: Stephen and Mary had three children:

   * Elizabeth b. England; she more than likely died before the Mayflower voyage.
   * Constance b. England, 1607; Mayflower passenger; married Nicholas Snow, who came to Plymouth on the ship Anne in 1623; died in Plymouth Colony, 1677.
   * Giles b. England, 1607/8; Mayflower passenger, married Catherine Whelden, daughter of Gabriel Whelden of Malden and Yarmouth

Stephen and Elizabeth had eight children:

   * Damaris b. England, 1618; Mayflower passenger.
   * Oceanus b. en route to Plymouth onboard the Mayflower.
   * Caleb b. Plymouth, 1623; dead by spring 1651.
   * Elizabeth b. Plymouth, 1623.
   * Deborah b. Plymouth, 1626, married Andrew Ring, son of William and Mary Ring
   * Damaris b. Plymouth, 1628, married Jacob Cooke, son of Pilgrim, Francis Cooke and Hester Mayhieu (Cooke)
   * Ruth b. Plymouth, 1630.

Hopkins had made a previous attempt to reach the New World in 1609 aboard the new flagship of the Virginia Company, the Sea Venture, on which Sir George Somers took the helm. Hopkins had embarked as a Minister's Clerk on the "Sea Venture", the Admiral of the Fleet. The ship was on the way to the Jamestown Colony in Virginia with much needed supplies when it was deliberately driven onto the reefs of Bermuda to prevent its foundering as a result of the damage it had sustained during a severe storm. All aboard, 150 passengers and crew and a dog, survived. The ship's longboat was fitted with a mast and sent to Virginia for help, but it and its crew were never seen again. Hopkins attempted to start a mutiny while stranded on the island. He was sentenced to death when this was discovered but was eventually set free after complaining of the "ruin of his wife and children". Hopkins and the remaining survivors spent nine months on Bermuda building two smaller ships, the Deliverance and Patience, from Bermuda cedar and materials salvaged from the Sea Venture. He and the other castaways eventually made their way to Jamestown, where Hopkins appears to have stayed for (some say) two years before returning to England. The Hopkins family is considered one of the First Families of Virginia. The story of the Sea Venture shipwreck (and Hopkins' mutiny) is said to be the inspiration for The Tempest by William Shakespeare. -------------------- Stephen Hopkins was aboard the ship "Sea Venture" which left for the Jamestown Colony in Virginia in 1609. The ship was wrecked by a hurricane in Bermuda and Stephen was one of one hundred and fifty castaways who survived. After about six months in Bermuda, Stephen began to challenge the authority of the governor and began to organize a mutiny. He was arrested and put in chains. He was tried and found to be guilty and was sentenced to death but the record states that "But so penitent hee was, and made so much moane, alleadging the ruine of his Wife and Children in this his trespasse" that he finally was pardoned. This shipwreck was partly responsible for inspiring Shakespeare=s play, The Tempest. Finally, the castaways worked together to construct two ships and were able to sail on to Jamestown. Stephen had contact with Indians there and it is thought that the reason that he was a passenger on the Mayflower was because of his experience in the New World. He was called a tanner or leather maker at the time. Stephen and Elizabeth and two children from his first marriage and a two-year-old child from their marriage sailed on the Mayflower. He also had two men servants. On the way, their son, Oceanus was born between 6 September and 11 November 1620 while the ship was at sea. They had five more children after their arrival in Plymouth. In Plymouth, Stephen was one of three men designated to advise Captain Myles Standish on the first land expedition. He was deputized to meet the Indians and act as an interpreter. In Plymouth, he was referred to as a merchant and a planter and was called "Gentleman". He served as Assistant Governor of the colony in 1633/34. The Mayflower passengers were referred to as Saints who were part of the religious group and "strangers" who had come along for other reasons. As a "stranger", Stephen often found himself in trouble. He was fined for battery of a John Tisdale, was charged at various times involving the sale of wine, beer, strong waters and nutmeg at excessive rates. He was charged with refusing to deal fairly with an apprentice girl and also with selling a looking glass at an excessive price. Stephen dated his will on 6 June 1644. It was proved upon testimony of William Bradford and Captain Myles Standish in Plymouth on 20 August 1644. -------------------- Stephan was a complex man. Like all men he wanted to provide for his family so he seized opportunities as the presented themselves. The year after Jamestown was founded, he sailed abourd the Sea Venture as a 3yr indentured servant to the new colony. The Sea Venture shipwrecked in the Bahamas during a hurricane. Since Stephen was literate and knowledgeable of scripture he had been appointed decans assistant and was accused of treason when he suggested that they build a boat from the wreckage of the ship and return to England; arguing that their contracts of servitude were rendered nul and void since they were not transported to Jamestown. This earned him a sentence of death which the Captain eventually withdrew after pleadings from Stephan and his many friends. They did build two boats out of the wreckage which they sailed to Jamestown only to discover the survivors there on the brink of starvation. Mercifully a supply ship arrived the next day. While Stephen served his 3rys. his first wife died of plague in London. His estate was sold off and his children were cared for by the church and his brother. It has been speculated that the character Stephono in Shakespears play "The Tempest" was loosely based on Stephen Hopkins. Since to even write about treason Shakespear cast Stephono as a "fool". Later Hopkins joined the Mayflour -------------------- Stephen Hopkins (settler) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search For other persons named Stephen Hopkins, see Stephen Hopkins (disambiguation). Bas-relief on Bradford Street in Provincetown depicting the signing of the Mayflower Compact Signing of the Mayflower Compact

