Is your surname Bernhardt?

Research the Bernhardt family

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Rosine Marie Henriette Bernhardt

Hebrew: שרה רוסין אנרייט ברנאר
Also Known As: "The Divine Sarah"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Paris, Ile-de-France, France
Death: March 26, 1923 (78)
56 boulevard Pereire, Paris, Île-de-France, France (Empoisonnement urémique (Uremic Poisoning))
Place of Burial: Paris, Île-de-France, France
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Julie Youle de Morny (Bernard)
Wife of Henri Maximilien, prince de Ligne et d'Amblise and Jacques Damala
Ex-partner of Mounet-Sully
Mother of Maurice Bernhardt

Occupation: famous actress
Managed by: Malka Mysels
Last Updated:

About Sarah Bernhardt

Sarah Bernhardt (c. October 22, 1844 – March 26, 1923) was a French stage and early film actress, and has been referred to as the most famous actress the world has ever known.

Bernhardt made her fame on the stages of Europe in the 1870s, and was soon in demand in Europe and the Americas. She developed a reputation as a serious dramatic actress, earning the nickname "The Divine Sarah".

Bernhardt was born in Paris as Rosine Bernardt, the daughter of Julie Bernardt (1821, Amsterdam – 1876, Paris) and an unknown father.

Julie, her mother, was one of six children of a widely traveling Jewish spectacle merchant, "vision specialist" and petty criminal Moritz Baruch Bernardt, and Sara Hirsch (later known as Janetta Hartog) (ca 1797–1829). Julie's father remarried Sara Kinsbergen (1809–1878) two weeks after his first wife's death, and abandoned his family in 1835.

Julie left for Paris, where she made a living as a courtesan and was known by the name "Youle".

Sarah would add the letter "H" to both her first and last name. Sarah's birth records were lost in a fire in 1871, but in order to prove French citizenship, necessary for Légion d'honneur eligibility, she created false birth records, on which she was the daughter of "Judith van Hard" and "Edouard Bernardt" from Le Havre, in later stories either a law student, accountant, naval cadet or naval officer.

As the presence of a baby interfered with her mother Julie's terrible and stressful life, Sarah was brought up in a pension, and later in a convent.

A child of delicate health, she considered becoming a nun, but one of her mother's reputed lovers – the future Duc de Morny, Napoleon III's half-brother – decided that Sarah should be an actress.

When she was 13, le Duc de Morny arranged for her to enter the Conservatoire, the government sponsored school of acting. She was not considered a particularly promising student, and, although she revered some of her teachers, she regarded the Conservatoire's methods as antiquated and too deeply steeped in tradition.

Bernhardt had an affair with a Belgian nobleman, Charles-Joseph Eugène Henri Georges Lamoral de Ligne (1837–1914), son of Eugène, 8th Prince of Ligne, with whom she had her only child, Maurice Bernhardt, in 1864. He married a Polish princess, Maria Jablonowska (see Jablonowski).

She later married Greek-born actor Aristides Damala (known in France by the stage name Jacques Damala) in London in 1882, but the marriage, which legally endured until Damala's death in 1889 at age 34, quickly collapsed, largely due to Damala's dependence on morphine.

During the later years of this marriage, Bernhardt was said to have been involved in an affair with the Prince of Wales, who later became Edward VII.

Much of the uncertainty about Bernhardt's life arises because of her tendency to exaggerate and distort.

She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1751 Vine Street.

Books

  • Dans les nuages, Impressions d'une chaise (1878)
  • L'Aveu, drame en un acte en prose (1888)
  • Adrienne Lecouvreur, drame en six actes (1907)
  • Ma Double Vie (1907), & as My Double Life: Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt, (1907) William Heinemann
  • Un Coeur d'Homme, pièce en quatre actes (1911)
  • Petite Idole (1920; as The Idol of Paris, 1921)
  • L'Art du Théâtre: la voix, le geste, la prononciation, etc. (1923; as The Art of the Theatre, 1924)
  • "Sarah: The Life of Sarah Bernhardt" Robert Gottlieb (2010)

Family & Partners

  • Parents: 
Charles Auguste Louis Joseph de MORNY, Judith Julie (Youle) de MORNY (née BERNHARDT)
  • Sister: 
Louise de PONIATOWSKI (née LE HON de MORNY)
  • Husband: 
Aristides DAMALA
  • Son: 
Maurice BERNHARDT
* Partner: 
Henri Maximilien Joseph Charles Louis Lamoral de LIGNE 
  • Partner: 
Charles François Marie de REMUSAT
  • Partner: 
Henri DUCASSE
  • Partner: 
Léon GAMBETTA
  • Partner: 
Louise ABBEMA
  • Partner: 
Victor Marie HUGO
  • Partner: 
Lucien Germain GUITRY
  • Partner: 
Georges Jules Victor CLAIRIN
  • Partner: 
Gustave DORE
  • Partner: 
Charles HAAS
  • Partner: 
Albert Edward (VII) de SAXE-COBURG & GOTHA

Sara Bernhardt in Chile:

The Chileans are rough, so cold, so lacking in intelligence, "said the great French actress after her only visit to the country in 1886. Juan Antonio Muñoz H. Neither the memory of the port of Valparaiso decked especially for her nor the tickets sold weeks in advance served to temper the mood of Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) after his passage through our country in 1886.

Several facts conspired. First, that she herself should be contradicted. La Bernhardt had asked to make the trip on the mountain range, on a mule, but his representative considered it preferable to do so by sea, supposedly safer. Thus, Sarah was shipped in Montevideo on the Cotopaxi steamer, which was about to sink in the waters of the Strait of Magellan. This was a difficult road, to say the least, that even motivated the song "Nous irons a Valparaiso", that the sailors sang to be animated when passing the Cape of Horns (consigned by Marcel Niedergang, of "Le Monde" , In February 1993).

Once away from the turbulence, the ship headed north, first docking in Lota, where the actress was received with the chords of "La Marseillaise". "After being housed in one of the houses of the very park of Lota (one of the seven wonders of the world, say the Penquistas), followed Talcahuano, and from there to Valparaíso" (Sara Vial, "La Segunda", February 15 Of 1996).

At the port, at nine o'clock in the morning, the armored Cochrane dispatched a boat to Prat Pier to accommodate those who would honor Sarah before her landing on board the Cotopaxi. They uploaded the uncle of the actress, Michel Kerbernhardt, owner of Hotel Colon; A nephew of Sarah; The administrator of the Victoria Theater; Some French residents; The consul of Peru, and the reporters.

