Louis "The Walloon" DuBois

Is your surname Dubois?

Research the Dubois family

Louis "The Walloon" DuBois's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

Louis Dubois

Also Known As: ""Louis the Walloon""
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Wicres, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Death: Died in Kingston, Ulster, New York
Place of Burial: Ulster, New York, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Chrétien du Bois; Chretien Maxmillan DuBois; Chretian Maximillian Du Bois De Fiennes; Chretian Maximillian Du Bois De Fiennes; Chretian Maximillian Du Bois De Fiennes and 8 others
Husband of <private> Cotton; Catharine Du Bois and Catherine Blanchan
Father of <private> Van Metren; Sarah van Meteren; Elizabeth Marie Mersereau; Abraham DuBois; Isaac DuBois and 9 others
Brother of Albert Pierre Dubois; Antoine DuBois; Françoise Du Bois; Anne Du Bois; Philippe Du Bois and 2 others
Half brother of Jacques Du Bois and Francois Balliou

Occupation: Married, 1656 in Manheim, Germany, Immagrated 1660. SettledNew Paltz, NY.
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:
view all 39

Immediate Family

About Louis "The Walloon" DuBois

Louis DuBois (Huguenot)

Louis DuBois was a Huguenot colonist in New Netherland who, with two of his sons and nine other refugees, founded the town of New Paltz, New York. These Protestant refugees fled Catholic persecution in France, emigrating to the Die Pfalz, the Rhenish Palatinate (in present day Germany), before going to New Netherland where they settled in Wiltwyck (present day Kingston, NY) and Nieuw Dorp, settlements midway between New Amsterdam (present day New York City) and Beverwyck (today known as Albany, New York) before ultimately founding New Paltz.

Louis was the son of Chrétien du Bois and Françoise le Poivre of Wicres, and later Herlies, in Lilloise Flanders, then part of Spanish Netherlands.

The 3rd part of Horton, "The Memory of the Just is Blessed",[1] begins with an extract from a document in the Archives du Nord, and commentary:

  • "Louis du Bois fils de feu Crestien de stil couturier dem(eurant) à Herlÿ ...at par ceste vendu cede et t(ran)sporte audict Franchois du Bois ... touttes tel part droict et action quil poeut ... avoir des suscessions et hoiries à luy venu ... par les trepas dudict Crestien son père et de Franchoise le Poivre sa mere ..." (2E3/3572-110 (August 12, 1643)).
  • On this day in 1643, our future Patentee sold his interest in his parents’ estate to his uncle "Franchois du Bois fils de feu Anthoine dem(eurant) à Wicre" (for 3,600 livres parisis). Ibid. Although he was already a 'dressmaker' by profession ("de still couturier"), he would have been on that date, according to our tradition, aged merely 16 years. The reader is justifiably struck by the singularity of this professional status and contractual capacity at such a tender age. There is no suggestion of record, for example, that he was operating under any tutelage or guardianship in this sale of his birthright. Nor does it indicate that Louis was merely a couturier’s “apprentice” or the like. When presented with the new evidence from Lille, readers will likely agree that American traditions regarding the birthdates of the three known Huguenot children of Chrétien du Bois — Louis, Françoise, and Jacques — should be revisited, and, perhaps, accordingly revised.

The article demonstrates convincingly that the christening recorded 21 Oct 1626 at Wicres refers to Toussaint du Bois, not his brother Louis. Louis du Bois and his (apparent twin) brother Antoine were christened at Wicres 17 Jun 1622. Louis and Antoine appear to have been named after their paternal grandfather and great-grandfather.

Louis fled persecution in France to Mannheim, Germany before 1650. Louis married Catherine Blanchan in Mannheim, Germany on October 10, 1655.

The DuBoises eventually moved to Kingston, New York within New Netherland around 1660, then to Hurley, New York. In 1663 the Esopus Indians captured DuBois' wife and three children who were eventually rescued three months later. According to legend but unmentioned in the detailed journal of the rescue expedition's commander, his wife, Catherine DuBois, was singing the Psalm 137 about the Babylonian captivity when they were rescued. Louis DuBois was also physically attacked by the Indians, but fought back and survived.[2][3]

DuBois and the others bought a 40,000 tract of land from the Esopus Indians in 1677. The tract, known in 17th-century colonial New York as a "patent," stretched from the Hudson River to the Shawangunk Mountains. DuBois was one of eleven men to begin settling on a rise over the Wallkill River, in the center of the patent, in 1678.[4] Louis DuBois served as one of the original elders in New Paltz's French Reformed Church, which is still in existence today.[5]

In the early years, DuBois and his fellow patentees governed the land communally. In 1728, the surviving patentees and their descendants created a more formal form a government called "The Twelve Men" (later known as the Duzine). This body consisted of one elected representative for each patentee families. Membership was restricted to their descendants through either male or female lines. To this date, some of the DuBois land is still owned by the family descendants. In 1785, the New York State Legislature confirmed the actions of this body. Although a standard form of town government was established in the late 18th century, the Duzine existed in at least ceremonial form into the 19th century. In the later years of the Duzine, the members were consumed with lawsuits defending the boundaries of the New Paltz patent. At one time, the Duzine hired Aaron Burr to represent them in such a lawsuit.

Louis himself eventually returned to Wiltwyck, by then known as Kingston, where he died prior to his will entering probate on June 23, 1696.[6] His widow remarried, and in her will freed two of her slaves.

The original settlement of Louis DuBois and his fellow patentees survives today as Historic Huguenot Street, a National Historic Landmark District. The site includes the DuBois Fort, a colonial stone house built by one of Louis' sons.

W.E.B. Du Bois is said to be grandson of a loyalist descendant of Louis DuBois' brother who left for the West Indies. Most DuBois descendants supported the revolution, though, and now, descendants of the family's "French father" can be found in every state of the union.[7]

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_DuBois_(Huguenot)

______________

  • Louis DuBois
  • M, #69397, b. 27 October 1627, d. 23 June 1696
  • Father Christian DuBois b. c 1597, d. 10 Oct 1655
  • Mother Jeanne Masic Brunel b. 26 Mar 1599
  • Louis DuBois was born on 27 October 1627 at Pasora de Calais, Artois, France. He married Catherine Blanchan, daughter of Matthys Blanchan and Magdalena Jorrisse Jorrison, on 10 October 1655 at Mannheim, Baden, Germany. Louis DuBois died on 23 June 1696 at Kingston, Ulster, NY, at age 68.
  • Family Catherine Blanchan b. 17 Oct 1627, d. 18 Oct 1713
  • Child
    • David DuBois+ b. 13 Mar 1667, d. c 1714
  • From: http://our-royal-titled-noble-and-commoner-ancestors.com/p2309.htm#i69397

____________

  • Louis DuBois
  • Birth: 1626 Wicres, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • Death: 1696 Kingston, Ulster County, New York, USA
  • Family links:
  • Parents:
  • Chretien DuBois (1597 - 1655)
  • Spouse:
  • Catherine Blanchan DuBois (1629 - 1713)*
  • Children:
    • Abraham DuBois (1657 - 1731)*
    • Isaac Dubois (1659 - 1690)*
    • Isaac DuBois (1660 - 1690)*
    • Jacob DuBois (1661 - 1745)*
    • Sarah DuBois Van Meteren (1664 - 1726)*
    • David DuBois (1667 - 1714)*
    • Solomon Dubois (1669 - 1759)*
    • Louis Dubois (1677 - 1729)*
    • Matheus DuBois (1678 - 1748)*
  • Siblings:
  • Francoise DuBois Billiou (1622 - 1695)*
  • Louis DuBois (1626 - 1696)
  • Jacques DuBois (1628 - 1677)*
  • Inscription:
  • Born in French Flanders, arrived 1661 in New Amsterdam, a New Paltz patentee 1677, Kingston merchant 1686. Memorial erected by the DuBois Family Association.
  • Burial: Old Dutch Churchyard, Kingston, Ulster County, New York, USA
  • Find A Grave Memorial# 19255932
  • From: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=19255932

_____________

  • A Genealogy of the Duke-Shepherd-Van Metre Family: From Civil, Military ... edited by Samuel Gordon Smyth
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=JXdIAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA23&lpg=PA23&dq=Chretien+Maximilian+Dubois+de+Fiennes&source=bl&ots=qg7xEVbYyS&sig=5MGylYaW3dZnjZj75yso5hNR97A&hl=en&ei=r9kdS6_jItPTlAfa0KH5Cw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CBcQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q&f=false
  • https://archive.org/details/genealogyofdukes02smyt
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogyofdukes02smyt#page/23/mode/1up
  • The line of descent from Charles du Bois and Claude de Lannoy was:
  • 1st generation: Eustache, Seigneur des Querder and de Fiennes, m. 1st Gille de Renel ; m. 2d Jeanne St. Ol.
  • 2d generation : Guislain des Fiennes, Count de Clarmont, who m. Jeanne de Longueville.
  • 3d generation : Marc de Fiennes, Seigneur des Querder, m. Madelaine d'Ognies.
  • 4th generation: Maximillian de Fiennes, Seigneur des Querder, m. Catharine Cecil Germand.
  • 5th generation: Maximillian des Fiennes, m. Louise Charlotte d' E'tamps.
  • 6th generation: Chas. Maximillian des Fiennes, m. Henrietta de Reignier de Boisleau.
  • 7th generation : Chrétien Maximillian des Fiennes, m. ____ ____ (not on record, but a Huguenot, as supposed by M. Le Turcq — record erased).
  • 8th generation: Louis du Bois de Fiennes, b. Oct., 1626, who evidently took refuge from religious persecution in Mannheim, Germany, where he m. Catharine Blanchan in 1655. Their two eldest children were born in Mannheim, and in 1660 the family came to America.
  • The du Bois des Fiennes appear to have been a military family and to have furnished to France some able soldiers. The first Maximillian beside being a Count was "Marischall des camps et des armées du roi." His son Maximillian was lieutenant-general "du armées du roi." Chrétian Maximillian, Marquis des Fiennes, was captain of cavalry in his father's regiment.
  • The erasure of the record of Chrétien's marriage and family, the Chrétien known to have been the father of Louis du Bois, makes a break in Louis' line of descent and it was done, obviously, to destroy official record of his ancestry because of his being a "heretic"; to prevent him or any of his descendants from ever afterward establishing a claim to the title and estates. But in this connection, continues Mrs. Thompson, "certainly there were not two branches after the resumption of the title of Marquis des Fiennes. It does not seem that Louis could belong to the line des Fiennes, as the writer of 'The Du Bois Family' says he does,
  • https://archive.org/stream/genealogyofdukes02smyt#page/24/mode/1up
  • and be other than the son of Chrétien Maximillian, Marquis de Fiennes."
  • Louis du Bois emigrated from Manheim to America with his family circa 1660 and eventually settled at New Village (now Hurley], near Kingston, Ulster County, N. Y., where he rapidly rose to prominence in the civil and religious affairs of the settlement. He was one of the twelve original patentees of New Paltz, a village next to Hurley ; he later became one of the magistrates of the jurisdiction comprising the villages of New Paltz and Hurley. Before this period, however, the settlement had been attacked by Indians who burned Hurley ; they killed and injured many of the inhabitants and carried into captivity all the family of Louis du Bois, the wife and three children of Jan Joosten Van Metern and others, all of whom were carried off to the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains. This event, which occurred 7th June, 1663, was known in history as the Second Esopus War. Captain Martin Krieger, an old Dutch soldier and a familiar figure in the earlier Dutch settlements on the Delaware, organized, and, with Louis du Bois, headed an expedition to rescue the captives and chastise the Indians. After three months of ineffectual warfare they finally rounded up the savages on September 3, 1663, defeated the Indians and restored the captive women and children to their homes. In connection with these tragic experiences. Professor Obenchain, of Ogden College, Bowling Green, Ky., sends me the following relation :
  • " About ten weeks after the capture the Indians decided to celebrate their escape from pursuit by burning one of their captives. For their victim they selected Catharine du Bois and her baby, Sara, who afterward married Joost Janse Van Veteren. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child were placed upon it ; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catharine began to sing a Huguenot hymn she had learned in earlier days in France. The Indians withheld the fire and listened. When she finished they demanded another song and then another. Before the last hymn was finished Dutch Soldiers arrived, the captives were all rescued and the Indians terribly punished."
  • Again, in 1670, when the Indians were on the warpath, Louis du Bois served in the colonial forces against them. He is credited with being the founder and first elder of the French Reformed Church at New Paltz. He left a family, a widow, who afterward m. Jean Cotton, and ten children, and their descendants are numerous, prominent and influential throughout the country, one of whom was Garrett A. Hobart, Vice-President of the United States during the first term of President McKinley's administration.

