William Hutchinson

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William Hutchinson

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Alford, Lincolnshire, England, UK
Death: Died in Newport, Newport, RI, USA
Place of Burial: Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Edward Hutchinson and Susanna Hutchinson
Husband of Anne Marbury Hutchinson
Father of Samuel Hutchinson; Anne Hutchinson; Capt. Edward Hutchinson, Jr.; Richard Hutchinson; Faith Savage (Hutchinson) and 10 others
Brother of Theophilus Hutchinson; Samuel Hutchinson; Esther Hutchinson; John Hutchinson; Richard "Ironmonger" Hutchinson and 4 others

Occupation: Textile Merchant & Military Captain, Became Judge (Governor) of Rhode Island, Textile Merchant, 1634 "Griffin", Settler, Judge, Deputy to Gov Coddinton of Colonial Rhode Island, sheep farmer/ textile merchant
Managed by: Sherry Cadenhead Klein
Last Updated:

About William Hutchinson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hutchinson_(Rhode_Island)

A BIOGRAPHY OF WILLIAM HUTCHINSON, by Larry Overmire: William Hutchinson immigrated with his family in 1634 on the "Griffin," settling initially in Boston. Because of the uproar over his wife's religious views, William moved the family to Rhode Island, where, with the help of Roger Williams, he received permission from the Narragansett Indians to homestead on Aquidneck Island. The family flourished. Anne continued to preach. After William died, fearing that Aquidneck would be taken over by Massachusetts, Anne moved the family to the Dutch colony on Long Island in New York. The Dutch had very poor relations with the local Indians. Anne and five of her children were killed in an Indian raid in 1643.

"WILLIAM, Boston, came in the ship with Rev. John Lathrop and Zechary Symmes, 1634, bring. w. and all his ch. exc. Edward, his eldest s. wh. came with Cotton the former yr. and d. Mary, w. of Rev. John Wheelwright, wh. came two yrs. later. He arr. in Sept. and next mo. unit. with our ch. He had liv. at Alford, in Co. Lincoln, a. 25 ms. from Boston, and prob. both hims. and w. Ann, d. of Rev. Edward Marbury of Lincolnsh. were drawn hither by their admira. of John Cotton. He was freem. 4 Mar. 1635, and two s. Richard and Francis were adm. the same day; rep. May 1635, and four courts foll. had one ch. Zuriel, bapt. 13 Mar. 1636; but by the viol. heats of the relig. controv. in wh. his friends, Sir Henry Vane and John Cotton were defeat. and his fam. beside others of the party very severely treat. he was forced, with Coddington and other promin. men, to rem. to R. I. there in 1638, form. a new civil compact, not much unlike that of Mass. was an Assist. 1639, and d. a. 1642. His wid. Ann, wh. had been the gifted prophetess of the doleful heresies that shook and almost subvert. the col. of Mass. rem. next yr. from R. I. beyond Conn. to the Dutch Prov. and bef. being, fairly estab. in her new planta. was, with sev. ch. and serv. to the number of sixteen, cut off by the Ind. His d. Faith m. at Boston a. 1637, Thomas Savage; Susanna m. 30 Dec. 1651, John Cole; Bridget m. a Willis of Bridgewater, whose bapt. name is unkn.; and one m. Collins, a scholar, of wh. Winthrop II. 38, tells. This last, and the s. Francis perish. with their mo. The wid. Susanna, mo. of Edward, Richard, Samuel, William, of the w. of Rishworth, and of Mary, the w. of Wheelwright, went from Boston to Exeter with her ds. h. in his banishm. and thence to Wells, where she was bur. By the Edit. in our days of the Memoirs of Col. John Hutchinson, the regicide, writ. by the charming pen of his Lady Lucy, a tradit. is giv. that one of the gr.s. of the warlike puritan emigr. "to the West Indies or America." But the common looseness of tradit. and the unusual carelessness of the Rev. publisher, in his story of seeing somebody from the W. world, wh. told him of the venerat. in wh. that gent.'s descend. were held on our side of the Atlantic, are equally unworthy of regard. Thirteen of this name had been gr. at Harv. in 1770, and none since." --James Savage