Three days after her arrival, on October 9, Sarah debuted in the capital in a role that was considered the most she could do: Fedora, based on the story of Princess Romazoff. He arrived by train to the Central Station, where shortly they stole a bracelet watch from his niece Juanita, who accompanied her. His debut in Valparaíso was on October 19, at the Victoria Theater. There she was the protagonist of eight roles in titles such as "Frou Frou", "Adriana Lecrouvreur", "The Lady of the Camelias" and "El Despecho Amoroso".

Neither Chile nor the port was to Sarah's taste. "I love Buenos Aires, I love Rio, I hate Chile and I love Mexico, and although I hate Chile, I have eight cousins ​​there, but they are all there," he said. French, are not Chilean. " With "The Tribune" in New York, it was no less blunt: "We passed through the Strait of Magellan and went to Chile, but there they are brutes, so cold, so lacking in intelligence, so unfriendly!

"El Mercurio" of Valparaíso, answering, wrote: "We will be very rough Chileans, but at least we know some dignity, and we also distinguish the merit of the artist and the merit of the woman. The Ristori (actress Adelaida Ristori, favorite in the country in those years) and a sack of vices and bones like the Bernhardt.

In 1906 his return was announced. It would now be received at the Teatro San Martín de Santiago, but it was burned intact, and the visit was suspended (February, 1906). "El Mercurio" of Santiago, on March 2 of that year, confirmed the cancellation with a notice signed by Sarah herself offering something in exchange for her frustrated presence: "Instead of not coming, she has sent to Which recreates the fumeril public of Santiago, the eminent and tasty Cigarettes Sarah Bernhardt Justifying your absence

The actress was going to return to Chile in 1906, but the theater where she would act burned. In a notice signed by her she offered in return cigarettes and "a nice card".

************************

Find A Grave Memorial# 1333

Sarah Bernhardt

  • Original name: Henriette Rosine Bernard
  • Birth:  Oct. 22, 1844
  • Death: Mar. 26, 1923

Legendary Actress. Also known as The Divine Sarah. Born Henriette Rosine Bernard the child of Dutch courtesan, Julie Bernard. She was the eldest of three illegitimate daughters, and though it is not clear who her father was, speculation often names a young student called Morel. The presence of children interfered with her mother's preferred lifestyle, so she spent her childhood in a pension, cared for by a hired nurse, and in Grandchamp Augustine convent school near Versailles. When she turned sixteen, her mother’s protector, Charles Duc de Morny, sent her to the Conservatoire de Musique et Déclamation in Paris, to study for a career in the theater. She came to regard the Conservatoire’s methods as antiquated. In 1862, she adopted the stage name of Sarah, and was accepted by the national theatre company Comédie-Française and debuted in the title role of Racine’s 'Iphigénie.' In 1863 she proceeded to the Théâtre du Gymnase-Dramatique, but was dissatisfied with the small parts she received. In 1868, she had her first public and critical success in Alexandre Dumas’ 'Kean,' followed buy a portrayal of Cordelia in 'King Lear,' and a great triumph as the minstrel boy in 'Le Passant.' In 1872, the Comédie Française attracted by her success, invited her back, and she became an undisputed star with her portrayals of 'Phèdre' (1874) and Doña Sol in Hugo’s 'Hernani' (1877). She played Desdemona in Othello in 1878, and again, when the Comédie-Française appeared in London in 1879. In 1880, she formed her own traveling company, touring in Europe and in the United States. The tour was a great success. In 1882 Sarah met Aristidis Damala, a Greek army officer. They married at St. Andrew’s in London at the end of Bernhardt’s successful European tour. Her fame at it's peak, she received honors from King Umberto of Italy, Alfonso XII of Spain, Austrian emperor Franz Joseph, and Czar Alexander III. In 1891, she undertook a world tour that included Australia and South America. Returning to France in 1893, she was the wealthiest and most publicized actress of her day. That same year, she became the manager of the Théâtre de la Renaissance, and in 1899 she relocated to the former Théâtre des Nations, which she renamed the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt. She had made notable appearances as Hamlet in Paris and London in 1899, and as François-Joseph Bonaparte in 'L’Aiglon' (1900). She was one of the first women known to have performed the title role in Hamlet. In 1905, during a South American tour, she injured her right knee when jumping off the parapet in the last scene of La Tosca. Nearly a decade later, the injury became infected and gangrenous; and her leg had to be amputated. She again left for America in October 1910. She appeared in several silent films, but her only success was in the title role in 'Elizabeth Queen of England' in 1912. In 1914, she was made a Chevalier of France’s Legion of Honor.

After the loss of her leg, she insisted on visiting the soldiers at the front during the 1st World War, carried in a litter chair. In 1916, she began her last tour of the United States, running to 18 months on the road. In November 1918, she returned to France, only to set out on a European tour, playing parts she could perform while seated. New roles were provided for her by several playwrights that catered to her physical needs. In the fall of 1922, she gave a benefit performance to raise money for Madame Curie’s laboratory. She later collapsed during the dress rehearsal of the play 'Un Sujet de roman' but recovered sufficiently to take an interest in the motion picture, 'La Voyante', which was being filmed in her house in Paris shortly before her death. She was the author of an autobiography, 'My Double Life: Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt,' (1907), a novel, 'Petite Idole,' (1920), and a treatise on acting, 'L’Art du théâtre' (1923). (bio by: Iola) 

  • Family links: 
    • Children:
      •  Maurice Bernhardt (1864 - 1958)*
  • Cause of death: Uremia following kidney failure
  • Burial: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France,
    • Plot: Division 44, #6; GPS (lat/lon): 48.86119, 2.39489

About Sarah Bernhardt (Français)

Sarah Bernhardt est une actrice française née entre les 22 et 25 octobre 1844 à Paris 5e et morte le 26 mars 1923 à Paris 17e. Elle est considérée comme une des plus importantes actrices françaises du xixe siècle et du début du xxe siècle.

Appelée par Victor Hugo « la Voix d'or », mais aussi par d'autres « la Divine » ou encore « l'Impératrice du théâtre », elle est considérée comme une des plus grandes tragédiennes françaises du xixe siècle. Première « star » internationale, elle est la première comédienne à avoir fait des tournées triomphales sur les cinq continents, Jean Cocteau inventant pour elle l'expression de « monstre sacré ».

