Christopher Woodward, Jr.

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Christopher Woodward, Jr.

Birthdate: (33)
Birthplace: Lambeth, surrey, England
Death: August 25, 1627 (33)
Westover, Charles City, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Christopher Woodward, Sr. and Elizabeth Oldbury, of Oldbury
Husband of Dorothy Woodward and Catherine Woodward
Father of Samuel Woodward; Christopher Woodward, III; Francis Woodward; George Woodward; Lancelot Woodward and 7 others
Brother of John Woodward; Thomas Woodward; Henry Woodward; Susan King/ Walton and Rebecca Sayer
Half brother of Ann Brown/ Bromfield; Catherine Bacoeman; Elizabeth Saracole and Sarah Emerson

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Christopher Woodward, Jr.

  • Encyclopedia of Virginia biography Vol. 1 by Tyler, Lyon Gardiner
  • https://archive.org/details/encyclopediavir03unkngoog
  • https://archive.org/stream/encyclopediavir03unkngoog#page/n397/mode/1up
  • .... etc.
  • Pg.363
  • Woodward, Christopher, born 1594, came to Virginia in 1620, and was burgess for Westover, 1629. Probably he was ancestor of Samuel Woodward, of Charles City county, who married Sarah, daughter of Robert Hallam, and died In 1680, having a son Samuel Woodward, who settled in Massachusetts.
  • Woodward, Thomas, assayer of the mint in London and a royalist, was dismissed by the parliamentary authorities in 1649, and came to Virginia. At the restoration he and his son John were appointed assay masters, but Thomas remained in Virginia, and was appointed first surveyor-general of Carolina. He patented large tracts of land in Isle of Wight county, Virginia. He had two sons, John, above named, and Thomas, who left descendants in the south.
  • ... etc.

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  William James Woodward. History informs us that several persons bearing the name of Woodward suffered persecution among the Friends of England, and one of them, named Henry, died in prison. In Worcestershire we find the names of Joan, John, Richard and Thomas, all of whom suffered more or less for their religious opinions. From careful research we find that there appears to have been as many as five different settlements of those bearing the name of Woodward in the early colonization of this country. They settled in Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland and Virginia. Those of Maryland, in the counties of Anne Arundel and St. Mary's were found there among the earliest settlers, near St. Anne's chapel, which is supposed to be one of the earliest churches of the Episcopal denomination in America. The Woodwards of Virginia antedate all others of the early settlers. Henry Woodward came to Virginia in the ship "Diana," and was living at Hog Island, with Jane, his wife, in 1624. The Rev. James Bacon, of England, first cousin of Sir Francis Bacon, married Martha, a daughter of George Woodward, of Buckinghamshire, England, and had issue, Nathaniel, born 1620, died in 1692, member of council in Virginia, 1657; burgess of York, 1659; acting governor, 1689; this was not the rebel. During the reign of Charles, fifteen thousand families had been ruined for their religious persuasions, and on the accession of James, twelve hundred Friends were released from filthy prisons and noisome dungeons, in which five thousand had perished for conscience's sake. In 1690 grants of land were made in North Carolina to William and Samuel Woodward. In 1719, grants were made to Henry, James and Edward Woodward. We find other records as follows: Thomas Woodward, clerk of the assembly, in March, 1655 ; Thomas Woodward, of the Isle of Wight, in 1678; Thomas Woodward constituted sole surveyor of North Carolina, in 1662. Captain Henry Woodward was an active participant in the French and Indian wars,
  • https://archive.org/stream/encyclopediavir07unkngoog#page/n404/mode/1up
  • Pg.300
  • 1755-57. Eliza Cocke married Lawrence Woodward, a descendant of Christopher Woodward, mentioned below.
  • Christopher Woodward, born in 1594, came to Virginia in the year 1620. In 1629 he was burgess for Westover. The name was found in Henrico county, where the patent was found at a later date. Christopher Woodward received a grant of three hundred acres on the Appomattox river for transportation of wife and four persons. He married (first) Margaret ---- , (second) Dorothy ---- .
  • Samuel Woodward, son of Christopher Woodward, of Charles City county, Virginia, died in 1680. He was prominent in Virginia, and wealthy, owning a large part of Turkey Island. He married Mrs. Sarah (Hallam) Sturdivant, a daughter of Robert Hallam, of James City county, Virginia .
  • Samuel Woodward, son of Samuel and Sarah (Hallam) (Sturdivant) Woodward, was born in Virginia, and removed to Boston, Massachusetts. In the county records there is a deed, dated 1705, from this Samuel Woodward, conveying to William Randolph a one-third interest in one thousand acres of land on Turkey Island. He had inherited Turkey Island from his mother. There is a record of his removal to Massachusetts, at which time he left a power of attorney for the sale of his property in Virginia. Subsequently he removed from Massachusetts to North Carolina, where he became a large land owner. He was known, as Captain Woodward, 1730-31 (?). An act of assembly appointed Samuel Woodward, Esq., powder receiver of Brunswick county, North Carolina, 1739. He died March 13, 1752. He married (first) Elizabeth ---- ; (second) Sarah, daughter of Edward Cannon. Children: Samuel; Edward; Richard, of further mention ; Elizabeth.
  • Richard Woodward, son of Samuel Woodward, married, in 1752, Abigail White, and removed to Portsmouth, Virginia. .... etc.

