Jehu Burr, Sr.

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Jehu Burr, Sr.

Also Known As: "John", "Jehue Burr"
Birthdate: (76)
Birthplace: Roxbury, Suffolk, England
Death: Died in Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut Colony
Place of Burial: Fairfield, Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Jonathan Burr, Sr. and Esther Burr
Husband of Elizabeth Prudden Burr; Martha Burre and Mary Burre
Father of Sarah Cable; Anne Betts; Jehu Burr, Jr.; Elizabeth Seeley; Major John Burr of Norwalk and 3 others
Brother of Richard Burr; Benjamin Burr and Thomas Burr

Occupation: Representative of the General Court 1641 and 1645-46, CARPENTER
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Jehu Burr, Sr.

Jehu Burr (1596-1672) was born in England and was the son of Jonathan Burr & Esther Stedman.

Find A Grave Memorial # 33486808 notes: "As the founder of an important and honored family, it would be interesting to know the circumstances of his death, and his place of burial. Careful search, however, fails to discover either. We know that he died some time in 1672, from an entry on p.238, vol. i.,Fair. Records, Jan. 12, 1673, which mentions John Burr as receiving twenty-seven acres of land by will of his father."

"Jehu Burr who was in Massachusetts in 1630 and was admitted freeman in 1631 This christian name in the record can hardly be distinguished from John and is often copied John Jehu Burr belonged to the church at Roxbury and settled at Springfield with William Pynchon and others in 1636 In a few years he removed to Fairfield where be died before 1650 He had sons Jehu and John and probably Nathaniel and Daniel Burr of Fairfield were his sons also..."

Jehu Burr was born around 1600 in England. He emigrated in 1630 in the Winthrop Fleet. On his arrival in America he settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts where he was made a freeman on 18 May 1631. In 1633 he served on a committee with William Pynchon, the Colony Treasurer. In 1636 he went with Pynchon to Springfield. He was appointed Collector for the Connecticut Colony. He was Deputy for Springfield to the Connecticut Legislature in April 1638 and September 1641. Soon after 1641 he removed to Fairfield. He was a Deputy to the Connecticut Legislature for Fairfield in September 1645 and April 1646. He was a carpenter.

Jehu married Miss Cable and they had six children. All of these children married and had families. Among the descendants one finds many individuals who were leaders in military, political, and human affairs. Their monuments can be found in the Old Burying Ground of Fairfield and other cemeteries in surrounding towns. This book details the first four generations of the family and gives the names of the members of generation five.

The first major Burr genealogy was A General History of the Burr Family by Charles Burr Todd. The second edition was published in 1891. Todd’s genealogy contains extensive biographical background on some of the well-known early representatives of the Burr family. This book also contains information on other Burr branches, the so-called Hartford, Dorchester, and New Jersey branches. Jehu Burr was the founder of the Fairfield branch. The Burr family is featured in The Families of Old Fairfield by Donald Lines Jacobus .

Todd’s genealogy does not  include the females lines. My new genealogy adds these lines and corrects some minor errors for the first four generations. All of the material from earlier studies on these families is included. Corrections based on new research are made. In addition, the female lines are followed and extensive biographical material is added. Detailed source references are given, often to primary records. Along with the text are numerous inscriptions of tombstones. There are indexes of people and places. The book is bound in soft-cover and is printed on acid-free paper.

Research is underway to extend this genealogy to the present.

JEHU BURR ORIGIN: Unknown MIGRATION: 1630 FIRST RESIDENCE: Roxbury REMOVES: Springfield 1636, Fairfield 1641 CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #12, which would be at or soon after the organization of the church in 1632 [ RChR 74]. Made second largest contributions (after WILLIAM PYNCHON) to building a house for Rev. George Moxon and for his maintenance, 13 January 1638 [ SpTR 1:15]. FREEMAN: Requested 19 October 1630 and admitted 18 May 1631 [ MBCR 1:80, 366]. EDUCATION: Signed by mark articles of agreement founding Springfield, 14 May 1636 [ NEHGR 13:297]. OFFICES: One of three Roxbury appointees to committee to oversee construction of cartbridges over Muddy River and Stony River, to connect Boston and Roxbury, 6 August 1633 [MBCR 1:107].

  Appointed tax collector for Agawam [Springfield] by Connecticut General Court, 9 February 1637/8 [ CCCR 1:12]. Springfield deputy to Connecticut General Court, 5 April 1638, 9 September 1641 [CCCR 1:17, 67]. Committee to set out the bounds of the plantation [Springfield], 3 January 1638/9 [SpTR 1:19].
  Commissioner for "Uncowaue" [Fairfield] to gather contributions for "the maintenance of scholars at Cambridge," 25 October 1644 [CCCR 1:112]. Deputy for Fairfield to Connecticut General Court, 11 September 1645, 9 April 1646 [CCCR 1:130, 138].

ESTATE: On 12 January 1673 a record was made of the land held in Fairfield by John Burr and Jehu Burr "per virtue of the last will of his deceased father." John Burr had three and three-quarters acres in the Old Field, four acres in the New Field or Mill Plain, eight acres on Sascoe Hill, ten and a half acres and 20 rods in Great meadow, and two and a half acres and thirty-four rods of meadow in Sascoe Neck [ Fairfield PR 4(reversed):27; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. Jehu Burr had a four acre homelot, eight and a quarter acres in the Old Field, eight acres on the Mill Plain, and sixteen acres on Sasqua Hill [Fairfield PR 4(reversed):55; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. BIRTH: By about 1605 based on estimated date of marriage (but possi~bly earlier if the eldest son was born some years prior to 1631). DEATH: Fairfield by 1654 and perhaps earlier [ FOOF 1:116]. MARRIAGE: By 1631 _____ _____. "_____ Bur the wife of Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #26, probably at or not long after the organization of the church in 1632 [RChR 75]. CHILDREN:

   i    JEHU, b. say 1631; "m. (1) after 1655, Esther, widow of Joseph Boosey of Westchester, and perhaps dau. of Andrew Ward; m. (2) by 1666, Elizabeth Prudden, dau. of Rev. Peter, bapt. at Milford, 11 Mar. 1642/3" [FOOF 1:118-20]. (The details on these two marriages are quoted directly from this source because Jacobus undertook an extended discussion of these complicated problems, and his work has not been superseded in this matter.)
   ii   JOHN, b. about 1633 (according to Jacobus deposed 1681 aged 48 [FOOF 121]); m. (poss.) (1) Mary Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [FOOF 1:119-21]; m. (2) by 1673 Sarah Fitch (she was not named in the will of her father, Thomas Fitch of Norwalk, but her brother John Fitch, executor of his father's estate, "engaged to give to the children of his deceased sister Burr the same amount which his other sisters had by will" [FOOF 1:205]).
   iii   NATHANIEL, b. say 1635; m. (1) by about 1662 Sarah Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [ NYGBR 51:164]; m. (2) between 1692 and 1721 Hannah (Goodyear) Wakeman, daughter of Stephen Goodyear and widow of Samuel Wakeman [FOOF 1:632].
   iv   ELIZABETH, b. say 1637; m. (1) by about 1655 Nehemiah Olmstead; m. (2) about 1660 Obadiah Gilbert; m. (3) 1674 Nathaniel Seeley (on 21 June 1688 there were recorded "several parcels of land made over by Elizabeth Seely unto her two sons Obadiah and Beniamin Gilbert as she is executor of her husband Gilbert" [Fairfield LR 1:615]; see also FOOF 1:221, 452, 525-26).
   v   DANIEL, b. about 1642 (according to Jacobus deposed 1682 aged 40 [FOOF 123]); m. (1) Stamford [blank] February 1668/9 (or perhaps 1669/70) Abigail Brewster, daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Brewster [ TAG 11:33, 13:116, 155]; m. (2) New Haven 11 December 1678 Abigail Glover [ NHVR 1:47].