Naissance

Sarah Bernhardt et sa mère.

La mère de Sarah, Judith-Julie Bernardtb (1821-1876), modiste sans le sou et fille d'un marchand de spectacles néerlandais itinérant, était une courtisane parisienne connue sous le nom de « Youle ». On ignore qui était son père, Sarah ayant toujours gardé le silence sur son identité. Les noms d'Édouard Bernhardt ou de Paul Morel, officier de marine, sont les plus couramment proposés.

Du fait de la destruction des archives de l'état civil lors de la répression de la Commune de Paris, la date de naissance de Sarah Bernhardt est incertaine et débattue. Si ses biographes donnent habituellement les dates 22 ou 23 octobre 1844, certains proposent juillet ou septembre 1844, voire 1843 ou même 1841.

En outre, pour faciliter les démarches d'obtention de la Légion d'honneur et prouver la nationalité française de l'actrice, un acte de naissance rétrospectif est établi par décision de justice le 23 janvier 1914., sur base d'un certificat de baptême produit par Sarah Bernhardt, bien que la falsification de celui-ci n'ait trompé personne, y compris les magistrats. Le document est ainsi daté du 25 septembre 1844 et affecté aux registres du 15e arrondissement. Elle s'y déclare fille de Judith van Hard et d'Édouard Bernhardt, un père qui, selon ses différentes versions, appartenait à une riche famille d'armateurs du Havre ou y était un étudiant en droit.

De même, le lieu de sa naissance n'est pas plus sûrement établi : une plaque mentionnant sa naissance (le 25 octobre 1844) est apposée au no 5 de la rue de l'École-de-Médecine (anc. 11e), on évoque également la rue Saint-Honoré — au 32 ou au 26 — ou encore le 22 de la rue de La Michodière (2e).

Ses prénoms — Sara-Marie-Henriette selon l'état civil reconstitué — sont également parfois présentés dans un ordre différent selon les sources, certaines indiquant « Henriette-Marie-Sarah » ou encore « Henriette-Rosine (Bernard) », suivant le nom qu'elle avait donné lors de son inscription au Conservatoire, « Rosine (dite Sarah) ».

Une certaine inclination de l'actrice à l’affabulation concernant sa vie n'a pas aidé à démêler l'écheveau.

Enfance Sarah Bernhardt eut au moins trois sœurs et souffrit en particulier longtemps de la préférence de sa mère pour sa jeune sœur Jeanne-Rosine, également comédienne. Délaissée par Youle qui choisit la vie mondaine à Paris, elle passe une petite enfance solitaire chez une nourrice à Quimperlé où elle ne parle que le breton. Le duc de Morny, l'amant de sa tante, pourvoit à son éducation en l'inscrivant dans l’institution de Mlle Fressard puis en 1853 au couvent des Grand-Champs à Versailles. Elle y devient mystique catholique. Elle y joue son premier rôle, un ange dans un spectacle religieux. Elle reçoit le baptême chrétien en 1857 et envisage de devenir religieuse.

C'est alors que son nom aurait été francisé en « Bernard » et qu'elle quitte vers quatorze ans la vie monacale et passe le concours du Conservatoire où elle est reçue. « Tout le monde m'avait donné des conseils. Personne ne m'avait donné un conseil. On n'avait pas songé à me prendre un professeur pour me préparer ».

Elle prend aussi des leçons d'escrime, dont elle tirera profit dans ses rôles masculins comme Hamlet.

Débuts et engagement à la Comédie-Française

Elle entre en 1859 au Conservatoire d'Art dramatique de Paris sur la recommandation du duc de Morny dans la classe de Jean-Baptiste Provost15. Sortie en 1862 avec un second prix de comédie, elle entre à la Comédie-Française mais en est renvoyée en 1866 pour avoir giflé une sociétaire, Mlle Nathalie, celle-ci ayant elle-même violemment bousculé sa sœur qui avait marché sur sa traîne.

À cette époque, la police des mœurs compte Sarah parmi 415 « dames galantes » soupçonnées de prostitution clandestine.

Elle signe un contrat avec l'Odéon18. Elle y est révélée en jouant Le Passant de François Coppée en 1869. En 1870, pendant le siège de Paris, elle transforme le théâtre en hôpital militaire et y soigne le futur maréchal Foch qu'elle retrouvera quarante-cinq ans plus tard sur le front de la Meuse, pendant la Première Guerre mondiale19. Elle triomphe dans le rôle de la Reine de Ruy Blas en 1872, ce qui la fait surnommer la « Voix d'or » par l'auteur de la pièce, Victor Hugo, à l'occasion d'un banquet organisé pour la centième représentation. Ce succès lui vaut d'être rappelée par la Comédie-Française où elle joue dans Phèdre en 1874 et dans Hernani en 1877.

Avec le succès, les surnoms élogieux se multiplieront : « la Divine », l'« Impératrice du théâtre »…

Consécration et indépendance

En 1880, elle démissionne avec éclat du « Français », devant lui payer cent mille francs-or en dommages et intérêts pour rupture abusive de contrat. Elle crée sa propre compagnie avec laquelle elle part jouer et faire fortune à l'étranger jusqu'en 1917. Première « star » internationale, elle est la première comédienne à avoir fait des tournées triomphales sur les cinq continents, Jean Cocteau inventant pour elle l'expression de « monstre sacré »23. Dès 1881, à l'occasion d'une tournée de Bernhardt en Russie, Anton Tchekhov, alors chroniqueur au journal moscovite Le Spectateur24 décrit malicieusement « celle qui a visité les deux pôles, qui de sa traîne a balayé de long en large les cinq continents, qui a traversé les océans, qui plus d'une fois s'est élevée jusqu'aux cieux », brocarde l'hystérie des journalistes « qui ne boivent plus, ne mangent plus mais courent » après celle qui est devenue « une idée fixe (sic) ».