__________

________________

  • Bi-centenary reunion of the descendants of Louis and Jacques Du Bois (emigrants to America, 1660 and 1675), at New Paltz, New York, 1875 .. (1876)
  • http://www.archive.org/details/bicentenaryreuni00dubo
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/bicentenaryreuni00dubo#page/17/mode/1up
  • Louis was married at Manheim, in October, 1655, and Jacques at Leyden, in April, 1663. The marriage record of Jacques, at Leyden, says that he was from the vicinity of LaBassee, which was in the province of Artois.
  • Jacques, however, did not arrive at Esopus till some fifteen years after Louis was settled there. The letters of church-membership, or letters of dismissal from the church of the Walloons, at Leyden, which he took with him on leaving that city, are dated 15th April, 1675, as is evidenced by the church records still extant. He must have died at Esopus, the same or the succeeding year, as in the old records of Ulster county there is still preserved a document by which it appears that his widow, Pieronne Bentyn, was married again to a John Pietersy, who, as such husband, and for a small consideration to himself personally, in December, 1677, contracts with Matthew Blanshan (who was the father-in-law of Louis DuBois) to pledge to him the lands belonging to Jacques Du Bois, in Ryssel, Flanders, as also the rents which the said lands had earned, for the fulfilment of the conditions of a contract which said Jacques DuBois, in his life-time, had made with said Blanshan. The nature or object of the contract does not in this document appear, but as Pieronne Bentyn is described in her marriage record with Jacques DuBois, at Leyden, as of Lisle (which is the same as Ryssel in Flanders), it may be that the lands referred to were held partly or altogether in right of the wife. Else there would seem to be no good reason why Pietersy should be called upon to confirm DuBois's contract with Blanshan.
  • http://www.archive.org/stream/bicentenaryreuni00dubo#page/29/mode/1up
  • The father of Louis Du Bois, as before remarked, was Chretien Du Bois. He is designated in the record of his son's marriage, at Manheim, October 10th, 1655, as the deceased Chretien Du Bois, resident of Wicres.
  • The records of this latter place have been examined, and I regret to say that, from age and bad ink and mutilation, the register is almost illegible.
  • The baptismal record shows that Chretien Du Bois had three children baptized at Wicres. The dates made out are the 18th June, 1622, the 13th November, 1625, and the 21st October, 1626. The names are illegible, and seem to have been intentionally obliterated. These researches were made by archivists under the direction of the consul for the United States at Lille, Mons. C. DuBois Gregoire. In his letter of 15th July, 1875, he writes that he had visited the canton of La Bassee several times, where there are very old records, but could make nothing out, as, where the Christian names occurred, the paper was torn or cut out. He further states that the registers in the village of Wicres were also in many places illegible from age, bad ink, and from being torn and worm-eaten. He says Wicres has a population of three hundred inhabitants, and that many farmers in the vicinity had pointed out to him the farm which the tradition of the country recognizes to have belonged to the Du Bois.

______________

  • Colonial Men and Times: Containing the Journal of Col. Daniel Trabue, Some ... By Daniel Trabue
  • https://books.google.com/books?id=a-xDAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA561&lpg=PA561&dq=cornelius+nieukirk+1715&source=bl&ots=HIrHKHL4K_&sig=a2-LOTbQaara_AiC-XIC_VDs8cY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CEgQ6AEwCWoVChMIzL6fy43oyAIVQ-RjCh2uQgww#v=onepage&q=cornelius%20nieukirk%201715&f=false
  • Pg.557
  • "Biographical History of the First Congressional District of New Jersey" Bol. 1. p. 32.
  • "Louis Du Bois married, Katryn, written Catryn and Catherine Blanshan. Katryn was daughter of Matthys and Madeline Jorisen, of Artois, France. Louis and Katryn were married at Mannheim, Germany Oct. 10, 1655. They and their children came to America in 1660, in the "Gilded Otter," and settled at Esopus, Ulster Co., New York. Louis and Catherine had ten children. Louis Du Bois Died in 1696.
    • "DU BOIS," FRENCH HUGUENOTS.
  • Chrétien or Christian Du Bois, of Artois, France, had
  • Louis Du Bois, "The Walloon," born 28th. of October 1626. Married Sun, Oct. 10th. 1655 Catherin Blancon, daughter of Matthe Blanshan.
  • Chrétien Du Bois is deceased at the time of his son Louis' marriage at Manheim. He has after his name "resident of Wicres," a place of 300 inhabitants in 1875.
  • "Louis du Bois and his 2 sons Isaac and Abraham were Patentees for the town of New Paltz in New York opposite Poughkeepsie, in 1677."
  • .... etc.
  • Pg.559
  • Louis Du Bois, or in French Louys du bois, was born October 28, 1626. Married Catherine Blancon, who was born and married at Manheim, Germany, They were married Sunday Oct. 10th, 1655. It was a Huguenot custom to be married on Sunday, after the communion service.
  • Catherine Blancon lived about ten years longer than her husband Louis Du Bois.
  • .... etc.
  • 1st Gen. Louis Du Bois died aged about 66 yrs. and no doubt was buried in the ground of the Dutch church at Kingston, N. Y. His will was proved 23rd of June 1696.
  • .... etc.
  • After the fifteen years that he had spent in New Palz he returned to Kingston, N. Y. The will of Louis Du Bois was proved 23rd June 1696 and was divided into eight equal parts. It mentions son 1. Abraham Du Bois, 2. Jacob Du Bois, 3. David Du Bois, 4. Solomon Du Bois, 5. Louis Du Bois, 6. Matthew Du Bois, 7 children of Isaac, deceased, 8. children of Sarah, deceased.
  • Louis Du Bois had 1. Abraham Du Bois, b. 1661. b. Artois, France, 2. Isaac Du Bois b. 1658. Died 1690. b. Manheim, Germany 3. Jacob Du Bois, b. Ulster Co. N. Y. 1661. 4 Sarah Du Bois, 5. David Du Bois, (married 1689) 6. Solomon Du Bois, b. 1669. D. 1759. 7. Rabecca Du Bois, b. 1671. 8, Rachel Du Bois, b.1675. 9. Louis Du Bois, b. 1677. 10. Matthew Du Bois, b. 1679.
  • .... etc.

____________________

  • The New York genealogical and biographical record Vol. XXVII. by Greene, Richard Henry
  • https://archive.org/details/newyorkgenealogi1896gree
  • https://archive.org/stream/newyorkgenealogi1896gree#page/190/mode/1up
  • The Du Bois family is one of the oldest of the noble houses of Cotentin, in the Duchy of Normandy. The heraldic records at Paris commence the genealogy with Geoffroi du Bois, a knight banneret and a companion of Duke William in the conquest of England in 1066.
  • In "America Heraldica " the arms, etc., are given as follows, viz.: Arms — Argent, a lion, rampant, sable, armed and langued, gules. Crest — between two tree stumps vert, the lion of the shield. Motto — Tiens ta foy.
  • In the "Du Bois Reunion," at page 38, is emblazoned another coat of arms, entitled "Original Du Bois Arms," and described as follows : "Arms d'or, a l'aigle eployé de sable onglé, becqué de gueles ;" but I have been able to find no authority for the use of these arms in connection with the family of Chrétien Du Bois.
  • Chrétien Du Bois, the father of Louis and Jacques, was a Huguenot gentleman of the family of Du Bois Seigneurs de Beaufermez and de Bourse, having an estate at Wicres, in La Bassée, near Lille, in French Flanders, now Artois.
  • Louis was born October 27, 1627, and the mutilated baptismal record at Wicres shows that two other sons of Chrétien Du Bois were baptized severally on June 18, 1622, and November 13, 1625. One of these was Jacques, and probably the other was named Albert.
  • The baptisms of these three sons are all of the records extant of Wicres referring to the children of Chrétien, but it is certain that he had also two daughters, Francoise and Anne, for the records of the church of the Walloons, at Leyden, Holland, show that his daughter Francoise was married on April 20, 1649, to Pierre Biljouw. By this marriage she had two daughters, Marie, baptized at Leyden March 3, 1650, and Martha, also baptized at Leyden February 8, 1652. Marie came to Kingston, where she married Arendt Jansen, with the approval of her uncle Louis, whose consent is signified in the marriage contract dated June 3, 1670.
  • It was undoubtedly owing to the circumstance of Chrétien's being identified with the Huguenot faith that an attempt was made to obliterate the public records of the family, and to destroy all evidences of his connection with the nobility of France.
  • The religious persecutions in Artois induced Louis and Jacques to abandon their country, and Louis went to Mannheim in the Palatinate, Jacques going to Leyden, where he became a manufacturer of silks and cloth.
  • .... etc.
  • https://archive.org/stream/newyorkgenealogi1896gree#page/191/mode/1up
  • At Mannheim Louis Du Bois was thrown into intimate relations with Mathese Blançhan and Christian Deyo, like himself Huguenot refugees, the former from the vicinity of his father's estate, and the latter from the neighborhood of Calais. His association with Blançhan was destined to be lasting, for on October 10, 1655, he was married to Catharine, daughter of Blançhan and wife Madeline Jorisse.
  • The following record is yet extant in the old Protestant Evangelical Church of Mannheim :
  • "Oct. 10, 1665, Louis Du Bois, fils du feu Chrétien Du Bois, vivant de Wicker, prés de La Bassée, d'un part, et Catherine Blançhan, fille de Mathieu Blançhan, bourgeois de Mannheim, d'autre part, ont été mariés en l'église Francaise de Mannhein le 10 Oct., 1655." Translation :
  • "Louis Du Bois, son of the late Chrétien Du Bois of Wicker, near La Bassée, of the one part, and Catherine Blançhan, daughter of Mathew Blançhan, citizen of Mannheim, of the other part, were married in the French Church at Mannheim, the 10th of October, 1655."
  • Two sons were born to him at Mannheim, viz. : Abraham, on December 26, 1657, and Isaac in 1659. All of his other children were born in America.
  • On April 27, 1660, Mathese Blançhan, with his wife Madeline Jorisse, his daughter Maria, and her husband Anthony Crispell, and three children, embarked in the Dutch ship Gilded Otter for New Netherland, and arrived at Wiltwyck before December 7, 1660, for on that date Domine Blom recorded their presence at his first celebration of the Lord's Supper.
  • .... etc.