ASSOCIATIONS: Jacobus, in preparing his study of Fairfield families, noted the following: "He may have married more than once. The mother of Jehu, Jr., was quite likely sister of John Cable, Sr. There was prob. some relationship between the Burrs and the family of Nathaniel Perry" [FOOF 1:116]. See JOHN CABLE for further discussion on this relationship.

The Winthrop Fleet consisted of eleven ships sailing from Yarmouth, Isle of Wright to Salem. Some sailed April 8, arriving June 13, 1630 and the followng days, the others to sail in May, arriving in July. The total count of passengers is believed to be about seven hundred, and presumed to have included the following people. Financing was by the Mass. Bay Company.

The ships were the Arbella flagship with Capt Peter Milburne, the Ambrose, the Charles, the Mayflower, the Jewel, the Hopewell, The Success, the Trial, the Whale, the Talbot and the William and Francis.

Sailed April 8 1630: Ambrose, Arbella, Hopewell, Talbot,

Sailed May 1630: Charles, Jewel, Mayflower, Success, Trial, Whale, William and Francis

Winthrop wrote to his wife just before they set sail that there were seven hundred passengers. Six months after their arrival, Thomas Dudley wrote to Bridget Fiennes, Countess of Lincoln and mother of Lady Arbella and Charles Fiennes, that over two hundred passengers had died between their landing April 30 and the following December, 1630. That letter traveled via the Lyon April 1, 1631 and reached England four week later.

Jehu Bhurr and his wife, Elizabeth Cable, were passengers. Perhaps their son Jehu was also a passenger.

COMMENTS: Savage discoursed at length on the ease with which the given name of Jehu can be misread as "John," and how he and several other contemporary antiquaries had done so. This would be the explanation for the entry in Pope for a Mr. John Burr made a freeman on 18 May 1631.

  On 1 March 1635/6 the General Court arranged for arbitration of a dispute between Jehu Burr and Mr. [Richard] Dummer [MBCR 1:164].
  The birth date estimated for the eldest son, Jehu, is derived from the estimated date of his first marriage. There is, however, another record which indicates that he may well have been some years older. On 10 April 1645 Connecticut General Court ordered that "Jehue Burr the elder and Tho: Barlowe are to be warned to the next Particular Court" [CCCR 1:125]. Although a son need not be twenty-one before his father is referred to as "the elder," he would probably be more than fourteen, so it may be that Jehu was born as early as the mid-1620s, although this would seem to make him several years older than any other child. This would in turn imply that the elder Jehu Burr's marriage had taken place some years before 1631 (or perhaps there was another, earlier wife).

The Great Migration Begins Sketches PRESERVED PURITAN



Jehu Burr was born around 1600 in England. He emigrated in 1630 in the Winthrop Fleet. On his arrival in America he settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts where he was made a freeman on 18 May 1631. In 1633 he served on a committee with William Pynchon, the Colony Treasurer. In 1636 he went with Pynchon to Springfield. He was appointed Collector for the Connecticut Colony. He was Deputy for Springfield to the Connecticut Legislature in April 1638 and September 1641. Soon after 1641 he removed to Fairfield. He was a Deputy to the Connecticut Legislature for Fairfield in September 1645 and April 1646. He was a carpenter.

Jehu married Miss Cable and they had six children. All of these children married and had families. Among the descendants one finds many individuals who were leaders in military, political, and human affairs. Their monuments can be found in the Old Burying Ground of Fairfield and other cemeteries in surrounding towns. This book details the first four generations of the family and gives the names of the members of generation five.

The first major Burr genealogy was A General History of the Burr Family by Charles Burr Todd. The second edition was published in 1891. Todd’s genealogy contains extensive biographical background on some of the well-known early representatives of the Burr family. This book also contains information on other Burr branches, the so-called Hartford, Dorchester, and New Jersey branches. Jehu Burr was the founder of the Fairfield branch. The Burr family is featured in The Families of Old Fairfield by Donald Lines Jacobus .

Todd’s genealogy does not include the females lines. My new genealogy adds these lines and corrects some minor errors for the first four generations. All of the material from earlier studies on these families is included. Corrections based on new research are made. In addition, the female lines are followed and extensive biographical material is added. Detailed source references are given, often to primary records. Along with the text are numerous inscriptions of tombstones. There are indexes of people and places. The book is bound in soft-cover and is printed on acid-free paper. Research is underway to extend this genealogy to the present.

JEHU BURR ORIGIN: Unknown MIGRATION: 1630 FIRST RESIDENCE: Roxbury REMOVES: Springfield 1636, Fairfield 1641 CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #12, which would be at or soon after the organization of the church in 1632 [ RChR 74]. Made second largest contributions (after WILLIAM PYNCHON) to building a house for Rev. George Moxon and for his maintenance, 13 January 1638 [ SpTR 1:15]. FREEMAN: Requested 19 October 1630 and admitted 18 May 1631 [ MBCR 1:80, 366]. EDUCATION: Signed by mark articles of agreement founding Springfield, 14 May 1636 [ NEHGR 13:297]. OFFICES: One of three Roxbury appointees to committee to oversee construction of cartbridges over Muddy River and Stony River, to connect Boston and Roxbury, 6 August 1633 [MBCR 1:107].