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  • *Related to George Woodward?
  • In attempting to establish the parentage and provenance of Thomas Woodward, who died in Isle of Wight County, Virginia about October the 5th, 1677 (1) (and who has been the subject of much research and speculation), many modern researchers, no doubt following the lead of genealogist and historian John Bennett Boddie in 1938 (2), have posited (ad infinitum) that said Woodward was somehow connected to the family of George Woodward and his wife Elizabeth Honywood (Honiwood, Honeywood, etc.), formerly of Burgate, Suffolk, Markeshall, Essex, and Charing, Kent. Boddie’s belief in Thomas Woodward’s relationship to these Woodwards and Honywoods has already been examined in a previous paper (3). Though it cannot presently be definitively proven that Boddie was wrong in his belief (and of course, he could have been correct), and although it is true that Thomas Woodward did indeed seem to be acquainted with Col. Sir Philip Honywood in Virginia (4) (undoubtedly a relation to the above Elizabeth), it can be shown (at the very least) that serious question can now be raised regarding Boddie’s stated belief:
    • Better evidence lies elsewhere
  • The above-referenced George Woodward had no fewer than twenty-one children by two successive wives, the above-mentioned Elizabeth Honywood, plus an earlier wife named Alice Woodford (5). Of those twenty-one children, and of the males who are now known to have married, only son Edward seems to have been of the right age to have been the father of our Thomas Woodward (born about 1600-1604). None of the children of wife Elizabeth Honywood seem to have been of the right age (old enough) to have fathered a son born around 1600 or 1604. And that Edward Woodward (wife Elizabeth Oxenbridge) is not presently known to have had a son named Thomas (though he indeed had a brother by that name, and it is possible he could have had a son with the same name). These facts alone (despite George Woodward’s prodigious number of offspring), seem to rule out (for the moment) consideration of him as the potential grandfather (or father) of our Thomas Woodward, of Isle of Wight, Virginia. We must at least begin to look elsewhere, if we wish to attempt to resolve this question. And—strangely enough—better evidence for Thomas Woodward’s possible parentage does indeed lie elsewhere:
    • Christopher Woodward, Jr., Esq., of Lambeth Marsh, London
  • There was a man named Christopher Woodward, who lived in Lambeth Marsh, Surrey (London)(7). Back in Roman times, “Lambeth Marsh” was indeed only an ordinary tidal marsh on the south side of London, and across the River Thames from Westminster. By the time of the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, however, the original marsh had largely been drained, and replaced with housing, so that “Lambeth Marsh” had instead come to refer, not to the ancient marsh itself, but to a thoroughfare bearing that name, and to the dwellings on either side of the thoroughfare (8).
  • This Christopher Woodward appears to have been identical to the man by that name (“of Lambeth, Surrey, Esq.”), who died on 25 August, 1627, and left a will in which he named a son Thomas (9). He also seems to have been the same man by that name who was recorded in the 1623 "Visitation of Surrey." That Christopher Woodward, whose father Christopher senior originally hailed from County "Sallop" (Shropshire), was recorded as being "of Lambeth in com. Surrey" in that year, and had seven children, of whom the middle child was a son Thomas, said to have been fourteen years of age in 1623 (thus born about 1609). I will say more on this Thomas Woodward momentarily. Interestingly, for what I will say shortly, the grandfather of this Christopher Woodward Jr. was an Edward Woodward of County Salop.(10)
  • Equally interesting is the fact that the daughter Elizabeth “Ash” also mentioned in this same 1627 will turns out to have been an ancestor of none other than the late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother (of recent memory), and thus of the present-day British royal family (11).