Presidents Franklin Delano Roosevelt, George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush, First Ladies Lucretia Rudolph (Mrs. James Garfield) and Frances Folsom (Mrs. Grover Cleveland), U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Attorney General Elliot Richardson, Lord Lyndhurst John Singleton Copley, genealogist James Savage, Happy Rockefeller, Mrs. George Gordon Meade, Phyllis Livingston Baker (Mrs. Fred Astaire), suspected murderer Lizzie Borden, poet Robert Lowell, writers Caroline Howard Gilman, DuBose Heyward and J. P. Marquand, and presumably Marilyn Monroe are descendants.

William Hutchinson (August 14, 1586 – 1642) was a prominent merchant and judge in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one of the founders of Rhode Island.

Hutchinson was born in Alford, Lincolnshire, England. His parents were Edward Hutchinson (1564-1631) and Susanna Wheelright (1564-1645). On August 9, 1612 he married Anne Marbury (1591-1643), the daughter of Rev. Francis Marbury (1555-1611) and Bridget Dryden (1563-1645). They were married in London, where William had become a merchant.

On September 18, 1634 the Hutchinsons, along with eight other family members, arrived in Boston aboard the ship Griffin. They were devout Puritans and wanted to join Rev. John Cotton who had migrated there earlier.

In 1635 Hutchinson was elected a judge and in 1636 he was elected a deputy.

Hutchinson supported his wife Anne during her conflicts with some of the Puritan authorities, including Governor John Winthrop. Anne was imprisoned and she and her followers were banished. Hutchinson went on a fact-finding tour led by John Clarke to Providence Plantations. After consulting with Roger Williams, they decided to settle on Aquidneck Island, which later became Rhode Island and was a part, first, of the Colony of Rhode Island, and eventually, of the state of Rhode Island.

Back in Boston, Hutchinson and the other supporters of his wife signed the Portsmouth Compact on March 7, 1638. Then they moved to Aquidneck and founded the town of Portsmouth on land that they purchased from the local Native Americans.

After the first leader of Portsmouth, William Coddington moved away to found Newport, Hutchinson became the leader of the Portsmouth settlement. In 1640 He was elected assistant to Coddington, who was now the governor of the Colony of Rhode Island. Two years later he died, and his widow moved with some of her surviving children to New York, where she and all but one of the children with her were killed by Native Americans in 1643.

Hutchinson's son Edward was a military captain who died in battle during King Philip's War.

Other children included: Susanna, Richard, Faith, Bridget, Francis, Elizabeth, William, Samuel, Anne, Mary, Katherine, Susanna, and Zuriel.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hutchinson_(Rhode_Island)'''"

-------------------- William Hutchinson (August 14, 1586 – 1642) was a prominent merchant and judge in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one of the founders of Rhode Island.

Hutchinson was born in Alford, Lincolnshire, England. His parents were Edward Hutchinson (1564-1631) and Susanna Wheelright (1564-1645). On August 9, 1612 he married Anne Marbury (1591-1643), the daughter of Rev. Francis Marbury (1555-1611) and Bridget Dryden (1563-1645). They were married in London, where William had become a merchant.

On September 18, 1634 the Hutchinsons, along with eight other family members, arrived in Boston aboard the ship Griffin. They were devout Puritans and wanted to join Rev. John Cotton who had migrated there earlier.

In 1635 Hutchinson was elected a judge and in 1636 he was elected a deputy.

Hutchinson supported his wife Anne during her conflicts with some of the Puritan authorities, including Governor John Winthrop. Anne was imprisoned and she and her followers were banished. Hutchinson went on a fact-finding tour led by John Clarke to Providence Plantations. After consulting with Roger Williams, they decided to settle on Aquidneck Island, which later became Rhode Island and was a part, first, of the Colony of Rhode Island, and eventually, of the state of Rhode Island.