Stephen Hopkins (born about 1582 – 1644), was a tanner and merchant who was one of the passengers on the Mayflower in 1620, settling in Plymouth Colony. Hopkins was recruited by the Merchant Adventurers to provide governance for the colony as well as assist with the colony's ventures. He was a member of a group of passengers known to the Pilgrims as "The Strangers" since they were not part of the Pilgrims' religious congregation. Hopkins was one of forty-one signatories of the Mayflower Compact and was an assistant to the governor of the colony through 1636. Contents [hide]

   * 1 Sea Venture shipwreck and Mutiny
   * 2 Diplomat and Veteran
   * 3 Marriage
   * 4 Children
   * 5 See also
   * 6 References
   * 7 External links

[edit] Sea Venture shipwreck and Mutiny

There is some evidence that the Stephen Hopkins who arrived on the Mayflower was the man of that name who had arrived in Virginia in 1609 aboard the new flagship of the Virginia Company, the Sea Venture, on which Sir George Somers took the helm. That Stephen Hopkins had embarked as a Minister's Clerk on the "Sea Venture", the Admiral of the Fleet. The ship was on the way to the Jamestown Colony in Virginia with much needed supplies when it was deliberately driven onto the reefs of Bermuda to prevent its foundering as a result of the damage it had sustained during a severe storm. All aboard, 150 passengers and crew and a dog, survived. The ship's longboat was fitted with a mast and sent to Virginia for help, but it and its crew were never seen again. Hopkins attempted to start a mutiny while stranded on the island. He was sentenced to death when this was discovered but was eventually set free after complaining of the "ruin of his wife and children". Hopkins and the remaining survivors spent nine months on Bermuda building two smaller ships, the Deliverance and Patience, from Bermuda cedar and materials salvaged from the Sea Venture. He and the other castaways eventually made their way to Jamestown, where Hopkins appears to have stayed for (some say) two years before returning to England. The Hopkins family is considered one of the First Families of Virginia. The story of the Sea Venture shipwreck (and Hopkins' mutiny) is said to be the inspiration for The Tempest by William Shakespeare. [edit] Diplomat and Veteran Hopkins (right) is portrayed by an actor at Plimoth Plantation

Hopkins was respected for his previous experience with Indians and was elected ambassador for native relations. When Squanto arrived in Plymouth he resided with the Hopkins family. In 1621 Hopkins, Edward Winslow and William Bradford were delegated by their associates to treat with the Indians in the Plymouth vicinity on behalf of the Pilgrims and succeeded in winning the friendship of Chief Massasoit (1580-1661), concluding a peace treaty on 22 March 1621 in the Hopkins home. He later served in the Pequot War of 1637. [edit] Marriage

1. Mary: She may have died while Hopkins was on his first attempt to reach New World.

2. Elizabeth Fisher: married Hopkins at St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechapel, London, on 19 February 1617/8, and was a Mayflower passenger who died in Plymouth, 1639. [edit] Children

Stephen and Mary had three children:

   * Elizabeth b. England; she more than likely died before the Mayflower voyage.
   * Constance b. England, 1607; Mayflower passenger; married Nicholas Snow, who came to Plymouth on the ship Anne in 1623; died in Plymouth Colony, 1677.
   * Giles b. England, 1607/8; Mayflower passenger, married Catherine Whelden, daughter of Gabriel Whelden of Malden and Yarmouth

Stephen and Elizabeth had eight children:

   * Damaris b. England, 1618; Mayflower passenger.
   * Oceanus b. en route to Plymouth onboard the Mayflower.
   * Caleb b. Plymouth, 1623; dead by spring 1651.
   * Elizabeth b. Plymouth, 1623.
   * Deborah b. Plymouth, 1626, married Andrew Ring, son of William and Mary Ring
   * Damaris b. Plymouth, 1628, married Jacob Cooke, son of Pilgrim, Francis Cooke and Hester Mayhieu (Cooke)
   * Ruth b. Plymouth, 1630.