  • This same Christopher Woodward who died in 1627 seems to have been the same person who in 1622 purchased a property in London from a Sir Nicholas Smyth (12). This property was described as being on the south side of Cheapside (then the most heavily-travelled street in London [13]), and in the northwest corner of the parish of St. Mary le Bow (14). Christopher Woodward’s son Thomas had evidently (so say the editors of “British History Online”) inherited this Cheapside property by the year 1630, which makes sense when one considers that his father Christopher had died in 1627. This Thomas Woodward was “dead by 1655” (again, according to the same editors), because it was in that year that his “widow” Grace Woodward “made a lease of 16A [one third of the said property], as guardian to her son Edward.” This same Edward Woodward “of Lambeth, gentleman” made a lease of the property himself (as an adult) in 1661 (15).
  • One can, of course, take the above statements flatly, at face value. In that case, we are manifestly dealing with a separate Thomas Woodward than the immigrant to Isle of Wight County, Virginia (even though, as per my earlier paper--and others, the immigrant Thomas Woodward is known to have held the office of Assay Master of the Royal Mint in 1649 [16]), since the latter Thomas Woodward (the immigrant) clearly left a widow named Katherine and several named children in Virginia in 1677 (17).
  • But was that Thomas Woodward of Lambeth Marsh, Surrey and St. Mary le Bow, Cheapside, really and truly deceased “by 1655”? Might it not be at least possible that, instead of merely dying, he had rather simply absconded to the colonies—to Virginia—leaving a wife and child (or children?) back in London to believe he had met an untimely end? Such occurrences were not at all uncommon back then. Another, equally-valid possibility is that he could have been officially “encouraged” to go there (in view of saving his skin—and head) because his outspoken Royalist political views (which had already caused Parliament to sack him from one lucrative position) had rendered his remaining in England ‘problematic’ for those then in power (the Cromwellian ‘Long Parliament’). Perhaps he was even sent there involuntarily by the English Parliamentarian government (this would later become a common--and highly controversial--practice during the Restoration), though this last possibility would appear unlikely based on Woodward's evident position of influence and power upon his arrival in Virginia. This is all merely speculation, yes; but there are several circumstances which (intriguingly) lend themselves to this new interpretation (that the Thomas Woodward of Lambeth, Surrey might not have died "by 1655"):
    • Some observations regarding Thomas Woodward, the immigrant
  • The Thomas Woodward who was the surveyor in Virginia and Carolina in the 1650s and 1660s is believed by some researchers today to have possibly had an earlier wife than the one named in his 1677 will. There is at least one big reason why: Thomas Woodward the surveyor apparently had two separate sons named “John”: one who remained behind in England and successfully obtained his father’s old post of Assay Master of the Mint from Charles II in 1661 (upon the Restoration), later dying in 1665 (18), and a second one who apparently left descendants in Virginia and North Carolina and was alive in 1684, when he was mentioned in his mother Katherine Woodward’s will (19). If in fact Thomas Woodward the immigrant had had two separate wives—one left behind in England, and another remarried in the colonies, then this apparent fact of two separate sons named “John” would make perfect sense, and the possibility would then be opened that Thomas Woodward the immigrant could have been a Seventeenth-Century bigamist. One hesitates to make such a statement on so little evidence, but the evidence (as it is) at least leaves open this possibility, and (due to the paucity of evidence), this writer feels little else is left to do except speculate.
  • .... etc.
  • From: http://www.countyhistorian.com/cecilweb/index.php/Thomas_Woodward_Part_2

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Christopher Woodward, Jr.'s Timeline

1594
1594
Lambeth, surrey, England
1620
1620
Age 26
Buckinghamshire, UK
1621
1621
Age 27
Lambell
1622
1622
Age 28
1625
1625
Age 31
England
1625
Age 31
Virginia, United States
1627
August 25, 1627
Age 33
Westover, Charles City, Virginia, United States
1634
1634
Age 33
Charles City, Charles City County, Virginia, United States
1645
1645
Age 33