Appointed tax collector for Agawam [Springfield] by Connecticut General Court, 9 February 1637/8 [ CCCR 1:12]. Springfield deputy to Connecticut General Court, 5 April 1638, 9 September 1641 [CCCR 1:17, 67]. Committee to set out the bounds of the plantation [Springfield], 3 January 1638/9 [SpTR 1:19]. Commissioner for "Uncowaue" [Fairfield] to gather contributions for "the maintenance of scholars at Cambridge," 25 October 1644 [CCCR 1:112]. Deputy for Fairfield to Connecticut General Court, 11 September 1645, 9 April 1646 [CCCR 1:130, 138]. ESTATE: On 12 January 1673 a record was made of the land held in Fairfield by John Burr and Jehu Burr "per virtue of the last will of his deceased father." John Burr had three and three-quarters acres in the Old Field, four acres in the New Field or Mill Plain, eight acres on Sascoe Hill, ten and a half acres and 20 rods in Great meadow, and two and a half acres and thirty-four rods of meadow in Sascoe Neck [ Fairfield PR 4(reversed):27; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. Jehu Burr had a four acre homelot, eight and a quarter acres in the Old Field, eight acres on the Mill Plain, and sixteen acres on Sasqua Hill [Fairfield PR 4(reversed):55; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. BIRTH: By about 1605 based on estimated date of marriage (but possi~bly earlier if the eldest son was born some years prior to 1631). DEATH: Fairfield by 1654 and perhaps earlier [ FOOF 1:116]. MARRIAGE: By 1631 _____ _____. "_____ Bur the wife of Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #26, probably at or not long after the organization of the church in 1632 [RChR 75]. CHILDREN:

i JEHU, b. say 1631; "m. (1) after 1655, Esther, widow of Joseph Boosey of Westchester, and perhaps dau. of Andrew Ward; m. (2) by 1666, Elizabeth Prudden, dau. of Rev. Peter, bapt. at Milford, 11 Mar. 1642/3" [FOOF 1:118-20]. (The details on these two marriages are quoted directly from this source because Jacobus undertook an extended discussion of these complicated problems, and his work has not been superseded in this matter.) ii JOHN, b. about 1633 (according to Jacobus deposed 1681 aged 48 [FOOF 121]); m. (poss.) (1) Mary Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [FOOF 1:119-21]; m. (2) by 1673 Sarah Fitch (she was not named in the will of her father, Thomas Fitch of Norwalk, but her brother John Fitch, executor of his father's estate, "engaged to give to the children of his deceased sister Burr the same amount which his other sisters had by will" [FOOF 1:205]). iii NATHANIEL, b. say 1635; m. (1) by about 1662 Sarah Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [ NYGBR 51:164]; m. (2) between 1692 and 1721 Hannah (Goodyear) Wakeman, daughter of Stephen Goodyear and widow of Samuel Wakeman [FOOF 1:632]. iv ELIZABETH, b. say 1637; m. (1) by about 1655 Nehemiah Olmstead; m. (2) about 1660 Obadiah Gilbert; m. (3) 1674 Nathaniel Seeley (on 21 June 1688 there were recorded "several parcels of land made over by Elizabeth Seely unto her two sons Obadiah and Beniamin Gilbert as she is executor of her husband Gilbert" [Fairfield LR 1:615]; see also FOOF 1:221, 452, 525-26). v DANIEL, b. about 1642 (according to Jacobus deposed 1682 aged 40 [FOOF 123]); m. (1) Stamford [blank] February 1668/9 (or perhaps 1669/70) Abigail Brewster, daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Brewster [ TAG 11:33, 13:116, 155]; m. (2) New Haven 11 December 1678 Abigail Glover [ NHVR 1:47]. ASSOCIATIONS: Jacobus, in preparing his study of Fairfield families, noted the following: "He may have married more than once. The mother of Jehu, Jr., was quite likely sister of John Cable, Sr. There was prob. some relationship between the Burrs and the family of Nathaniel Perry" [FOOF 1:116]. See JOHN CABLE for further discussion on this relationship.

The Winthrop Fleet consisted of eleven ships sailing from Yarmouth, Isle of Wright to Salem. Some sailed April 8, arriving June 13, 1630 and the followng days, the others to sail in May, arriving in July. The total count of passengers is believed to be about seven hundred, and presumed to have included the following people. Financing was by the Mass. Bay Company.

The ships were the Arbella flagship with Capt Peter Milburne, the Ambrose, the Charles, the Mayflower, the Jewel, the Hopewell, The Success, the Trial, the Whale, the Talbot and the William and Francis.

Sailed April 8 1630: Ambrose, Arbella, Hopewell, Talbot,

Sailed May 1630: Charles, Jewel, Mayflower, Success, Trial, Whale, William and Francis

Winthrop wrote to his wife just before they set sail that there were seven hundred passengers. Six months after their arrival, Thomas Dudley wrote to Bridget Fiennes, Countess of Lincoln and mother of Lady Arbella and Charles Fiennes, that over two hundred passengers had died between their landing April 30 and the following December, 1630. That letter traveled via the Lyon April 1, 1631 and reached England four week later.

Jehu Bhurr and his wife, Elizabeth Cable, were passengers. Perhaps their son Jehu was also a passenger.

COMMENTS: Savage discoursed at length on the ease with which the given name of Jehu can be misread as "John," and how he and several other contemporary antiquaries had done so. This would be the explanation for the entry in Pope for a Mr. John Burr made a freeman on 18 May 1631.

On 1 March 1635/6 the General Court arranged for arbitration of a dispute between Jehu Burr and Mr. [Richard] Dummer [MBCR 1:164]. The birth date estimated for the eldest son, Jehu, is derived from the estimated date of his first marriage. There is, however, another record which indicates that he may well have been some years older. On 10 April 1645 Connecticut General Court ordered that "Jehue Burr the elder and Tho: Barlowe are to be warned to the next Particular Court" [CCCR 1:125]. Although a son need not be twenty-one before his father is referred to as "the elder," he would probably be more than fourteen, so it may be that Jehu was born as early as the mid-1620s, although this would seem to make him several years older than any other child. This would in turn imply that the elder Jehu Burr's marriage had taken place some years before 1631 (or perhaps there was another, earlier wife). The Great Migration Begins Sketches PRESERVED PURITAN


JEHU BURR

ORIGIN: Unknown MIGRATION: 1630 FIRST RESIDENCE: Roxbury
REMOVES: Springfield 1636, Fairfield 1641 CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #12, which would be at or soon after the organization of the church in 1632 [RChR 74]. Made second largest contributions (after WILLIAM PYNCHON) to building a house for Rev. George Moxon and for his maintenance, 13 January 1638 [SpTR 1:15]. FREEMAN: Requested 19 October 1630 and admitted 18 May 1631 [MBCR 1:80, 366]. EDUCATION: Signed by mark articles of agreement founding Springfield, 14 May 1636 [NEHGR 13:297]. OFFICES: One of three Roxbury appointees to committee to oversee construction of cartbridges over Muddy River and Stony River, to connect Boston and Roxbury, 6 August 1633 [MBCR 1:107].

  Appointed tax collector for Agawam [Springfield] by Connecticut General Court, 9 February 1637/8 [CCCR 1:12]. Springfield deputy to Connecticut General Court, 5 April 1638, 9 September 1641 [CCCR 1:17, 67]. Committee to set out the bounds of the plantation [Springfield], 3 January 1638/9 [SpTR 1:19].
  Commissioner for "Uncowaue" [Fairfield] to gather contributions for "the maintenance of scholars at Cambridge," 25 October 1644 [CCCR 1:112]. Deputy for Fairfield to Connecticut General Court, 11 September 1645, 9 April 1646 [CCCR 1:130, 138].