Back in Boston, Hutchinson and the other supporters of his wife signed the Portsmouth Compact on March 7, 1638. Then they moved to Aquidneck and founded the town of Portsmouth on land that they purchased from the local Native Americans.

After the first leader of Portsmouth, William Coddington moved away to found Newport, Hutchinson became the leader of the Portsmouth settlement. In 1640 He was elected assistant to Coddington, who was now the governor of the Colony of Rhode Island. Two years later he died, and his widow moved with some of her surviving children to New York, where she and all but one of the children with her were killed by Native Americans in 1643.

Hutchinson's son Edward was a military captain who died in battle during King Philip's War.

Other children included: Susanna, Richard, Faith, Bridget, Francis, Elizabeth, William, Samuel, Anne, Mary, Katherine, Susanna, and Zuriel.

-------------------- Was a sheep farmer, textile merchant. Puritan

-------------------- William Hutchinson Gentleman1 M, b. 14 August 1586, d. 1642, #466

Father Edward Hutchinson2,3,4,1 b. circa 1564, d. 1632 Mother Susanna (?)2,4,1 b. 1564, d. 1646 Pop-up Pedigree

Charts Pedigree for Parley Parker Pratt Pedigree for Winifred Dean Reference 2QVT-1V

Birth William Hutchinson Gentleman was born in 1586 at Alford, Lincoln, England.4 Christening* He was christened on 14 August 1586 at Alford, Lincolnshire, England.5,3,1 Marriage* He married Anne Marbury, daughter of Rev. Francis Marbury and Bridget Dryden, on 9 August 1612 at St. Mary Woolnoth, London, Middlesex, England.6,5,7,3,8,1 Emigration* He and Anne Marbury emigrated on 18 September 1634 from Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts; on the ship "Griffin".7,8,1 Event-Misc He was admitted to full communion on 10 October 1634 at First Church, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.4 Occupation* He was deputy to the General Court between 1635 and 1636 at Boston, Suffok, Massachusetts.1 Event-Misc* He was made freeman. On 4 March 1635 at Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.4 Death He died after June 1641.1 Death* He died in 1642 at Boston, MA.6,3,4,1 Burial* He was buried in 1642 at Prob, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. Baptism He witnessed the baptism of William Hutchinson Gentleman on 29 December 1934. Note* Info. source: Alford, Lincoln, Eng., Vol. 5, pp. 30-37, 39,41; Report of Record Comm. 1888; Vital Rec. 1630-1699 Boston.


Wife: Anne Marbury b. 20 July 1591, d. 20 September 1643

Children Capt. Edward Hutchinson b. 28 May 1613, d. 19 Aug 1675 Susanna Hutchinson b. 4 Sep 1614, d. Sep 1630 Richard Hutchinson b. 8 Dec 1615, d. 1645 Faith Hutchinson b. 14 Aug 1617, d. 20 Feb 1650/51 Bridget Hutchinson b. 15 Jan 1618/19, d. 29 Sep 1696 Francis Hutchinson b. 24 Dec 1620, d. 20 Sep 1643 Elizabeth Hutchinson b. 15 Feb 1622, d. Oct 1630 William Hutchinson b. 22 Jun 1623 Samuel Hutchinson b. 17 Dec 1624, d. 20 Sep 1643 Anne Hutchinson b. 5 May 1626, d. 20 Sep 1643 Mary Hutchinson b. 22 Feb 1627/28, d. 20 Sep 1643 Katherine Hutchinson b. 7 Feb 1629/30, d. 20 Sep 1643 William Hutchinson b. 28 Sep 1631, d. 20 Sep 1643 Susanna Hutchinson b. 15 Nov 1633, d. 1713 Zuryell Hutchinson b. 13 Mar 1636/37, d. 20 Sep 1643

Last Edited 28 May 2004

Citations [S284] Douglas Richardson, Plantagenet Ancestry, p 493. [S182] Joseph Lemuel Chester, "Hutchinson Family", p. 360. [S233] Frederick Lewis Weis, Magna Charta Sureties, 34-17. [S281] Marston Watson, Reverend Francis Marbury, p. 4. [S182] Joseph Lemuel Chester, "Hutchinson Family", p. 363. [S168] Frederick Lewis Weis, Ancestral Roots, 14-41. [S183] Jr. Meredith B. Colket, Marbury Ancestry, p. 33. [S281] Marston Watson, Reverend Francis Marbury, p. 2.