Elle interprète à plusieurs reprises des rôles d'homme (Hamlet, Pelléas), inspirant à Edmond Rostand sa pièce L'Aiglon en 1900. Elle se produit à Londres, à Copenhague, aux États-Unis (1880-1881) où elle affrète un train Pullman pour sa troupe et ses 8 tonnes de malles, et en Russie, notamment au théâtre Michel de Saint-Pétersbourg (en 1881, 1892 et 1908). Son lyrisme et sa diction emphatique enthousiasment tous les publics. Afin de promouvoir son spectacle, elle rencontre Thomas Edison à New York et y enregistre sur cylindre une lecture de Phèdre. Elle devient l'un des très rares artistes français à avoir son étoile sur le Hollywood Walk of Fame à Los Angeles.

Invitée en Australie en février 1891, elle se produit à Melbourne notamment, fait la connaissance d'Adrien Loir, neveu de Pasteur, avec lequel elle a sans doute une liaison.

Proche d'Oscar Wilde, elle lui commande la pièce Salomé, dont elle interprète le rôle-titre, en 1892. À partir de 1893, elle prend la direction du théâtre de la Renaissance où elle remonte quelques-uns de ses plus grands succès (Phèdre, La Dame aux camélias) mais crée aussi de nombreuses pièces comme Gismonda de Victorien Sardou, La Princesse lointaine d'Edmond Rostand, Les Amants de Maurice Donnay, La Ville morte de Gabriele D'Annunzio et Lorenzaccio d'Alfred de Musset (inédit à la scène), puis, en 1899, du théâtre des Nations qu'elle rebaptise « théâtre Sarah-Bernhardt » et où elle crée entre autres L'Aiglon de Rostand et reprend La Tosca de Sardou. En opposition à son fils, elle apporte son soutien à Émile Zola au moment de l’affaire Dreyfus, elle soutient Louise Michel et prend position contre la peine de mort.

Le 9 décembre 1896, une « journée Sarah Bernhardt » est organisée à la gloire de l'actrice par Catulle Mendès et d'autres sommités de l'art : Edmond Rostand, Antonio de La Gandara qui fit d'elle plusieurs portraits, Jean Dara, José-Maria de Heredia, Carolus-Duran. Le Tout-Paris s'y presse : un repas de cinq-cents convives au Grand Hôtel précède un gala au théâtre de la Renaissance — qu'elle dirige alors — où l'actrice se rend accompagnée de deux cents coupés et où l'on peut entendre entre autres hommages un Hymne à Sarah composé par Gabriel Pierné sur des paroles d'Armand Silvestre et interprété par l'orchestre Colonne.

Ayant compris l'importance de la réclame, elle met en scène chaque minute de sa vie et n'hésite pas à associer son nom à la promotion des produits de consommation. Son style et sa silhouette inspirent la mode, les arts décoratifs mais aussi l’esthétique de l’Art nouveau. Elle fait elle-même appel au peintre Alfons Mucha pour dessiner ses affiches à partir de décembre 1894. Ces six années de collaboration donnent un second souffle à sa carrière. Tuberculeuse comme sa sœur Régina qui en meurt en 1874, elle développe une certaine morbidité en se reposant régulièrement dans un cercueil capitonné qui trône chez elle. Devant le scandale suscité, elle s'y fait photographier par un opérateur du studio Melandri pour en vendre des photos et cartes postales.

En 1905, lors d'une tournée au Canada, le Premier ministre Wilfrid Laurier l'accueille à Québec ; mais l’archevêque Louis-Nazaire Bégin, détestant le théâtre et reprochant à l'actrice un jeu du corps nouveau pouvant être qualifié d'érotique, demande à ses paroissiens de boycotter la représentation et l’actrice, habituée aux foules, se produit devant une salle en partie vide.

Après avoir joué dans plus de 120 spectacles, Sarah Bernhardt devient actrice de cinéma. Son premier film est Le Duel d'Hamlet réalisé en 1900. C'est un des premiers essais de cinéma parlant avec le procédé du Phono-Cinéma-Théâtre, où un phonographe à cylindre synchronisait plus ou moins la voix de l'actrice aux images projetées. Elle tournera d'autres films — muets — dont deux œuvres autobiographiques, la dernière étant Sarah Bernhardt à Belle-Île en 1912, qui décrit sa vie quotidienne.

Dernières années

En 1914, le ministre René Viviani lui remet la croix de chevalier de la Légion d'honneur, pour avoir, en tant que comédienne, « répandu la langue française dans le monde entier » et pour ses services d'infirmière pendant la guerre franco-prussienne de 1870-1871.

Sarah Bernhardt est amputée de la jambe droite en 1915, à l'âge de 70 ans, en raison d'une tuberculose osseuse du genou. Les premiers symptômes remontent à 1887, lorsqu’elle se blesse au genou sur le pont d'un bateau qui la ramène d'une tournée aux Amériques. Cette première luxation, non soignée, s’aggrave en 1887, lors des sauts répétés du parapet dans le final de La Tosca, la comédienne ayant chuté à de nombreuses reprises sur les genoux, puis en 1890 à la suite d'une nouvelle blessure contractée lors d'une représentation du Procès de Jeanne d'Arc au théâtre de la Porte-Saint-Martin. En 1902, lors d’une tournée, un professeur de Berlin diagnostique une tuberculose ostéo-articulaire et prescrit une immobilisation de six mois que l’actrice ne peut se résoudre à suivre. Elle se contente de séances d'infiltrations et, en 1914, d'une cure à Dax, d'ailleurs sans effet.

En septembre 1914, craignant que Sarah Bernhardt ne soit prise en otage, lors d’une éventuelle avancée allemande sur Paris, le ministère de la Guerre conseille à l’actrice de s’éloigner de la capitale. Henri Cain, un de ses proches dont la femme, Julia Guiraudon, est fille d’un ostréiculteur de Biganos, lui recommande de séjourner sur le Bassin d’Arcachon, où lui et son épouse louent une villa à Andernos-les-Bains35. Elle arrête son choix sur la villa « Eurêka », où elle s'installe de septembre 1914 à octobre 1915e.

Plâtré durant six mois, son genou développe une gangrène. Son médecin et ancien amant, Samuel Pozzi, que Sarah surnomme « Docteur Dieu », ne peut se résoudre à pratiquer lui-même l'opération et sollicite le concours du professeur Jean-Henri Maurice Denucé, désormais chirurgien à Bordeaux. L'actrice est amputée au-dessus du genou le 22 février 1915 à la clinique Saint-Augustin de Bordeaux. Sarah revient en convalescence à Andernos en mars 1915. Elle participe à une manifestation patriotique le 10 août 1915 où elle lit deux poèmes puis quitte définitivement Andernos en octobre 191535. Elle va à Reims, « la ville où il faut être vu », le 9 septembre 191643 et joue le rôle d'une infirmière devant la cathédrale martyre.