__________

  • The New York genealogical and biographical record by Greene, Richard Henry
  • https://archive.org/details/newyorkgenealogi1897gree
  • https://archive.org/stream/newyorkgenealogi1897gree#page/13/mode/1up
  • (Continued from Vol. XXVII., p. 194, of THE RECORD.)
  • Louis Du Bois remained in New Paltz during the first ten years of its existence, returning to Kingston with his wife in 1686, where he purchased a residence on what is now the northwest corner of East Front and John Streets, and here, surrounded by old neighbors and friends, he passed the closing years of his life. He died in June, 1696, his last will being dated on the 23d of that month. He left a considerable estate, which he divided equally among his children after making a liberal provision for his widow, who survived him ten years. From the time of his arrival in Esopus to his death, Louis Du Bois was the chief of the Huguenot settlers, in all their trials they looked to him as their adviser and head, and among them his word was law. During his residence at Hurley he was an overseer and a justice of the peace, and he, with Cornelis Barents Slecht and Albert Heymans Roosa, was prominent in the "mutiny at Esopus" against the tyranny of Captain Brodhead, which resulted in the suspension of that doughty warrior from his command.
  • The descendants of Louis Du Bois far outnumber those of Jacques, as he left seven sons to perpetuate his name, while Jacques had but three, and only two of those are known with certainty to have been married. The names and fortunes of those families are inseparably welded with the making of New York, and no history of that commonwealth can be complete, that omits mention of the early influences for piety, industry, and valor, and the later sacrifices on the altar of patriotism, of Louis and Jacques Du Bois and their descendants.
  • Louis Du Bois and Catharine Blanchan, his wife, had the following children :
    • 2. i. Abraham2, born at Mannheim, in the Palatinate, December 26, 1657 ; married at Kingston, March 6, 1681, Margriet, the youngest of the five children of Christian Deyo.
    • 3. ii. Isaac, born Mannheim, 1659; married at Kingston in June, 1683, Maria Hasbrouck. He settled at New Paltz, and died June 28, 1690.
    • 4. iii. Jacob2, baptized October 9, 1661 ; married, March 8, 1689, Lysbeth Varnoye ; died 1745.
    • 5. iv. Sarah2, baptized September 14, 1664 ; married, December 12, 1682, Joost Janz, of Marbletown.
    • 6. v. David2, baptized March 13, 1667 ; married, March 8, 1689, Cornelia Varnoye.
    • 7. vi. Solomon2, born at Hurley, 1670; married, 1692, Trintje Gerritsen.
    • 8. vii. Rebecca2, baptized June 18, 1671 ; died young.
    • 9. viii. Ragel2 , baptized April, 1675 ; died young.
    • 10. ix. Louis2, born 1677 ; married, January 19, 1701, Rachael Hasbrouck.
    • 11. x. Matthew2, born January 3, 1679, at Hurley; married, January 17, 1697, Sara Matthyssen.
  • .... etc.

_________________

_______________________

_____________________

____________________

__________________

__________________

.LOUIS DUBOIS141,142,143 October 10, 1655 in Mannheim, in the Lower Palatinate of Germany143, son of MARQUIS DES FIENNES CHRISTIAN DUBOIS. He was born October 10, 1626 or 10/27/1627?, La Basse, near Lille, in the province of Artois, France143, and died 1695-1696 in Kingston, Ulster Co., New York144,145,146. She married (2) JEAN COTTIN138,139,140.

LOUIS DUBOIS: The du Bois des Fiennes appear to have been of military stock, and to have furnished France with some able soldiers. At least ten of them were in the last crusade. The first Maximillien was "Marischall des camps et du armees du roi"; his son was a Lieutenant-General in the French Legion; and Louis du Bois' father--Chretien, Marquis des Fiennes--was Captain of cavalry in his father's regiment. Refugees from French Flanders to Wicres, Artois, France. The two eldest children of Louis du Bois were born in Mannheim; and in 1660 the family came to America. Upon their arrival here they proceeded to New Village [New Pals] in Ulster Co., N. Y., where Louis rapidly rose to prominence in local civil and religious affairs. He, with two of his sons, were among the "twelve patentees" of New Paltz, receiving the grant from Governor Andros, September 6, 1677. Louis was also a member of the first Court of Sessions held at Kingston, the seat of Ulster County. He led in demanding of the English government, and of the Assembly, that there should be no taxation without the consent of the people, and for this daring attitude he lost his commission. Thus anticipating the crisis of 1776! In 1663, Louis du Bois headed an expedition against the Minnisink Indians, and was of the colonial forces against them again in 1670. The first-named punitive expedition of June 7, 1663, was known in New York history as the Esopus War. It was organized at the time the settlement was attacked by the Minnisinks, who burned Hurley, killed and injured some of the settlers, and carried away as prisoners, the wife of Louis du Bois, his three children, and at least two of Jan Joosten's. These were taken to the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains and there remained in captivity for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by du Bois and Captain Martin Kreiger's company of Manhattan soldiers; the trainband finally rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663. In connection with this tragic experience the following statement is quoted: "About ten weeks after the capture of the women and children, the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine du Bois, and her baby Sara, who afterward married her companion in captivity, John Van Metre. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child placed thereon; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withheld the fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they demanded more, and before she had finished the last one her husband and the Dutch soldiers from New Amsterdam arrived and surrounded the savages, killed and captured some,and otherwise inflicted terrible punishment upon them, and released the prisoners."

Louis du Bois was one of the founders, and the first elder, of the Reformed Dutch Church at New Paltz. He often officiated at the marriage ceremonies and baptisms among the families connected with the church, and with many enterprises of civic importance and progress his name was frequently mentioned. After his death, in 1695, his widow married Jean Cotton and their three children left numerous descendants, one of whom, Garrett A. Hobart, was the Vice-President of the United States during President McKinley's first administration. (The Origin and Descent of an American Van Metre Family)

Among the Walloons that came to New Netherland, in the last days of the Dutch occupation, was Louis du Bois, founder of the Huguenot settlement of New Paltz, in Ulster county, New York. Louis was the son of Chr'tien du Bois, an inhabitant of Wicres, a hamlet in the district of La Barr'e, near Lille, in Flanders, where he was born on the twenty-seventh day of October, in the year 1627. The province of Flanders was at that time a dependency of Spain; and when, twenty years later, the rights of conscience were secured by the treaty of Westphalia to the Protestants of Germany, the benefits of that treaty did not extend to the Spanish dominions. It was perhaps on this account, and in quest of religious freedom, that Louis left his native province, in early manhood, and removed, as numbers of his countrymen were doing, to the lower Palatinate. This Calvinistic state, which had taken the lead among the Protestant powers of Germany, from the outbreak of the Thirty Years' War, now offered a refuge to the oppressed Huguenots, and to the Waldenses, driven from their Alpine valleys by the fierce soldiery of Savoy. Long before this, indeed, a little colony of Walloons, flying before the troops of Alva, had come to settle within the hospitable territory of the Palatinate, at Frankenthal, only a few miles from Mannheim, its capital. Mannheim itself now became the home of many French refugees, and among them we recognize several families that afterwards removed to America. Here David de Marest, Frederic de Vaux, Abraham Hasbroucq, Chr'tien Duyou (Deyo), Matthew Blanchan, Meynard Journeay, Thonnet Terrin, Pierre Parmentier, Antoine Crispel, David Usilie, Philippe Casier, Bourgeon Broucard, Simon Le Febre, Juste Duri', and others, enjoyed for several years the kindness of their German co-religionists and the protection of the good Elector Palatine. Hither Louis du Bois came, and here, on the tenth day of October, 1655, he married Catharine, daughter of Matthew Blanchan, who, like himself, was from French Flanders. Two sons, Abraham and Isaac, were born of this marriage in Mannheim.

The refugees found much, doubtless, to bind them to the country of their adoption. They were encouraged in the free exercise of their religion. The people and their prince were Calvinists, like themselves. Openings for employment, if not for enrichment in trade, were afforded in the prosperous city, where, a century later, Huguenot merchants and manufacturers were enabled to amass large fortunes. How pleasantly and fondly they remembered the goodly Rhine-land, in after days, we may gather from the fact that the emigrants to America named their home in the wilderness, not from their native province in France, but from the place of their refuge in Germany, calling it "The New Palatinate." In spite, however, of all inducements to remain, Louis du Bois and certain of his fellow-refugees determined to remove to the New World; influenced, it may be, by a feeling of insecurity in a country lying upon the border of France, and liable to foreign invasion at any moment.

Arrival in New Amsterdam. The Dutch ship Gilded Otter, in the spring of the year 1660, brought over several of these families. Others followed, in the course of the same year. The little town of New Amsterdam, nestled upon the lower end of Manhattan island, presented a curious appearance to the strangers. Inclosed within the limits of Wall street and Broadway, "two hundred poorly-constructed houses gave partial comfort to some fourteen hundred people. The fort loomed up broadly in front, partially hiding within it the governor's residence, and the Dutch church. The flag of the States-General, and a wind-mill on the western bastion, were notable indications of Holland rule." Our colonists did not linger long in New Amsterdam. Taking counsel doubtless of their Walloon countrymen, and obtaining permission from the governor and his council, they soon decided upon a place of settlement: and by the end of the year, Matthew Blanchan and Anthony Crispel, with their families, had established themselves in Esopus; where, before the following October, they were joined by Louis du Bois and his wife and sons.

The spot where, after many wanderings, our refugees at length had found a home, was happily chosen. It lay but a short distance from that noble river, whose majestic course and varied scenery must have vividly recalled to them the Rhine. The plateau upon which the village of Wiltwyck stood was skirted by Esopus creek. From the banks along which the palisades protecting it had been constructed, the settlers overlooked the fertile lands occupied by the farms of the white men, and by the patches upon which the Indian women still raised their crops of maize and beans. The beautiful valley of the Wallkill opened toward the southwest. On the north, the wooded slopes of the Catskill mountains were visible.

