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George Geer

Also Known As: "Geroge Greer"
Birthdate: (105)
Birthplace: Heavitree, Devon, England
Death: January 1, 1727 (105)
Preston, New London County, Connecticut Colony
Place of Burial: Griswold, New London County, Connecticut, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Jonathan Geer and Eleanor Geer
Husband of Sarah Geer
Father of Sarah Parke; Jonathan Geer; Joseph Geer; Hannah Williams; Margaret Gates and 6 others
Brother of Thomas Geer and Margaret Geer

Occupation: Imm.
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About George Geer

George and his brother Thomas emigrated to America in 1635. He was one of the earliest settlers in North Groton, Conn. George settled in Boston, but in 1651 went to New London, Conn. with Robert Allyn and others. On Feb 17 1658 he married Sarah Allyn and was given a tract of land adjoining that of Robert Allyn, his father-in-law. That tract was 50 acres and he soon purchased 150 acres from Eleazer Isbell, which was part of the original Poquotannock grants. In 1665, the town granted him 100 acres more land, and he also purchased tracts in Preston and in what is now Griswold, Conn.


George Geer, the fifth townsman (of Groton), was the only one born in the old country. He was born in Hevitree, England, in 1621 and must have been eighty-four years of age at the time of his election. He lived to the ripe old age of onehundred and five years. Left an orphan at an early age, he and a brother, Thomas, were put in charge of an uncle. They came to Boston in 1635 and George is found at New London in 1651. Having married a daughter of Robert Allyn, he took up a tract of fifty acres of land granted him by the town of New London, and adjoining the farm of his father-in-law, at Allyn's Point. Although he had a larger family than any of his associates, less is known of his history than of any of his fellow townsmen.

GROTON, CONN., 1705-1905, by Charles R. Stark, Stonington, CT, 1922, p. 81-2

_____

George Geer and His Descendants (from Linda Darien http://www.lindaslineage.com/geer.html )

Family stories are told that George Geer and his brother, Thomas, were left as young boys under the guardianship of an uncle in Heavitree, Exeter, Devonshire, England. The uncle gave them little or no schooling and arranged to ship the boys to America in order to obtain possession of their property. The ship arrived in Boston in 1635 and the boys were put on shore without money or friends. Researchers found George Geer again when he and his friend, Robert Allyn, arrived in New London, CT. He took up land east of Allyn in 1651 in an area he named Geer Hill. Two years later he married Robert Allyn's daughter, Sarah Allyn. They had 11 children. George was reputed to have lived to age 105.


He was buried near the Welcome Browning farm in an old Indian burial ground (now the town of Griswold) about 2 miles from the farm where he died. The early graves were marked by flat stones. George's grave was known by a white oak tree which marked the spot. Later the tree was cut to the ground and used for ship timber, but the grave continued to be marked by the stump.


In the 1670 CT Census, the population of New London was 633.


George Geer's grandson, Ezra Geer, settled near Geer Mountain, 2 miles southeast of the village of Kent, CT, about 1750. He married Elizabeth Canada and had 14 children. After 4 generations were born, lived and died in Kent, CT, Ezra Geer's great grandson Nathaniel moved his family from CT to NY and then to IL. Nathaniel, lost his wife, 2 youngest children, and granddaughter to an unknown misfortune within months in 1874 in IL.


Nathaniel Geer's daughter, Harriet D. Geer witnessed the Lincoln/Douglas Debate held in Ottawa, IL in 1858 and saw Lincoln carried on the shoulders of his fans. She observed them again in debate for the Presidency in 1860. She also traced her family history to the Mayflower. Several of her descendants have joined the DAR, Colonial Dames, Pilgrim John Howland Society, and Mayflower Society through her record-keeping efforts. She was my great grandmother and she died the year I was born.

  - Linda Darien

Arrived in Boston, USA in 1635 with his brother Thomas. George moved to New London, Connecticut, probably with Robert Allyn, whose daughter, Sarah Allyn, he later married. From: The History of the Descendants of Peter Spicer pages 508/509