ESTATE: On 12 January 1673 a record was made of the land held in Fairfield by John Burr and Jehu Burr "per virtue of the last will of his deceased father." John Burr had three and three-quarters acres in the Old Field, four acres in the New Field or Mill Plain, eight acres on Sascoe Hill, ten and a half acres and 20 rods in Great meadow, and two and a half acres and thirty-four rods of meadow in Sascoe Neck [Fairfield PR 4(reversed):27; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. Jehu Burr had a four acre homelot, eight and a quarter acres in the Old Field, eight acres on the Mill Plain, and sixteen acres on Sasqua Hill [Fairfield PR 4(reversed):55; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. BIRTH: By about 1605 based on estimated date of marriage (but possi~bly earlier if the eldest son was born some years prior to 1631). DEATH: Fairfield by 1654 and perhaps earlier [FOOF 1:116]. MARRIAGE: By 1631 _____ _____. "_____ Bur the wife of Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #26, probably at or not long after the organization of the church in 1632 [RChR 75]. CHILDREN:

   i   JEHU, b. say 1631; "m. (1) after 1655, Esther, widow of Joseph Boosey of Westchester, and perhaps dau. of Andrew Ward; m. (2) by 1666, Elizabeth Prudden, dau. of Rev. Peter, bapt. at Milford, 11 Mar. 1642/3" [FOOF 1:118-20]. (The details on these two marriages are quoted directly from this source because Jacobus undertook an extended discussion of these complicated problems, and his work has not been superseded in this matter.) 
   ii   JOHN, b. about 1633 (according to Jacobus deposed 1681 aged 48 [FOOF 121]); m. (poss.) (1) Mary Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [FOOF 1:119-21]; m. (2) by 1673 Sarah Fitch (she was not named in the will of her father, Thomas Fitch of Norwalk, but her brother John Fitch, executor of his father's estate, "engaged to give to the children of his deceased sister Burr the same amount which his other sisters had by will" [FOOF 1:205]). 
   iii   NATHANIEL, b. say 1635; m. (1) by about 1662 Sarah Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [NYGBR 51:164]; m. (2) between 1692 and 1721 Hannah (Goodyear) Wakeman, daughter of Stephen Goodyear and widow of Samuel Wakeman [FOOF 1:632]. 
   iv   ELIZABETH, b. say 1637; m. (1) by about 1655 Nehemiah Olmstead; m. (2) about 1660 Obadiah Gilbert; m. (3) 1674 Nathaniel Seeley (on 21 June 1688 there were recorded "several parcels of land made over by Elizabeth Seely unto her two sons Obadiah and Beniamin Gilbert as she is executor of her husband Gilbert" [Fairfield LR 1:615]; see also FOOF 1:221, 452, 525-26). 
   v   DANIEL, b. about 1642 (according to Jacobus deposed 1682 aged 40 [FOOF 123]); m. (1) Stamford [blank] February 1668/9 (or perhaps 1669/70) Abigail Brewster, daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Brewster [TAG 11:33, 13:116, 155]; m. (2) New Haven 11 December 1678 Abigail Glover [NHVR 1:47]. 

ASSOCIATIONS: Jacobus, in preparing his study of Fairfield families, noted the following: "He may have married more than once. The mother of Jehu, Jr., was quite likely sister of John Cable, Sr. There was prob. some relationship between the Burrs and the family of Nathaniel Perry" [FOOF 1:116]. See JOHN CABLE for further discussion on this relationship. COMMENTS: Savage discoursed at length on the ease with which the given name of Jehu can be misread as "John," and how he and several other contemporary antiquaries had done so. This would be the explanation for the entry in Pope for a Mr. John Burr made a freeman on 18 May 1631.

  On 1 March 1635/6 the General Court arranged for arbitration of a dispute between Jehu Burr and Mr. [Richard] Dummer [MBCR 1:164].
  The birth date estimated for the eldest son, Jehu, is derived from the estimated date of his first marriage. There is, however, another record which indicates that he may well have been some years older. On 10 April 1645 Connecticut General Court ordered that "Jehue Burr the elder and Tho: Barlowe are to be warned to the next Particular Court" [CCCR 1:125]. Although a son need not be twenty-one before his father is referred to as "the elder," he would probably be more than fourteen, so it may be that Jehu was born as early as the mid-1620s, although this would seem to make him several years older than any other child. This would in turn imply that the elder Jehu Burr's marriage had taken place some years before 1631 (or perhaps there was another, earlier wife).

William Richard Cutter, New England Families, v. IV, p. 1756-7 "Jehue Burre or Burr was born in England of German descent. He came over it is supposed, in the fleet with Governor Winthrop to New England and was in Boston in 1630. On October 19th of that year he applied to the general court of Massachusetts for the rights of a freeman, and was admitted May 18, 1631. In 1633 he was one of a committee to oversee building a bridge over Muddy and Stone rivers, between Boston and Roxbury. In 1635 his name and that of his wife are mentioned as among the church members of Roxbury, Massachusetts. He was one of the pioneers of Springfield or Agawam, and with William Pyncheon, William Smith and six other young men "of good spirits & sound bodies" founded that town in 1636. On February 9, 1637, he was appointed by the general court of Connecticut to collect taxes at Agawam (at that time under the jurisdiction of Connecticut) to assist in defraying the expenses of the Pequot war. Savage says that he removed to Fairfield in 1640, and represented that town in 1641. He was granted a house lot by the town, southwest of the meeting-house green and the pond, afterwards called Edward's pond. He was deputy to the general court in September, 1645, also in 1646. He is believed to have been the Jehue Burr who appealed a jury verdict in 1651, given in Stratford, to the general court at Hartford in the same year; was a grand juror in 1660, a commissioner of the United Colonies in 1664; and died before 1670. It is uncertain who his wife was. It is possible that she was a sister of Sergeant Nehemiah Olmstead, in a record of whose lands is mentioned the fact that said Olmstead "before he died, did purchase land of his brother-in-law Jehue Burre." It is more probable, however, that Olmstead married a daughter of Jehue Burr. John Cable, Sr., who died in 1682, mentioned in his will his kinsmen Jehu and John Burr, and the wife of Jehue may have been a sister of John Cable. Children: Jehue, mentioned below; John, Daniel, Nathaniel. ".


Birth: 1600, EnglandDeath: 1692 Fairfield Fairfield County Connecticut, USA

Jehu was the son of Jonathan Burr & Esther Stedman. Jehu Burr was born around 1600 in England. He emigrated in 1630 in the Winthrop Fleet. On his arrival in America he settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts where he was made a freeman on 18 May 1631. In 1633 he served on a committee with William Pynchon, the Colony Treasurer. In 1636 he went with Pynchon to Springfield. He was appointed Collector for the Connecticut Colony. He was Deputy for Springfield to the Connecticut Legislature in April 1638 and September 1641. Soon after 1641 he removed to Fairfield. He was a Deputy to the Connecticut Legislature for Fairfield in September 1645 and April 1646. He was a carpenter. Jehu married Miss Elizabeth Cable and they had ten children. All of these children married and had families. Among the descendants one finds many individuals who were leaders in military, political, and human affairs. Their monuments can be found in the Old Burying Ground of Fairfield and other cemeteries in surrounding towns.