Cela ne l'empêche pas de continuer à jouer assise (elle refuse de porter une jambe en bois ou une prothèse en celluloïd), ni de rendre visite aux poilus au front en chaise à porteurs, lui valant le surnom de « Mère La Chaise »45. Elle ne s'épanche jamais sur son infirmité, sauf pour rire : « Je fais la pintade ! ». Son refus des faux-semblants n'a pas été jusqu'à lui faire négliger la chirurgie esthétique. En 1912, elle demande au chirurgien américain Charles Miller un lifting, technique alors débutante, dont les résultats seront corrigés par Suzanne Noël.

Alors qu'elle est en train de tourner un film pour Sacha Guitry, La Voyante, elle meurt « d'une insuffisance rénale aiguë » le 26 mars 1923, au 56 boulevard Pereire (17e arr.), en présence de son fils. Le gouvernement lui organise des obsèques nationales, faisant d'elle la première femme à recevoir un tel honneur en France. Elle est enterrée à Paris au cimetière du Père-Lachaise (division 44).

L'artiste

Style dramatique

La performance théâtrale de Sarah Bernhardt, que ses contemporains acclamèrent à l'égale de celle de Mounet-Sully, est, comme cette dernière, emphatique tant dans la pantomime que dans la déclamation. Les modulations de la voix s'éloignent délibérément du naturel50 ; les émotions sont rendues, tant par le geste que par l'intonation, plus grand que nature51. Ce style hérité de la déclamation baroque se démode avant la fin de sa carrière ; Alfred Kerr remarque « tout ce qui sort de sa bouche est faux ; sinon, tout est parfait52 ». Les critiques modernes qui écoutent ses enregistrements de Phèdre chez Thomas Edison en 1903 sont souvent déçus53.

Peinture et sculpture

Vers 1874, alors qu'elle est une comédienne au talent reconnu, mais manquant d'emplois qui l'intéressent, Sarah Bernhardt apprend le modelage, puis la peinture. Elle fréquente l'académie Julian et présente au Salon de 1880 La Jeune Fille et la Mort, reçu « moins comme un résultat qu'une promesse ».

Elle réalise également quelques bronzes, dont un buste d'Émile de Girardin et un de Louise Abbéma exposés aujourd'hui au musée d'Orsay.

Un autoportrait est exposé dans une des salles consacrées à la peinture moderne de la Fondation Bemberg à Toulouse.

Vie privée

Les détails de la vie privée de Sarah Bernhardt sont souvent incertains ; quand elle expliquait : « Je suis si mince, si maigre, que quand il pleut je passe entre les gouttes », Alexandre Dumas fils — qui la détestait — ajoutait dans une discussion avec le journaliste Louis Ganderax : « Elle est si menteuse qu’elle est peut-être grasse57. »

La vie privée de Sarah Bernhardt fut assez mouvementée. À l'âge de vingt ans, elle donne naissance à son seul enfant qui deviendra écrivain, Maurice Bernhardt, fruit d'une liaison avec un prince belge, Henri de Ligne (1824-1871), fils aîné d'Eugène, 8e prince de Ligne. Elle a par la suite plusieurs amants, dont Charles Haas, mondain très populaire à qui elle vouait une véritable passion alors qu'il la traitait en femme légère et la trompait sans états d'âme. Après leur rupture, ils demeurèrent cependant amis jusqu'à la mort de Haas. On compte également des artistes tels que Gustave Doré et Georges Jules Victor Clairin et des acteurs tels que Mounet-Sully, Lucien Guitry et Lou Tellegen ou encore son « Docteur Dieu » Samuel Pozzi. On parle également de Victor Hugo59 et du prince de Galles. Certaines sources lui prêtent également des liaisons homosexuelles, notamment avec la peintre Louise Abbéma qui fit d'elle plusieurs portraits. Elle est également portraiturée par Gustave Doré, Giovanni Boldini et Jules Bastien-Lepage

En 1874-1875, elle entretient des rapports intimes moyennant rétribution avec plusieurs députés dont Léon Gambetta, Henri Ducasse et le comte de Rémusat.

En 1882, elle se marie à Londres avec un acteur d'origine grecque, Aristides Damala (en), mais celui-ci est dépendant de la morphine et leur relation ne dure guère. Elle restera cependant son épouse légitime jusqu'à la mort de l'acteur, en 1889 à l'âge de 34 ans.

Elle était amie du poète Robert de Montesquiou qui lui avait dédié un poème (inédit). Ce poème manuscrit faisait partie de sa bibliothèque vendue en 1923.

Sarah Bernhardt a séjourné plusieurs années avec ses commensaux — qu'elle appelait « sa ménagerie » — dans un fortin militaire désaffecté qu'elle avait acquis en 1894 au lieudit « La pointe des Poulains », à Belle-Île-en-Mer (île que lui avait fait découvrir son portraitiste attitré Georges Clairin)63. À côté de ce fortin elle avait fait bâtir, décorer et meubler la villa Lysiane (le prénom de sa petite-fille) et la villa Les Cinq Parties du monde, travaux importants qui lui coûtèrent plus d'un million de francs-or, somme considérable pour l'époque. Elle s'installa quant à elle dans le manoir de Penhoët, un manoir de briques rouges, disparu lors des bombardements de la Seconde Guerre mondiale ; qu'elle avait acheté, car elle le jugeait trop proche de son fortin, et aussi plus confortable. En 1922, infirme et malade, elle vend ces propriétés, où un musée lui est consacré depuis 200764. Le musée Sarah Bernhardt de Belle-Île-en-Mer peut se visiter au cœur de la citadelle Vauban dominant le port de Le Palais. Le fort à la pointe des Poulains et ses abords ont été aménagés pour faciliter les visites.

Elle était la marraine de l'actrice franco-américaine Suzanne Caubet.

Personnalité Sa devise était « Quand même » en référence à son audace et à son mépris des conventions. Alors qu'elle est attaquée par des détracteurs sur ses origines, après la défaite de 1871, elle déclare : « Si j'ai de l'accent, Monsieur (et je le regrette beaucoup), mon accent est cosmopolite, et non tudesque. Je suis une fille de la grande race juive, et mon langage un peu rude se ressent de nos pérégrinations forcées »66.