Blanchan and Crispel were soon joined at Wiltwyck by Louis du Bois, and shortly after by a fourth Walloon family, that of Rachel de

la Montagne, daughter of Jean de la Montagne of New Amsterdam, and now wife of Gysbert Imborch. Meantime, another settlement had

been commenced in the Esopus country. The "New Village," afterwards known as Hurley, was founded about a mile to the west of Wiltwyck.

Taught by experience, the settlers took pains to protect their homes against the attacks of the savages. The houses and barns were built within a fortified inclosure, where fifteen families formed a compact community. Blanchan and his two sons-in-law were among those who removed from Wiltwyck to the New Village.

On the seventh of June, a concerted attack was made by parties of Indians upon both the settlements. The destruction of the "New Village" was complete. Every dwelling was burned. The greater number of the adult inhabitants had gone forth that day as usual to their field work upon the outlying farms, leaving some of the women, with the little children, at home. Three of the men, who had doubtless returned to protect

them, were killed; and eight women, with twenty-six children, were taken prisoners. Among these were the families of our Walloons: the wife and three children of Louis du Bois, the two children of Matthew Blanchan, and Anthony Crispel's wife and child. The rest of the people, those at work in the fields, and those who could escape from the village, fled to the neighboring woods, and in the course of the afternoon made their way to Wiltwyck, or to the redoubt at the mouth of Esopus creek. Brave defense of Wiltwyck.

Meanwhile, the attack at Wiltwyck had been less successful. Twelve houses were burned, and but for a timely change of wind the entire settlement would have been consumed. Some of the Indians, seizing the women and children, hastened away with them into the forest: whilst others, stationed near the gates, despatched those of the men who attempted to enter the town. As at the New Village, most of the inhabitants were away, at their employments in the neighboring fields. The palisades surrounding the place had been destroyed by the fire. All night long the colonists toiled to replace them, or kept watch along the exposed borders. Seventy of the inhabitants were missing. Of these, twenty-four had been murdered; while forty-five, women and children, had been taken away into captivity.

One of the legends surrounding this event includes the story of Catherine du Bois. About ten weeks after the capture the Indians selected Catharine du Bois and her baby, Sara to be sacrificed. A pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child were placed upon it; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catharine began to sing a Huguenot hymn she had learned in earlier days in France. The Indians withheld the fire and listened. When she finished they demanded another song and then another. Before the last hymn was finished Dutch Soldiers arrived, the captives were all rescued and the Indians terribly punished.

Evidence heard at the hearing related to Captain Brodhead April 1667; "Coming to the house of Louis DuBois, Captain Brodhead took an anker of brandy and threw it upon the ground because DuBois had refused him free brandy. Du Bois was forced to give Brodhead brandy and when Dubois' wife, Catherine Blanchan, came to Brodhead's house to demand payment, the Captain drove her out of the house with a knife, calling her many bad names and told her that were she not with child, he would cut her."

Children of CATHERINE BLANCHAN and LOUIS DUBOIS are:

10. i. SARAH4 DUBOIS, b. 1664.

ii. ABRAHAM DUBOIS147, b. 1657, Manhiem.
iii. ISAAC DUBOIS147, b. 1659, Manhiem.
iv. JACOB DUBOIS, b. 1661.
v. DAVID DUBOIS, b. Abt. 1667.

11. vi. SOLOMON DUBOIS, b. abt 1669; d. February 2, 1759.

vi. REBECCA DUBOIS, b. Abt. 1671.
vii. RACHEL DUBOIS, b. Abt. 1675.

Louis DuBois died between 22 Feb 1696, the date of the last codicil to his will, and 26 Mar 1696, the date of probate.

_________________

http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=wsenne&id=I01034

Baptism: 13 NOV 1626

   The two eldest children of Louis du Bois were born in Mannheim; and in 1660 the family came to America. Upon their arrival here they proceeded to New Village [New Pals] in Ulster County, New York, where Louis rapidly rose to prominence in local civil and religious affairs. He, with two of his sons, were among the "twelve patentees" of New Paltz, receiving the grant from Governor Andross, September 6, 1677. Louis was also a member of the first Court of Sessions held at Kingston, the seat of Ulster County,. He led in demanding of the English government, and of the Assembly, that there should be no taxation without the consent of the people, and for this daring attitude he lost his commission. [MacKenzie's "Col. Families of U. S.," VII., p. 472.] Thus anticipating the crisis of 1776!
   In 1663, Louis du Bois headed an expedition against the Minnisink Indians, and was of the colonial forces against them again in 1670. [Index of Ancestors, Year-Book of Colonial Wars, 1922.] The first-named punitive expedition of June 7, 1663, was known in New York history as the Eusopus War. It was organized at the time the settlement was attacked by the Minnisinks, who burned Hurley, killed and injured some of the settlers, and carried away as prisoners, the wife of Louis du Bois, his three children, and at least two of Jan Joosten's. These were taken to the fastness of the Catskill Mountains and there remained in captivity for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by du Bois and Captain Martin Kreiger's company of Manhattan soldiers; the train band finally rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663. In connection with this tragic experience the following statement is quoted: "About ten weeks after the capture of the women and children, the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine du Bois, and her baby Sara, who afterward married her companion in captivity, John Van Metre. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child placed thereon; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withheld the fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they demanded more, and before she had finished the last one her husband and the Dutch soldiers from New Amsterdam arrived and surrounded the savages, killed and captured some, and otherwise inflicted terrible punishment upon them, and released the prisoners."[Martin Kreiger's Journal.][MacKenzie's Col. Fam. U. S., VII., p. 472.]
   Louis du Bois was one of the founders, and the first elder, of the Reformed Dutch Church at New Paltz. He often officiated at the marriage ceremonies and baptisms among the families connected with the church, and with many enterprises of civic importance and progress his name was frequently mentioned. After his death, in 1695, his widow married Jean Cotton and their three children left numerous descendants, one of whom, Garrett A. Hobart, was the Vice-President of the United States during President McKinley's first administration.

__________________

The earliest comprehensive record of Louis Du Bois begins with that of his marriage at Mannheim, Germany, whither he had gone to escape persecution because of his religion. Translated, it reads:

"Louis Du bois, son of late Chretian Du Bois, of Wikres, near La Basse, on the one side, and Cahteirne Blanshan, daughter of Matthew Blanshan, citizen of Mannheim, on the other side, were married in the French Church at Mannehim the 10th Oct, 1655"

The little Hamlet of Wikres contained about three hundred inhabitants devoted to agriculture, adn is in the Province of Artois, French Flanders. here Louis Du Bois was born Oct 21, 1626. The family was then a very ancient one, and is referred to in the arhcives and books of hereldry "as one of the most ancient and noble of the realm." How long he had been at Mannheim is unknown; he was twenty-nine years old at his marriage, and was proably about 10 years older than his wife.

In New Netherland, to which he emigrated in 1660, he was farmer, merchant, magistrate and leading citizen, and is found to have been in the forefront of every undertaking. In 1677 he organized the movement which resulted in the purchase of about 40 thousand acres of land from the Indians, known as the New Paltz Patent. The Village of New Paltz was laid out, and on the principal street a number of substantisl stone residneces were built, several of which are still standing. A church was organized with Louis Du Bois as the first elder.

For a time he and his associates, all of whom were Frenchmen, resided at New paltz, but he later returned to Kingson and spent the remainder of his life with the Dutch settlers of Kingston and Hurley. [Ulster county]

He left a large family, all named in his will; his widow married Jean Cottie, the schoolmaster - Du Bois Family of Ulster County, by H. O. Collins, in The New York Genealogical and Biographical record, vols xxfii, xviii.

Data Conflicts:

Last Name - Du Bois or du Bois

Birth Place - Wicres, Nord-pas-de-Calais, France or Oct 27 or 1627 Wicres, Artois, Feance

Oct 12, 1626 - Wikres, Artois, French Flanders

__________________________

Source: Wikipedia, DuBois Family Assoc

____________________

http://www.dbfa.org/family_history.htm

http://www.dbfa.org/louis_dubois.htm

By Anson DuBois, 1875

[ From the 1875 reunion book ]

I am to present to you a sketch of

The life and times of Louis DuBois

(called sometimes Louis deWall, or the Walloon).