--------------------

William Hutchinson (Aug 14 1586-1642) was a prominent merchant and judge in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one of the founders of Rhode Island. Hutchinson was born in Alford, Lincolnshire, England. His parents were Edward Hutchinson (1564-1631) and Susanna Wheelright (1564-1645). On August 9, 1612 he married Anne Marbury (1591-1643), the daughter of Rev. Francis Marbury (1555-1611) and Bridget Dryden (1563-1645). They were married in London, where William had become a merchant. On September 18, 1634 the Hutchinsons, along with eight other family members, arrived in Boston aboard the ship Griffin. They were devout Puritans and wanted to join Rev. John Cotton who had migrated there earlier. In 1635 Hutchinson was elected a judge and in 1636 he was elected a deputy. Hutchinson supported his wife Anne during her conflicts with some of the Puritan authorities, including Governor John Winthrop. Anne was imprisoned and she and her followers were banished. Hutchinson went on a fact-finding tour led by John Clarke to Providence Plantations. After consulting with Roger Williams, they decided to settle on Aquidneck Island, which later became Rhode Island and was a part, first, of the Colony of Rhode Island, and eventually, of the state of Rhode Island. Back in Boston, Hutchinson and the other supporters of his wife signed the Portsmouth Compact on March 7, 1638. Then they moved to Aquidneck and founded the town of Portsmouth on land that they purchased from the local Native Americans. After the first leader of Portsmouth, William Coddington moved away to found Newport, Hutchinson became the leader of the Portsmouth settlement. In 1640 He was elected assistant to Coddington, who was now the governor of the Colony of Rhode Island. Two years later he died, and his widow moved with some of her surviving children to New York, where she and all but one of the children with her were killed by Native Americans in 1643. Hutchinson's son Edward was a military captain who died in battle during King Philip's War. Other children included: Susanna, Richard, Faith, Bridget, Francis, Elizabeth, William, Samuel, Anne, Mary, Katherine, Susanna, and Zuriel. --------------------

Sheep Farmer and Textile Merchant marriage to Anne Marbury immigration to USA Abt. 1634 left U.K. aboard the ship Griffin bound for New England religion was Puritan

His daughter Katherine could NOT be the Katherine who married John Walker based on the following information [P Scoggin]:

From: http://www.longislandsurnames.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I0835&tree=Dodge''' Email from D. M. Kenyon Feb 27, 2012

John Walker did not marry Catherine Hutchinson as commonly broadcast on Ancestry.com. His will indicates that his wife's name was "Katherine", but no maiden name is given. The Catherine Hutchinson that died in 1643 was the young, unmarried, childless teenage daughter of Anne Hutchinson of Puritan fame. Catherine was killed with her mother in an indian attack in 1643.