Elle a en partie inspiré à Marcel Proust — sans doute avec les comédiennes Rachel et Réjane — le personnage de l'actrice « la Berma » dans À la recherche du temps perdu. Proust la désignait parfois dans sa correspondance par « Haras », son prénom à l'envers.

Sacha Guitry, dans ses Mémoires, l'évoque ainsi :

« Madame Sarah jouait un grand rôle dans notre existence. Après notre père et notre mère, c'était assurément la personne la plus importante du monde à nos yeux. [%E2%80%A6] Que l'on décrive avec exactitude et drôlerie — ainsi que Jules Renard l'a fait dans son admirable Journal — sa maison, ses repas, ses accueils surprenants, ses lubies, ses excentricités, ses injustices, ses mensonges extraordinaires, certes [%E2%80%A6] mais qu'on veuille la comparer à d'autres actrices, qu'on la discute ou qu'on la blâme, cela ne m'est pas seulement odieux : il m'est impossible de le supporter. [%E2%80%A6] Ils croient qu'elle était une actrice de son époque. [%E2%80%A6] Ils ne devinent donc pas que si elle revenait, elle serait de leur époque »

— Sacha Guitry, Si j'ai bonne mémoire

On lui attribue aussi ces mots :

« Il faut haïr très peu, car c'est très fatigant. Il faut mépriser beaucoup, pardonner souvent, mais ne jamais oublier. »

« Sarah Bernhardt, à qui une jeune comédienne a déclaré qu'elle avait déjà joué plusieurs fois et qu'elle n'avait même plus de trac, aurait alors répondu : « Ne vous en faites pas, le trac, cela viendra avec le talent ». »

— Maurice Thévenet, Les Talents

Wikipedia

About Sarah Bernhardt (עברית)

שרה ברנאר

' (בצרפתית: Sarah Bernhardt;‏ 22 באוקטובר 1844 - 26 במרץ 1923) הייתה שחקנית תיאטרון צרפתייה ממוצא יהודי.

תוכן עניינים 1 תולדות חייה 1.1 ילדות ונעורים 1.2 קריירה 1.3 שנים אחרונות 2 ספריה 3 לקריאה נוספת 4 קישורים חיצוניים תולדות חייה ילדות ונעורים נולדה בשם אנרייט רוסין ברנאר (בצרפתית: Henriette Rosine Bernard). אמה, יהודית ברנאר, הייתה יהודייה ילידת אמסטרדם, קורטיזנה מפורסמת בפריז. אביה היה כנראה צעיר הולנדי, וסבה מצד אמה היה מוריץ ברנהארד - סוחר יהודי באמסטרדם. כאשר הייתה בת שתים עשרה שנה הוטבלה לנצרות ונכנסה למנזר לנשים. ב-1859 התקבלה לקונסרבטוריון למוזיקה ולמשחק תיאטראלי בהמלצתו של שארל, דוכס מורני. ב-11 באוגוסט 1862 החלה לשחק בתפקיד משני בקומדי פראנסז במחזהו של ז'אן רסין: "איפיגניה".

קריירה ב־1866 עברה לשחק בתיאטרון אודיאון בפריז ושם נחלה את הצלחותיה הראשונות כאשר גילמה את דמותה של קורדליה בגרסה הצרפתית למחזהו של שייקספיר "המלך ליר", ואת דמותה של זאנטו במחזהו של פרנסואה קופה "עובר האורח" (1869). ב-1872 גילמה בהצלחה רבה את תפקיד מלכת ספרד במחזהו של ויקטור הוגו "רואי-בלה" - מה שגרם לקומדי פראנסז להזמינה לשחק בשורותיו כשחקנית מן המניין. בתקופה זו שיחקה, בין היתר, ב-1874 את התפקיד הראשי במחזהו של ז'אן רסין "פדרה" וב-1877 את תפקידה של דונה סול במחזהו של ויקטור הוגו "ארנאני".

ב-1879 הייתה לה עונה מוצלחת בלונדון, ומכאן ואילך נודעה כשחקנית הגדולה ביותר של זמנה. היא גילתה, לטענת אוהביה, עוצמה רגשית במשחקה, ונודעה בשל אישיותה המקסימה וקולה, שזכה לכינוי "קול הזהב".

ב-1880, בשל ביקורת שנמתחה על משחקה במחזהו של אמיל אוז'ייה "ההרפתקנית", עזבה את קומדי פראנסז, הקימה להקה משלה - תיאטרון שרה ברנאר - איתה יצאה למסע הופעות בלונדון, בקופנהגן, ברוסיה ובארצות הברית. בניו יורק פגשה בתומאס אדיסון וקראה בפניו בביתו את תפקידה במחזה "פדרה". ב-1881 גילמה את דמותה של דופלסי במחזהו של אלכסנדר דיומא הבן "הגברת עם הקמליות".

בין 1891 ל-1893 ערכה מסע הופעות באמריקה הצפונית, באמריקה הדרומית, באוסטרליה וברוב בירות מדינות אירופה. ב-1899 העלתה על הבמה גרסה צרפתית של "המלט" שבה שיחקה את התפקיד הראשי. בשנת 1900 גילמה את הדמות בסרט הקצר "Le Duel d'Hamlet".

שנים אחרונות ב-1905, כאשר הופיעה בריו דה ז'ניירו, נפלה מן הבמה ונפגעה בברכה. פצע זה, שהפך בהדרגה לנמק, גרם לכריתת רגלה הימנית ב-1915. למרות זאת המשיכה בקריירה שלה, ואף שלא הייתה מסוגלת להתנועע על הבמה, קולה האפיל על נכותה. באותה שנה ערכה מסע הצגות מוצלח באמריקה, ולאחר מכן המשיכה לשחק כמעט עד יומה האחרון.

שרה ברנאר נפטרה בפריז ב-1923 כתוצאה ממחלת כליות ונקברה בבית הקברות פר לשז שבעיר.