Jehu Burr was the founder of the Fairfield branch. The Burr family is featured in The Families of Old Fairfield by Donald Lines Jacobus . He has many prominent descendants including Govenor and Vice President Aaron Burr.

 Children:
 Jehu Burr (1625 - 1692)
 Sarah Burr Gold (1672 - 1711)

Spouses:
 Elizabeth Rebecca Cable Burr (1600 - ____)
 Wife Burr
Burial:

Old Burying Ground Fairfield Fairfield County Connecticut, USA

Jehu Burr was born around 1600 in England. He emigrated in 1630 in the Winthrop Fleet. On his arrival in America he settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts where he was made a freeman on 18 May 1631. In 1633 he served on a committee with William Pynchon, the Colony Treasurer. In 1636 he went with Pynchon to Springfield. He was appointed Collector for the Connecticut Colony. He was Deputy for Springfield to the Connecticut Legislature in April 1638 and September 1641. Soon after 1641 he removed to Fairfield. He was a Deputy to the Connecticut Legislature for Fairfield in September 1645 and April 1646. He was a carpenter.

Jehu married Miss Cable and they had six children. All of these children married and had families. Among the descendants one finds many individuals who were leaders in military, political, and human affairs. Their monuments can be found in the Old Burying Ground of Fairfield and other cemeteries in surrounding towns. This book details the first four generations of the family and gives the names of the members of generation five.

The first major Burr genealogy was A General History of the Burr Family by Charles Burr Todd. The second edition was published in 1891. Todd’s genealogy contains extensive biographical background on some of the well-known early representatives of the Burr family. This book also contains information on other Burr branches, the so-called Hartford, Dorchester, and New Jersey branches. Jehu Burr was the founder of the Fairfield branch. The Burr family is featured in The Families of Old Fairfield by Donald Lines Jacobus .

Todd’s genealogy does not include the females lines. My new genealogy adds these lines and corrects some minor errors for the first four generations. All of the material from earlier studies on these families is included. Corrections based on new research are made. In addition, the female lines are followed and extensive biographical material is added. Detailed source references are given, often to primary records. Along with the text are numerous inscriptions of tombstones. There are indexes of people and places. The book is bound in soft-cover and is printed on acid-free paper. Research is underway to extend this genealogy to the present.

JEHU BURR ORIGIN: Unknown MIGRATION: 1630 FIRST RESIDENCE: Roxbury REMOVES: Springfield 1636, Fairfield 1641 CHURCH MEMBERSHIP: "Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #12, which would be at or soon after the organization of the church in 1632 [ RChR 74]. Made second largest contributions (after WILLIAM PYNCHON) to building a house for Rev. George Moxon and for his maintenance, 13 January 1638 [ SpTR 1:15]. FREEMAN: Requested 19 October 1630 and admitted 18 May 1631 [ MBCR 1:80, 366]. EDUCATION: Signed by mark articles of agreement founding Springfield, 14 May 1636 [ NEHGR 13:297]. OFFICES: One of three Roxbury appointees to committee to oversee construction of cartbridges over Muddy River and Stony River, to connect Boston and Roxbury, 6 August 1633 [MBCR 1:107].

Appointed tax collector for Agawam [Springfield] by Connecticut General Court, 9 February 1637/8 [ CCCR 1:12]. Springfield deputy to Connecticut General Court, 5 April 1638, 9 September 1641 [CCCR 1:17, 67]. Committee to set out the bounds of the plantation [Springfield], 3 January 1638/9 [SpTR 1:19]. Commissioner for "Uncowaue" [Fairfield] to gather contributions for "the maintenance of scholars at Cambridge," 25 October 1644 [CCCR 1:112]. Deputy for Fairfield to Connecticut General Court, 11 September 1645, 9 April 1646 [CCCR 1:130, 138]. ESTATE: On 12 January 1673 a record was made of the land held in Fairfield by John Burr and Jehu Burr "per virtue of the last will of his deceased father." John Burr had three and three-quarters acres in the Old Field, four acres in the New Field or Mill Plain, eight acres on Sascoe Hill, ten and a half acres and 20 rods in Great meadow, and two and a half acres and thirty-four rods of meadow in Sascoe Neck [ Fairfield PR 4(reversed):27; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. Jehu Burr had a four acre homelot, eight and a quarter acres in the Old Field, eight acres on the Mill Plain, and sixteen acres on Sasqua Hill [Fairfield PR 4(reversed):55; Fairfield LR A:1:229]. BIRTH: By about 1605 based on estimated date of marriage (but possi~bly earlier if the eldest son was born some years prior to 1631). DEATH: Fairfield by 1654 and perhaps earlier [ FOOF 1:116]. MARRIAGE: By 1631 _____ _____. "_____ Bur the wife of Jehu Bur" admitted to Roxbury church as member #26, probably at or not long after the organization of the church in 1632 [RChR 75]. CHILDREN:

i JEHU, b. say 1631; "m. (1) after 1655, Esther, widow of Joseph Boosey of Westchester, and perhaps dau. of Andrew Ward; m. (2) by 1666, Elizabeth Prudden, dau. of Rev. Peter, bapt. at Milford, 11 Mar. 1642/3" [FOOF 1:118-20]. (The details on these two marriages are quoted directly from this source because Jacobus undertook an extended discussion of these complicated problems, and his work has not been superseded in this matter.) ii JOHN, b. about 1633 (according to Jacobus deposed 1681 aged 48 [FOOF 121]); m. (poss.) (1) Mary Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [FOOF 1:119-21]; m. (2) by 1673 Sarah Fitch (she was not named in the will of her father, Thomas Fitch of Norwalk, but her brother John Fitch, executor of his father's estate, "engaged to give to the children of his deceased sister Burr the same amount which his other sisters had by will" [FOOF 1:205]). iii NATHANIEL, b. say 1635; m. (1) by about 1662 Sarah Ward, daughter of ANDREW WARD [ NYGBR 51:164]; m. (2) between 1692 and 1721 Hannah (Goodyear) Wakeman, daughter of Stephen Goodyear and widow of Samuel Wakeman [FOOF 1:632]. iv ELIZABETH, b. say 1637; m. (1) by about 1655 Nehemiah Olmstead; m. (2) about 1660 Obadiah Gilbert; m. (3) 1674 Nathaniel Seeley (on 21 June 1688 there were recorded "several parcels of land made over by Elizabeth Seely unto her two sons Obadiah and Beniamin Gilbert as she is executor of her husband Gilbert" [Fairfield LR 1:615]; see also FOOF 1:221, 452, 525-26). v DANIEL, b. about 1642 (according to Jacobus deposed 1682 aged 40 [FOOF 123]); m. (1) Stamford [blank] February 1668/9 (or perhaps 1669/70) Abigail Brewster, daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Brewster [ TAG 11:33, 13:116, 155]; m. (2) New Haven 11 December 1678 Abigail Glover [ NHVR 1:47]. ASSOCIATIONS: Jacobus, in preparing his study of Fairfield families, noted the following: "He may have married more than once. The mother of Jehu, Jr., was quite likely sister of John Cable, Sr. There was prob. some relationship between the Burrs and the family of Nathaniel Perry" [FOOF 1:116]. See JOHN CABLE for further discussion on this relationship.

