Otto I von Brandenburg, Markgraf

Is your surname von Brandenburg?

Research the von Brandenburg family

Otto I von Brandenburg, Markgraf's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Related Projects

About Otto I von Brandenburg, Markgraf

http://www.friesian.com/germany.htm#saxony

Predecessor: Albert the Bear Successor: Otto II

OTTO I 1170-1184, OTTO II 1184-1205


OTTO von Brandenburg, son of ALBRECHT "der Bär" Markgraf von Brandenburg [Ballenstedt] & his wife Sophie von Winzenburg ([1126/28]-7 Mar 1184, bur Kloster Lehnin). The Cronica Principum Saxonie names (in order) "Ottonem, Bernardum ducem Saxonie, Sifridum episcopum Brandenburgensem, postea archiepiscopum Bremensem et Hadewigem [uxor] Otto marchio Misenensis" as children of "Albertus Ursus"[118]. He was co-ruler with his father in 1144. Rudolf Bishop of Halberstadt confirmed an exchange between Hillersleben and Walbeck by charter dated 11 Apr 1145, which names "Adelbertus marchio et Otto filius eius" among the representatives of Hillersleben[119]. "Adelbertus…marchio Brandenburgensis" donated property to the convent at Magdeburg, with the consent of "filiorum meorum Heinrici canonici sancti Mauritii in Magdaburg, Ottonis marchionis, Hermanni, Adelberti, Theoderici et Bernhardi comitum", by charter dated [end May/early Jun] 1151[120]. "Adelbertus, Brandenburgensis Marchio, et Otto Marchio, filius meus" donated property to Kloster Leitzlau, for the repose of "mee coniugis Sophie", by charter dated 1162[121]. "Alberto Brandenburgensi marchione, Ottone filio eius…Hermanno comite de Horlemunde filio eius, Theoderico comite de Werben filio eius, Alberto comite de Balstede filio eius, Bernardo comite de Anehalt filio eius…" witnessed the charter dated 1170 under which "Cazimerus…Pomeranorum princeps" donated property to the church of Havelberg, with the consent of "fratre nostro Boguzlao"[122]. He succeeded his father in 1170 as OTTO I Markgraf von Brandenburg. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" donated property to the bishopric of Havelberg, for the souls of "…Judithe…nostre conjugis", by charter dated 1170[123]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et Judita uxor mea, filiique nostri Otto maior et Henricus minor" granted customs privileges to the town of Brandenburg by charter dated 1170[124]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio" donated churches "in villa Cechowe" to the bishop of Brandenburg by charter dated 28 Dec 1170, witnessed by "Juditha marchionissa, Otto et Heirnicus filii eius…"[125]. The Cronica Principum Saxonie records that "Otto primus [filius Alberti Ursi]" founded "cenobium Leninense ordinis Cisterciensis", where he was buried, in 1180, and in 1184 "Arnesse claustrum dominarum ordinis Benedicti"[126]. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" founded Kloster Arendsee, with the consent of "meis heredibus Ottone, Heinrico, Adelberto filiis meis et uxore mea Adelheide", by charter dated 1184[127]. An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee recalls "Ottonis Marchionis et Alheydis uxoris eius" as founders of the church, confirmed by "Ottonis, Heynrici et Adelberti filiorum suorum"[128]. Pulchawa´s Böhmischer Chronik records that "Otto filius Alberti" died in 1184 and was buried "in Leninensi monasterio"[129]. m firstly (6 Jan 1148) as her second husband, JUDYTA of Poland, divorced wife of LÁSZLÓ of Hungary [later LÁSZLÓ II King of Hungary], daughter of BOLESŁAW III "Krzywousty/Wrymouth" Prince of Poland & his second wife Salome von Berg-Schelklingen ([1133]-8 Jul [1171/75], bur Brandenburg Cathedral). The Annales Polanorum name "[filiam] Iuditham" in addition to naming the six sons of Prince Bolesław[130]. The Annales Cracovienses Compilati record that "Boleslaus dat filiam suam regi Ungarie" in 1136, but does not name her[131]. She is shown as King László's possible wife in Europäische Stammtafeln which also names her Judyta[132], but the source on which this is based has not been identified. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et Judita uxor mea, filiique nostri Otto maior et Henricus minor" granted customs privileges to the town of Brandenburg by charter dated 1170[133]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio" donated churches "in villa Cechowe" to the bishop of Brandenburg by charter dated 28 Dec 1170, witnessed by "Juditha marchionissa, Otto et Heirnicus filii eius…"[134]. The Regesta Historia Brandenburgensis records the death "VIII Id Jul" of "Juditha marchionissa gemma Polonorum"[135]. An undated charter, dated to [1190], refers to rights previously granted by "marchio Otto Brand." for the soul of "uxoris sue Juditte marchionisse"[136]. m secondly ([1171/75]) ADELHEID, daughter of ---. A charter of Markgraf Otto I dated 1 Jan 1177 names "Adelheida conjugis mea et…heredibus meis Ottone et Heinrico et Adelberto"[137]. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" founded Kloster Arendsee, with the consent of "meis heredibus Ottone, Heinrico, Adelberto filiis meis et uxore mea Adelheide", by charter dated 1184[138]. An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee recalls "Ottonis Marchionis et Alheydis uxoris eius" as founders of the church[139]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln[140], she was Ada of Holland, daughter of Floris III Count of Holland & his wife Ada of Scotland. Ada´s marriage into the Brandenburg family is confirmed by the charter dated 1205 under which "Ada…marchionissa de Brandebrug" donated land "in Pole" to Rijnsburg abbey, with the consent of "Wilhelmi comitis et Florentii fratrum meorum et Ade comitisse matris mee et Ade neptis mee"[141]. The similarity between "Ada" and "Adelheid" appears at first sight to establish the connection. However, the chronology is not ideal. It is most likely that "Adelheid" was the mother of Markgraf Otto I´s youngest son Markgraf Albrecht II, as discussed more fully below. Albrecht II was named in the charter dated 1 Jan 1177 quoted above, so was born in the mid-1170s. Albrecht is named in an 1197 document in his own capacity, indicating that he had already reached the age of majority. If Ada of Holland was his mother, she would have been 12 years old at the most when he was born, assuming that she was her parents´ oldest child (which appears unlikely). The Chronologia Johannes de Beke names (in order) "Theodricum succedentem comitem Hollandie, Wilhelmum comitem Orientalis Frisie, Florencium prepositum Traiecetensis ecclesie, Robertum presidium Kenemarie, Beatricem, Elizabeth, Adelheydim et Margaretam comitissam Clivie" as the children of Count Floris III and his wife[142]. This suggests that "Adelheydim" was the third daughter. While it is acknowledged that the order of births as recorded in such sources is not consistently reliable, the order in which Count Floris´s sons are named in the Chronologia does appear to correspond to the order of their births. If Ada was her parents´ third daughter, it is unlikely that she was born before [1166/68], also bearing in mind that the birth of the couple´s oldest son Dirk should probably be placed in the 1160s in view of his marriage which is recorded in 1186. This date [1166/68] makes it impossible that Ada was the mother of Markgraf Albrecht II. A second possibility for Ada´s Brandenburg husband is Otto II Markgraf von Brandenburg (see below), stated to be the case by Alfred Riedel who compiled the Codex Diplomaticus Brandenburgensis series in the mid-19th century: in his index volume, he lists "Ada Margräfin v. Brandenburg, Gemahlin Otto´s II, Schwester des Grafen Wilhelm von Holland", although he cites no primary source which confirms that this statement is correct[143]. All problems of chronology would be resolved if Otto II was Ada of Holland´s husband, and "Adelheid", second wife of Markgraf Otto I, was a different person. In addition, the timing of Ada´s 1205 donation to Rijnsberg abbey would have followed her husband´s death. It would also be easier to explain Ada´s return to Holland (why would she have gone back if Markgraf Albrecht II had been her son?) and also the absence of any reference to Brandenburg relatives in the 1205 charter. Markgraf Otto I & his first wife had two children: 1. OTTO von Brandenburg (-4 Jul 1205, bur Kloster Lehnin). The Cronica Principum Saxonie names (in order) "Ottonem, Henricum et Albertum" as the three sons of "Otto primus [filius Alberti Ursi]"[144]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et Judita uxor mea, filiique nostri Otto maior et Henricus minor" granted customs privileges to the town of Brandenburg by charter dated 1170[145]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio" donated churches "in villa Cechowe" to the bishop of Brandenburg by charter dated 28 Dec 1170, witnessed by "Juditha marchionissa, Otto et Heirnicus filii eius…"[146]. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" founded Kloster Arendsee, with the consent of "meis heredibus Ottone, Heinrico, Adelberto filiis meis et uxore mea Adelheide", by charter dated 1184[147]. An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee recalls "Ottonis Marchionis et Alheydis uxoris eius" as founders of the church and names "Ottonis, Heynrici et Adelberti filiorum suorum"[148]. He succeeded his father in 1184 as OTTO II Markgraf von Brandenburg. "Adelberti filii marchionis de Misene, comitis Friderici de Anvort, Walteri de Arnsten, Cunradi filii burggravii Sifridi de Arneburg ex familia ipsius marchionis…" witnessed the charter dated 1187 under which "secundus Otto marchio Brandenburgensis et frater eius comes Hinricus de