[edit] See also

   * Pilgrims
   * Jamestown, Virginia
   * First Families of Virginia

[edit] References

   * Caleb Johnson, Here Shall I Die Ashore: Stephen Hopkins, Bermuda Castaway, Jamestown Survivor, and Mayflower Pilgrim (Xlibris, 2007) ISBN 978-1-4257-9638-9.
   * Caleb Johnson, The American Genealogist 73:161-171, “The True English Origins of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower”, July 1998. His first wife was not Constance Dudley, though this erroneous name is given by older references.
   * Mayflower Families Through Five Generations, Volume Six, Third Edition, Stephen Hopkins ISBN 0-930270-03-7

[edit] External links

   * Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower
   * Stephen Hopkins First encounter marker
   * MayflowerHistory.com page on Stephen Hopkins
   * Stephen Hopkins in the Records of the 17th Century
   * Last Will and Testament of Stephen Hopkins at The Plymouth Colony Archive Project

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hopkins_(settler)" Categories: 1580s births | 1644 deaths | Mayflower passengers | English Americans | Massachusetts colonial people -------------------- Stephen Hopkins was a passenger on the Mayflower. There has been much written about him which can be found online. His daughter Constance was also a Mayflower passenger.

Stephen Hopkins was from Hampshire, England. He married his first wife, Mary, and in the parish of Hursley, Hampshire; he and wife Mary had their children Elizabeth, Constance, and Giles all baptized there. It has long been claimed that the Hopkins family was from Wortley, Gloucester, but this was disproven in 1998. For more information on the true English origins of Stephen Hopkins, see the "Published Research" section at the bottom of this page.

Stephen Hopkins went with the ship Sea Venture on a voyage to Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 as a minister's clerk, but the ship wrecked in the "Isle of Devils" in the Bermudas. Stranded on an island for ten months, the passengers and crew survived on turtles, birds, and wild pigs. Six months into the castaway, Stephen Hopkins and several others organized a mutiny against the current governor. The mutiny was discovered and Stephen was sentenced to death. However, he pleaded with sorrow and tears. "So penitent he was, and made so much moan, alleging the ruin of his wife and children in this his trespass, as it wrought in the hearts of all the better sorts of the company". He managed to get his sentence commuted.

Eventually the castaways built a small ship and sailed themselves to Jamestown. How long Stephen remained in Jamestown is not known. However, while he was gone, his wife Mary died. She was buried in Hursley on 9 May 1613, and left behind a probate estate which mentions her children Elizabeth, Constance and Giles.

Stephen was back in England by 1617, when he married Elizabeth Fisher, but apparently had every intention of bringing his family back to Virginia. Their first child, Damaris, was born about 1618. In 1620, Stephen Hopkins brought his wife, and children Constance, Giles, and Damaris on the Mayflower (child Elizabeth apparently had died). Stephen was a fairly active member of the Pilgrims shortly after arrival, perhaps a result of his being one of the few individuals who had been to Virginia previously. He was a part of all the early exploring missions, and was used almost as an "expert" on Native Americans for the first few contacts. While out exploring, Stephen recognized and identified an Indian deer trap. And when Samoset walked into Plymouth and welcomed the English, he was housed in Stephen Hopkins' house for the night. Stephen was also sent on several of the ambassadorial missions to meet with the various Indian groups in the region.

Stephen was an assistant to the governor through 1636, and volunteered for the Pequot War of 1637 but was never called to serve. By the late 1630s, however, Stephen began to occasionally run afoul of the Plymouth authorities, as he apparently opened up a shop and served alcohol. In 1636 he got into a fight with John Tisdale and seriously wounded him. In 1637, he was fined for allowing drinking and shuffleboard playing on Sunday. Early the next year he was fined for allowing people to drink excessively in his house: guest William Reynolds was fined, but the others were acquitted. In 1638 he was twice fined for selling beer at twice the actual value, and in 1639 he was fined for selling a looking glass for twice what it would cost if bought in the Bay Colony. Also in 1638, Stephen Hopkins' maidservant got pregnant from Arthur Peach, who was subsequently executed for murdering an Indian. The Plymouth Court ruled he was financially responsible for her and her child for the next two years (the amount remaining on her term of service). Stephen, in contempt of court, threw Dorothy out of his household and refused to provide for her, so the court committed him to custody. John Holmes stepped in and purchased Dorothy's remaining two years of service from him: agreeing to support her and child.