The Winthrop Fleet consisted of eleven ships sailing from Yarmouth, Isle of Wright to Salem. Some sailed April 8, arriving June 13, 1630 and the followng days, the others to sail in May, arriving in July. The total count of passengers is believed to be about seven hundred, and presumed to have included the following people. Financing was by the Mass. Bay Company.

The ships were the Arbella flagship with Capt Peter Milburne, the Ambrose, the Charles, the Mayflower, the Jewel, the Hopewell, The Success, the Trial, the Whale, the Talbot and the William and Francis.

Sailed April 8 1630: Ambrose, Arbella, Hopewell, Talbot,

Sailed May 1630: Charles, Jewel, Mayflower, Success, Trial, Whale, William and Francis

Winthrop wrote to his wife just before they set sail that there were seven hundred passengers. Six months after their arrival, Thomas Dudley wrote to Bridget Fiennes, Countess of Lincoln and mother of Lady Arbella and Charles Fiennes, that over two hundred passengers had died between their landing April 30 and the following December, 1630. That letter traveled via the Lyon April 1, 1631 and reached England four week later.

Jehu Bhurr and his wife, Elizabeth Cable, were passengers. Perhaps their son Jehu was also a passenger.

COMMENTS: Savage discoursed at length on the ease with which the given name of Jehu can be misread as "John," and how he and several other contemporary antiquaries had done so. This would be the explanation for the entry in Pope for a Mr. John Burr made a freeman on 18 May 1631.

On 1 March 1635/6 the General Court arranged for arbitration of a dispute between Jehu Burr and Mr. [Richard] Dummer [MBCR 1:164]. The birth date estimated for the eldest son, Jehu, is derived from the estimated date of his first marriage. There is, however, another record which indicates that he may well have been some years older. On 10 April 1645 Connecticut General Court ordered that "Jehue Burr the elder and Tho: Barlowe are to be warned to the next Particular Court" [CCCR 1:125]. Although a son need not be twenty-one before his father is referred to as "the elder," he would probably be more than fourteen, so it may be that Jehu was born as early as the mid-1620s, although this would seem to make him several years older than any other child. This would in turn imply that the elder Jehu Burr's marriage had taken place some years before 1631 (or perhaps there was another, earlier wife). The Great Migration Begins Sketches PRESERVED PURITAN

Source

[http://books.google.com/books?id=GNsNvzRr2IYC&dq=jehu%20bur&pg=PA24#v=onepage&q=jehu%20bur&f=false A general history of the Burr family in America: with a genealogical record from 1570 to 1878] (Google eBook). Charles Burr Todd, E.W. Sackett & Bro., 1878,


(f/g) Sr Jehu Burr Birth: 1600, England Death: 1692 Fairfield Fairfield County Connecticut, USA

Jehu was the son of Jonathan Burr & Esther Stedman. Jehu Burr was born around 1600 in England. He emigrated in 1630 in the Winthrop Fleet. On his arrival in America he settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts where he was made a freeman on 18 May 1631. In 1633 he served on a committee with William Pynchon, the Colony Treasurer. In 1636 he went with Pynchon to Springfield. He was appointed Collector for the Connecticut Colony. He was Deputy for Springfield to the Connecticut Legislature in April 1638 and September 1641. Soon after 1641 he removed to Fairfield. He was a Deputy to the Connecticut Legislature for Fairfield in September 1645 and April 1646. He was a carpenter. Jehu married Miss Elizabeth Cable and they had ten children. All of these children married and had families. Among the descendants one finds many individuals who were leaders in military, political, and human affairs. Their monuments can be found in the Old Burying Ground of Fairfield and other cemeteries in surrounding towns.

Jehu Burr was the founder of the Fairfield branch. The Burr family is featured in The Families of Old Fairfield by Donald Lines Jacobus . He has many prominent descendants including Govenor and Vice President Aaron Burr.


Family links:

Spouse:
 Wife Cable Burr (1600 - 1670)
Children:
 Sarah Burr Cable (1620 - 1660)*
 Jehu Burr (1625 - 1692)*
 Elizabeth Burr Olmstead Gilbert Seeley (1637 - ____)*
 Daniel Burr (1642 - 1695)

Burial: Old Burying Ground Fairfield Fairfield County Connecticut, USA Created by: Beca Record added: Feb 02, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 33486808 -tcd


Born in England in 1600. Migrated to America in 1630 with Governor Winthrop. Settled first in Roxbury then in Fairfield, CT. Married a woman named ? Stedman. They had four children Jehu and John born in England and Nathaniel and Daniel born in America. Died in Fairfield,Connecticut in1672.
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=33486808
I found this page about the Burrs that might be helpful. http://www.burrcook.com/history/burrhisa.htm There were more than one Jehu and it's hard to find evidence of his daughters. So it is quite confusing.
Birth: 1600, England Death: 1672 Fairfield Fairfield County Connecticut, USA

Jehu Burr was born around 1600 in England and was the son of Jonathan Burr & Esther Stedman.

He emigrated in 1630 in the Winthrop Fleet and on his arrival in America, he settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts where he was made a freeman on 18 May 1631. In 1633 he served on a committee with William Pynchon, the Colony Treasurer. In 1636 he went with Pynchon to Springfield and was appointed Collector for the Connecticut Colony. He was Deputy for Springfield to the Connecticut Legislature in April 1638 and September 1641. Soon after 1641 he removed to Fairfield, becoming a Deputy to the Connecticut Legislature for Fairfield in September 1645 and April 1646.

By trade he was a carpenter.

Jehu married Miss Elizabeth Cable and they had ten children. All of these children married and had families. Among the descendants one finds many individuals who were leaders in military, political, and human affairs. Their monuments can be found in the Old Burying Ground of Fairfield and other cemeteries in surrounding towns.

Jehu Burr was the founder of the Fairfield branch. The Burr family is featured in The Families of Old Fairfield by Donald Lines Jacobus. He has many prominent descendants including Govenor and Vice President Aaron Burr.

As the founder of an important and honored family, it would be interesting to know the circumstances of his death, and his place of burial. Careful search, however, fails to discover either. We know that he died some time in 1672, from an entry on p.238, vol. i.,Fair. Records, Jan. 12, 1673, which mentions John Burr as receiving twenty-seven acres of land by will of his father.

Headstones of early settlers were of rude construction and quarried by the relatives of the deceased before there were any regular stone cutters in the area. They usually only had the initials of the person and the date of their death. Very few remain and are so eroded by time and weather to be almost illegible. No headstone can be found or Jehu Burr.