Gardelegen" donated property to the church of Brandenberg[149]. "Otto…secundus marchio in Brandenburch" donated property to the Domkapitel, Brandenburg by charter dated 28 May 1197, which names "patris mei Ottonis, marchionis Brandenburgensis…frater meus Albertus comes in Arneburch"[150]. Pulchawa´s Böhmischer Chronik records that "Otto secundus, filius primi Ottonis" died in 1205[151]. m ---. The name and origin of Otto II´s wife is not known. The Cronica Principum Saxonie records that "Otto secundus" had "uxorem cum magna sibi in Werda gloria presentatam" but died childless[152]. Pulchawa´s Böhmischer Chronik records that "Otto secundus, filius primi Ottonis" married "uxorem…sibi traditam cum magna gloria in Verdn" but was childless[153]. One possibility is that Markgraf Otto II´s wife was Ada of Holland, daughter of Floris III Count of Holland & his wife Ada of Scotland (-after 1205). This is stated to be the case by Alfred Riedel who compiled the Codex Diplomaticus Brandenburgensis series in the mid-19th century: in his index volume, he lists "Ada Margräfin v. Brandenburg, Gemahlin Otto´s II, Schwester des Grafen Wilhelm von Holland", although he cites no primary source which confirms that this statement is correct[154]. This possibility was also discussed by Hermann Krabbo in the early 20th century[155]. Krabbo´s article refers to three charters, the first in which Pope Innocent III summoned Otto II to treat his wife with love, the second dealing with an attempt to murder Ada, the third Otto´s participation in a crusade hoping that God will favour him with the birth of an heir[156]. Ada of Holland´s marriage into the Brandenburg family is confirmed by the charter dated 1205 under which "Ada…marchionissa de Brandebrug" donated land "in Pole" to Rijnsburg abbey, with the consent of "Wilhelmi comitis et Florentii fratrum meorum et Ade comitisse matris mee et Ade neptis mee"[157]. According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Ada of Holland was the second wife of Otto I Markgraf von Brandenburg[158], but as explained in detail above this is not an ideal chronological fit. All problems of chronology would be resolved if Otto II was Ada of Holland´s husband. In addition, the timing of Ada´s 1205 donation to Rijnsberg abbey would have followed her husband´s death. It would also be easier to explain her return to Holland (why would she have gone back if Markgraf Albrecht II had been her son?) and also the absence of any reference to Brandenburg relatives in the 1205 charter. 2. HEINRICH (-after 15 Apr 1192, bur Stendal St Nikolai). The Cronica Principum Saxonie names (in order) "Ottonem, Henricum et Albertum" as the three sons of "Otto primus [filius Alberti Ursi]", specifying that Heinrich possessed "marchiam citra Albiam, videlicet Tangermunde et Stendal", built "ecclesiam sancti Stephani in Tangermunde" and in 1188 founded "[in] civitatis Stendalensis…ecclesiam sancti Nicolai", dying in 1192 and being buried at St Nikolai[159]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio et Judita uxor mea, filiique nostri Otto maior et Henricus minor" granted customs privileges to the town of Brandenburg by charter dated 1170[160]. "Otto…Brandenburgensis marchio" donated churches "in villa Cechowe" to the bishop of Brandenburg by charter dated 28 Dec 1170, witnessed by "Juditha marchionissa, Otto et Heirnicus filii eius…"[161]. "Otto Brandenburgensis marchio" founded Kloster Arendsee, with the consent of "meis heredibus Ottone, Heinrico, Adelberto filiis meis et uxore mea Adelheide", by charter dated 1184[162]. An undated memorial of the foundation of Kloster Arendsee recalls "Ottonis Marchionis et Alheydis uxoris eius" as founders of the church and names "Ottonis, Heynrici et Adelberti filiorum suorum"[163]. Graf von Tangermünde. Graf von Gardelegen: "Secundus Otto marchio Brandenburgensis et frater eius comes Hinricus de Gardelegen" donated property to the church of Brandenberg by charter dated 1187[164]. "Henricus…comes in Gardelege" donated property "in Folckfelde" to Lutter church by charter dated 1191[165]. Markgraf Otto I & his [second] wife had one child: 3. ALBRECHT von Brandenburg ([1172/76]-25 Feb 1220, bur Kloster Lehnin). The Cronica Principum Saxonie names (in order) "Ottonem, Henricum et Albertum" as the three sons of "Otto primus [filius Alberti Ursi]"[166]. He succeeded his [half-]brother in 1205 as ALBRECHT II Markgraf von Brandenburg.

from: http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BRANDENBURG,%20PRUSSIA.htm#AlbrechtIIdied1220

view all

Otto I von Brandenburg, Markgraf's Timeline

1126
March 11, 1126
Dresden, Sachsen, Germany
1151
1151
Brandenburg, Deutschland(HRR)
1174
1174
Brandenburg, Deutschland(HRR)
1175
1175
Tangermuende, Germany
1184
March 7, 1184
Age 58
Brandenburg, Deutschland(HRR)
????
????