Stephen died in 1644, and made out a will, asking to be buried near his wife, and naming his surviving children.

-------------------- Came over in the Mayflower in 1620 his second voyage. The first voyage was on July 23, 1609 in the Sea Venture (300 Tons). He reached Virginia in 1610, after being shipwrecked in Bermuda. This shipwreck was the subject for the "Tempest" (1611) by William Shakespeare. -------------------- "Mayflower" -------------------- Babtized April 30, 1581 in Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England. Died between June 6 and July 17, 1644. -------------------- Baptized: 30 April 1581, Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England, son of John and Elizabeth (Williams) Hopkins. Book coverHere Shall I Die Ashore: Stephen Hopkins, Bermuda Castaway, Jamestown Survivor, and Mayflower Pilgrim, by Caleb Johnson (Xlibris, 2007).

Marriages:

   * Mary, maiden name unknown, prior to 1604, probably in Hampshire, England.
   * Elizabeth Fisher, 19 February 1617/8, St. Mary Matfellon, Whitechapel, Middlesex, England

Death: Between 6 June 1644 and 17 July 1644, at Plymouth. Children by Mary: Elizabeth, Constance, Giles Children by Elizabeth: Damaris, Oceanus, Caleb, Deborah, Damaris, Ruth, and Elizabeth.

Biographical Summary

Stephen Hopkins was from Hampshire, England. He married his first wife, Mary, and in the parish of Hursley, Hampshire; he and wife Mary had their children Elizabeth, Constance, and Giles all baptized there. It has long been claimed that the Hopkins family was from Wortley, Gloucester, but this was disproven in 1998. For more information on the true English origins of Stephen Hopkins, see the "Published Research" section at the bottom of this page.

Stephen Hopkins went with the ship Sea Venture on a voyage to Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 as a minister's clerk, but the ship wrecked in the "Isle of Devils" in the Bermudas. Stranded on an island for ten months, the passengers and crew survived on turtles, birds, and wild pigs. Six months into the castaway, Stephen Hopkins and several others organized a mutiny against the current governor. The mutiny was discovered and Stephen was sentenced to death. However, he pleaded with sorrow and tears. "So penitent he was, and made so much moan, alleging the ruin of his wife and children in this his trespass, as it wrought in the hearts of all the better sorts of the company". He managed to get his sentence commuted.

Eventually the castaways built a small ship and sailed themselves to Jamestown. How long Stephen remained in Jamestown is not known. However, while he was gone, his wife Mary died. She was buried in Hursley on 9 May 1613, and left behind a probate estate which mentions her children Elizabeth, Constance and Giles.

Stephen was back in England by 1617, when he married Elizabeth Fisher, but apparently had every intention of bringing his family back to Virginia. Their first child, Damaris, was born about 1618. In 1620, Stephen Hopkins brought his wife, and children Constance, Giles, and Damaris on the Mayflower (child Elizabeth apparently had died). Stephen was a fairly active member of the Pilgrims shortly after arrival, perhaps a result of his being one of the few individuals who had been to Virginia previously. He was a part of all the early exploring missions, and was used almost as an "expert" on Native Americans for the first few contacts. While out exploring, Stephen recognized and identified an Indian deer trap. And when Samoset walked into Plymouth and welcomed the English, he was housed in Stephen Hopkins' house for the night. Stephen was also sent on several of the ambassadorial missions to meet with the various Indian groups in the region.

Stephen was an assistant to the governor through 1636, and volunteered for the Pequot War of 1637 but was never called to serve. By the late 1630s, however, Stephen began to occasionally run afoul of the Plymouth authorities, as he apparently opened up a shop and served alcohol. In 1636 he got into a fight with John Tisdale and seriously wounded him. In 1637, he was fined for allowing drinking and shuffleboard playing on Sunday. Early the next year he was fined for allowing people to drink excessively in his house: guest William Reynolds was fined, but the others were acquitted. In 1638 he was twice fined for selling beer at twice the actual value, and in 1639 he was fined for selling a looking glass for twice what it would cost if bought in the Bay Colony. Also in 1638, Stephen Hopkins' maidservant got pregnant from Arthur Peach, who was subsequently executed for murdering an Indian. The Plymouth Court ruled he was financially responsible for her and her child for the next two years (the amount remaining on her term of service). Stephen, in contempt of court, threw Dorothy out of his household and refused to provide for her, so the court committed him to custody. John Holmes stepped in and purchased Dorothy's remaining two years of service from him: agreeing to support her and child.

