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  • Sir Richard Champernon, Knight and Sheriff of Devonshire (1344 - c.1394)
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  • John Arthur Edward Herbert (1818 - 1895)
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High Sheriff


No profiles, please; add High Sheriffs to the Shrievality project listed below.

If no project exists for the shrievality, it would be much appreciated if you create it, and link to the index list (below), as well as as a "related" project to this "umbrella."


Description

From Wikipedia retrieved September 2016:

A High Sheriff is a ceremonial officer for each shrieval county of England and Wales and Northern Ireland or the chief sheriff of a number of paid sheriffs in U.S. states who outranks and commands the others in their court-related functions.

The office existed in what is now the Republic of Ireland but was abolished there in 1926.

In England and Wales, the term High Sheriff arose to distinguish sheriffs of counties proper from sheriffs of cities and boroughs designated "counties-of-themselves" but not counties properly speaking. These cities and boroughs no longer have sheriffs except for the City of London, so now all English and Welsh sheriffs except the sheriffs of the City of London are high sheriffs. The office is now an unpaid privilege with ceremonial duties, the sheriffs being appointed annually by the Crown through a warrant from the Privy Council except in Cornwall, where the high sheriff is appointed by the Duke of Cornwall. In England and Wales the office's civil (civil judgement) enforcement powers exist but are not exercised by convention. The office was termed that of sheriff until 1 April 1974, except in the City of London, which has two Sheriffs of the City of London.


Shrievalties in England before 1965

  • High Sheriff of Bedfordshire
  • High Sheriff of Berkshire
  • High Sheriff of Bristol
  • High Sheriff of Buckinghamshire
  • High Sheriff of Cambridgeshire
  • High Sheriff of Cheshire
  • High Sheriff of Cornwall
  • High Sheriff of Cumbria
  • High Sheriff of Derbyshire
  • High Sheriff of Devon
  • High Sheriff of Dorset
  • High Sheriff of Durham
  • High Sheriff of the East Riding of Yorkshire
  • High Sheriff of East Sussex
  • High Sheriff of Essex
  • High Sheriff of Gloucestershire
  • High Sheriff of Greater London
  • High Sheriff of Greater Manchester
  • High Sheriff of Hampshire
  • High Sheriff of Herefordshire
  • High Sheriff of Hertfordshire
  • High Sheriff of Humberside
  • High Sheriff of the Isle of Wight
  • High Sheriff of Kent
  • High Sheriff of Lancashire
  • High Sheriff of Lincolnshire
  • High Sheriff of Merseyside
  • High Sheriff of Norfolk
  • High Sheriff of Northamptonshire
  • High Sheriff of North Yorkshire
  • High Sheriff of Northumberland
  • High Sheriff of Nottinghamshire
  • High Sheriff of Oxfordshire
  • High Sheriff of Rutland
  • High Sheriff of Shropshire
  • High Sheriff of Somerset
  • High Sheriff of South Yorkshire
  • High Sheriff of Staffordshire
  • High Sheriff of Suffolk
  • High Sheriff of Surrey
  • High Sheriff of Tyne and Wear
  • High Sheriff of Warwickshire
  • High Sheriff of the West Midlands
  • High Sheriff of West Sussex
  • High Sheriff of West Yorkshire
  • High Sheriff of Wiltshire
  • High Sheriff of Worcestershire
  • High Sheriff of Yorkshire

Town sheriffs

Town sheriffs are maintained in some of the historic counties corporate.

  • Sheriff of Berwick-upon-Tweed
  • Sheriff of Canterbury
  • Sheriff of Chester
  • Sheriff of Gloucester
  • Sheriff of Lichfield
  • Sheriff of Lincoln
  • Sheriff of London
  • Sheriff of Nottingham
  • Sheriff of Norwich
  • Sheriff of Oxford
  • Sheriff of Poole
  • Sheriff of Southampton
  • Sheriff of York

Wales

  • High Sheriff of Clwyd
  • High Sheriff of Dyfed
  • High Sheriff of Gwent
  • High Sheriff of Gwynedd
  • High Sheriff of Mid Glamorgan
  • High Sheriff of Powys
  • High Sheriff of South Glamorgan
  • High Sheriff of West Glamorgan

Town sheriffs

  • Sheriff of Carmarthen
  • Sheriff of Haverfordwest

Northern Ireland

  • High Sheriff of County Armagh
  • High Sheriff of County Antrim
  • High Sheriff of County Down
  • High Sheriff of County Fermanagh
  • High Sheriff of County Londonderry
  • High Sheriff of County Tyrone
  • High Sheriff of Belfast (City)
  • High Sheriff of Londonderry City

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