       From the date of his arrival in America, we have just had; what can be known of his European history. His birth at Wicres, near Lille, the chief town of Artois, in northern France, October 27,1626. His retiring to the city of Mannheim, in the Palatinate of the Rhine, in Germany, where he married Catherine Blanchon, or Blanjean, the daughter of a burgher of that place. October 10th 1655; and the birth there of two sons, Abraham and Isaac. This little family, doubtless with other French Protestants, embarked for America in 1660, seeking in the New World, an asylum from royal and Romish persecution.
       They sailed, no doubt, from a Holland port, in a Dutch vessel, to these western possessions of the States-General. At the period in which they arrived, the whole country was new. How different the Bay of New York, upon which our ancestors looked in 1660, and the same bay at the present time! And still greater changes have taken place on Manhattan Island. Then Wall street and Broadway enclosed the quaint, irregularly-built little town, nestled upon the lower point of the island sloping to the East river, and even this narrow extent broken by sandhills, marshy meadows and broad, open ditches.
       Two hundred poorly constructed houses gave partial comfort to some fourteen hundred people. The fort loomed up broadly in front, partially hiding within it the barracks, the governor's official residence, and the Old Dutch church. A globe-shaped steeple upon the latter seemed to suggest that the church alone could elevate the world, and the weathercock, upon his high perch, stood watching for the millennial morning. The flag of the States-General, and a wind-mill on the western bastion, were notable indications of Hollandish rule. Wherever else in all that broad and beautiful bay, the eye of our ancestor rested, he saw only the forest, with possibly here and there an opening among the trees.
       We have not the name of the ship or of his fellow-passengers. Probably Reverend Hendricus Selyns, afterwards pastor at Brooklyn, and his companion to America, Rev. Hermanus Blom, were in the company. Blom had preached at Kingston the previous year and now came to settle there, and thus became the pastor of Louis DuBois.They came in the same year.But we cannot say that they came in the same ship. Mathew Blanchon, a brother-in-law, and Antone Crispell and Hugo Frere, early and intimate friends of Louis, may also have been with him.
       DuBois and his companions must have landed at the company's dock. Some two blocks from South ferry, near Moore Street. Turning to the left, they would have passed the White Hall of Governor Stuyvesant and the fort, and entered the Heere straat the "Lord street", or street of rank, now Broadway, just above Bowling Green. A little further up they would have found the substantial residence of the Dutch clergyman, or Dominie, as the Dutch delight to call him Rev. Megapolensis.
       Just across the street was the affable inn- keeper, Captain Martin Kregier, a man of mark, a captain of the militia, a burgomaster, and officer of the council. His discretion and bravery had full exercise three years after this, while in command at Esopus. DuBois may have met other refugees, some of whom came as early as 1628.And he may have found friends at New Rochelle.
       DuBois and his companions must now leave New Amsterdam. Governor Stuyvesant was absent on business, in the summer of 1660, at Esopus and Fort Orange if his absence occurred at this time, DuBois applied for permission to go to the upper country to Henrick Van Dyck. The schout fischael, whose tasteful mansion stood on the Heere straet. Among gardens and orchards, running down to the North River, and near Dominie Megapolensis.
       All things being in readiness, DuBois, with his wife, children and friends, much refreshed by their sojourn in the City set out for the upper Hudson. The scenes were now a constant wonder for the people who had sailed only on European rivers, where hamlet and castle and city leave scarcely room for farm or garden. The sloping Eastern Shore, the bald front of the Palisades, the Highlands with narrower water and towering peaks springing to the clouds from either shore; the broader bay at Newburg. And, finally, the blue outlines of the Shawangunk and the Catskills met their gaze.
       Everywhere were forests, vast and deep. At long intervals only could be seen the thin smoke of the Indian wigwam circling among the tree-tops, or a bark-canoe gliding furtively across some darksome bay; but nothing, in the long. Tedious sail, that bore the most distant resemblance to their old home beyond the Atlantic.
       We must suppose that deep, earnest thoughts crowded themselves upon the active mind of our ancestor in that voyage up the Hudson. Everything so new, strange and bewildering. The sky only, of all about him, remained unchanged, and the stars at night; and as he looked on these he felt that Heaven beyond them and his Divine Lord and Savior were unchanged and unchangeable. He had fled from country and kindred for God and liberty. This wilderness was to be his name and that of his children. He could not forecast the future, but one thing was sure --
       he knew in whom he had believed, and could trust all to Him.
       At length the sloop turned her prow into the Rondout creek. The village of Wiltwyck. In the "Esopus country", as Dominie Blom designated the Kingston of his day, was now just beginning its permanent growth. History states that the Dutch established a trading post at Rondout in 1614.
       Tradition, however, has it that the first settlers of Ulster county landed at Saugerties, and followed up the Esopus kill, through unbroken forests, twelve miles, and settled finally at Kingston, being attracted by the rich alluvial meadows. But this settlement was twice broken up before the arrival of our emigrants, and so late as 1655 is said to have been wholly abandoned. Before 1660 it had been reoccupied and put in some posture of defense.
       We have now conducted Louis DuBois and his associates to their first American home. We must narrate their labors at this place. And the terrible events through which they were led; all of which show the character of our Huguenot ancestors and have important relation to the history of New Paltz.
       *The writer and reader of this article, Anson DuBois, is of the tribe of Benjamin, who was the son of Solomon, son of Louis. They belong to Catskill. He was formerly pastor of the Second Reformed Church in Kingston, now of the Reformed Church of Flatlands, near Brooklyn

(Read the rest at http://www.dbfa.org/louis_dubois2.htm)

_________________

He was also said to have been born 21 October 1626 in Wicres, France and died 22 Feb 1696 in Kingston, NY. 1704

He was also said to have been born 27 Oct 1627. 1732

He was also said to have been born 27 Oct 1626. 1735, 1725

"All these names under the conditions I have named, underwent same change and many came to be written with a radical variation from the original. . . and that of Dubois, as: D'boy, Debois, Dibois, Deboys, du Bois, Buboy, and so on." 1696

"A copy of the 1655 marriage record of Louis du Bois is cited to show that he was the son of Chretien du Bois of Wicres (eidgerd 1:5): 'Louis du Bois, fils de feu Chretien du bois vivant de Wickes pres de al Bassee . . . ') However, no evidence is given in either book to show that either Jacques or Francoise was the child of Chretien du Bois. A manuscript du Bois genealogy, based on research commissioned and/or performed by the U.S. Consul in Lille in 1871, cites the Roman Catholic parish registers of Wicres as containing the baptisms between 1622 and 1628 of four children of Chretient du Bois: Francoise, Anne, Louis and Jacques. This manuscript is described and quoted from in an important Addendum to Mr. Murphy's book, entitled 'original du Bois Family References Used to Write the European Ancestry of Chretien du Bois of Wicres, France 1597-1628.' Apparently the parish registers of Wicres were illegible by 1883 (Addendum p. 3). " 1736

"Nevertheless, evidence does exist to show that Louis du Bois and Francoise (du Bois) Billiou were brother and sister. In his article, 'Marriages at Kingston, New York,' (rec. 106:193-94), Dr. Kenneth Scott lists marriages found in Kingston court records. Among these was the 1670 marriage of 'Mria Biljouw of Leyden' to 'Arendt Jansen Van Naerden,' with the authorization of 'Lowies De Booys, uncle of the aforesaid young woman. This Maria was clearly the daughter of Pierre and Francoise (du Bois) Billiou (John E. Stillwell, Stillwell Genealogy . . ., 4 vols, New york, 1929-31, 3:295). Since Louis du Bois was a child of Chretien du Bois of Wicres, it follows that Francoise was, too. The 1649 proclamation in Leiden of Pierre Billiou and Francoise du Bois (vol. 268, p. 95b; FHL 0119016; Addendum pp. 3-4) gives her place of origin as near Lille, which is a reasonable way to describe Wicres. And there is no other known explanation for Louis du Bois to be called the uncle of Maria Billiou." 1736

"Louis du Bois was a farmer, merchant, magistrate and leading citizen and is found to have been in the forefront of every undertaking. In 1677 he organized the movement which resulted int he purchase of some 37,000-40,000 acres of land from the Indians, known as the New Paltz Patent. A church was organized with Louis du Bois the first Elder. A village - New Paltz - was laid out with several of the original stone residences still standing some three hundred years later. In 1686 Louis du Bois who had been the leader of the settlement returned from New Paltz to Kingston to live. He purchased 'a house and homelott' from Derrick Schoepmes. This was the last house in which he lived. It was his residence for ten years. It was left by Will to his son Matthew. After 1777 when the British burned all of Kingston, another house was erected on this lot, which gave way to a store in 1816. Louis had lived about 66 years. His will was proved the 23rd of June 1696. The vast real property holdings of Louis du Bois were divided among his children. Louis du Bois had three Wills recorded in Ulster County Surrogate's office: Liber B, p. 266: An early Will, or more properly defined, a joint agreement of Louis DuBois and Catherine, his wife, dated 10-13-1676, was to the effect that after the deaths of 'Louis Du Booys' and his wife 'Catharina Blansjan' the whole estate to go to the childre, 'the minors first to be educated until they can earn a living.' In case of remarriage of either party, without lawful issue, the children shall have one half the estate. Liber AA, p. 39: Will dated 3-30-1686. Estate, after payment of debts to be equally divided 'amongst my children but my two eldest sons desiring to have each of them a part of the land of New Paltz and more than the other children by reason their names 'uppon the Patent', but if they will be content 'to deale equally with my other children whether in land, houses or any other sort of goods whatever belonging to my Estate as well the land of the Paltz . . .' that if they have the land at New Paltz they should pay a share of its worth to the other children as all of the estate should be divided equally. 'My wife, their mother, shall have the ordering of the Estate as long as she remains a widow.' If she marry the Estate to be divided among the children aforesaid except my two eldest sons.' Recorded 5-5-1686. The second Will dated 3-27-1694, proved 3-26-1696: States that if the widow should marry, then to the eldest son Abraham, £6, as his primogeniture right, also 1/8 of the estate; son Jacob 1/8; and 1/8 to each of the following children: David, Solomon, Louis, Matthew; and to the children of deceased son Isaac 1/8; and to children of Sara, wife of Joost Janse (Van Meter) 1/8. Wife Catherine appointed executrix. There was a third Will 2-22-1696 which affirmed the Will of 1694 with the following exceptions: Son Jacob was to get a farm in Hurley on condition that he pay 1500 sheps (schepels) of wheat to youngest son Matthew. Son Matthew conveyed house and lot in Kingston for which he was to pay his father's estate 1500 schepels of wheat. Payment for land which son Daavid bought of Jan Wood to come out of estate. Sons Solomon and Louis to have lands in New Paltz for which they were to pay to the estate 800 schepels of wheat. Daughter Sara wife of Joost Janse was to have a piece of land in Hurley for which she was to pay to the estate 700 schepels of wheat. Proved 3-26-1696." 1704

"Louis DuBois, the first of the family in America, was the son of Cretian or Christian DuBois, and was descended from a Huguenot family in the province of Artois, (now known as the 'Department of Pas du-Calas,') France. Louis was born at Wicres near Lille, Oct. 27, 1626. He left France, whose laws were inimical to the free enjoyment of his protestant faith, taking refuge in Mannheim, Germany, where Oct. 10, 1655, he married Catherine Blanshan, and in 1660, along with his wife and two young children, Abraham and Isaac, immigrated to this country. He lived at Hurley near Kingston, N.Y., until 1677 when he removed to New Paltz, N.Y., as leader of a colony of Huguenot settlers. He returned from New Paltz to Kingston about 1687, and died there 1695. he was the father of ten children, seven sons and three daughters." 1735

"The record of the erasure of Chretien's marriage and family, that is, the Chretien known to have been the father of Louis du Bois, makes a break in Louis' line of descent. The official record was obviously destroyed because of his Protestantism, and to prevent him - or any of his descendants - from ever after establishing a claim to the title and estates. We are informed that there were not two branches after the resumption of the title of Marquis des Fiennes. We are also advised that Louis was a second son; and that the title and arms of the des Fiennes became extinct with the death of the Marchioness de Poyanne, in 1761." 1679

He was said to have been born 21 October, 1626 in Wicres, France and died 22 Feb 1696 in Kingston, NY. His father was said to be Chretien du Bois de Fiennes b. prob. 1597, Wicres, France, died prior to 1655, Wicres, France and his mother was said to be Cornelia. 1704

"The five children of Matthew Blanchan and Magdelaine Joire/Jorisen were widely spaced. Matthew, Jr. was only six months old when his eldest sister Catharine marrried Louis du Bois in 1655. A second sister, Maria, married Antoine Crispell on 31 Janaury 1661. Almost at once the Blancan family with their new son-in-law set out for the New World. Catharine and Louis du Bois remained in Mannheim where their son Isaac was born on May 14th, emigrating in 1661 on the 'St. Jan Baptiste'." 1704

"Louis DU BOIS was baptized on 21 October 1626 at Lille, parish church of Wicres, France, the son of Chretien du Bois (and possibly a Cornelia [Unknown]).

Either with his parents or on his own he went to Mannheim, Germany in the Pfalz, German Palatinate. Abstracts of Mannheim Palatine Records translated by Louis DuBois of Yardley, Pennsylvania in 1928 state: "In the year 1606, the Elector Frederick IV of the Palatinate, being an Evangelical Prince and foreseeing a religious war, built the fortified city of Mannheim at the confluence of the Neckar and Rhine Rivers. Soon after, in 1618, there broke out the devastating 'Thirty Years War' and then the youthful fortress of Mannheim was taken and destroyed by the Bavarian General Tilly.