ספריה Dans les nuages, Impressions d'une chaise (1878) L'Aveu, drame en un acte en prose (1888) Adrienne Lecouvreur, drame en six actes (1907) Ma Double Vie (1907), My Double Life: Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt, (1907) William Heinemann Un Coeur d'Homme, pièce en quatre actes (1911) Petite Idole (1920; as The Idol of Paris, 1921) L'Art du Théâtre: la voix, le geste, la prononciation, etc. (1923; as The Art of the Theatre, 1924) התיאטרון על סף המאה העשרים לקריאה נוספת Robert Gottlieb, Sarah: The Life of Sarah Bernhardt (Jewish Lives) Arthur Gold, The Divine Sarah: A Life of Sarah Bernhardt Carol Ockman, Sarah Bernhardt: The Art of High Drama קישורים חיצוניים מיזמי קרן ויקימדיה

, במסד הנתונים הקולנועיים IMDb (באנגלית) Allmovie Logo.png שרה ברנאר , באתר AllMovie (באנגלית) הלנה שפירו, שרה ברנאר , באנציקלופדיה לנשים יהודיות (באנגלית) שרה ברנאר , באתר "Find a Grave" (באנגלית) https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%A9%D7%A8%D7%94_%D7%91%D7%A8%D7%A0...

------------------------------------------

Sarah Bernhardt (c. October 22, 1844 – March 26, 1923) was a French stage and early film actress, and has been referred to as the most famous actress the world has ever known.

Bernhardt made her fame on the stages of Europe in the 1870s, and was soon in demand in Europe and the Americas. She developed a reputation as a serious dramatic actress, earning the nickname "The Divine Sarah".

Bernhardt was born in Paris as Rosine Bernardt, the daughter of Julie Bernardt (1821, Amsterdam – 1876, Paris) and an unknown father.

Julie, her mother, was one of six children of a widely traveling Jewish spectacle merchant, "vision specialist" and petty criminal Moritz Baruch Bernardt, and Sara Hirsch (later known as Janetta Hartog) (ca 1797–1829). Julie's father remarried Sara Kinsbergen (1809–1878) two weeks after his first wife's death, and abandoned his family in 1835.

Julie left for Paris, where she made a living as a courtesan and was known by the name "Youle".

Sarah would add the letter "H" to both her first and last name. Sarah's birth records were lost in a fire in 1871, but in order to prove French citizenship, necessary for Légion d'honneur eligibility, she created false birth records, on which she was the daughter of "Judith van Hard" and "Edouard Bernardt" from Le Havre, in later stories either a law student, accountant, naval cadet or naval officer.

As the presence of a baby interfered with her mother Julie's terrible and stressful life, Sarah was brought up in a pension, and later in a convent.

A child of delicate health, she considered becoming a nun, but one of her mother's reputed lovers – the future Duc de Morny, Napoleon III's half-brother – decided that Sarah should be an actress.

When she was 13, le Duc de Morny arranged for her to enter the Conservatoire, the government sponsored school of acting. She was not considered a particularly promising student, and, although she revered some of her teachers, she regarded the Conservatoire's methods as antiquated and too deeply steeped in tradition.

Bernhardt had an affair with a Belgian nobleman, Charles-Joseph Eugène Henri Georges Lamoral de Ligne (1837–1914), son of Eugène, 8th Prince of Ligne, with whom she had her only child, Maurice Bernhardt, in 1864. He married a Polish princess, Maria Jablonowska (see Jablonowski).

She later married Greek-born actor Aristides Damala (known in France by the stage name Jacques Damala) in London in 1882, but the marriage, which legally endured until Damala's death in 1889 at age 34, quickly collapsed, largely due to Damala's dependence on morphine.

During the later years of this marriage, Bernhardt was said to have been involved in an affair with the Prince of Wales, who later became Edward VII.

Much of the uncertainty about Bernhardt's life arises because of her tendency to exaggerate and distort.

She has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 1751 Vine Street.

Books

  • Dans les nuages, Impressions d'une chaise (1878)
  • L'Aveu, drame en un acte en prose (1888)
  • Adrienne Lecouvreur, drame en six actes (1907)
  • Ma Double Vie (1907), & as My Double Life: Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt, (1907) William Heinemann
  • Un Coeur d'Homme, pièce en quatre actes (1911)
  • Petite Idole (1920; as The Idol of Paris, 1921)
  • L'Art du Théâtre: la voix, le geste, la prononciation, etc. (1923; as The Art of the Theatre, 1924)
  • "Sarah: The Life of Sarah Bernhardt" Robert Gottlieb (2010)

Family & Partners

  • Parents: 
Charles Auguste Louis Joseph de MORNY, Judith Julie (Youle) de MORNY (née BERNHARDT)
  • Sister: 
Louise de PONIATOWSKI (née LE HON de MORNY)
  • Husband: 
Aristides DAMALA
  • Son: 
Maurice BERNHARDT
* Partner: 
Henri Maximilien Joseph Charles Louis Lamoral de LIGNE 
  • Partner: 
Charles François Marie de REMUSAT
  • Partner: 
Henri DUCASSE
  • Partner: 
Léon GAMBETTA
  • Partner: 
Louise ABBEMA
  • Partner: 
Victor Marie HUGO
  • Partner: 
Lucien Germain GUITRY
  • Partner: 
Georges Jules Victor CLAIRIN
  • Partner: 
Gustave DORE
  • Partner: 
Charles HAAS
  • Partner: 
Albert Edward (VII) de SAXE-COBURG & GOTHA

Sara Bernhardt in Chile:

The Chileans are rough, so cold, so lacking in intelligence, "said the great French actress after her only visit to the country in 1886. Juan Antonio Muñoz H. Neither the memory of the port of Valparaiso decked especially for her nor the tickets sold weeks in advance served to temper the mood of Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) after his passage through our country in 1886.

Several facts conspired. First, that she herself should be contradicted. La Bernhardt had asked to make the trip on the mountain range, on a mule, but his representative considered it preferable to do so by sea, supposedly safer. Thus, Sarah was shipped in Montevideo on the Cotopaxi steamer, which was about to sink in the waters of the Strait of Magellan. This was a difficult road, to say the least, that even motivated the song "Nous irons a Valparaiso", that the sailors sang to be animated when passing the Cape of Horns (consigned by Marcel Niedergang, of "Le Monde" , In February 1993).

Once away from the turbulence, the ship headed north, first docking in Lota, where the actress was received with the chords of "La Marseillaise". "After being housed in one of the houses of the very park of Lota (one of the seven wonders of the world, say the Penquistas), followed Talcahuano, and from there to Valparaíso" (Sara Vial, "La Segunda", February 15 Of 1996).