                                                           ALLIED FAMILIES II
                                                                         GEER
 From the "Genealogy of the Geer Family" is learned that George Geer, with his brother Thomas, came to America in the year 1635.  According to tradition they were the sons of Jonathan Geer of Heavitree or Shoreham, Devonshire, England, and related to John Geer, to whom a coat of arms pertain.  They were left orphans at an early age, in the care of an uncle, who in order to obtain the considerable estate to which they were heirs transported them to America.  They were landed in Boston without money or friends.  For quite a number of years no trace of them in found on record.  About 1651 George Geer became an inhabitant of New London, coming, probably with Winthrop.  He married Feb. 17, 1658-9, Sarah, daughter of Robert and Sarah Allyn.  Oct. 31, 1665, he bought the farm of Robert Isbell, in the northeastern part of the now town of Ledyard, and later built him a house on a side hill near a never-failing spring of water.  (This spring is still in use)  The northern boundary of his farm was the line between Norwich and New London.  At the first town meeting held after that part of New London east of the river became the town of Groton, December 1705, he was chosen to be the fourth townsman.  He died in 1726, in that part of Preston, now Griswold.  Sarah Allyn Geer was baptized March 22, 1642, in Salem, Massachusetts.  Her date of death is not known.  She was living in 1723.

George Geer removed to Preston about six years before his death and he was nearly if not totally blind some few years before his removal from Groton. It is therefore probable that he did not write his own will. He had deeded previously nearly all his real estate to his sons.

                                                 THE GEER GENEALOGY                pages 7 & 8
                                            THE AMERICAN ANCESTORS

George Geer was born about 1621, and Thomas (as appears from the records in the town of Enfield, Connecticut), in 1623. Their uncle apparently gave them little or no privilege of school instruction. Hence, in subsequent life, although both brothers held responsible positions, they never wrote their names in deeds or wills, but simply made their mark. The consequence was that their name was spelled in a variety of ways, by those who had occasion to write it, Geer, Gear, or Gere. Their descendants, with but few exceptions (e.g., the Syracuse Geres), write the name Geer, and the correctness of this spelling is verified by the fact that the name was thus written is attached to the original coat of arms.

At an early age, their uncle, in order to obtain possession of their property, arranged to ship the two boys to America. The event is thus described by a descendant of the fifth generation:

"George and Thomas were left orphans when quite young and were brought up by their uncle, and as they were heirs to a considerable estate it was the desire of their uncle to remove them out of the way that the inheritance might be his. To enable him to realize his wishes without hindrance, he wrote to the captain of a ship about to sail for America, requesting him to take the lads with him. George and his brother were sent with the letter, with orders to remain on board until they received an answer. They remained as directed, but to their surprise, while waiting, found themselves victims of deception and already on their passage without the possibility of returning."

"The above facts I received from my father, Thomas Geer, but mostly from Joseph Geer, grandson of George, when I was fifteen years of age."

                                                                                                 "JEPTHAH GEER"

The above ship referred to arrived in Boston in 1635 and the boys were then put on shore in a new country without money and without friends. For quite a number of years after their arrival in Boston we find no history of their lives, and how long they remained in Boston and vicinity cannot be determined with absolute certainty. The first reliable record we find of them is that George was one of the early settlers of New London about 1651, and Thomas of Enfield in 1682. It is probable, however, that George came to New London in company with Robert Allyn and others as early as 1651, and that Thomas remained in Salem, Massachusetts, until after the death of King Philip in 1676.

                                              GEORGE  GEER  AND  HIS  
                                                       DESCENDANTS
                                                  FIRST GENERATION

GEORGE GEER was born about 1621 in Heavitree, near Exeter, Devon, England; died in 1726 in Preston, Connecticut; married 17 February 1658, Sarah, daughter of Robert Allyn. She was born in 1642, and died later than 1723, the exact date of her death being unknown.

As has been related previously, George arrived in Boston in 1635 with his brother Thomas (born in 1623). They probably lived in Salem or Boston for quite a number of years. About 1651, George became an inhabitant of New London, coming probably with Robert Allyn, whose daughter he married a few years later. In October 1665, he bought the farm of Robert Isbell, in the northeast part of the present town of Ledyard, adjoining the farm of Peter Spicer, and later built a house on a side-hill near a never failing spring of water which is still in use. The site of this first house is still to be seen near the spring. The present house, known as the George Geer Homestead, is the fourth house built on the farm, and was erected by James Geer, the great-grandson of George. It has always been owned and occupied by that branch of the family.

The northern boundary of his farm was the line between New London and Norwich. In the early colonial days before the township of New London embraced a large area both west and east of the Thames River, so that prior to 1705 the settlers east of the river are listed as inhabitants of New London; during that year a separation was made, and that territory, measuring fourteen miles north and south by an average of six miles east and west, became the town of Groton; its boundaries being the Preston, or town of Norwich, line on the north, the Mystic River and its Lantern Hill tributaries, which separated it from the town of Stonington, on the east, Fisher's Island on the south, and the Thames River on the west.