The persecuted French Protestants were brotherly received in the German Evangelical country, particularly in the Rhineland. The Walloons were likewise welcomed in Mannheim and allowed to establish their own French Evangelical community with their own clergymen. For a time they were united with the German Evangelical Reformed church, which union was made with the understanding that services and Holy Communion should be held in the French language in the Spring and Autumn.

"The civil and church records of Mannheim do not go back beyond the year 1621, the date of the city's destruction. It is only at a later date that the records of the French Protestants are to be found inscribed by French clergymen in the German church book of records.

"The name du Bois is found for the first time in 1653.... Louis du Bois, son of the late Chretien DuBois, resident of Wicres in the vicinity of La Bassee, of the first part, and Catharine Blanchan, daughter of Mathieu Blanchan, bourgeois of Mannheim, of the second part, were married at the French (Protestant) Church of Mannheim (in the Pfalz, German Palatinate), the 10th of October 1655. (Note: A photostatic copy of this record is included in the DuBois Family History)" 1722

"It has been generally accepted that Louis, his wife and children accompanied Matthys Blanchan and Antoine Crispell (departing 27 April 1660 in the 'Gilded Otter'), but Riker suggests that he probably came with his brother-in-law Pierre Billiou the following year.

"Blanchan, Crispell and DuBois all received grants of land in Hurley, near Kingston, obtaining ground briefs on 25 April 1663.

"On the 10th of June 1663, Hurley and part of Kingston was burned by the Indians, and the wife of Louis DuBois and three children were among those who were carried away captive. Three months afterward an expedition under Captain Krieger, sent from New York, recovered the captives by surprising the Indians at their Fort near the Hogaberg in Shawangunk.

"From Ralph LeFebre's History of New Paltz, Fort Orange Press, Albany, New York, 1909: 'The story (of the rescue of the Indian captives) which is dear to the Huguenot heart of New Paltz, is that when Captain Krieger and his company, directed by an Indian, attacked the savages at their place of refuge near the Shawangunk Kill, they were about to burn one or more captives at the stake, and the women commenced singing the 137th Psalm, which so pleased the red men that they deferred the proposed death by torture. In the meantime Captain Krieger's band, with Louis DuBois and others, arrived and rescued the captives from a horrible death. Louis DuBois is reported to have killed with his sword an Indian who was in advance of the rest, before the alarm could be raised. Captain Krieger's report says nothing of this. However, as the tradition contains nothing irreconcilable with the Captain's report which deals mainly with the fighting done by his soldiers, it is interesting to keep the tradition alive as it deals more upon the condition of the captives.'

"E. M. Ruttenber, the Orange County historian, states his objections to the tradition as follows: 'The story was repudiated as a statement of fact, first, on the authority of Indian customs. We do not recall a single instance where a woman was burned at the stake by the Indians. They killed female prisoners on the march sometimes when they were too feeble to keep up but very rarely after reaching camp. Mrs. DuBois and her companions had been prisoners from June 10th to September 5th, or nearly three months before they were rescued from captivity. During all that time they had been guarded carefully at the castle of the Indians, and held ransom or exchange, to which end negotiations had been opened. The Indians asked especially for the return of some of their chiefs who had been sent to Curacao and sold as slaves by Governor Stuyvesant.

"'Second: Documentary evidence concerning events of that period is entirely against tradition. The written record is, that when the Dutch forces surprised the Indians, the latter were busy in constructing a third angle to their fort for the purpose of strengthening it, instead of being engaged in preparations for burning prisoners. The prisoners were found alive and well, and no complaint is recorded of any ill treatment, not even their heads had been shaved and painted as had been customary. Every night, says the record, they were removed from the castle to the woods, lest the Dutch should recover them before negotiations for their release were consumated.'

"Among the Huguenot settlers at Kingston, at this time, was Abraham Hasbrouck. He had served with Edmund Andros in the English army. He was a native of Calais, had emigrated to Mannheim, and in 1675 to America, settling finally in Esopus.

"The Huguenots, being desirous of forming a settlement of their own, were indebted to some extent to the acquaintanceship of Abraham Hasbrouck with Edmund Andros who was Colonial Governor at this time, having been appointed to that office when the colony of New York passed from the Dutch to the English in 1665.

"These French settlers longed for a settlement of their own where they could speak their own language, worship in their own church, and be in a community where they could govern themselves according to their own choice. The traffic with the Indians in furs was becoming less profitable. It was becoming more and more necessary to follow the occupation of cultivating the soil. The fertile lowlands of the Wallkill had undoubtedly been in the mind of Louis DuBois as an ideal place to establish the French community. The mountains and forests lining the valley most certainly must have reminded the Huguenots of their native county in French Flanders, and the Meuse Valley through which they escaped to the Pfalz.

"The papers relating to the Paltz Patent are among the most cherished possessions of the Huguenot Historical Society of New Paltz, New York, Inc They are written in Dutch and present a unique example of fair dealing between red men and white. LeFevre's History gives the translation as follows:

Contract of Sale

'By approbation of his Excellency Governor Edmond Andros, dated 28 April 1677, an agreement is made on this date, the 26th of May, of the year 1677, for the purchase of certain lands, between the parties herein named and the undersigned Esopus Indians.

'Matsaysay, Nekahakaway, Magakahas, Assinnerakan, Wawawanis, acknowledge to have sold to Lowies du Booys and his partners the land described as follows: Beginning from the high hills at a place named Moggonck, from thence south-east toward the river to a point named Juffrous Hoock (Juffrons Hook), lying in the Long Reach, named by the Indians Magaatramis (Great River), then north up along the river to the island called by the Indians Raphoes (Rappoos, on the Kroonme Elbow), then west toward the high hills to a place called Waratahaes and Tawaentaqui, along the high hills south-west to Moggonck, being described by the four corners with everything included within these boundaries, hills, dales, waters, etc., and a right of way to the Ronduyt kill (Rondout Kill - New Paltz) as directly as it can be found, and also that the Indians shall have the same right to hunt and to fish as the Christians, for which land the Indians have agreed to accept the articles here specified:

'40 kettles, 10 large, 30 small; 40 axes, 40 adzes; 40 shirts, 400 fathoms of white net-work; 300 fathoms of black net-work; 60 pairs of stockings, half small sizes; 100 bars of lead; 1 keg of powder; 100 knives; 4 kegs of wine; 40 oars; 40 pieces of duffel (heavy woolen cloth); 60 blankets; 100 needles; 100 awls; 1 measure of tobacco; 2 horses - 1 stallion, 1 mare.

'Parties on both sides acknowledge to be fully satisfied herewith and have affixed their own signatures ad ut supra.

Louwies Du Booys

Matsaya x his mark

Christian de Yoo x his mark

Waehtonck x his mark

Abraham Haesbroecq

Seneraken x his mark

Andrie Lefeber

Magakahoos x his mark

Jan Broecq

Wawateanis x his mark

Piere Doyo

Anthony Crespel

Abraham Du Booys

Hugo Freer

Isaack D. Boojs

Symon Lefeber Witnesses: Jan Eltinge; Jacomeyntje Sleght; Jan Mattyse. Agrees with the original. W. La: Montague, Secry.

'I do allow of the within Bargaine and shall Grant patents for y Same when payments made accordingly before mee or Magistrates of Esopus.

Andross,'

"This contract of sale, signed by the five chiefs of the Esopus and the twelve patentees of New Paltz, was followed on 15 September 1677 by a deed signed by 29 heads of families of the Esopus (including two women), and is translated as follows:

The Indian Deed

'We the undersigned persons, former owners of the land sold to Lowies du Booys and his partners acknowledge to have been fully satisfied by them according to agreement we therefore transfer the designated land with a free right of way for them and their heirs, and relinquishing forever our right and title, will protect them against further claims, in token whereof we have affixed our signatures in the presence of the Justice, Sheriff, Magistrates and Bystanders, on the 15 September 1677 at Hurley, Esopus Sackmakers

'Witnesses: Sewakuny x his mark; Hamerwack x his mark; Manvest x her mark; Mahente; Papoehkies x his mark; Pochquqet x his mark; Haroman x his mark; Pagotamin x his mark; Haromini x his mark; Wingatiek x his mark; Wissinahkan x his mark; Mattawessick x his mark; Matsayay x his mark; Asserwvaka x his mark; Umtronok x his mark; Wawanies x sister in his absence called Warawenhtow; Magakhoos x her mark; Wawejask x his mark; Nawas x his mark; Tomaehkapray x his mark; Sagarowanto x his mark; Sawanawams x his mark; Machkamoeke x his mark.

'Witnesses: Jan Eltinge; Roelof Hendrycke; John Ward; Gars x Harris; Albert Jansen.

'Testis: Thomas Chambers; Hall Sherrife; Wessel Ten Broeck; Dirck Schepmoes; Hendrik Jochemsen; Joost de Yadus; Garit x Cornelise; Lambert x Huybertse.

'Mattay has publicly proclaimed and acknowledged in the presence of all the Indian bystanders that the land had been fully paid for in which all concurred.

'Testis:

W. Montague, Secr.'

"The grant by Gov. Edmund Andros confirming this purchase of land from the Indians, is in English as follows:

The Patent

'Edmund Andros, Esqr. Seigneur of Sansmarez, Lieut't Governor generall under his Royall Highness: James Duke of Yorke & Albany &c. of all his Territoryes in America. WHEREAS there is a certain piece of Land att Esopus, the which by my approbation and Consent, hath been purchased of the Indian Proprietors, by Lewis DuBois and Partners; The said Land lyeing on the South side of the Redoute Creek or Kill, beginning from the High Hills called Moggonck, from thence stretching South East neare the Great River, to a certain Point or Hooke, called the Jeuffrous Hoocke, lyeing in the long Reach named by the Indyans Magaatramis, then North up alengst the River to an Island in a Crooked Elbow in the Beginning of the Long Reach called by the Indyans Raphoos, then West, on to the High Hills, to a place called Waratahaes and Tawaratague, and so alongst the said High Hills South West to Moggonck aforesaid; All which hath by the Magistrates of Esopus been certifyed unto mee, to have been publiquely bought and paid for in their presences; As by the returne from theme doth and may appeare:

'KNOW YEE that by vertue of his Ma'ties Letters Patents and the Commission and authority unto mee given by his Royall Highness, I have given, Ratifyed, confirmed and granted, and by these presents doe hereby give, ratify, confirme & grant unto the said Lewis DuBois and Partners, Thatt is to say, Christian Doyo, Abraham Haesbroecq, Andries Lefevre, Jean Broecq, Pierre Doyo, Laurens Biverie, Anthony Crespell, Abraham DuBois, Hugo Frere, Isaack DuBois, and Symeon LeFebre, their heyres and Assignes, the afore recited piece of Land and premises; Together with all the Lands, Soyles, Woods, Hills, Dales, meadowes, pastures, Marshes, Lakes, waters, Rivers, fishing, Hawking, Hunting and fowling, and all other Profitts, Commoditys, and Emoluments whatsoever to the said piece of land and premises belonging, with their & every of their appurtenances, & of every part and parcell thereof; TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the said piece of Land and Premises, with all and Singular the appurtenances unto the said Lewis DuBois and partners their heyres and Assignes, to the proper use and behoofe of him the said Lewis DuBois and partners their heyres and Assignes for ever. AND that the plantacons which shall bee settled upon the said piece of land bee a Township and that the Inhabitants to have liberty to make a High Way between them and the Redout Creeke or Kill for their Convenience. Hee, the said Lewis DuBois and partners their heyres and Assigns, Returning due Surveys & makeing improvem't thereon according to Law; And Yielding and paying therefore yearely and every yeare unto his Royall Highnesse use as an acknowledgment or Quitt Rent att the Redout in Esopus five bushells of good Winter Wheat unto such Officer or Officers as shall be empowered to receive the same:

'Given under my hand and Sealed with y Seale of the Province in New Yorke this 29th day of September in the 29th yeare of his Ma'ties Reigne, Anno Domini 1677.