John Walker's wife is currently a historical mystery. '''He registers at the church in Roxbury in 1633 or 1634 as being married to a Katherine. Catherine Hutchinson [born in 1629] would have been five years old at that time.'''
  • Note: William Hutchinson was a prominent merchant and judge in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one of the founders of Rhode Island. William was born August 14, 1586 at Alford, Lincolnshire, England and died in 1642 at Newport, Rhode Island. William, a wealthy sheep farmer and textile merchant, married Anne Marbury on August 9, 1612 at Saint Mary Woolnoth, Lincoln, England. William and Anne made their home in Alford where fourteen of their children were born. (The fifteenth would be born in America.) The Hutchinson family came to New England in the ship Griffin, landing at Boston, September 18, 1634. The family consisted of William's widowed mother, Mrs. Susanna Hutchinson; a younger sister of Anne's, Katherine Marbury, about 24 years old; and William and Anne's eleven children (three died young in Alford). William was made freeman with his sons Richard and Francis on March 4, 1635. William became very active politically. Already elected a deputy to the General Court in May 1635 (representing the approximately one hundred freemen of Boston whose attendance at all meetings of the legislature would have been too cumbersome), he was additionally honored by his Boston neighbors who chose him as Boston selectman, responsible for local problems such as maintenance of roads, prevention of fire, allotment of land (a post to which he would be elected three more times, serving four consecutive six-month terms.) At the same time, the court appointed him appraiser to settle small cases in the so-called particular courts. In consequence of the Antinomian controversy, which resulted in the banishment of his wife, William removed with most of his family in 1638 to Rhode Island. As first treasurer of the new colony, he succeeded William Coddington as Judge (Governor) on the formation in 1639 of the Newport Colony. In 1640, on the union of the two towns, when Coddington was elected Governor, William was chosen one of the Assistants. William died in Newport in 1642. His widow, Anne and her younger children moved to Pelham Bay, New York where a year later, they were massacred by Indians.

-------------------- (f/g) William Hutchinson Birth: Aug. 14, 1586 Lincolnshire, England Death: 1642 Boston Suffolk County Massachusetts, USA

William Hutchinson was a prominent merchant and judge in the Massachusetts Bay Colony and one of the founders of Rhode Island. . .

  • see f/g # 22328205 for extended bio

Family links:

Spouse:
 Anne Marbury Hutchinson (1595 - 1643) 
Children:
 Edward Hutchinson (1613 - 1675)*
 Susanna Hutchinson (1614 - 1630)*
 Richard Hutchinson (1615 - 1670)*
 Faith Hutchinson Savage (1617 - 1651)*
 Bridget Hutchison Sanford Phillips (1618 - 1698)*
 Francis Hutchinson (1620 - 1643)*
 William Hutchinson (1623 - 1643)*
 Samuel Hutchinson (1624 - 1643)*
 Anne Hutchinson Collins (1626 - 1643)*
 Mary Hutchinson (1627 - 1643)*
 Katherine Hutchinson (1630 - 1643)*
 Susannah Hutchinson Cole (1633 - 1713)*
 Zuriel Hutchinson (1636 - 1643)

Burial: Kings Chapel Burying Ground Boston Suffolk County Massachusetts, USA Plot: Per "Patriots, Preachers, & Plain Folks" by Wells & Wells, available for sale at King's Chapel, the grave location for this person is unknown. Therefore and regrettably, there is nothing to photograph. Created by: Ryan Curtis Record added: Oct 21, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 22328205 -tcd -------------------- William Hutchinson (1586–1641) was a judge (chief magistrate) of the Colony of Portsmouth on the island of Aquidneck, also known as Rhode Island (and later a part of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations). Sailing from England to New England with his large family in 1634, he became a merchant in Boston and served as both Deputy to the General Court and selectman. In Boston, his wife, the famed Anne Hutchinson, became embroiled in a theological controversy with the Puritan leaders of the colony, resulting in her banishment in 1638. Hutchinson and 18 others departed with her to form the new settlement of Pocasset on the Narragansett Bay, renamed Portsmouth, one of the original towns in the Rhode Island colony.

In Portsmouth, Hutchinson became treasurer, then, in 1639 when controversy compelled the judge (governor) of the town, William Coddington to relocate and found the town of Newport, Hutchinson became the chief magistrate of Portsmouth, which lasted for less than a year. Hutchinson died shortly after June 1641, after which his widow and many of her younger children moved to New Netherland (later in the Bronx in New York City). Mrs. Hutchinson and all but one of her children perished in a massacre which sprang from tensions between the Dutch and the Indians. William Hutchinson was described by Governor John Winthrop as being mild tempered, somewhat weak, and living within the shadow of his prominent and outspoken wife.