Stephen died in 1644, and made out a will, asking to be buried near his wife, and naming his surviving children.


-------------------- Same Stephen Hopkins married to Constance Dudley Hopkins and father of Bethia -------------------- Stephen Hopkins, Mayflower

According to Crispin Gill, in Mayflower Remembered, 1970, "[Stephen] Hopkins, a Gloucestershire man, had been among those wrecked on Bermuda with Admiral Somers, and had gone on to Virginia. He was the only Pilgrim to have been in America before and much use was made of his experience." His Gloucestershire heritage was disproved in 1998, but he is widely known to have been in Bermuda in 1609. Some believe that in writing his play "The Tempest", Shakespeare used the account of the wreck of the "Sea Venture" as a source of information (basing it on Montaigne's essay "Of Cannibals").

Gill also says that when Samoset, an Indian chief from a tribe in Maine who knew some English, first came to visit the settlement "he was lodged in the house of Stephen Hopkins in the middle of the village, where he was well watched." He told them that they were settled on the lands of the Patuxet, which four years earlier had been wiped out by an epidemic. Samoset came back with other Indians, the second time bringing Squanto, the only survivor of the Patuxet tribe, who had been a long time in England. With Squanto acting as interpreter, the Indians and the Pilgrims made a pact to honor each other's property and aid each other if attacked. Squanto them returned to his native lands and lived with the Pilgrims until he died.

It is now believed (2008) that Stephen Hopkins was from Hampshire, England. He married his first wife, Mary, and in the parish of Hursley, Hampshire; he and wife Mary had their children Elizabeth, Constance, and Giles all baptized there. It has long been claimed that the Hopkins family was from Wortley, Gloucester, but this was disproven in 1998. (see reference sources below).

Stephen Hopkins went with the ship Sea Venture on a voyage to Jamestown, Virginia in 1609 as a minister's clerk, but the ship wrecked in the "Isle of Devils" in the Bermudas after 3 days in a strong storm. 150 people and 1 dog landed safely at what is now Discovery Bay in Bermuda. Stranded on the uninhabited island for ten months, and presumed dead, the passengers and crew survived on turtles, birds, and wild pigs. Six months into the castaway, Stephen Hopkins and several others organized a mutiny against the current governor. The mutiny was discovered and Stephen was sentenced to death. However, he pleaded with sorrow and tears. "So penitent he was, and made so much moan, alleging the ruin of his wife and children in this his trespass, as it wrought in the hearts of all the better sorts of the company". He managed to get his sentence commuted.

Eventually the castaways built two small ships, "Deliverance" and "Patience" from the spars and rigging of the wrecked "Sea Venture" along with local timber. In May 1610 they set sail for Jamestown with 142 castaways on board. They found the Virginia colony almost destroyed by familne and disease. How long Stephen remained in Jamestown is not known. However, while he was gone, his wife Mary died. She was buried in Hursley on 9 May 1613, and left behind a probate estate which mentions her children Elizabeth, Constance and Giles.

Stephen was back in England by 1617, when he married Elizabeth Fisher, but apparently had every intention of bringing his family back to Virginia. Their first child, Damaris, was born about 1618. In 1620, Stephen Hopkins brought his wife, and children Constance, Giles, and Damaris on the Mayflower (child Elizabeth apparently had died). Stephen was a fairly active member of the Pilgrims shortly after arrival, perhaps a result of his being one of the few individuals who had been to Virginia previously. He was a part of all the early exploring missions, and was used almost as an "expert" on Native Americans for the first few contacts. While out exploring, Stephen recognized and identified an Indian deer trap. And when Samoset walked into Plymouth and welcomed the English, he was housed in Stephen Hopkins' house for the night. Stephen was also sent on several of the ambassadorial missions to meet with the various Indian groups in the region.

