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American Revolution: Battles of Lexington and Concord, April 19, 1775

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  • Stanley Jones Photographer
    Capt. Samuel Bowman (1753 - 1818)
    One of seven brothers who participated in the American Revolutionary War as soldiers in the Continental Army, Samuel Bowman and a brother fought at Lexington as two of the village's 48 minutemen and as...
  • Colonel Thomas Hunt (1754 - 1808)
    Hunt (1754—1808) was an American military officer who served in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War and later served in the United States Army where he rose to the rank of colone...
  • Colonel William Conant (1727 - 1811)
    Profile Photograph: Old North Church in Boston, Massachusetts* Reference-Full Text: A History and Genealogy of the Conant Family in England and America, Thirteen Generations, 1520-1887 : Containing Als...
  • Walter Russell (1765 - 1848)
    Per the Genealogical and Family History of the State of New Hampshire, compiled under the editorial supervision of Ezra S. Stearns, ex-secretary of the state (Dec 1971): Walter is the second son and ch...
  • Cpl. Abraham Harrington (1751 - 1811)
    Cpl. Abraham Harrington was a patriot for the American Revolution for MASSACHUSETTS. Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Ancestor #A051347 Early generations of the family of Robert Harrington of...

Please add your militia and minute men to this project; maybe we'll figure out who fired "the shot heard round the world."

The Battles of Lexington and Concord

were the first military engagements of the American Revolutionary War. They were fought on April 19, 1775, in Middlesex County, Province of Massachusetts Bay, within the towns of Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Menotomy (present-day Arlington), and Cambridge, near Boston. The battles marked the outbreak of open armed conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen of its colonies on the mainland of British America.

In late 1774 the Suffolk Resolves were adopted to resist the enforcement of the alterations made to the Massachusetts colonial government by the British parliament following the Boston Tea Party. An illegal Patriot shadow government known as the Massachusetts Provincial Congress was subsequently formed and called for local militias to begin training for possible hostilities. The rebel government exercised effective control of the colony outside of British-controlled Boston. In response, the British government in February 1775 declared Massachusetts to be in a state of rebellion. About 700 British Army regulars in Boston, under Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith, were given secret orders to capture and destroy rebel military supplies that were reportedly stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. Through effective intelligence gathering, Patriot colonials had received word weeks before the expedition that their supplies might be at risk and had moved most of them to other locations. They also received details about British plans on the night before the battle and were able to rapidly notify the area militias of the British expedition.

The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington. The militia were outnumbered and fell back, and the regulars proceeded on to Concord, where they searched for the supplies. At the North Bridge in Concord, approximately 500 militiamen engaged three companies of the King's troops at about an hour before Noon, resulting in casualties on both sides. The outnumbered regulars fell back from the bridge and rejoined the main body of British forces in Concord.

In late 1774 the Suffolk Resolves were adopted to resist the enforcement of the alterations made to the Massachusetts colonial government by the British parliament following the Boston Tea Party. An illegal Patriot shadow government known as the Massachusetts Provincial Congress was subsequently formed and called for local militias to begin training for possible hostilities. The rebel government exercised effective control of the colony outside of British-controlled Boston. In response, the British government in February 1775 declared Massachusetts to be in a state of rebellion. About 700 British Army regulars in Boston, under Lieutenant Colonel Francis Smith, were given secret orders to capture and destroy rebel military supplies that were reportedly stored by the Massachusetts militia at Concord. Through effective intelligence gathering, Patriot colonials had received word weeks before the expedition that their supplies might be at risk and had moved most of them to other locations. They also received details about British plans on the night before the battle and were able to rapidly notify the area militias of the British expedition.

The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising at Lexington. The militia were outnumbered and fell back, and the regulars proceeded on to Concord, where they searched for the supplies. At the North Bridge in Concord, approximately 500 militiamen engaged three companies of the King's troops at about an hour before Noon, resulting in casualties on both sides. The outnumbered regulars fell back from the bridge and rejoined the main body of British forces in Concord.

Wiki Link

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battles_of_Lexington_and_Concord

resources

Project Notes:

Simeon Hicks Pension file, page 6. States that he was called into duty the day after Lexington. Moved to Seige of Boston