At the port, at nine o'clock in the morning, the armored Cochrane dispatched a boat to Prat Pier to accommodate those who would honor Sarah before her landing on board the Cotopaxi. They uploaded the uncle of the actress, Michel Kerbernhardt, owner of Hotel Colon; A nephew of Sarah; The administrator of the Victoria Theater; Some French residents; The consul of Peru, and the reporters.

Three days after her arrival, on October 9, Sarah debuted in the capital in a role that was considered the most she could do: Fedora, based on the story of Princess Romazoff. He arrived by train to the Central Station, where shortly they stole a bracelet watch from his niece Juanita, who accompanied her. His debut in Valparaíso was on October 19, at the Victoria Theater. There she was the protagonist of eight roles in titles such as "Frou Frou", "Adriana Lecrouvreur", "The Lady of the Camelias" and "El Despecho Amoroso".

Neither Chile nor the port was to Sarah's taste. "I love Buenos Aires, I love Rio, I hate Chile and I love Mexico, and although I hate Chile, I have eight cousins ​​there, but they are all there," he said. French, are not Chilean. " With "The Tribune" in New York, it was no less blunt: "We passed through the Strait of Magellan and went to Chile, but there they are brutes, so cold, so lacking in intelligence, so unfriendly!

"El Mercurio" of Valparaíso, answering, wrote: "We will be very rough Chileans, but at least we know some dignity, and we also distinguish the merit of the artist and the merit of the woman. The Ristori (actress Adelaida Ristori, favorite in the country in those years) and a sack of vices and bones like the Bernhardt.

In 1906 his return was announced. It would now be received at the Teatro San Martín de Santiago, but it was burned intact, and the visit was suspended (February, 1906). "El Mercurio" of Santiago, on March 2 of that year, confirmed the cancellation with a notice signed by Sarah herself offering something in exchange for her frustrated presence: "Instead of not coming, she has sent to Which recreates the fumeril public of Santiago, the eminent and tasty Cigarettes Sarah Bernhardt Justifying your absence

The actress was going to return to Chile in 1906, but the theater where she would act burned. In a notice signed by her she offered in return cigarettes and "a nice card".

************************

Find A Grave Memorial# 1333

Sarah Bernhardt

  • Original name: Henriette Rosine Bernard
  • Birth:  Oct. 22, 1844
  • Death: Mar. 26, 1923

Legendary Actress. Also known as The Divine Sarah. Born Henriette Rosine Bernard the child of Dutch courtesan, Julie Bernard. She was the eldest of three illegitimate daughters, and though it is not clear who her father was, speculation often names a young student called Morel. The presence of children interfered with her mother's preferred lifestyle, so she spent her childhood in a pension, cared for by a hired nurse, and in Grandchamp Augustine convent school near Versailles. When she turned sixteen, her mother’s protector, Charles Duc de Morny, sent her to the Conservatoire de Musique et Déclamation in Paris, to study for a career in the theater. She came to regard the Conservatoire’s methods as antiquated. In 1862, she adopted the stage name of Sarah, and was accepted by the national theatre company Comédie-Française and debuted in the title role of Racine’s 'Iphigénie.' In 1863 she proceeded to the Théâtre du Gymnase-Dramatique, but was dissatisfied with the small parts she received. In 1868, she had her first public and critical success in Alexandre Dumas’ 'Kean,' followed buy a portrayal of Cordelia in 'King Lear,' and a great triumph as the minstrel boy in 'Le Passant.' In 1872, the Comédie Française attracted by her success, invited her back, and she became an undisputed star with her portrayals of 'Phèdre' (1874) and Doña Sol in Hugo’s 'Hernani' (1877). She played Desdemona in Othello in 1878, and again, when the Comédie-Française appeared in London in 1879. In 1880, she formed her own traveling company, touring in Europe and in the United States. The tour was a great success. In 1882 Sarah met Aristidis Damala, a Greek army officer. They married at St. Andrew’s in London at the end of Bernhardt’s successful European tour. Her fame at it's peak, she received honors from King Umberto of Italy, Alfonso XII of Spain, Austrian emperor Franz Joseph, and Czar Alexander III. In 1891, she undertook a world tour that included Australia and South America. Returning to France in 1893, she was the wealthiest and most publicized actress of her day. That same year, she became the manager of the Théâtre de la Renaissance, and in 1899 she relocated to the former Théâtre des Nations, which she renamed the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt. She had made notable appearances as Hamlet in Paris and London in 1899, and as François-Joseph Bonaparte in 'L’Aiglon' (1900). She was one of the first women known to have performed the title role in Hamlet. In 1905, during a South American tour, she injured her right knee when jumping off the parapet in the last scene of La Tosca. Nearly a decade later, the injury became infected and gangrenous; and her leg had to be amputated. She again left for America in October 1910. She appeared in several silent films, but her only success was in the title role in 'Elizabeth Queen of England' in 1912. In 1914, she was made a Chevalier of France’s Legion of Honor.

After the loss of her leg, she insisted on visiting the soldiers at the front during the 1st World War, carried in a litter chair. In 1916, she began her last tour of the United States, running to 18 months on the road. In November 1918, she returned to France, only to set out on a European tour, playing parts she could perform while seated. New roles were provided for her by several playwrights that catered to her physical needs. In the fall of 1922, she gave a benefit performance to raise money for Madame Curie’s laboratory. She later collapsed during the dress rehearsal of the play 'Un Sujet de roman' but recovered sufficiently to take an interest in the motion picture, 'La Voyante', which was being filmed in her house in Paris shortly before her death. She was the author of an autobiography, 'My Double Life: Memoirs of Sarah Bernhardt,' (1907), a novel, 'Petite Idole,' (1920), and a treatise on acting, 'L’Art du théâtre' (1923). (bio by: Iola) 

  • Family links: 
    • Children:
      •  Maurice Bernhardt (1864 - 1958)*
  • Cause of death: Uremia following kidney failure
  • Burial: Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris, City of Paris, Île-de-France, France,
    • Plot: Division 44, #6; GPS (lat/lon): 48.86119, 2.39489

Over Sarah Bernhardt (Nederlands)

view all

Sarah Bernhardt's Timeline

1844
October 22, 1844
Paris, Ile-de-France, France
1864
December 20, 1864
Paris, Paris, Île-de-France, France
1923
March 26, 1923
Age 78
Paris, Île-de-France, France
????
Paris, Île-de-France, France