Stephen was an assistant to the governor through 1636, and volunteered for the Pequot War of 1637 but was never called to serve. By the late 1630s, however, Stephen began to occasionally run afoul of the Plymouth authorities, as he apparently opened up a shop and served alcohol. In 1636 he got into a fight with John Tisdale and seriously wounded him. In 1637, he was fined for allowing drinking and shuffleboard playing on Sunday. Early the next year he was fined for allowing people to drink excessively in his house: guest William Reynolds was fined, but the others were acquitted. In 1638 he was twice fined for selling beer at twice the actual value, and in 1639 he was fined for selling a looking glass for twice what it would cost if bought in the Bay Colony. Also in 1638, Stephen Hopkins' maidservant got pregnant from Arthur Peach, who was subsequently executed for murdering an Indian. The Plymouth Court ruled he was financially responsible for her and her child for the next two years (the amount remaining on her term of service). Stephen, in contempt of court, threw Dorothy out of his household and refused to provide for her, so the court committed him to custody. John Holmes stepped in and purchased Dorothy's remaining two years of service from him: agreeing to support her and child.

Stephen died in 1644. On 6 June 1644 he made out a will, asking to be buried near his wife, and naming his surviving children. 17 July an inventory was taken of his estate, so he is assumed to have died between these dates.


Main Sources: http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/Passengers/StephenHopkins.php

Ernest M. Christiensen, "The Probable Parentage of Stephen Hopkins of the Mayflower," The American Genealogist, 79(October 2004):241-249. Caleb Johnson, "The True Origins of Mayflower Passenger Stephen Hopkins," The American Genealogist, 73(1998):161-171.

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Will of Stephen Hopkins, 6 June 1644

Will of Stephen Hopkins

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The last Will and Testament of Mr. Stephen Hopkins exhibited upon the Oathes of mr Willm Bradford and Captaine Miles Standish at the generall Court holden at Plymouth the xxth of August Anno dm 1644 as it followeth in these wordes vizt.

The sixt of June 1644 I Stephen Hopkins of Plymouth in New England being weake yet in good and prfect memory blessed be God yet considering the fraile estate of all men I do ordaine and make this to be my last will and testament in manner and forme following and first I do committ my body to the earth from whence it was taken, and my soule to the Lord who gave it, my body to b eburyed as neare as convenyently may be to my wyfe Deceased And first my will is that out of my whole estate my funerall expences be discharged secondly that out of the remayneing part of my said estate that all my lawfull Debts be payd thirdly I do bequeath by this my will to my sonn Giles Hopkins my great Bull wch is now in the hands of Mris Warren. Also I do give to Stephen Hopkins my sonn Giles his sonne twenty shillings in Mris Warrens hands for the hire of the said Bull Also I give and bequeath to my daughter Constanc Snow the wyfe of Nicholas Snow my mare also I give unto my daughter Deborah Hopkins the brodhorned black cowe and her calf and half the Cowe called Motley Also I doe give and bequeath unto my daughter Damaris Hopkins the Cowe called Damaris heiffer and the white faced calf and half the cowe called Mottley Also I give to my daughter Ruth the Cowe called Red Cole and her calfe and a Bull at Yarmouth wch is in the keepeing of Giles Hopkins wch is an yeare and advantage old and half the curld Cowe Also I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth the Cowe called Smykins and her calf and thother half of the Curld Cowe wth Ruth and an yearelinge heiffer wth out a tayle in the keeping of Gyles Hopkins at Yarmouth Also I do give and bequeath unto my foure daughters that is to say Deborah Hopkins Damaris Hopkins Ruth Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins all the mooveable goods the wch do belong to my house as linnen wollen beds bedcloathes pott kettles pewter or whatsoevr are moveable belonging to my said house of what kynd soever and not named by their prticular names all wch said mooveables to be equally devided amongst my said daughters foure silver spoones that is to say to eich of them one, And in case any of my said daughters should be taken away by death before they be marryed that then the part of their division to be equally devided amongst the Survivors. I do also by this my will make Caleb Hopkins my sonn and heire apparent giveing and bequeathing unto my said sonn aforesaid all my Right title and interrest to my house and lands at Plymouth wth all the Right title and interrest wch doth might or of Right doth or may hereafter belong unto mee, as also I give unto my saide heire all such land wch of Right is Rightly due unto me and not at prsent in my reall possession wch belongs unto me by right of my first comeing into this land or by any other due Right, as by such freedome or otherwise giveing unto my said heire my full & whole and entire Right in all divisions allottments appoyntments or distributions whatsoever to all or any pt of the said lande at any tyme or tymes so to be disposed Also I do give moreover unto my foresaid heire one paire or yooke of oxen and the hyer of them wch are in the hands of Richard Church as may appeare by bill under his hand Also I do give unto my said heire Caleb Hopkins all my debts wch are now oweing unto me, or at the day of my death may be oweing unto mee either by booke bill or bills or any other way rightfully due unto mee ffurthermore my will is that my daughters aforesaid shall have free recourse to my house in Plymouth upon any occation there to abide and remayne for such tyme as any of them shall thinke meete and convenyent & they single persons And for the faythfull prformance of this my will I do make and ordayne my aforesaid sonn and heire Caleb Hopkins my true and lawfull Executor ffurther I do by this my will appoynt and make my said sonn and Captaine Miles Standish joyntly supervisors of this my will according to the true meaneing of the same that is to say that my Executor & supervisor shall make the severall divisions parts or porcons legacies or whatsoever doth appertaine to the fullfilling of this my will It is also my will that my Executr & Supervisor shall advise devise and dispose by the best wayes & meanes they cann for the disposeing in marriage or other wise for the best advancnt of the estate of the forenamed Deborah Damaris Ruth and Elizabeth Hopkins Thus trusting in the Lord my will shalbe truly prformed according to the true meaneing of the same I committ the whole Disposeing hereof to the Lord that hee may direct you herein

