Teresa de Leão, condessa de Portugal

Is your surname Alfonso?

Research the Alfonso family

Teresa de Leão, condessa de Portugal's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Teresa Alfonso, condesa de Portugal

Spanish: Da. Teresa Alfónsez, Condesa de Portugal
Also Known As: "Theresa", "of Castile /Theresa/", "Mathilde of Portugal Teresa of León", "Queen Theresa of Portugal", "Countess of Portugal", "(Portuguese Rainha Dona Teresa", "Condessa de Portugal) (sometimes Infanta Teresa of León)", "Condessa de Portugal"
Birthdate:
Death: November 01, 1130 (42-51)
Place of Burial: Braga, Portugal
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Alfonso VI the Brave, King of Castile and León and Jimena Muñoz
Wife of Fernando Pérez de Traba, Conde de Trastámara and Henrique de Borgonha, conde de Portugal
Mother of Sancha Fernández de Traba; Teresa Fernández de Traba; Froila Pérez de Traba; Dª. Urraca Henriques, infanta de Portugal; Sancha Henriques, infanta de Portugal and 5 others
Sister of Elvira Alfonso, condesa de Tolosa
Half sister of N.N. Alfonso de Léon; Urraca I, reina de Castilla y León; Elvira de Castilla; Sancho Alfónsez, Infante de Castilla y León; Elvira Alfónsez, infanta de Castilla y León and 1 other

Occupation: Condessa de Portugal, Condesa de Portugal, Reine, Reina de Portugal, Infanta de Castilla, Infanta de León, condessa de Portugal, Princess of Leon & Castile, Countess of Portugal
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr.
Last Updated:

About Teresa de Leão, condessa de Portugal

Teresa de Leão, condessa de Portugal

  • Daughter of Alfonso VI the Brave, King of Castile and León and Jimena Muñoz
  • Teresa de Leão, countess of Portugal (in Galician-Portuguese : Tarasia or Tareja de Portugal , better known in Portugal only by Dona Teresa ; c. 1080 - Póvoa de Lanhoso or Montederramo Monastery , November 11 , 1130 ) was countess of Portugal from 1112 to 1128.  
  • She was an infant of the kingdom of Leão and countess of the Portucalense County, governing like queen. Wife of Henrique de Borgonha, count of Portucale and mother of D. Afonso Henriques , founder of the kingdom of Portugal and first king of Portugal.

Project MedLands, Chapter 1. KINGS OF PORTUGAL 1113-1383 (BURGUNDY-CAPET)