Born into a prominent Lincolnshire family, William Hutchinson was the grandson of John Hutchinson (1515–1565) who had been Sheriff, Alderman, and Mayor of the town of Lincoln, dying in office during his second term as mayor.[1] John's youngest son, Edward (1564–1632), moved to Alford and with his wife, Susanna, had 11 children, the oldest of whom was William, who was baptized 14 August 1586 in Alford.[1]

William Hutchinson grew up in Alford, where he was the warden of his church in 1620 and 1621, and after becoming a merchant in the cloth trade he moved to London.[2] Here he became close to an old acquaintance from Alford, Anne Marbury, the daughter of Francis Marbury and Bridget Dryden, and the couple was married on 9 August 1612 at the Church of Saint Mary Woolnoth on Lombard Street in London.[1][3] Anne's father was a clergyman, school master, and Puritan reformer who was educated at Cambridge.[4]

Hutchinson and his wife raised a large family in Alford, as he prospered in his business. The couple had 14 children in England, one of whom died in infancy, and two of whom died from the plague. The Hutchinsons, particularly Anne, became very enamored with the preaching of the Reverend John Cotton who was the vicar of Saint Botolph's Church in the town of Boston, about 21 miles from Alford.[1] The Hutchinsons made the day-long round trip to Boston whenever they could to hear Cotton preach, but Cotton had strong Puritan sympathies, and when Archbishop William Laud began cracking down on those whose opinions differed from those of the established Anglican church, Cotton was forced into hiding, and then had to flee the country to avoid imprisonment.[1] Mrs. Hutchinson was distraught to lose her mentor, and the Hutchinsons would have sailed with Cotton to New England aboard the ship Griffin in 1633, but Mrs. Hutchinson's 14th pregnancy kept the family from leaving. However, with the intention of following Cotton to New England as soon as they could, the Hutchinsons sent their oldest son, 20-year old Edward, under the care of Cotton.[1] William Hutchinson's youngest brother, also named Edward, was also aboard the same ship with his wife.[1]

In 1634 William Hutchinson, his wife Anne, and his other ten children sailed from England to New England on the Griffin, the same ship that had taken Cotton and their oldest son a year earlier, and the family first resided at Boston where Hutchinson was admitted to the Boston Church on 26 October 1634, and his wife was admitted seven days later.[5] He became a merchant in Boston and took the freeman's oath there in 1635.[6] He was one of the town's Deputies to the Massachusetts Bay General Court from 1635 to 1636, and was also a selectman from 1635 to 1637, attending a selectmen's meeting for the last time in January 1638 as his tenure in Boston was coming to an end.[7]

Hutchinson's wife was described by historian Thomas W. Bicknell as "a pure and excellent woman, to whose person and conduct there attaches no stain."[6] She was helpful to the sick and needy, and gifted in argument and ready speech, but she saw theological doctrines a little differently than the Puritan elders.[6] In late 1636 Governor John Winthrop gave the first warning of an issue that would consume his attention, and that of other Boston leaders, for the next two years. He wrote that Mrs. Hutchinson, "a woman of ready wit and bold spirit," had brought with her two dangerous theological errors, elaborating upon them in his journal.[8] She was holding private meetings at her home, drawing many people from Boston as well as other towns, including many prominent citizens, and entreating them to a religious view that was antithetical to the rigid orthodoxy of the Puritan church.[8] As the situation worsened, Mrs. Hutchinson was put on trial in November 1637, convicted, and banished from the colony along with some of her followers.[8] To put the expulsion into perspective, Bicknell wrote in his 20th century history of Rhode Island:

The real gist of the matter as between the Puritans of the Bay and the men and women whom they persecuted and banished was this, that the former came to the New World to establish a State Church while the latter came for the sake of freer thought in civil and religious concerns. The Boston Puritan had no use for a Baptist, a Quaker, A Churchman, a Roman Catholic, or in fact for any who differed in doctrine from them. Error in religion as they interpreted it was treason to the State. It threatened the solidarity of Puritanism, which as Cotton Mather interpreted it was Puritans only in a Puritan Commonwealth.[6]