June 6th 1644

Witnesses hereof By me Steven Hopkins

Myles Standish

William Bradford

Additional information -------------------- Came to America on the Mayflower. -------------------- Stephen Hopkins sailed on the Mayflower in 1620. Was one of the Londoners or strangers recruited for the voyage. He was called Master, and only two other of the 17 free men on the voyage were styled. Stephen was called a tanner or leather maker at the time of the Mayflower voyage. He seems to have origionated from the family of Hopkins, alias Seborne, located for several generations at Wortley, Wooton Underedge, Gloucester County, England. Although Stephen of the Mayflower may well have been a son of Stephen Hopkins, a clothier of Wortley, who also had a son Robert Hopkins of London. Two indentured servants (Edward Doty and Edward Lister) came with Hopkins on the Mayflower.

Source: Mayflower Families Through Five Generations: volume six "Hopkins" published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1992 -------------------- Stephen Hopkins came over on the Mayflower. He had been to the new world before and also was one of the first occupants of Jamestown -------------------- Came on the Mayflower in 1620. -------------------- Hopkins was baptized April 30, 1581 at Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England, the son of John Hopkins and Elizabeth Williams. He died between June 6, 1644 and July 17, 1644.

Not much is known about his early life in Hampshire, but his family appears to have removed to Winchester, Hampshire by 1586. His father died there in 1593, and by 1604 he had moved to Hursley, Hampshire. He was married to a woman named Mary about 1603.

He was a passenger on the Mayflower in 1620, one of forty-one signatories of the Mayflower Compact, and an assistant to the governor of Plymouth Colony through 1636. He worked as a tanner and merchant and was recruited by the Merchant Adventurers to provide the governance for the colony and assist with the colony's ventures. He is known as the only Mayflower passenger with prior New World experience being shipwrecked in Bermuda in 1609 and after rescue served for several years under Captain John Smith at the Jamestown Colony in Virginia.

Children of Stephen and Mary Hopkins, born in Hursley, Hampshire, England:

- Elizabeth was baptized on May 13, 1604. She was alive at her mother's death in 1613, but there is no further reference.

- Constance was baptized on May 11, 1606 and died in Eastham, Mass. in mid-October 1677. She married Nicholas Snow in Plymouth by May 22, 1627 and had twelve children. She was a Mayflower passenger. Her husband came over in 1623 on the 'Anne'.

- Giles was baptized on January 30, 1607/8 and died in Eastham between March 5, 1688/9 and April 16, 1690. He married Catherine Whelden in Plymouth on October 9, 1639 and had ten children. He was a Mayflower passenger. He was buried at Cove Burying Ground, Eastham, Mass

+++++++++++++++++++

Children of Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins:

- Damaris (1) was born about 1618 in England and died young in Plymouth. Mayflower passenger.

- Oceanus was born in the fall of 1620 aboard the Mayflower. He had died by May 22, 1627.

- Caleb was born in Plymouth about 1624. He became a seaman and died at Barbados between 1644 and 1651.

- Deborah was born in Plymouth about 1626 and died probably before 1674. She married Andrew Ring at Plymouth on April 23, 1646 and had six children.

- Damaris (2) was born in Plymouth about 1627-8 and died in Plymouth between January 1665/6 and November 18, 1669. She married Jacob Cooke after June 10, 1646 and had seven children. Jacob was a son of Pilgrim Francis Cooke.