In 1836, the town of Groton was divided, and the larger portion, including all of the North Parish, was called the town of Ledyard. This tract of land is mostly fertile, and quite picturesque; it contains many hills and valleys, and has several small water courses. Part of the peaceful village of Poquetanuck now lies on its northern border, the remainder being within the limits of Preston. About two miles south of this village is located the first tract of land granted to Peter Spicer, whose great granddaughter, Abigail Spicer, married Daniel Geer, Jr. the grandson of George.

At the first town meeting held in December 1705, after the division of the township of New London, George Geer was chosen to be the fourth townsman for the new town of Groton. He resided in Groton until five or six years previous to his decease, and then moved to Preston and lived with his daughter Margaret Gates. He died at the age of 105 years. He was totally blind the last few years of his life. His will is given in full in the Spicer Genealogy.

George was buried near the Welcome Browning Farm in an old Indian burial ground in what is now the town of Griswold, about two miles from the farm where he died. These early graves were marked only by small flat stones, with simple initials, which cannot now be distinguished; but the grave of George was known by a white oak tree which marked the spot. Many years later the tree was cut to the ground and used for ship timber, but the grave was still marked by the stump. James L. Geer, who lived in the old Homestead, thought the spot should have a permanent marker, so he had a rough stone cut of Westerly granite, with the inscription: "Our first Ancestor, George Geer, died 1726, aged 105, to mark his grave." This was placed on a solid foundation of stones and cement.

GEORGE GEER (1621 - 1726) The ancestors and immediate family of George Geer were wealthy landholders in the area of Heavitree, near Exeter, Devonshire, England. It is now a small town about a mile and half southeast from Exeter, having in 1900 a population of about 7,000.

Their father had considerable property and somehow a mischief (murder?) occurred. Their uncle acquired the property by initially raising the boys. He apparently gave George and his brother, Thomas, little or no privilege of school instruction. Hence, in later life, although both brothers held responsible positions, they never wrote their names in deeds or wills, but simply made their mark. The consequence was that their names have been spelled in a variety of ways: Gear, Gere, Geer, etc. Their descendants, with but a few exceptions such as Geres, write the name Geer, and the correctness of this spelling is verified by the fact that the name thus written is attached to the original coat of arms.

In order to obtain possession of their property, their uncle arranged to ship the two boys to America at an early age. The event is thus described by a descendant: "George and Thomas were orphaned when quite young and were brought up by their uncle, and as they were heirs to a considerable estate it was the desire of their uncle to remove them out of the way that the inheritance might by his. To enable him to realize his wishes without hindrance, he wrote to a captain of a ship about to sail for America, requesting him to take the lads with him. George and and his brother were sent with the letter, with orders to remain on board until they received an answer. They remained as directed, but to their surprise, while waiting, found themselves victims of deception and already on their passage without the possibility of returning".

The ship arrived in Boston in 1635 and the boys were put on shore in a new country without money and without friends, at the ages of 14 and 12. For quite a number of years after their arrival in Boston, no history is found of their lives, and how long they remained in Boston and vicinity cannot be determined with absolute certainty. The first reliable record found is that George was one of the early settlers of New London, CT about 1651, and Thomas of Enfield, CT in 1682. It is probable, however, that George came to New London with Robert Allyn and others as early as 1651, and that Thomas remained in Salem, Massachusetts, until after the death of King Philip in 1676.

George married Sarah Allen (Allyn), daughter of Robert Allen, one of the earliest settlers of New London, CT. Soon after his marriage, George settled on a tract of land near his father-in-law. He lived at the northern edge of the terriorty (known today as Ledyard). He had first a grant of 50 acres at New London where he settled in 1651, and in 1665 a hundred acres more. His farm was in part of New London, now the town of Ledyard. Later he owned a tract of land in Preston, now Griswold, CT. He received land by deed from an Indian chief, Owaneco, son of Uncas, on December 11, 1691. Uncas was the chief of the Mohegan Indians, and lived ca. 1588-1643. The tribe lived in southwest Connecticut in the 17th century when they joined with the Pequot Indians. Uncas later rebelled against the Pequot rule: he sought British support, became very powerful and expanded his tribe. Constantly at war with Miantonomo, the Narrangansett chief, he was captured in 1643 and murdered.

George's first house was built on a side hill near a never-failing spring of water near the present town of Ledyard. He built a second house, which was occupied later by his youngest son, Jeremiah.