WIVES: Martha Heath Burre Mary Burre Elizabeth Cable Burr

CHILDREN: Ann 1618-1683 New Haven, CT

Sarah Ann 1620-1660 in CT Wife of John Cable

Jehu Jr. 1625 Lavenham, Suffolk, England-31 Oct 1692 Fairfield, CT, Husband of Esther Ward and Elizabeth Prudden

Elizabeth 17 May 1632 Eng.-17 Oct 1682 Fairfield, CT, Wife of Nehemiah Olmstead, Obadiah Gilbert & Capt. Nathaniel Seeley Sr

Maj. John b. abt 1633 Roxbury, Norfolk, MA - 6 Dec 1694 Fairfield, CT Married Mary Tash, Mary Ward, and Sarah Fitch

Nathaniel John 1635-26 Feb 1712 Fairfield, CT, Husband of Hannah Goodyear and Sarah Ward

Daniel 1640-5 Nov 1695 Fairfield, CT, Married Abigail Glover and Abigail Brewster

Joanna 1643-


Family links:

Spouse:
 Wife Burr (1600 - 1670)*

Children:
 Ann Burr Betts Cable*
 Sarah Burr Cable (1620 - 1660)*
 Jehu Burr (1625 - 1692)*
 Elizabeth Burr Olmstead Gilbert Seeley (1637 - ____)*
 Nathaniel Burr (1640 - 1712)*
 Daniel Burr (1642 - 1695)*
  • Calculated relationship

Burial: Old Burying Ground Fairfield Fairfield County Connecticut, USA


Maintained by: Sandy Vandertol Originally Created by: Beca Record added: Feb 02, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 33486808

______________________________ Jehue Burr. With Winthrop’s fleet, early in 1630, came to the New World one whose descendants were destined to play a not unimportant part in the affairs of the coming nations. His name was Jehue Burr. He was the first of his race in America, so far as we have any record, and soon after his arrival settled in Roxbury, Mass. He was admitted a freeman in 1632. In 1655 both himself and wife appear as members of the church in Roxbury. About the same time he received his first appointment in the colony as overseer of roads and bridges between Boston and Roxbury. At a General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, held at Boston, Aug. 6, 1635, “Mr. Tresur” (Treasurer, an official title) Jehue Burre and John Johnson were appointed a committee for “Rocksbury” and a like number of men for Boston “in the making of a cart bridge over Muddy River, and over Stony River at the charge of Boston and Rocksbury.” His name also appears in the records of a General Court held at Newtown, March 1, 1635, as follows: “The difference betwixt Mr. Dumer and Jehue Burre, aboute Mr. Dumer’s swine spoyling his corne, is by their consent referred to the final determination of Wm. Parke, Goodman Potter, and Goodman Porter.” No further mention is made of him in the Massachusetts Records. He did not, however, long remain a resident Roxbury. There, opportunities for rising in the world were far too limited to suit one of his enterprising turn, and, in company with several other aspiring spirits, he early determined on a farther emigration. ‘The settlers had often heard from the friendly Indians of the rich valley lands of the Connecticut, several days’ journey west, and early in the spring of 1636, Wm. Pynchon, Jehue Burr, and six other young men, “of good spirits and sound bodies,” with their families and effects, set out on a journey through the wilderness to this land of promise. The women and children performed the journey on horseback, the men on foot. They followed a blazed path though the forest that led them over wooded heights, through romantic glades, and across foaming torrents; now skirting the shores of an ancient lake, where the beaver reigned undisturbed by man, and again following the westward current of a placid river, until at last they issued from the forest, upon the banks of the Connecticut. Here they built their village, which they called Agawam, and which in our day has expanded into the flourishing city of Springfield. The following documents concerning the early history of Springfield, furnished the New England Historical and Genealogical Register by Mr. Stearns of Springfield, will be interesting to the descendants of Jehue Burr. The first is a copy of the deed given by Indians of Agawam to Wm. Pynchon, Jehue Burr, and Henry Smith, dated, “Agaam, alias Agawam. This fifteenth day of June, 1636, “It is agreed between Commuck and Metaneham, ancient Indians of Agaam, for and in the name of all the other Indians, and in particular for and in ye name of Cuttomas, the right owner of Agaam and Quana, and in the name of his mother, Kewenesek, the Tameshan, or wife of Wenarois, and Wianum the wife of Coa: To and with William Pynchon, Henry Smith, and Jehue Burr, their heirs and associates, for to truck and sel all that ground and muck of quittag, or meadow accompsick, viz.: on the other side of Agaam, except cotteniackees, or ground that is now planted, for ten fathom of wampum, ten coats, ten hoes, ten hatchets, and ten knives; and also the sd. Ancient Indians with the consent of the rest, and in particular with the consent of Menis, Westherme, and Itapometinan, do trucke and sel to William Pynchon, Henry Smith, and Jehue Burr, and their associates, for all that ground on the east side of Quinnecticut River, called Usquanok, and Mayasset, reaching about four or five miles in length, from the North end of Massacksicke, up to Chicopee River, for four fathoms Wampum, four coasts, four homes, four hatchets, four knives. “Also the sd. Ancient Indians do with the consent of the other Indians, and in particular of Machetuhooh, Wemapawem, and Mohemeres trucke and sell the ground and mucke of quittag, and grounds adjoining called Massacksicke, for four fathom of Wampum, four coats, four homes, four hatchets, and four knives, and the said Pynchon hath in hand paid the said tem fathom Wampum, ten coats, ten coats, tem hoes, ten hatchets, and ten knives to the said Commuck and Metaneham, and doth further condition with said Indians, that they shall have and enjoy all that cotteniackees, or ground that is now planted, and have liberty to take fish and deer, ground nuts, Walnuts, and Acorns, and Sassikimmook, or a kind of Pease, and also if any of said cattle spoyle their corne, to pay as it is worth, and that hogs shall not go on the side of Agaam but in corn time; also, the sd. Pynchon doth give to Wruthorme, two coats, over and above the said part expressed, and in witness hereof, the two said Indians and the rest, do set their hands this present 15th day of June, 1636.” The deed was signed by thirteen Indians, and also by Pynchon, Burr, and Smith. The articles of agreement between the planters of Agawam are also preserved in the Genealogical Register. The following is an abstract:

           May 14, 1636

We, whose names are underwritten, being by God’s providence engaged together to make a Plantation at and over against Agawam, upon Connecticut, doe mutually agree to certayne articles and orders to be observed and kept by us, and by our successors, except well and every of us, for ourselves, and in our own persons, shall think meet upon better reasons to alter our resolutions. 1ly. Wee intend, by God’s grace, as soone as we can with all convenient speede, to procure some Godly and faithful minister, with whom we purpose to joyne in Church Covenant to walke in all ways of Christ. 2ly. Wee intent that our town shall be composed of fourty families, or if we think meet after to alter our purpose, yet not to exceede fifty families, riche and poore. 3ly. That every inhabitant shall have a common portion for a house-lot, as we shall see meet for every one’s quality and estate. 4ly. That every one that hath a house-lot, shall have a portion of the cow-pasture to ye North of Endbrooke, lyinge northward from the towne, and also that every one shall have a share of the hassokey marsh over against his lot, if it be to had, and every one to have his portionable share of all the woodland. 5ly. That every one shall have a share of the meddowe, or plantinge ground, over against them as nigh as may be, on the Agaam side. 6ly. That the long meddowe called Massacksick, lyinge in the way to Dorchester, shall be distributed to every man as we shall think meet, except we shall find other conveniency for some, for their milch cattayle, and other cattayle also. 7ly. That the meddow and pasture called Nagas, toward Pawtucket, on ye side of Agaam, lyinge about four miles above in the river, shall be distributed to every man as above said in ye former order, and this was altered with consent before ye hands were set to it. [Article 8th relates to the raising of taxes] 9ly. That, Whereas Mr. William Pynchon, Jehue Burr, and Henry Smith have continued to prosecute this plantation, when others fell off for fear of the difficulties, and continued to prosecute the same at great charges, and at great personal adventure-therefore it is mutually agreed that forty acres of meddow, lyinge on the south of Endbrooke, under a hill-side, shall belong to the sd. Parties, free from all charges forever; that is to say, twenty acres to Mr. William Pynchon, and his heirs and assigns forever, and ten acres to Jehue Burr, and ten acres to Jehue Burr, and ten acres to Henry Smith, and to their heirs and assigns forever, which said forty acres is not disposed to them as any allotment of town lands, but they are to have their accommodation in all other places notwithstanding. [Article 10th fixes the tax to be laid upon those who should join the settlers at a later day.] [Article 11, 12, 13, and 14 refer to the distribution of the land among the actual settlers.] The instrument is signed by seven persons, who may be reckoned the first settlers of Agawam, or Springfield. They seem to have considered themselves beyond the bounds of the Massachusetts Colony, and to have joined their fortunes with Connecticut at once, as at the General Court of the latter for that year, Wm. Pynchon appears as Deputy for the plantation of Agawam, and indeed for several sessions afterward. Also the next year, 1637, Jehue Burr, who is described as a leading spirit in the settlement, was appointed collector of rates therein. He was probably the first tax-gatherer in the Connecticut Valley, and was appeased with lesser rates than are some of his successors. From the act of legislature appointing him, we learn that there were then but four settlements or “plantations” in the Connecticut Colony, viz., Hartford, Windsor, Wethersfield, and Agawam. The collectors for these were Wm. Wadsworth, Henry Wolcott, the elder, Andrew Ward, and Jehue Burre, respectively. Of this levy, Agawam’s apportionment was £86 16s., payment optional “in money, in Wampum, at fower a penny or in good and merchantable beaver, at 9s. per pound. Jehue Burr remained an active and useful member of the society at Springfield for about eight years, and then removed for the third and last time to Fairfield, Conn., which had been discovered a few years before during the famous pursuit of the Pequots, and which, with its level lands and warm productive soil, was very attractive to the early settlers. He seems to have taken a high rank at Fairfield from the first. The next year after his removal, in 1645, he represented Fairfield at the General Court, again in 1646, and for several succeeding sessions prior to the union of the Hartford and New Haven colonies. His name appears quite often in the records of the colony; in some cases hard to be distinguished from his son Jehue. Thus, in Col. Rec., vol. i., p. 125, we read,” Jehue Bur the elder, and Tho. Barlowe, are to be warned to the Paricular Court.” P. 226, Oct. 6, 1651, “Tho. Barlowe and Jehue Burr, having appealed from the Judgment of the last Court of Stratford, the Court, though they see no reason for confirming the full verdict of the jury, yet they judge it meet, that the said Barlowe and Burr should pay to Wheeler for his damage, forty shillings.” As early as 1643 commissioners had been appointed by the New England colonies for the founding and maintenance of good schools and other places of learning in their midst, and in 1666 a plan was presented for “a generall contribution for the maintenance of poore scollers at Cambridge College.” The commissioners referred it to the several general courts as “a matter worthy of due consideration and entertainment,” and it was so considered at the October session of the General Court of Connecticut, which ordered “that the proposition concerning the scollers at Cambridge, made by the sd. Commissioners, is confirmed, and it is ordered that two men shall be appoynted in every Town within this jurisdiction, who shall demand what every family will give, and the same to be gathered and brought into some room in March, and this to continue yearely as yt shall be considered by ye Commissioners.” The men appointed to this praiseworthy work for “Uncowau,” (Fairfield) were Jehu Burr and Ephraim Wheeler. In 1660 he was appointed grand juror with twelve other important men of the colony, and as such, ordered by the General Court “to inquire into, and consider of ye misdemeanors and breaches of ye orders of this colony, and present all offences to ye next Particular Court.” The succeeding May he was appointed commissioner for Fairfield, and ordered to repair to a magistrate and take the oath. He was reappointed May 12, 1664, and again in 1668, with Wm. Hill as associate. This was his last public service, as later mention of the name in the records refers undoubtedly to his son Jehu. But little is found of him in town records of Fairfield now extant. These records, for the first fifteen or twenty years after its settlement, were carried to Virginia by one of the original proprietors, and many others were burned by the British in the war of the Revolution. There is, however, in vol. I, p. 147, a record of a land grant to Henry Jackson, signed by Jehu Bur, Commissioner, and dated March 18, 1671. Also p. 202, same vol., this entry, “Jehu Bur having held quiet possession of his house lot for fifteen years, it is granted him.” Also, same date, John Bur received a deed from his father, Jehu Bur. As the founder of an important and honored family, it would be interesting to know the circumstances of his death, and his place of burial. Careful search, however, fails to discover either. We know that he died some time in 1672, from an entry on p. 238, vol. i, Fair. Records, Jan. 12, 1673, which mentions John Burr as receiving twenty-seven acres of land by will of his father.* No vestiges of his grave remain. The head-stone of the earlier settlers were of exceedingly rude construction, apparently quarried by the relatives of the deceased before there was any regular stone-cutter in the place, and bore only the initials of the dead and the date of decease. But few of these remain, and they are so defaced by the lapse of time and the action of the weather as to be almost illegible. He was probably buried in the old Fairfield burial-ground, or in that at Stratfield, where many of his more immediate descendants repose. We have no record of his marriage, nor of the maiden name of his wife. He left four sons, Jehu, probably born in England, John, Daniel, and Nathaniel, all of whom became fathers of families, and lived and died in Fairfield. No will or distribution of property is found.

  • In an article in the N.E. Hist. and Gen. Reg, vol. v., p. 472, the lat Sylvester Judd, Esq., of Northampton, Mass., a careful and painstaking genealogist, places his death in 1650, but a careful search of the Fairfield records (as well as the opinions of other genealogists) places his death at a much later period
view all 17

Jehu Burr, Sr.'s Timeline

1596
1596
Roxbury, Suffolk, England
1620
1620
Age 24
Probably England
1624
1624
Age 28
Of Fairfield, Fairfield, Connecticut
1625
1625
Age 29
Lavenham, Suffolk, England
1630
1630
Age 34
Roxbury, Norfolk, MA
1632
May 17, 1632
Age 36
Probably England
1633
1633
Age 37
Roxbury, Norfolk, Massachusetts
1635
1635
Age 39
Roxbury, Massachussetts Bay Colony
1640
1640
Age 44
Probably England