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התושבים הראשונים בבני ברק-The first residents of Bnei Brak

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 מ 1924 עד סוף השואה 1945   

From 1924 until the end of the  Holocaust 1945

The purpose of this Geni Project is to identify and collect the first residents in Bnei Brak, Israel, from its foundation until the end of the Holocaust. This would be generally the period from 1924 to 1945. The Profiles could include those who moved to Bnei Brak in the given time period, those who were born in Bnei Brak and those who died in the town.

From Britannica.com: "Bnei Brak, also spelled Bene Beraq, city, northeastern suburb of Tel Aviv–Yafo, west-central Israel, in the southern Plain of Sharon. In Assyrian texts, Bnei Brak is listed as a city that fell to Sennacherib, king of Assyria, in 701 BCE. It is also mentioned in the Bible (Joshua 19) and was a well-known scholarly centre (c. 100 BCE) during the time of the compilation of the Talmud.

Near the presumed location of ancient Bnei Brak, a modern settlement was founded by Orthodox Polish-Jewish immigrants in 1924. At first chiefly agricultural (citrus groves), it later became industrialized. Bnei Brak has preserved its character as a citadel of Orthodox Judaism; it is the site of several schools for Talmudical study. Inc. 1950. Pop. (2006 est.) 147,100." Sourced August 22, 2019.

From findagrave.com: "Address: Bnei Brak Cemetery, Ramat Gan, Israel

There are five general cemeteries in the Tel Aviv area, which includes Tel-Aviv-Yaffo, Holon, Bat-Yam, Ramat Gan, Givatayim and Bnei Brak. These are all operated by the same burial society - the Chevra Kadisha of Greater Tel Aviv.

Additionally, there are another two cemeteries on Rechov Chazon Ish in Bnei Brak, used by the charedi community and served by its own chevra kaddisha. Bnei Brak Cemetery, Ramat Gan Central District: there are in fact two adjacent cemeteries on Hazon Ish Street - Ponevezh and Zichron Meir.

The mission of the International Jewish Cemetery Project, International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies [IAJGS], is to catalogue every Jewish burial site throughout the world. As the work progresses more clarity about the composition of Bnei Brak Cemetery is expected." Sourced August 22, 2019.

RI-PL Digest for Wednesday, September 25, 2019.

1. New useful resource for finding graves in Israel

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Subject: New useful resource for finding graves in Israel From: Miriam Bulwar David-Hay <miriambdh@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2019 10:59:09 +0300 X-Message-Number: 1

I haven't seen any mention of this previously, so thought people might be interested ...

The Israeli Chevra Kadisha forum has just launched a website and app called Gravez which enables people to search for graves, see photos and info about them online, and (using the app, which works like Waze) navigate to visit them physically. At the moment they cover around 25 cemeteries in Israel with thousands of burials.

This seems to be a very useful resource in addition to the long-running and even bigger BillionGraves website, which covers a large number of cemeteries in Israel. (Of course, another major grave-finding website is Find A Grave, but this has very few records from Israel.)

There seems to be some overlap between Gravez and BillionGraves in the cemeteries they cover, but each also has cemeteries the other doesn't have, so it's worth searching both sites! I personally have been able to find the graves of many people in one or the other or both.

Please note that in the case of Gravez, their platform works in English (and looks very nice!) but you have to search for names in Hebrew. In BillionGraves, you can search for names in English but the only results you'll get will be from other countries, so you'll need to search in Hebrew for people buried in Israel.

I have no affiliation with or special knowledge about any of the organizations mentioned above and am just posting to let people know about these useful resources!

Gravez: https://gravez.me/en/

BillionGraves: https://billiongraves.com

Shana Tova Umetuka and Gmar Hatima Tova to all, Yours Sincerely, Miriam Bulwar David-Hay, Raanana, Israel.

מ 1924 עד סוף השואה 1945

From 1924 until the end of the  Holocaust 1945
  • *******************************************************************************

The purpose of this Geni Project is to identify and collect the first residents in Bnei Brak, Israel, from its foundation until the end of the Holocaust. This would be generally the period from 1924 to 1945. The Profiles could include those who moved to Bnei Brak in the given time period, those who were born in Bnei Brak and those who died in the town.

From Britannica.com: "Bnei Brak, also spelled Bene Beraq, city, northeastern suburb of Tel Aviv–Yafo, west-central Israel, in the southern Plain of Sharon. In Assyrian texts, Bnei Brak is listed as a city that fell to Sennacherib, king of Assyria, in 701 BCE. It is also mentioned in the Bible (Joshua 19) and was a well-known scholarly centre (c. 100 BCE) during the time of the compilation of the Talmud.

Near the presumed location of ancient Bnei Brak, a modern settlement was founded by Orthodox Polish-Jewish immigrants in 1924. At first chiefly agricultural (citrus groves), it later became industrialized. Bnei Brak has preserved its character as a citadel of Orthodox Judaism; it is the site of several schools for Talmudical study. Inc. 1950. Pop. (2006 est.) 147,100." Sourced August 22, 2019.

From findagrave.com: "Address: Bnei Brak Cemetery, Ramat Gan, Israel

There are five general cemeteries in the Tel Aviv area, which includes Tel-Aviv-Yaffo, Holon, Bat-Yam, Ramat Gan, Givatayim and Bnei Brak. These are all operated by the same burial society - the Chevra Kadisha of Greater Tel Aviv.

Additionally, there are another two cemeteries on Rechov Chazon Ish in Bnei Brak, used by the charedi community and served by its own chevra kaddisha. Bnei Brak Cemetery, Ramat Gan Central District: there are in fact two adjacent cemeteries on Hazon Ish Street - Ponevezh and Zichron Meir.

The mission of the International Jewish Cemetery Project, International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies [IAJGS], is to catalogue every Jewish burial site throughout the world. As the work progresses more clarity about the composition of Bnei Brak Cemetery is expected." Sourced August 22, 2019.