HENRI de Bourgogne, son of HENRI “le damoiseau” de Bourgogne [Capet] & his wife ([1069/72]-killed in battle Astorga, León 22 May 1112, bur Braga Cathedral). "Heynricus frater meus" witnessed the donation to Cluny of "Oddo dux Burgundie"[2]. An indication of his age is given in the charter dated to [1081/84] under which "Odo dux Burgundie" confirmed a donation by "frater meus domnus Hugo" to the abbey of Molesme with the consent of "fratres mei Robertus archidiaconus, Henricus puer, Beatrix et Helia sorores mee"[3]. His parentage is confirmed by an early 12th century document at Fleury which records that "Ainrico uni filiorum, filio…ducis Roberti" married "alteram filiam…non ex coniugali" of Alfonso VI King of Castile[4]. His aunt Constance Queen of Castile invited him to the court of Castile. He may have arrived in Spain with the expedition of the Eudes I Duke of Burgundy in 1086/87, following a call from the abbey of Cluny to fight "the infidel"[5]. Señor de Braga [1093], count in Tordesillas 1096/97. He made a mutual pact [Dec 1094/Jul 1095] with Raymond de Bourgogne, husband of Infanta doña Urraca de Castilla, under which he promised support in securing Castile and León for Raymond in return for a pledge to grant him Toledo (or in default, Galicia)[6]. Alfonso VI King of Castile made him a large grant of land, from the River Minho in the north to Santarem in the south, in [1095/96], which in effect resulted in his installation as HENRIQUE Conde de Portugal. This grant may have been motivated as much by a desire to offset the growing power of his son-in-law, Raymond de Bourgogne, as to increase the power base of Henri de Bourgogne. “Comite Dono Henrico...cum uxore mea Infante Dona Taraxea” granted privileges to “Villa Constantin de Panonias”, confirmed by “Infans Dono Alfoso filius Henrici comiti et uxor mea Infante Dona Taraxia”, by charter dated 1096[7]. The dating clause of a charter dated 9 Oct 1096, under which "Pelayo Xemeniz" donated land “en Ville Ceide...” to the monastery of San Salvador, records “Sanxus comes in Toro et alius comes domino Ancricco in Auctario de Selles, comes Remundus tenente in Coria et in Zamora”[8]. The dating clause of a charter dated 19 Jan 1097, under which "Brabolio Gutierrez" sold land “en territorio de León las villas Cubillas” to “Ordoño Sarraciniz y a su mujer Fronilde Ovéquiz”, records “comes Raimundus in Galicia et in Zamora, comes domno Enrriz in Otero de Sellas, comite Petro Ansurez in Saldania”[9]. Henrique established his residence at Guimarães, winning several battles against the Moors, although he was defeated at Malagón, south of Toledo, 16 Sep 1100[10]. "…Taraxia Adefonsi regis filia…Henrik comes…" subscribed the charter dated 14 Mar 1099 under which Alfonso VI King of Castile donated the monastery of Santa María de Algadefe to the monastery of Eslonza[11]. “Comes domnus Henricus et uxor mea Domna Theresia, domini Regis Alfonsi filia” donated property to La Charité-sur-Loire by charter dated Mar 1100[12]. He went to Palestine after 8 Jun 1101, but had returned by 1103 when he confirmed several of his father-in-law's charters[13]. After the death of Alfonso VI King of Castile in 1109, the county of Portugal enjoyed de facto independence, due largely to the troubles faced by Queen Urraca in Castile after her accession. Henrique took advantage of this situation by joining forces with Alfonso I King of Aragon and defeating Urraca at Candespina, near Sepúlveda 26 Oct 1111. However, he changed sides after the battle and besieged Alfonso at Peñafiel jointly with Urraca's forces. The dating clause of the charter dated 21 Dec 1111, under which “Tello Telliz...cum coniuge mea Maior Suariz” donated "divisa...in villa...Oterolo iusta flumen Aratogie territorio Castro Froila...que fuit de Pelagio Pelaiz" to “Iohan Flainiz”, records “Henricus comes in Alcamora et in Astorica simul in Portugal...”