- Ruth was born about 1630 and died in Plymouth between November 30, 1644 and spring 1651. She was unmarried.

- Elizabeth was born in Plymouth about 1632 and probably died before October 6, 1659. She was unmarried. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Birth: 1581 Upper Clatford Hampshire, England Death: 1644 Plymouth Plymouth County Massachusetts, USA

Hopkins was baptized April 30, 1581 at Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England, the son of John Hopkins and Elizabeth Williams. He died between June 6, 1644 and July 17, 1644.

Not much is known about his early life in Hampshire, but his family appears to have removed to Winchester, Hampshire by 1586. His father died there in 1593, and by 1604 he had moved to Hursley, Hampshire. He was married to a woman named Mary about 1603.

He was a passenger on the Mayflower in 1620, one of forty-one signatories of the Mayflower Compact, and an assistant to the governor of Plymouth Colony through 1636. He worked as a tanner and merchant and was recruited by the Merchant Adventurers to provide the governance for the colony and assist with the colony's ventures. He is known as the only Mayflower passenger with prior New World experience being shipwrecked in Bermuda in 1609 and after rescue served for several years under Captain John Smith at the Jamestown Colony in Virginia.

Children of Stephen and Mary Hopkins, born in Hursley, Hampshire, England:

- Elizabeth was baptized on May 13, 1604. She was alive at her mother's death in 1613, but there is no further reference.

- Constance was baptized on May 11, 1606 and died in Eastham, Mass. in mid-October 1677. She married Nicholas Snow in Plymouth by May 22, 1627 and had twelve children. She was a Mayflower passenger. Her husband came over in 1623 on the 'Anne'.

- Giles was baptized on January 30, 1607/8 and died in Eastham between March 5, 1688/9 and April 16, 1690. He married Catherine Whelden in Plymouth on October 9, 1639 and had ten children. He was a Mayflower passenger. He was buried at Cove Burying Ground, Eastham, Mass

+++++++++++++++++++

Children of Stephen and Elizabeth Hopkins:

- Damaris (1) was born about 1618 in England and died young in Plymouth. Mayflower passenger.

- Oceanus was born in the fall of 1620 aboard the Mayflower. He had died by May 22, 1627.

- Caleb was born in Plymouth about 1624. He became a seaman and died at Barbados between 1644 and 1651.

- Deborah was born in Plymouth about 1626 and died probably before 1674. She married Andrew Ring at Plymouth on April 23, 1646 and had six children.

- Damaris (2) was born in Plymouth about 1627-8 and died in Plymouth between January 1665/6 and November 18, 1669. She married Jacob Cooke after June 10, 1646 and had seven children. Jacob was a son of Pilgrim Francis Cooke.

- Ruth was born about 1630 and died in Plymouth between November 30, 1644 and spring 1651. She was unmarried.

- Elizabeth was born in Plymouth about 1632 and probably died before October 6, 1659. She was unmarried.


Family links:

Spouses:
 Mary Hopkins (____ - 1613)*
 Elizabeth Fisher Hopkins*

Children:
 Elizabeth Hopkins (1604 - ____)*
 Constance Hopkins Snow (1606 - 1677)*
 Giles Hopkins (1607 - 1690)*
 Damaris Hopkins (1618 - ____)*
 Oceanus Hopkins (1620 - 1627)*
 Caleb Hopkins (1624 - ____)*
 Deborah Hopkins Ring (1626 - ____)*
 Damaris Hopkins Cooke (1628 - 1669)*
 Ruth Hopkins (1630 - ____)*
 Elizabeth Hopkins (1632 - 1659)*
  • Calculated relationship

Note: Stephen Hopkins is my 11th great grandfather


Burial: Unknown Specifically: Massachusetts


Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]


Created by: JP Fortin Record added: Sep 14, 2002 Find A Grave Memorial# 6776866 http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6776866

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Stephen Hopkins, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1581
April 30, 1581
Upper Clatford, Hampshire, England
October 29, 1581
Hursley, Hampshire, England
October 29, 1581
Hursley, Hampshire , England
October 29, 1581
October 29, 1581
Wortley, Gloucestershire, Eng.
October 29, 1581
Wortley, Wotton Underedge, Gloucestershire, England
October 29, 1581
October 29, 1581
Wortley, Wotton Underedge, Gloucestershire, England
October 29, 1581
Wortley,Wotton Underedge,Gloucestershire,England
October 29, 1581