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Maren Wold's Geni Profile

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Maren Jørgensen Lee (Wold)

Also Known As: "Born Tørjevollen", "Born Wold)"
Birthdate: (70)
Birthplace: Skoger, Drammen, Buskerud, Norway
Death: April 27, 1924 (70)
West Hempstead, NY, USA
Place of Burial: NY, USA
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Jørgen Oleson Wold and Anna Knudsdatter Wold
Wife of Henry H. (Hans Halvorsen Skjold) Lee
Mother of Henry Martin Lee; Helen Lee Youngman; Herman Hjalmar Lee; George Lee; Ruth Lee and 2 others
Sister of Johanne Øya; Martinius Jørgensen Wold; Anton Jørgensen Wold; Charley Wold; Birgitte Lundeby and 3 others

Managed by: Kitty Munson Cooper
Last Updated:

About Maren Wold

mtDNA haplogroup H5a1 vaccinated on 23 aug 1869 per http://digitalarkivet.arkivverket.no/en-gb/kb/kf/person/pk00000001094187

obituary in the Brooklyn Eagle https://bklyn.newspapers.com/image/60015821/?terms=%22Henry%2BH%2BLee%22

a memory via here great grandson:

Maren Wold (Skjold) Lee was was my mother's namesake and they were very close. Mom used to talk of going to suffragette parades in NYC when she was very little and marching with her grandmother.

from a granddaughter's written recollections:

She first came to Florida for about 5 years. She did not like the climate, so she decided to seek employment in NY. She sailed from Jacksonville FLA to New York and took respectable lodging recommended by the ship captain in the same house as her future husband. There were married soon after. At some point, she had to return to Norway to take care of her ailing father. source: as told by Marian Munson Pasquet

She worked for many years as dairy-maid at Imjeltsetra (seter = summer pastur). Later she went to America together with her father, and there she married one Lee. About Maren it is said when her father, Jørn, was dying she returned home the day before he died. Maren loved her native district, and she returned many times from America to visit it. When she was at home she always visited Tørjervollen and looked at the carrot bed she had as a child, and cried every time. Last time she was at home was in 1922. She died a few years later. source (via Mike Wold-Steele): Translation of Folk og fàr, by Skoger historielag. Plass 50: Tørjervollen. [SkjoldFamily.FTW]

1900 census lists birthdate as 9/1852

 To emigrate to America was the alternative at that time, and in 1868  Jørn

also went to America together with his children Maren, Birgitte, Sopie and Herman. At that time they travelled by sailships, and the voyage lasted for 7 weeks. It is told they brought with them something like rusks (skonrokk) for food...

About Maren it is said when her father, Jørn, was dying she returned home the day before he died.

   Maren loved her native district, and she returned many times from

America to visit it. When she was at home she always visited Tørjervollen and looked at the carrot bed she had as a child, and cried every time. Last time she was at home was in 1922. She died a few years later.

Source: Folk og fàr, by Skoger historielag.

see her grandson Alex's memories of her http://kittymunson.com/Munson/DaddabyAlex.htm#mormor here are some excerpts:

  We haven’t much information on Mormor’s early days, or how she got to America. We knew her as a strong, soft, and loyal woman who loved her family, her garden, and her church.
  There were three beautiful sisters Maren Wold, Sophie, and Bertha. They became Maren Wold Lee, Sophie Wold Larsen, and Bertha Wold Lundeby. They all came to America and lived in the New York area.
  They spent their summers at Ronnehode, where as children they learned something about the forests and fjords of Norway.
  I remember Mormor best for the many Christmasses we as a family spent with her at Hempstead Gardens. My family (on the Lee side) and my uncles and aunt and their families always went

hose Christmas dinners were memorable with lot’s of turkey and special stuffing, mashed potatoes and sweet potatoes, with a large variety of vegetables – then desserts. Always mince, and pumpkin pies, and some special cakes.

There was such warmth and love in that group. It was a joy to be there.

  I do remember one time when Mormor came up to Cragsmoor one summer, without letting us know that she was coming. She got off the train at Spring Glen, the station before Ellenville. She planned to walk up from there. There are several switchbacks in the road – Horseshoe and Hairpin turns. There were shortcuts that cut across the middle of each. But thinking she was on a short-cut, she followed a berry-pickers path up the mountain. It was quite dark by the time she reached the top, torn and exhausted. Undaunted, she started walking along the first road she came upon.
  She stopped at the first cottage she came to and asked directions to the Lee or the Munson place.
  Seeing how scratched and weary she was they harnessed their horse to a rig, and drove her to the other side of the mountain which was our part of Cragsmoor. She explained to them how she had gotten lost, and expressed her gratitude, for the ride. She was made of rugged individualism. That mountain laurel is rough to walk through, especially up a steep mountain side.
  She was very religious. I remember one time that I was visiting in Hempstead gardens for a long week-end. I kept a dozen or so homing pigeons in the top of the chicken house. That week-end I built larger and better facilities for them, so they had a little more room. I worked hard to finish before leaving on Sunday, but got up early Sunday morning to finish. Mormor came out to get some eggs for breakfast.
  "No good will come of working on Sunday," she told me.
  "But I have to finish before we drive in to church. I won’t be back for 3 weeks," I said. "I just have one more board to put on the side."
  When I returned 3 weeks later, the pigeons were gone. I was heartbroken. And I have often wondered whether or not she let them loose, as a lesson to me not to work on Sunday. She wouldn’t even tolerate whistling on Sunday. She and Dadda had ‘devotions’ every morning, after Dadda had his very soft boiled eggs and oatmeal and coffee. I remember how Mormor would pour some of the very hot coffee into her saucer, blow on the coffee to cool it, then pop a sugar lump into her mouth and sip the still hot coffee.

She loved gardening. I often saw her on her knees in her various gardens, weeding, or putting in bulbs, or picking flowers for a bouquet.

birth record: LDS microfilm International #278252 - 1st item Dopte from parish register


view all 12

Maren Wold's Timeline

1853
September 4, 1853
Skoger, Drammen, Buskerud, Norway
1854
June 6, 1854
Skoger, Drammen, Buskerud, Norway
1880
May 10, 1880
Age 26
Brooklyn, NY, USA
1884
June 17, 1884
Age 30
Brooklyn, NY, USA
1886
November 10, 1886
Age 33
Brooklyn, Kings, NY, USA
1889
February 6, 1889
Age 35
Brooklyn, NY, USA
1891
1891
Age 37
1895
1895
Age 41
Brooklyn, NY, USA
1899
1899
Age 45
Brooklyn, NY, USA
1924
April 27, 1924
Age 70
West Hempstead, NY, USA