Andross.

'Examined by mee, Matthias: Nicolls, Secr.'

"The final action taken by Governor Andros in regard to granting the patent appears in the Documentary History of New York as follows:

'Upon request of Louis DuBois and partners at Esopus, that they may have Liberty to goe and settle upon the land by them purchased on the South side of the Redout Creek, at their first convenience, these are to certify that they have Liberty to do so, Provided they build a Redoute there first for a place of Retreat and Safeguard upon Occasion:

'Action in New York, November 1677. E. Andros'

"From Kingston the little party came to New Paltz in three carts, and the spot of their encampment, about a mile south of the present village, on the west side of the Wallkill is still known as Tri-Cor, 'Three Carts'.

"On 28 December 1678 an Indian deed for land at Esopus, embracing 'ye land on both sides of ye creeke, and ye land called in ye Indian tongue Pawachta to Pakasek, Wakaseeck, Wakankonach (Ibid., p. 152).

"In 1686, Louis DuBois, who had been the leader of the settlement, returned from New Paltz to Kingston, where he purchased a house and lived at this location ten years until his death in 1696."

"Early records of Kingston include: "Book 1, p. 11: 16 November 1661, Lowys DuBo against Bart Lybrantse, demand for freight of cattle, 7 schepels of wheat - sentenced to pay. "Book 2, p. 259: 11 August 1679, shows sale of negro named Mingoo for 1000 Guilders to Thomas Harmansen & Jan Hendrix. "Book 2, p. 259: 11 August 1679, shows a sale of negro and negress for 800 guilders to Matthew Blanchan. "Book 2, p. 450: 22 December 1679, Louis DuBois complaint that he has been beaten and also that he was disturbed by loud knocking at his door. The jury decided that the defendant has been unjustly accused and complainent must pay expenses. "Book 2, p. 603: 4 April 1682, Louis DuBois against Thomas Chambers. Demand excise pay. Answer: that according to law no excise is to be levied at the Paltz. Ordered not to distill until the case shall have been settled and the hose and distilling apparatus are to be taken from there. "And many others.

"Some land transfers in Kingston: "6 February 1688: Lewis DuBois to Anthony Dilba, a house and lot in Kingston, south of William de la Montanye. "16 March 1689: Joachim Van Name to Louis DuBois, a certain fly (meadow) being upon the Great Binnewater. "8 August 1689: Trustees of the Corporation of Kingston to Louis DuBois, a tract upon the Great Binnewater, north of Town. "20 May 1691: Matthys Matthysen to Louis DuBois, a house and lot adjoining the land of the said DuBois. "5 November 1698: Trustees of the Corporation of Kingston to heirs of Louis DuBois, Twenty acres formerly owned by John Hendrickse."

Louis died at Kingston, reported by Heidgerd as 23 June 1693. However, Louis had three wills (all written in Dutch) recorded in Ulster County Surrogate's Office, the last of which was dated 22 February 1696, and his wills were proved on 26 March 1696, so his death occurred sometime during that interval of a month's time.

An early will, or more properly defined, a joint agreement of Louis DuBois and Catherine, his wife, was dated 13 October 1676 and written in Dutch, translated as follows: "After their deaths, the whole estate shall go to their children, the monors first to be educated until they can earn a living. If either should re-marry, he or she shall pay one half to the children, begotten by them, and in case of death, one fourt of the remaining half shall be divided among the children. If the survivor remains unmarried, he or she shall not be compelled to pay out anything more to the children than it may please the survivor, either as a marriage portion, or in some other way. At death of both parties, the children shall inherit the entire estate. In case of re-marriage of either party, without lawful issue, the children shall have one half of the estate."

A will dated 30 March 1686, and recorded 5 May 1686, provides that Louis' "estate, after payment of debts to be equally divided 'amongst my children but my two eldest sons desiring to have Each of them a part of the land of New Paltz and more than the other children by Reason their names 'uppon the Patent', but if they will be content 'to deale Equally with my other children whether in land, houses or any other sort of goods whatever belonging to my Estate As well the land of the Paltz....' that if they have the land at New Paltz they should pay a share of its worth to the other children as all of the estate should be divided equally. 'My wife, their mother, shall have the ordering of the Estate as long as she remains a widow.' 'If she marry the Estate to be divided among the children aforesaid except my two eldest sons.'

"The second will dated 27 March 1694, proved 26 March 1696, states that if the widow should marry, then to the eldest son Abraham, 6 Pounds, as his primogeniture right, also 1/8 of the estate; son Jacob 1/8; and 1/8 to each of the following children: David, Solomon, Louis, Matthew; and to the children of deceased son Isaac 1/8; and to children of Sara wife of Joost Janse (Van Meter) 1/8. Wife Catherine appointed executrix."

Louis' will dated 22 February 1695/6 and written in the Dutch language provides for the disposition of his property as follows: "to my son Jacob half of my farm at Hurley adjoining land of Hyman and Jan Rosa and land of Lammert Huyberse on condition that he pays 1500 shepels wheat; Jacob to use the other half until my youngest son Matthew Du Bois becomes of age, for which he is to pay 50 shepels wheat yearly. I have this day conveyed to my youngest son, Matthew Du Bois, house and land in Kingston, a parcel of me adow land, and one half of my land at Hurley, for which he is to pay 1500 schepels of wheat. Payments for the land which my son David bought from Jan Wood to come out of my estate, as I had promised my son David. My sons Salomon and Louis Du Bois are to have my land in the Paltz, conveyed to me by deed from Coll. Thomas Dongan, dated 2 June 1688, for which they are to pay 800 shepels of wheat. My daughter Sara wife of Joost Janse to have a piece of land in Hurley adjoining the land of Corneles Cool, for which she is to pay 700 shepels of wheat. This includes the woodland adjoining."

The Ulster County Genealogy Archive included a brief biography which stated: "There is a memorial to Louis in the Dutch Reformed Churchyard, right across from the Post Office. His actual burial place is unknown, but it is somewhere on the Churchyards grounds." 1722

"Louis du Bois de Finnes, born October 10, 1626, in La Basse, near Lille, in the province of Artois, France, married, October 10, 1655, at Mannheim, in the Lower Palatinate of Germany, to Catherine Blanchan, daughter of Mathese and Madelaine [Jorisse] Blanchan, who were co-refugees with the du Bois from French Flanders to Wicres, Artois, France. Louis du Bois died 1695. The du Bois des Fiennes appear to have been of military stock, and to have furnished France with som eable soldiers. At least ten of them were in the last crusade. The first Maximillien was 'Marischall des camps et du armees du roi'; his son was a Lieutenant-General int he French Legion; and Louis du Bois' father - Cretien, Marquis des Fiennes - was Captain of cavalry in his father's regiment." 1679

"Among the Walloons from Artois found here, were Matthieu Blanchan, Louis Du Bois, and Antoine Crispel: Blanchan having sojourned in England, as perhaps had the other two, who became his sons-in-law. "1737

"Louis Du Bois, married to Blanchan's daughter Catherine, probably came out with his brother-in-law Pierre Billiou, also from artois, in the ship St. Jan Baptist, which arrived here August 6, 1661 - reasons Du Bois and wife were not present at the communion season referred to, but with letters joined the church there not until October 1, 1661, having a child baptized nine days after. Blanchan, Du Bois and Crepel all got land in Hurley, near Kingston, and received groundbriefs April 25, 1663. Du Bois died in Kingston in 1696, and his widow married Jean cottin, named page 71."1737

"The two eldest children of Louis du Bois were born in Mannheim; and in 1660 the family came to America. Upon their arrival here they proceeded to New Village [New Pals] in Ulster Co., N.Y., where Louis rapidly rose to prominence in local civil and religious affairs. He, with two of his sons, were among the 'twelve patentees' of New Paltz, receiving the grant from Governor Andross, September 6, 1677. Louis was also a member of the first Court of Sessions held at Kingston, the seat of ulster County. He led in demanding of the English government, and of the Assembly, that there should be no taxation without the consent of the people, and for this daring attitude he lost his commission. Thus anticipating the crisis of 1776! In 1663, Louis du Bois headed an expedition against the Minnisink Indians, and was of the colonial forces against them again in 1670. The first-named punitive expedition of June 7, 1663, was known in the New York history as the Eusopus War. It was organized at the time the settlement was attacked by the Minnisinks, who burned Hurley, killed and injured some of the settlers, and carried away as prisoners, the wife of Louis du Bois, his three children, and at least two of Jan Joosten's. These were taken to the fastnesses of the Catskill Mountains and there remained in captivity for months, but were rescued on the eve of torture by du Bois and Captain Martin Kreiger's company of Manhattan soldiers; the trainband finally rounded up the Indians and defeated them on September 3, 1663. In connection with this tragic experience the following statement is quoted: ' About ten weeks after the capture of the women and children, the Indians decided to celebrate their own escape from pursuit by burning some of their victims and the ones selected were Catherine du Bois, and her baby Sara, who afterward married her companion in captivity, John Van Metre. A cubical pile of logs was arranged and the mother and child placed thereon; when the Indians were about to apply the torch, Catherine began to sing the 137th Psalm as a death chant. The Indians withheld the fire and gave her respite while they listened; when she had finished they demanded more, and before she had finished the last one her husband and the Dutch soldiers from New Amsterdam arrived and surrounded the savages, killed and captured some, and otherwise inflicted terrible punishment upon them, and released the prisoners.' Louis Du Bois was one of the founders, and the first elder, of the Reformed Dutch Church at New Paltz. He often officiated at the marriage ceremonies and baptisms among the families connected with the church, and with many enterprises of civic importance and progress his name was frequently mentioned." 1679