George Geer was a selectman (one of a board of town officers, elected annually in New England to manage local affairs), and held other offices of trust and honor. In 1655 he was appointed to the position of "cowkeeper" for the town of Wethersfield, CT, just prior to locating in Pequot Plantation. During his last years he was totally blind. He resided in Groton, CT, until 5 or 6 years before his death. He then moved to Preston, and lived with his daughter, Margaret Gates. His will, dated June 5, 1723, bequeathed to his wife and his children.

George was buried in an old Indian burial ground in what is now Griswold, CT, about two miles from the farm where he died. The early graves were marked only by small flat stones, and the only legible marks were simple initials, if anything, and cannot now be distinguished, but the grave of George was known, as a white oak tree grew out of his grave to mark the spot. Many years ago the tree was cut to the ground and used for ship timber, but the grave was still known by the stump. A descendant of George thought the place ought to have a permanent marker, so he had made a marker of westley granite placed there, cut with this inscription: "Our first Ancestor, George Geer, died 1726, aged 105, to mark his grave". This was placed on a solid foundation of stones and cement.

A book titled "Swamp Yankee from Mystic" by James H. Allyn (@1980) has a paragraph on George Geer: "George Geer was born in Devonshire in 1621, and came to New London with Robert Allyn thirty years later. In 1656 he took up land east of Allyn in the area of Geer Hill. Two years later he married Allyn's daughter Sarah and they had eleven children. Geer lived to be 105."

NOTE FROM LORNA LEFFEL WALTZ, Dec 1998 " Our visit to Concord was special. It was fun to push back to the time when the New Englad coast line was wilderness, with small harbors tucked in the rocks and a forest of trees as tall as the ship masts that they would later become. I imagined how it must have looked to the first newcomers from whom we are descended in 1633-1636. It seems the various branches of our family have always sought the wilderness. We found help from the "woodpile cousin", Robert Geer. He took us to the site of the "old spring" where George Geer built his first home, a dug out. Later with Robert's help we located George's burial place in the "old Indian cemetery" way back in the woods. "

NOTE FROM LORNA LEFFEL WALTZ, June 2000: "It was through the GFA (Geer Family Association) that we were able to find information for our visit to Ledyard CT in 1998 and Bob Geer one of the descendants living in that area took us to the Geer cemetary, out in the woods, where Geo. Geer is buried. Went to the property that has the spring where George first lived and saw lots of Geer related sites. Also saw the old house on Geer Hill that had been purchased by the local Indian tribe and now through $$$ and trades has come back to the Geer family and is being restored by Bob's son Ken a contractor."

Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s

Name: George Geer Year: 1635 Place: Boston, Massachusetts Source Publication Code: 1262 Primary Immigrant: Geer, George Annotation: Date and place of settlement or date and place of arrival. Names not restricted to the Order of Founders and Patriots of America. Source Bibliography: COLKET, MEREDITH B. JR. Founders of Early American Families: Emigrants from Europe, 1607-1657. Cleveland: General Court of the Order of Founders and Patriots of America, 1975. 366p. Page: 120

American Marriages Before 1699

Name: George Geer Spouse: Sarah Allyn Marriage Date: 17 Feb 1658 Marriage Place: New London, Conn.

Source Information: Ancestry.com. American Marriages Before 1699 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Networks, Inc., 1997. Original data: Clemens, William Montgomery. American Marriages Before 1699. Pompton Lakes, NJ, USA: Biblio Co. 1926.

George Geer... George Geer was born in Heavitree, England, about 1621; died at Preston Conn., in 1726; married 17 Feb. 1658, SARAH ALLYN, daughter of Robert Allyn, one of the earliest settlers of New London, Conn. She was baptized in Salem about 1640, sometime previous to her father's removal to New London, Conn. (1)