[14]. He was killed at the siege of Astorga, supporting doña Urraca Queen of Castile against her second husband don Alfonso I King of Aragon. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death “Kal Mai” in 1152 (1114) of “Comes D. Henricus”[15]. The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos records that "El Conde D. Enrique" died "en Astorga"[16]. married ([1095]%29 doña TERESA de Castilla y León, illegitimate daughter of ALFONSO VI King of Castile & his mistress Jimena Muñoz de Guzmán ([1081/82]-1 Nov 1130, bur Braga Cathedral). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names "Jimena Muñoz" as the first of two concubines of King Alfonso, and their daughters "Elvira the wife of count Raymond of Toulouse…and Teresa the wife of Count Henry"[17]. Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 23 Mar 1143 under which her daughter Sancha Enríquez property in Trobajo del Cerecedo, which she inherited from "avia mea dompna Hensemena Muñiz…et de mater mea eius filia regina dompna Teresa", to the parents of Juan Albertino Bishop of León[18]. The 13th century history of Sahagún monastery records that "el Rey D. Alonso…una hija…Teresa" married "un Conde…Enrique que venia de sangre Real de Francia"[19]. An early 12th century document at Fleury records that "Ainrico uni filiorum, filio…ducis Roberti" married "alteram filiam…non ex coniugali" of Alfonso VI King of Castile[20]. “Comite Dono Henrico...cum uxore mea Infante Dona Taraxea” granted privileges to “Villa Constantin de Panonias”, confirmed by “Infans Dono Alfoso filius Henrici comiti et uxor mea Infante Dona Taraxia”, by charter dated 1096[21]. "…Taraxia Adefonsi regis filia…Henrik comes…" subscribed the charter dated 14 Mar 1099 under which Alfonso VI King of Castile donated the monastery of Santa María de Algadefe to the monastery of Eslonza[22]. “Comes domnus Henricus et uxor mea Domna Theresia, domini Regis Alfonsi filia” donated property to La Charité-sur-Loire by charter dated Mar 1100[23]. Regent of Portugal 1112-1128. She continued her husband's expansionist policy, harrying her half-sister Queen Urraca at every opportunity, probably with a view to replacing her as Queen of Castile. She adopted the title TERESA Queen of Portugal from Nov 1117. She became the mistress (1124) of Fernando Pérez de Traba Conde de Trastámara, son of Pedro Froilaz de Traba & his first wife Urraca Froilaz, who appeared first as a confirmant of one of Teresa's charters 1 Feb 1121[24]. The Historia Compostelana records that “Fernando Perride, Petris Comitis filio” left his lawful wife and lived in adultery with “Regina Tarasia”[25]. The Chronica Adefonsi Imperatoris records that Alfonso VII King of Castile met "Teresa queen of the Portuguese and with Count Fernando" at Ricobayo and made peace with them after his accession in 1126[26]. "Tarasia regina domni Adefonsi Yspaniarum imperatoris filia" donated "monasterio Sancte Marie quod cognomento Viminerium" to Cluny by charter dated 23 May 1127, confirmed by "Infans Ildefonsus…Comes Fernandus…Comes Monio…Infanta Sancia"[27]. Her rule caused resentment among local leaders, and she and her second husband were defeated and expelled from Portugal in 1128 by her son dom Afonso Henriquez. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the death “Kal Nov” in 1168 (1130) of “Regina Donna Tarasia mater Donni Alfonsi…anno secundo regni”[28].