"Louis du Bois, as he always wrote his name, - 'Dubois' being wholly a modern usage, - was born in 1626. He was about thirty-four years old when he arrived in America with his wife, Catherine, whose maiden name was Blanshan, and their two sons, Abraham and Isaac. Old Testament names were much used by the Huguenots, and Louis and Jacques du Bois were Huguenots. Louis and his wife had been married in Germany. They settled in Kingston, New York, where their house is still in the possession of the family. Louis du Bois was one of the founders of the historic old Dutch Reformed Church at Kingston." 1727

"The Coat-Armor here embazoned is ascribed to Louis du Bois, the Huguenot setler of Kingston. It is: Argent, a lion rampant sable, armed and langued gules. Crest: Between two tree stumps vert, the lion of the Arms. Motto: Tiens ta foy." 1727

He and Jacques have often been said to have been sons of Chretien du Bois. 763, 1727

"Louis du Bois, born at Wicres, near Lille in Artois, France, 1626, migrated to Manheim in the Palatinate of the Rhine, Germany, to escape religious persecution. He married, October 10, 1655, Cahterin Blanshan or Blanjean. They emigrated to America 1660 with their two sons, Abraham and Isaac. Louis du Bois died 1696, and his wife Catherine survived him several years." 763

"Louis du Bois paid thirteen guilders a year pew rent. On the church register we note: 'October 9, 1661 Vadde van dit kint Loui Duboi Modder Cattery Blancsan Kint Jacob Getruygen Antoy Crepel, Maddeleen Joonse.' Translated, somewhat paraphrased: On the 9th October 1661 there was presented for baptism, by the father Louis du Bois, and the mother Catharine Blancon, a child named Jacob, being only a few days old. The witnesses or sponsors (usual in Dutch churches) were Anthony Crispel and Magdalen Janse. The church kept excellent records. When the British came and burned Kingston, the State Capitol, the records were hastily tossed into a cart to escape the British invaders and the flames of 1777 during the Revolutionary War." 1704

"The first Register of the French church of New Paltz contains a brief account of the baptisms, marriages, and deaths of the congregation from January 1683 to 1702. The first page is in the handwriting of Louis du Bois himself, the first Elder, and Clerk of the Session. . . .the church of which Louis du Bois was the first elder was established in 1683, a french Reformed Church, as strictly Huguenot as any association of protestant christians in France. For fifty years the language of the record was french, succeeded by the Low Dutch for seventy years more." 1704

"Louis DuBois, the leader of the Huguenot settlers at New Paltz, was born at Wicres, near Lille, in the province of Artois (in French Flanders), October 27, 1626. The farm of his father Cretien is still pointed out. Louis moved to Manheim, on the Rhine, the capital of the Palatinate or Paltz, a little principality, now incorporated in Baden, and there he married Catharine Blanshan, the daughter of Matthew Blanshan, a burgher residing there. To Louis and his wife there were born a numerous family of children . . Of these children Abraham and Isaac were born at Manheim and the rest in Ulster county. Manheim was at that time a refuge for the Protestants from the neighboring parts of France, and Baird in his 'Huguenot Emigration,' says that the LeFevres, Hasbroucks, Crispells, etc., were associated with Louis DuBois at Manheim. The exact date of the emigration to America and the name of the ship are not known, but the time was certainly between 1658 and 1661. At the latter date he was residing at Hurley, and his third son, Jacob, was presented for baptism at the church at Kingston, as still shown by the church register, that being one of the earliest entries. In 1663, June 10, Hurley and part of Kingston were burned by the Indians, and the wife of Louis DuBois, with three children, were among those carried away captive. Three months afterwards an expedition under Captain Crieger recovered the captives, surprising the Indians at their fort, near the Hogabergh, in Shawangunk. According to the tradition the discovery of the lowlands along the Wallkill during this expedition led to the settlement at New Paltz in 1678. Louis DuBois was the first elder of the church here, and the first entry int he church register commencing in 1638, still in existance, is in his hand writing. In 1686 Louis DuBois returned from New Paltz to Kingston, where he bought a house and resided ten years, until his death in 1696. This house stood at the north-west corner of John street and Clinton avenue, near the late residence of F.L. Westbrook." 1738

"On June 7th, 1663, an Indian war party raided the settlement, taking Catherine, three of their children, and others as prisoners. Louis, with Captain Martin Kreiger and a party of thirty men set out in pursuit of the Indians and their captives. They surprised and killed one of the Indian's rear guard, and took another captive. From him they learned the whereabouts of the main party, and on the second day found them. The Indians had bound the captives ot trees, in preparation for torture and death, but Catherine led the group in singing the 137th Psalm, which laments the affliction of the Israelites as they sat by Babylon's stream. So sweet was the sound of this soung that the savages hesitated. Louis and his party also heard them, surprised the Indians, and set the prisoners free." 1739

"Three years later, remembering the fertile Walkill valley, where this had taken place, Louis and eleve others bought from the Indians a large tract of land and founded the historic 'New Paltz' colony. Louis became the first Elder of the Walloon Church there - the Walloons were French speaking Protestant Belgians - and died at Kingston in June, 1696. " 1739

"Jan Joosten was selected, October 6, 1673, as one of the four magistrates of Hurley and Marbletown - to supervise the merging of the vilalge of Niew-Drop into those of Hurley and Marbletown under the English rule. The other magistrates were Jan Broerson, Louis du Bois, and Roelof Hendricksen." 1707

"Louis du Bois de Fiennes, Huguenot ancestor in Colonial wars, (father of Sara of Meteren) born 28 Oct. 1626 in La Basse near Lille, in Province of Artois, France. He is said to have been a descendant of Guelph, Prince of the Scyrii (A.D. 476) (Italy to Bavaria) but the line is broken, the names of some being erased and their property confiscated, when they espoused and held to the faith of Protestantism. Louis took efuge from religious persecution at Mannheim in Lower Palatinate of Germany, where he married a refugee from French Flanders, Catherine, dau. of Mathese Blanchan of Wicres, Artois or Marseilles, France, 10 Oct. 1655. Their two eldest children were b. in Mannheim. Emigrated to America 1660, settled in New Village (Hurley) near Kingston, Ulster Co., N.Y. - was one of the original patentees of New Paltz. Fought in Second Esopus war 1663 . . served with Colonial forces against Indians 1670 - Louis d. Kingston, 1696. Will was proved 27 Mar. 1696." 1703

"Louis Du Bois is the ancestor of the Huguenot family of Du Bois. He was born October 27th, at Wierer, in France. Driven from France by religious persecution, he sought refuge in Germany. While at Mannheim, in Germany, he married, October 10th, 1655, Kathryn, the daughter of Matthys Blanshan, afterward the distiller at Hurley. He came over to this country and settled in Esopus about the year 1660; from thence he removed to Hurley. In 1667 he and his eleven associates became the patentees of New Paltz. He then removed with his associates and formed the settlement at New Paltz. After a residence of ten years in New Paltz he returned to Kingston. He purchased a house on the northwest corner of what is now Clinton Avenue and John Street, and there spent the remaining ten years of his life. What is remarkable, that plot of land, after having been out of the family only two generations in this century, is again in the family and owned and occupied by his descendants. Loui had a large family of children, ten in number, and many of them have been as fruitful as he; so that they are very numerous, and scattered about the Union in every direction." 1740

"Lewis Dubois, who emigrated to America, was born about the year 1630, and settled up the North river, in Ulster county, N.Y., where a number of his countrymen had also come to escape religious persecution. They were called Huguenots, being followers of Calvin. The great persecution, amounting almost to extermination of the Protestants, is generally referred to the revocation of the edict of Nantes, which took place in 1685, in the reign of Louis XIV. Lewis Dubois married Catharine Blancon; she was born at Manheim, in Germany, where he had gone to escape persecution. It appears, by the record of him after their marriage, they returned to France again, and in that country their son, Abraham Dubois, was born in 1638; soon after that event they left Strasburg for this country, and settled in Ulster county. Their son, Jacob Dubois, was born in 1662. About the year 1714 Jacob had heard there was a large quantity of good land for sale in the southern part of New Jersey. He left his native county in New York and moved to this State to view the lands he heard so much of. Daniel Cox, of Burlington, after he married Rebecca Hedge, the widow of Samuel Hedge, Jr., came in possession of a large quantity of good land in Fenwick's tenth. He owned large tracts of land in what is now Pittsgrove township. Jacob and his sister, John and Isaac Vanmeter, purchased 3,000 acres of the said Daniel Cox, of this tract." 1714

In Dutch Records of Kingston: "First Session, held Wednesday, November 16, Anno 1661 . . . Bart Sybrantse, plaintiff, demands of Lowys Dubo the amount of seven schepels of wheat as payment for the freight of cattle. Lowys Dubo, defendant, says he paid his share. Whereas, the defendant admits having ordered the cattle of Bart, he is therefore, after deliberation, ordered to pay." 1717

In Dutch Records of Kingston: "Ordinary Session, held Tuesday, March 19, 1662. . . Lowys Dubo, plaintiff, vs. Coenraet Jans or Ham and Christiaen Andrissen, defendatns. Plaintiff demands from defendants payment of five schepels of rye, on account of ribbons sold them. Defendants admit the debt. The Commissaries order defendants to pay within three weeks." 1717

"Ordinary Session, held Tuesday, April 18, 1662. . . Lowys Dubo, plaintiff, vs. Coenraet Ham and Christiaen Andrissen, defendants. Default. Lowys Dubo, plaintiff, vs. Pieter hillebratse, defendant. Default." 1717

"Ordinary Session, held Tuesday, May 2, 1662. . . Lowys Dubo, plaintiff, demands from Pieter Hillebrantse payment of the amount of two schepels of wheat due for ribbons sold him. Defendant, Pieter hillebrantsen admits owing the debt to plaintiff. The Commissaries order defendant to pay plaintiff the amount sued for, within two months' time." 1717

Tuesday, December 9, 1664: "Mattheus Capito, Plaintiff vs. Louwies DuBois, Defendant Plaintiff says that defendant refuses to contribute to the preacher's salary for the two lots of plaintiff's which he occupies. Defendant answers, having contracted with plaintiff to use the lots till May 1665 in consideration for fencing them in, chopping the trees and manuring the land. Plaintiff answers and denies the same, and demands that defendant shall quit the lots, in case he remains unwilling to satisfy plaintif's demand. The hon. court orders defendant to prove his assertion at the next session." 1717

" '1683, January 22. Mr. Pierre Daillie, Minister of the Word of God, arrive

view all 24

Louis "The Walloon" DuBois's Timeline

1626
October 21, 1626
Wicres, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
October 21, 1626
"
October 28, 1626
Wicres near Lille, Artois, France
1627
October 27, 1627
Age 1
Wicres, Artois, Pasora DE Calais, France
1643
1643
Age 16
Staten Island, Richmond, NY
1657
December 26, 1657
Age 31
Mannheim, Baden-Württemberg, Deutschland
1659
May 14, 1659
Age 32
Mannheim, Baden, Paltz, Germany
1661
October 9, 1661
Age 34
Kingston, Ulster Co., New York