He and his brother Thomas came to America in 1635 and settled in Boston. George became an early settler of New London, Conn., about 1651, and Thomas settled at Enfield, Conn. near 1682. Soon after his marriage, George settled on a tract of land near his father-in-law. He had first a grant of fifty acres at New London, and in 1665 a hundred acres more. His farm was in that part of New London, now the town of Ledyard. Later he owned a tract of land in Preston, now Griswold, Conn. He received land by deed from Owaneco, son of Uncas, 11 Dec. 1691. A part of his land he had purchased of Eleazer Isbell, land which the town of New London had given to Isbell's father, Robert Isbell, and was known as one of the "Poquetannock grants." His first house was built on the side hill near a never-failing spring of water, still in use, a few rods from the present house. He built the second house, which was occupied later by his youngest son, Jeremiah. Ebenezer Geer (Robert, George) in 1742 built the third house. James (Robert, Ebenezer, Robert, George) built the fourth house on the homestead farm in 1848, and is now standing. In the early days the settlement of New London was made on both sides of the Thames River, later the town of Groton lay on the east side, and in 1835 the north part of Groton became Ledyard. He was selectman and held other offices of trust and honor. During his last years he was totally blind. His will was dated June 5, 1723, bequeathing to wife Sarah and his children. He resided in Groton until five or six years before his death, then removed to Preston, to live with his daughter, Margaret, who married Thomas Gates. He and Sarah, his wife, lived together sixty-five years. He died at the great age of 105 years.(2) His wife died a short time before his death.(3)
(1)Gen. and Biog. Records of New London County, Cnn., pub. 1905, pp. 428, 914.
(2) History of New London County, Conn., by D. Hamilton Hurd, pp. 525, 416. Gen. and Family HIst. of Conn. by Cutter, Vol. 11, p. 840, also New Eng. Families, Vol. 1, p. 393; Geer Gen, by Walter Geer; Hist. of Ledyard, Conn., by John Avery, pp. 123-129.
(3)Gen. and Biog. Records of New London County, Conn., pub. 1905, pp. 428, 914.

George Geer GEORGE6 GEER/GEERE (JONATHA/JONATHON5 GEER/GEARE/GEERE, GEORGE4 GEER/GEERE, JOHN3, JOHN2, WALTER1) was born 1620 - 1621 in Heavitree (Heae Tree), near Exeter, Devonshire, England; notes, and died 1722 - 1726 in Ledyard/Preston, New London, Connecticut; age 105 years; buried in Griswold, CT; age 105. He married SARAH/SARA ALLYN February 17, 1656 - 1659 in New London County, Connecticut, daughter of ROBERT ALLYN/ALLEN and SARAH. She was born May 22, 1640 - 1643 in New London, CT or Salem, Essex, MA; Baptised: Salem, Massachusetts abt 1640, and died 1723 - 1726 in Preston, New London, Connecticut. Notes for GEORGE GEER/GEERE: The ancestors and immediate family of George Geer were wealthy landholders in the area of Heavitree, near Exeter, Devonshire, England. It is now a small town about a mile and half southeast from Exeter, having in 1900 a population of about 7,000. Their father had considerable property and somehow a mischief (murder?) occurred. Their uncle acquired the property by initially raising the boys. He apparently gave George and his brother, Thomas, little or no privilege of school instruction. Hence, in later life, although both brothers held responsible positions, they never wrote their names in deeds or wills, but simply made their mark. The consequence was that their names have been spelled in a variety of ways: Gear, Gere, Geer, etc. Their descendants, with but a few exceptions such as Geres, write the name Geer, and the correctness of this spelling is verified by the fact that the name thus written is attached to the original coat of arms. In order to obtain possession of their property, their uncle arranged to ship the two boys to America at an early age. The event is thus described by a descendant: "George and Thomas were orphaned when quite young and were brought up by their uncle, and as they were heirs to a considerable estate it was the desire of their uncle to remove them out of the way that the inheritance might by his. To enable him to realize his wishes without hindrance, he wrote to a captain of a ship about to sail for America, requesting him to take the lads with him. George and and his brother were sent with the letter, with orders to remain on board until they received an answer. They remained as directed, but to their surprise, while waiting, found themselves victims of deception and already on their passage without the possibility of returning". The ship arrived in Boston in 1635 and the boys were put on shore in a new country without money and without friends, at the ages of 14 and 12.. For quite a number of years after their arrival in Boston, no history is found of their lives, and how long they remained in Boston and vicinity cannot be determined with absolute certainty. The first reliable record found is that George was one of the early settlers of New London, Connecticut about 1651, and Thomas of Enfield in 1682. It is probable, however, that George came to New London with Robert Allyn and others as early as 1651, and that Thomas remained in Salem, Massachusetts, until after the death of King Philip in 1676. George married Sarah Allyn, daughter of Robert Allyn, one of the earliest settlers of New London, Connecticut. Soon after his marriage, George settled on a tract of land near his father-in-law. He had first a grant of 50 acres at New London where he settled in 1651, and in 1665 a hundred acres more. His farm was in part of New London, now the town of Ledyard. Later he owned a tract of land in Preston, now Griswold, Connecticut. He received land by deed from an Indian chief, Owaneco, son of Uncas, on December 11, 1691. Uncas was the chief of the Mohegan Indians, and lived ca. 1588-1643. The tribe lived in southwest Connecticut in the 17th century when they joined with the Pequot Indians. Uncas later rebelled against the Pequot rule: he sought British support, became very powerful and expanded his tribe. Constantly at war with Miantonomo, the Narrangansett chief, he was captured in 1643 and murdered. George's first house was built on a side hill near a never-failing spring of water near the present town of Ledyard.. He built a second house, which was occupied later by his youngest son, Jeremiah. George Geer was a selectman (one of a board of town officers, elected annually in New England to manage local affairs), and held other offices of trust and honor. During his last years he was totally blind. He resided in Groton, Connecticut, until 5 or 6 years before his death. He then moved to Preston, and lived with his daughter, Margaret Gates. His will, dated June 5, 1723, bequeathed to his wife and his children. George was buried in an old Indian burial ground in what is now Griswold, CT, about two miles from the farm where he died. The early graves were marked only by small flat stones, and the only legible marks were simple initials, if anything, and cannot now be distinguished, but the grave of George was known, as a white oak tree grew out of his grave to mark the spot. Many years ago the tree was cut to the ground and used for ship timber, but the grave was still known by the stump. A descendant of George thought the place ought to have a permanent marker, so he had made a marker of Westley granite placed there, cut with this inscription: "Our first Ancestor, George Geer, died 1726, aged 105, to mark his grave". This was placed on a solid foundation of stones and cement.

