Geni Tips: Clean Up Your Merge Center

Posted March 30, 2018 by Amanda | 12 Comments

Spring is here! As you start your spring cleaning in your home, you may also want to make time to do a little spring cleaning in your Merge Center too. Do you recall the last time you took a look at your Requested Merges, Tree Conflicts, or Data Conflicts? It’s easy to forget to check these when you are busy adding new branches.

Take a fresh look at some of these pending requests and conflicts to clean up your family tree on Geni.

Geni Tips: Clean Up Your Merge Center

Don’t forget, you can adjust what profiles you view in each list by changing the dropdown at the top right. You can choose to view a list of just your relatives, profiles you follow, profiles you manage, profiles managed by all your collaborators, or profiles managed by a specific collaborator.

Requested Merges

Geni Tips: Clean Up Your Merge Center

Take a moment to review any requested merges you may have sitting in your Merge Center. Requested merges are merges proposed by other Geni users who believe they have found duplicates to profiles for your family or those that you manage. These requests may even be coming from a new relative who is trying to connect to the World Family Tree. Completing merges is free for everyone. So, if you have pending merge requests, take a moment to review them and help confirm the ones that are correct.

Tree Conflicts

Have you taken a look at the status of your tree lately? While completing a large number of merges, it’s easy to miss duplicates here or there. Tree Conflicts occur when a profile has been merged, but there are still duplicate profiles remaining in the immediate family. Unresolved Tree Conflicts can be frustrating because they tend to leave the tree in a very messy state. Do yourself and others a favor by cleaning up these Tree Conflicts by merging the remaining duplicates. View the list of your Tree Conflicts in your Merge Center to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

Geni Tips: Clean Up Your Merge Center

If you are on the tree page, a yellow triangle will appear at the bottom right corner of the node to indicate a Tree Conflict.

Keep an eye out for conflicting parents, spouses or even children. If you find that there was an incorrect merge, you can reach out to a volunteer curator for assistance in undoing the merge.

Data Conflicts

Geni Tips: Clean Up Your Merge Center

Another area that is often forgotten after a merge are Data Conflicts. Data conflicts arise when two profiles have merged but some of the information on the profiles do not match. When this happens, you can review a side-by-side comparison of the data to determine which is the best information for the profile. You can access all your Data Conflicts in your Merge Center or directly from a profile page. If on a profile page, click ‘Actions’ and select ‘Resolve Conflicting Data.’

If you don’t have the necessary edit permissions to resolve the conflict, a request will be sent to the profile manager to resolve the data conflict on the profile along with your suggestions on which data to keep.

Start cleaning up your Merge Center now!

Post written by Amanda

Amanda is the Social Media Coordinator at Geni. If you need any assistance, she will be happy to help!

See all posts by

Share:

  • http://www.tostieproductions.com kevintostado

    I would love to clean up my Merge Center notifications, but it is requiring me to have a Pro account to deal with most of them.

    • geniblog

      A Pro account is required to resolve Tree Matches. You should be able to resolve pending merges, tree conflicts and data conflicts for profiles you have permission to edit.

  • Fabio Zugno

    I joined Geni because the connections between family groups fascinate me. A Geni user told me that “designed for teamwork” profiles can be freely edited. I tried to add missing people and marriages to the profiles of others; the system allowed the changes, but strangely attributed it to the administrator (unaware). As a beginner, I do not understand this mechanism. I have identified many cases that require a “merge” (according to the spirit of Geni) but I think that the approval of the directors involved is required.

    • geniblog

      Hi Fabio, can you please provide a link to an example of where a change was attributed to the wrong person? If you have added a new profile, then your name will be listed as the person who added the profile and as a manager of the profile. If you have updated an existing profile, then your name will appear in the profile’s revision tab as the person who updated the information. As for merges, if you do not have the necessary permissions to complete a merge, you can create a pending merge which will send a notification to the profile managers to review and approve. If you need assistance with merges, you can contact a volunteer curator in this public discussion https://www.geni.com/discussions/178003

      • Fabio Zugno

        Thank you for your reply. Maybe I was wrong about editing profiles, but the problem of duplicate people is real. For the moment, I’m tackling it by writing my reports directly in the profiles. Messages rarely have an answer. This is an emblematic example of duplicates:

        https://www.geni.com/people/Gustava-Woldstedt/6000000077510035072

        • geniblog

          If the profile managers are not responding, you may want to reach out to a volunteer curator for assistance merging the profiles. You can post your request in this public discussion https://www.geni.com/discussions/178003 . We’d also recommend sending collaboration requests to the mangers and curators. Once a collaboration request is accepted, you will be able to merge each other’s public profiles without needing to wait for approval.

  • amhuizar

    I joined Geni because I had maxed out on the number of ancestors I could add to my tree using the free version of My Heritage and could still see matches through that site. The problems I have run into are extremely frustrating. When other Geni members add branches to my tree it invariably creates duplicates which don’t show up in my merge center. Quite often when I try to move these profiles to indicate they are the same person they repeatedly bounce back to their original position and I get a little popup telling me to drop them on a node which I am not allowed to do. My parents share a common ancestor which I am unable to move, I frequently am informed that certain ancestors have too many sets of parents who are just double entries of the same person but I can’t just delete either entry but must say one set is adoptive or just ignore it. While I appreciate taking advantage of the work of others to fill out my tree, which we all know can be extremely time consuming, I had been doing my best to verify any additions I made. With the thousands of entries for branches I had never even been aware of being added to my tree it makes not only trying to authenticate these relationships impossible but cleaning up as well. Thanks for listening to my rant.

    • geniblog

      Hi, from your description about multiple sets of parents, it sounds like you may have some unresolved tree conflicts. In the tree view, click on the yellow triangle at the bottom left corner of the node with multiple sets of parents. Then drag and drop the duplicate entries to merge them. You should be taken to the merge compare page where you will be able to complete the merges. If you need additional assistance completing a merge, you can reach out to a volunteer curator for help. Simply post your request in this public discussion https://www.geni.com/discussions/178003

      • amhuizar

        Thank you. Do you have any suggestions on how I can move my parent’s common relative to join the branches?

        • geniblog

          Which profile are you trying to move?

          • amhuizar

            I’m not sure how much info you need but Mary Crane (Backus) 1632-1717 wife of Benjamin Crane 1630-1691 is a direct ancestor of my mother. Her brother Lt. William Backus 1634-1721 is a direct ancestor of my father. Both were children of William Backus (Backhouse) “the Immigrant” 1606-1664 and Elizabeth Ellen Cook 1603-1643.

          • geniblog

            It appears they are already connected. You can see them in your parents’ Ancestor Reports. On your mother ‘s or father’s profile, click ‘Actions’ and select ‘Ancestor Report.’ Adjust the number of generations to display. You should their names in the list of ancestors.