Henrique & his wife had TERESA de Castilla y León [seven] children:

  • 1. [AFONSO Henriques ([1095/1096]-before 1110, bur Braga Cathedral). “Comite Dono Henrico...cum uxore mea Infante Dona Taraxea” granted privileges to “Villa Constantin de Panonias”, confirmed by “Infans Dono Alfoso filius Henrici comiti et uxor mea Infante Dona Taraxia”, by charter dated 1096[29]. It is possible that this document is misdated and that Afonso was born later, considering the likely birth date of his mother. One possibility is that the document is misdated by more than 15 years and that the confirmant was in fact the same person as the future King Afonso I whose birth is dated to 1110 (see below). It does appear inconsistent with usual naming patterns that the eldest son of Henrique and Teresa should be named after the boy´s maternal grandfather, although it is recognised that such patterns do not amount to hard and fast rules and that exceptions to the norm may have applied in the case of a particularly illustrious ancestor.]
  • 2. URRACA Henriques ([1097/1105]-after 21 Sep 1161). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names (in order) "Urraca, Elvira and Afonso" as the children of Count Henrique & his wife[30]. "[Uere]mundus Petri" granted arras to "uxori mee infanti domne Orrache filie comitis domni Anrrich et regine domne Tarasie" by charter dated 25 Jul 1122, subscribed by "…comitissa domna Maior, comitissa domna Lupa, Munia Froilaz, Uisclauara Froilaz"[31]. "Ueremudus Petriz filius dompni comitis Petri Froyle et uxor mea infans dompna Urracha comitis Henriqui filia et regine Tharasie…cum filiis et filiabus nostris" refounded the monastery of San Pelayo de Genroso for "filie mee dompne Urrache Ueremundi" by charter dated 9 Oct 1138, subscribed by "…Domna Lupa comitissa Petri comitis filie"[32]. The Chronicon Lusitanum records the rebellion in 1169 (1131) of “Vermudus Petri gener Reginæ Donnæ Tarasiæ…in Castello Sene” and that he was expelled by “Infans [Alfonso]”[33]. The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Teresa hija de la Reina usurpada i del Conde D. Enrique" as the second wife of "D. Vermuiz Perez potestade de Trava"[34]. A charter dated 21 Sep 1161 records the settlement of a dispute between "Domnus Ueremudus Petri…cum uxore mea infantissa domna Urracha et cum filiis et filiabus meis" and the monks of Tojos Outos, which records that "predictus domnus Ueremundus Petri" had become a monk "in monasterium Superaddi" and that "uxor…eius infantissa domna Urracha" had become a nun "in…monasterio de Nogueirosa", subscribed by "filia eius Urracha Uermuiz, Fernandus Ueremudi, Sudarius Ueremudi, Santia Ueremudi, Tarasia Ueremudi…"[35]. married (before 25 Jul 1122) VERMUDO Pérez de Trava Conde de Trastámara, son of PEDRO Froilaz de Traba & his first wife Urraca Fróilaz (-Sobrado [1168]).
  • 3. ELVIRA Henriques The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names (in order) "Urraca, Elvira and Afonso" as the children of Count Henrique and his wife[36].
  • 4. daughter Her parentage and marriage are confirmed by two charters of Afonso I King of Portugal dated Dec 1166 in which the son of Sancho Núñez, conde don Velasco Sánchez, is described as "filius sororis eius"[37]. This daughter may have been the same person as either Sancha or Teresa who are named below. married [as his first wife,] SANCHO Núñez, son of conde NUÑO Velásquez & his wife condesa doña Fronilde Sánchez.
  • 5. SANCHA Henriques (-after 1147). Her parentage is confirmed by the charter dated 23 Mar 1143 under which she donated property in Trobajo del Cerecedo, which she had inherited from "avia mea dompna Hensemena Muñiz…et de mater mea eius filia regina dompna Teresa", to the parents of Juan Albertino Bishop of León[38]. Sousa says that Sancha married “D. Fernando Mendes, Rico-homem, Senhor de Bragança”, dying “sem successaõ”, but cites only Antonio Brandaõ´s 1632 Monarchia Lusitana and the Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos[39]. Brandaõ quotes a charter dated 1147 under which “Sancia reginæ Taresiæ ac comitis Henrici filia” donated “hum Casal em Saõ Pedro de Gostem” to Braga ”cum concilio mariti mei Fernandi Mendes”[40]. The Nobiliario does not support Sousa´s statement at all: it records the wife of “D. Fernan Mendez el Bravo Bragançon” as “D. Teresa Alonso”, daughter of Afonso I King of Portugal by "D. Elvira Gualtar", adding that the king had separated Teresa from her previous husband “don Sancho Nuñez” with whom he had fought[41]. The Livro Velho does not name the wife of "D. Fernão Mendes o bravo" at all[42]. The mid-14th century Nobiliario and Livro Velho cannot be considered reliable sources for events which occurred more than 200 years earlier, in the absence of corroboration from earlier documents. The Braga charter must therefore be preferred. Barton, citing Mattoso, on the other hand names Sancha Henriques as the wife of Sancho Núñez (whose marriage to an unnamed daughter of Conde Henrique is confirmed above)[43]. As noted below under her possible sister Teresa, one solution to the problem would be if Sancha married both noblemen in turn, as reported by the Nobiliario, which would have merely mistaken her parentage and her name. married [as his second wife,] FERNANDO Mendes “o Bravo” Senhor de Bragança de Langroiva e Noman (in Galicia), son of MENDO Fernández Senhor de Bragança & his wife.
  • 6. [TERESA Henriques . The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Teresa Enriquez" as the daughter of "El Conde D. Enrique" and his wife "la Reina D. Teresa"[44]. Sousa says that Teresa died “sem estado”, but adds that Antonio Brandaõ (writing in 1632) states that she could have been the wife of “D. Sancho Nunes de Barbosa”[45]. Brandaõ cites no document in support of the statement, other than the Nobiliario´s report concerning the daughter, not sister, of King Afonso I who married in turn Sancho Núñez and Fernando Mendes (see above under her sister Sancha)[46]. He also refers to one of the Dec 1166 charters of Afonso I King of Portugal, referred to above, in which Sancho´s son, conde don Velasco Sánchez, is described as "filius sororis eius"[47]. As noted above, the mid-14th century Nobiliario can hardly be considered a reliable source for events which occurred more than two centuries earlier. One solution to this confused situation may be that the same sister of King Alfonso I (presumably Sancha) married both noblemen, as reported by the Nobiliario, which merely mistook her parentage and her name. If that is correct, it is possible that there never was a daughter of Conde Enrique who was named Teresa (although that does seem unlikely considering the name of Enrique´s wife).]
  • 7. NN Henriquez (-[before 1110], bur Braga Cathedral). Sousa refers to the Chronica do Conde D. Henrique which records the birth of a son (unnamed) who died young and was buried “em Braga”[48].
  • 8. AFONSO Henriquez (Guimaraes 25 Jul [1106/12]-Coimbra 6 Dec 1185, bur Coimbra, Church of the Cross). The Chronicon Regum Legionensium names (in order) "Urraca, Elvira and Afonso" as the children of Count Henrique & his wife[49]. He succeeded his father in 1112 as AFONSO I Conde de Portugal. Ruling through his mother, he overthrew and expelled her from Portugal in 1128. He proclaimed himself AFONSO I "the Conqueror" King of Portugal in 1139.