Family Data Collections - Deaths

Name: George Geer Death Date: 1726 City: Preston County: New London State: CT Country: USA

Source Information: Edmund West, comp. Family Data Collection-Deaths [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., The Generations Networks, Inc., 2001.

www.findagrave.com

Birth: 1621, England Death: 1726 Preston New London County Connecticut, USA Son of Jonathan Geer (1580-1635) and wife Eleanor (1608-1635). Married Sarah Allyn on 17 Feb 1658 in New London. Father of Sarah, Jonathan, Mary, Joseph, Hannah, Margaret, Daniel, Robert, Anne, Isaac, Jeremiah and David. George came to the colonies in 1635 at age 14 with his 12 year old brother, Thomas. He purchased land that would increase to 150 acres in the area that would become Ledyard. Additional land near New London was granted to him from Owaneco, son of Uncas. He was elected a Selectman of New London. He moved in with his daughter, Margaret, after his wife Sarah died. He became blind when he was about 102, and lived to be 105 years old.

From the "Genalogy of the Geer Family in America from 1635 to 1914." "George Geer was buried in an old Indian burial ground in what is now the town of Griswold, about two miles from the farm where he died. These early graves were marked only by small flat stones, and the only legible marks were simple initials, if anything, and cannot now be distinguished; but the grave of George Geer was known, as a white oak tree grew out of his grave to mark the spot. Many years ago the tree was cut to the ground, and used for ship timber, but the grave was still known by the stump. James L. Geer thought the place ought to have a permanent marker, so he had a rough stone cut of Westerly granite, with this inscription, 'Our first Ancestor, George Geer, died 1726, aged 105,' to mark his grave."

Family links: Spouses: Sarah Allyn Geer (1642 - 1723) *

Children: Sarah Allyn Geer Parke (1659 - 1718) * Joseph Geer (1664 - 1743) * Mary Geer Maynard (1671 - 1739) * Daniel Geer (1673 - 1749) * Robert Geer (1675 - 1742) *

Burial: Brown Cemetery Griswold New London County Connecticut, USA

Created by: John Hoff63 Record added: Aug 30, 2009



            
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George Geer's Timeline

1621
January 14, 1621
Heavitree, Devon, England
1658
February 27, 1658
Age 37
New London, New London, Connecticut, United States
1662
May 26, 1662
Age 41
New London, New London County, Connecticut
1664
October 14, 1664
Age 43
Niantic, New London County, Connecticut Colony
1666
February 27, 1666
Age 45
Groton, New London, CT, United States
1669
February 2, 1669
Age 48
Preston, New London, CT, United States
1671
March 26, 1671
Age 50
Of Marlboro, Middlesex, Massachusetts
1673
September 1673
Age 52
New London, New London County, Connecticut Colony
1675
January 2, 1675
Age 53
New London, New London, Connecticut, United States