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Anglo Boere Oorlog/Boer War (1899-1902) UITENHAGE Kamp/Camp

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Uitenhage

People in this camp

1061

People who died in this camp

13

Uitenhage was the third of the camps that the ORC authorities established at the coast [see East London for further details]. Louis Mansergh, the Cape Colony secretary of public works, who was responsible for constructing the coastal camps, considered that the site was an ideal one, slightly protected from the prevailing south-east wind and close to an ‘inexhaustible’ water supply of ‘exceptional purity’.It was built on the Uitenhage municipal commonage, known as‘Pannell’s Hill’, about two and a half miles from the town. The area of the camp was about 140 acres, surrounded by heavy bush. This was a disadvantage for Mansergh feared that highveld children, who were not used to the bush, might stray and get lost, so he was anxious that the camp should be properly secured and some of the bush cleared.1 Initially the local authorities were unenthusiastic about the prospect of having a Boer camp so close to the town. South Africa’s‘sanitation syndrome’ in which outsiders, be they Chinese, Indian, African or Boer, were suspected of being a health hazard, came into play. The municipality claimed the right to inspect the sanitary arrangements of the camp, for instance, to which the ORC agreed reluctantly provided that a qualified inspector was used. The town council as a body was banned from the camp, however. Once this hurdle had been overcome, the Uitenhage mayor took a keen interest in the camp, visiting the site to inspect its progress . Local merchants now hoped that they might benefit from the construction of the camp and the supply of the inmates, although the value for local business must have been limited since the camp authorities tended to favour the contractors they knew.2 Despite favourable reports, for some time the camp authorities dithered about going ahead with Uitenhage but, in the end, decided to do so. At the end of February 1902 the ORC people hoped that the camp would be ready by 7 April. The Governor the Cape, Sir William Hely Hutchinson, who visited the site at the end of January 1902, also thought the location ideal, close to the railway, well drained with‘convenient smooth sward’. He suspected, however, that the estimate that the camp would be ready in six weeks’ time was overoptimistic.3 A breakdown in communications between the ORC and Louis Mansergh did threaten the opening of the camp. Provision had not been made in time for English nurses and teachers, nor for an assistant superintendent, the newly-appointed superintendent, Frank Richards explained. However, this difficulty was soon rectified. The chief superintendent was also concerned that the staff should be in place and working well before any inmates were sent down from the ORC. He wanted to ensure, too, that the journey should not be unreasonably uncomfortable. While the families had to travel in open trucks, they were to be cleaned properly and provision had to be made for latrine stops. Hot water should also be provided at the various stations http://www2.lib.uct.ac.za/mss/bccd/Histories/Uitenhage/

Blue names Geni Profiles

Black names Not on Geni Yet

They survived

A

B

  • Barnard, Hendrik Christoffel (32) Unique ID 90706 with wife and 4 daughters. One died in Bethulie Camp.
  • Camp History: 28/10/1901 -24/4/1902 Bethulie then transferred to
  • Uitenhage Camp: 26/4/1902-19/8/1902
  • Tranferred to Springfontein on 29/8/1902 to go back to farm.
  • Farm History: Driefontein, Philippolis OVS
  • Barnard, (Mev) Aletta Susanna Catharina (30) Unique ID 90707 with husband and 4 daughters. One died in Bethulie Camp.
  • Camp History: 28/10/1901 -24/4/1902 Bethulie then transferred to
  • Uitenhage Camp: 26/4/1902-19/8/1902
  • Tranferred to Springfontein on 29/8/1902 to go back to farm.
  • Farm History: Driefontein, Philippolis OVS
  • Barnard, Gertina Marie (10) Unique ID 90708 with parents and 3 sisters. One died in Bethulie Camp.
  • Camp History: 28/10/1901 -24/4/1902 Bethulie then transferred to
  • Uitenhage Camp: 26/4/1902-19/8/1902
  • Tranferred to Springfontein on 29/8/1902 to go back to farm.
  • Farm History: Driefontein, Philippolis OVS
  • Barnard, Christina Catharina (7) Unique ID 90709 with parents and 3 sisters. One died in Bethulie Camp.
  • Camp History: 28/10/1901 -24/4/1902 Bethulie then transferred to
  • Uitenhage Camp: 26/4/1902-19/8/1902
  • Tranferred to Springfontein on 29/8/1902 to go back to farm.
  • Farm History: Driefontein, Philippolis OVS
  • Barnard, Aletta Susanna Catharina (5) Unique ID 90710 with parents and 3 sisters. One died in Bethulie Camp.
  • Camp History: 28/10/1901 -24/4/1902 Bethulie then transferred to
  • Uitenhage Camp: 26/4/1902-19/8/1902
  • Tranferred to Springfontein on 29/8/1902 to go back to farm.
  • Farm History: Driefontein, Philippolis OVS

They died in Uitenhage Camp

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

J

K

  • Kruger, Izak Jacobus (33) Phneumonia
  • Farm History> Rooiwal/Roodewal/Roodeheuvel, Bloemfontein

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  4. Select the ABO ===Uitenhage===" project

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