Henrique had [one illegitimate son by an unknown mistress]:

  • 9. [PEDRO Afonso de Portugal Sousa refers to the Chronica do Conde D. Henrique which records “D. Pedro Affonso” as illegitimate son of Conde Henrique by “huma mulher de qualidade”[50]. However, if this information is correct, the patronymic “Affonso” makes little sense, especially as the use in the Iberian peninsula of “variable” patronymics, adopted from an illustrious ancestor not just the father, is not observed with frequency before the 13th century. Sousa also notes that the same person was Maestre of the Order of Aviz. However, the charter dated 1162, issued by the Cistercians to confirm the rules of the Order of Aviz, in the presence of “regis Aldephonsi”, is subscribed by “...Petrus proles Regis Par Francorum et Magister novæ militiæ...”[51]. The reference to “proles Regis” in this document suggests that Pedro´s father must have been King Afonso I and not Conde Henrique, who never adopted the royal title. Until the emergence of more information, it is assumed that this person never existed and that he has been confused with the illegitimate son of King Afonso who was called Pedro (see below). Sousa quotes an epitaph in Alcobaça which records the death 9 May 1175 of “Domnus Petrus Alphonsus Alcobatiæ monachus Alphonsi regis frater” and adding that his body was transferred to the monastery in 1293[52]. However, the epitaph itself says that it was placed in 1678, and it would not therefore be surprising if the inscription contained errors.]

Teresa of Leon Queen Countess of Portugal, by Wikipedia

Wedding and Portucalense County

Teresa was the illegitimate daughter of King Afonso VI of Galicia, León and Castile and of Ximena Moniz , a noble Leonese daughter of Countess Velasquita Moniz and Munio Moniz de Bierzo, count of Bierzo . She lived all her childhood in the company of her mother and maternal grandfather, who educated her, and her sister Elvira .

In 1093 Teresa was given by her father in marriage to Henrique de Borgonha, a French nobleman who had helped him in many conquests to the Moors. Teresa was thirteen years old at the time and Henrique 24. Afonso VI then donated them the County of Portugal, territory of the kingdom of Galicia between Minho and Vouga, which, from 1096, would extend between Minho and the Tagus . D. Henrique had several children, but few survived: the only man who reached adulthood was Afonso Henriques, in addition to his daughters Urraca, Sancha and Teresa Henriques.

After Henry's death in 1112 Teresa ruled the county as queen in her own right, being recognized as such by Pascoal II (through Bula Fratrum Nostrum issued on June 18 , 1116 [ 1 ] ), by her sister, Urraca de Galicia, Leon and Castile and, later, by his nephew Afonso VII of Galicia, Leon and Castile . From 1117, he signs as "Ego regina Taresia de Portugal regis Ildefonssis filia". [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]

Attacked by the forces of her half sister, Queen D Urraca, D. Teresa's forces retreated from the left bank of the river Minho , defeated and dispersed, until D. Teresa ended up in the Castle of Lanhoso . There he suffered the siege imposed by D. Urraca in 1121. In a position of inferiority, D. Teresa also managed to negotiate the Treaty of Lanhoso , by which she saved her government from the Portucalense County.