— Thomas W. Bicknell, historian

The court order banishing her reads: "Mrs. Anne Hutchinson (the wife of William Hutchinson) being convented for traducing the ministers and their ministry in this country, shee declared volentarily her revelations for her ground, & that shee should bee delivered & the Court ruined, with their posterity & thereupon was banished, & the meanwhile was committed to Mr. Joseph Weld untill the Court shall dispose of her."[9] On 12 March 1638 it was ordered that she must be gone by the end of the month.[10]

On 7 March 1638, before leaving Boston, William Hutchinson and other supporters of his wife signed an instrument, sometimes called the Portsmouth Compact, agreeing to form a non-sectarian government that was Christian in character.[11] The group of signers considered going to New Netherland, but Roger Williams suggested they purchase some land on the Narragansett Bay from the Indians, which they did. They settled on the island of Aquidneck (an island called Rhode Island, whose name was later given to the entire colony and state), and formed the settlement of Pocasset, renamed Portsmouth in 1639. In June 1638 Hutchinson was the treasurer of the town and William Coddington was called judge, the name given to the chief magistrate of the settlement.[7] The following year a disagreement prompted Coddington and a few other leaders to leave Portsmouth and begin a new settlement at the south end of the island called Newport. Hutchinson became the judge (governor) of the Portsmouth settlement from 1639 until 12 March 1640, when Portsmouth united with Newport to become the Colony of Rhode Island, with Coddington elected as governor of the two-town colony, and Hutchinson becoming one of his assistants.[10] In his journal, Governor Winthrop described the 1639 disagreement in Portsmouth, writing, "the people grew very tumultuous and put out Mr. Coddington and the other three magistrates, and chose Mr. William Hutchinson only, a man of very mild temper and weak parts, and wholly guided by his wife, who had been the beginner of all the former troubles in the country and still continued to breed disturbance."[8]

Hutchinson died in Portsmouth shortly after June 1641, after which his widow left Rhode Island to live in the part of New Netherland that later was on the border between the Bronx and Westchester County, New York. Here, as the result of tensions between the Dutch and the Native Americans, she, six of her children, a son-in-law, and as many as seven others (likely servants) were massacred by Native Americans in late summer 1643.[3][10]

William and Anne Hutchinson had 15 children, all but the last one being born in England. The oldest child, Edward, was a military captain who died from wounds suffered at the battle known as Wheeler's Surprise during King Philip's War.[12] The fourth child, Faith, married Thomas Savage, a Boston soldier and merchant, and the fifth child, Bridget, married John Sanford who succeeded William Coddington as Governor of (the two towns of) Rhode Island following the repeal of the Coddington Commission.[13][14] Their 14th child, Susanna was the only survivor of the Indian attack that killed her mother and six of her siblings, and was taken captive for several years.[15] Hutchinson's sister Mary was the wife of the Reverend John Wheelwright, another banished minister who founded Exeter, New Hampshire.[16] Prominent descendants of William and Anne Hutchinston include U.S. Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt, George H. W. Bush and George W. Bush.[17]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hutchinson_(Rhode_Island)

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William Hutchinson's Timeline

1586
August 14, 1586
Alford, Lincolnshire, England, UK
August 14, 1586
Alford, Lincolnshire, England, (Present UK)
August 14, 1586
Alford, Lincoln, England
August 14, 1586
Alford, Somerset, England
August 14, 1586
Alford, Somerset, England
August 14, 1586
Alford, Somerset, England
August 14, 1586
Alford, Somerset, England
1590
November 1, 1590
Age 4
Alford, Lincolnshire, England
1591
1591
Age 4
Alford, Lincolnshire, England
1612
August 9, 1612
Age 25
London, Middlesex, England, (Present UK)