In an alliance with D. Teresa in the Galician-Portuguese revolt against Urraca was Fernão Peres de Trava , from the most powerful house in the Kingdom of Galicia . The triumphs in the battles of Vilasobroso and Lanhoso sealed the alliance between Trava and Teresa de Portugal. Fernão Peres de Trava thus came to govern Porto and Coimbra and to sign important provisions and documents with Teresa in the county of Portugal. With the death of Urraca, Fernão Peres de Trava became a great ally of King Alfonso VII of Leon and Castile in the Kingdom of Galicia. The alliance and connection of D. Teresa with the Galician count Fernão Peres de Trava, of whom he had two daughters, made the noble Portucalenses and her own son Afonso Henriques indisposed against her

Conflict with his Son, D. Afonso Henriques

Teresa had exercised the regency of Condado Portucalense during the age of D. Afonso Henriques. But in 1122, under the guidance of Paio Mendes, archbishop of Braga , Afonso intended to secure his dominance in the county and he became a knight in Zamora .

Soon the strategic interests of mother and child came into conflict. In 1128, joining the Portuguese knights to his cause against Fernão Peres de Trava and Teresa de Leão, Afonso Henriques defeated both in the battle of São Mamede , when they intended to take the sovereignty of the Galician-Portuguese space, and assumed the county government.

Thus forced to leave the government, some authors claim that she was detained by her own son in Castelo de Lanhoso or exiled in a convent in Póvoa de Lanhoso , where she died in 1130. Modernly, it appears that after the battle and already in escape, she and Count Fernão Peres were imprisoned and expelled from Portugal. D. Teresa would have died in Galicia, possibly in the monastery of Montederramo, which she had refounded in 1124, according to a document signed in Allariz.

Her remains were later brought, by express order from her son King Afonso I of Portugal, to the Cathedral of Braga , where they still rest today near the grave of her husband, Count D. Henrique.

Links

Sources

  • MATTOSO, José, D. Afonso Henriques, Círculo de Leitores e Centro de Estudos dos Povos e Culturas de Expressão Portuguesa, 1st ed., Lisboa, 2006, ISBN 972-42-3867-9978-972-42-3867-8.
  • Categories: 1080 births | 1130 deaths | Women in Medieval warfare | Women of medieval Portugal | Portuguese royalty | Burials at Braga Cathedral, Portugal | Counts of Portugal (Asturias-León)
  • Condes de Barcelona: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 367. Desde Bellón, conde de Carcasona, hasta Berenguer Ramón I (1018-1035).
  • Reyes de Pamplona: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 359. Desde García Jiménez (c.870) hasta García Sánchez III (1035-1054).
  • Condes de Castilla: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 366. Desde Fernán González a Munia.
  • Primeros príncipes pamploneses: ver cuadro genealógico en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo IV, p. 245. Desde Íñigo Arista (m. 851) hasta Sancho Garcés I (905-925).
  • Ver cuadro genealógico de los descendientes de Sacho el Mayor, rey de Navarra de 1004 a 1035, en Historia Universal, EUNSA, tomo V, p. 375. Se pueden ver los enlaces matrimoniales de los reyes de Portugal, León, Castilla, Navara. Aragón y Cataluña, desde el siglo X hasta el siglo XIV.
  • Marsilio Cassotti, D. Teresa utilizou armas de homens - Jornal de Notícias (pag.39), 13 July 2008
  • D. Teresa - The First Queen of Portugal ( 2008 , A Esfera dos Livros ), by Marsilio Cassotti . [ 10 ]
  • D. Teresa - A woman who did not give up her power ( 2015 , Manuscrito Editora), by Isabel Stilwell . [ 11 ]
  • Teresa, the Countess-Rainha ( 2020 , Themes and Debates), by Luís Carlos Amaral and Mário Jorge Barroca .
  • The Latin Chronicle of Castile , attributed the division of the kingdom by the emperor's children to his initiative: "divisit siquidem regmum suum, allowing Deo propter peccata hominum, duobus filiiis suis ad instanciam Fernandi comitis de Gallecia"