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  • Mary Ann Rhodes Swartzendruber (1870 - 1937)
    Swartzendruber.-Mary Ann, daughter of Jacob and Polly Rhodes, was born in Johnson Co., Iowa, Oct. 31, 1870; died Jan. 5, 1937; aged 66 y. 2 m. 5 d. She accepted Christ as her Savior in her girlhood and...

In how many states do you have pioneer ancestors? This is the portal for Geni's U.S. state pioneer projects.

Do not add profiles to this project. Add relevant profiles to related projects.

The most common definition of pioneer is someone who lived in a state before statehood. However, several states have unique circumstances that has led to some other definition, such as someone who lived there before the coming of the railroad.

The definitions used for Geni's pioneer projects do not always match the definitions used by local lineage societies.

To find contact information for local First Family and Pioneer lineage societies, see First Families & Pioneers at Cyndi's List.

Do not add profiles to this project. Add them to the relevant state project.

Alabama, admitted December 14, 1819

Alaska, admitted January 3, 1959

Arizona, admitted February 14, 1912

Arkansas, admitted June 15, 1836

California, admitted September 9, 1850

Pioneers of California. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad in 1869.

Colorado, admitted August 1, 1876

Colorado Pioneers. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before statehood in 1876.

Connecticut, admitted January 9, 1788

Delaware, admitted December 7, 1787

Florida, admitted March 3, 1845

Georgia, admitted January 2, 1788

Hawaii, admitted August 21, 1959

Idaho, admitted July 3, 1890

Idaho Pioneers. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before statehood in 1890.

Illinois, admitted December 3, 1818

Indiana, admitted December 11, 1816

Iowa, admitted December 28, 1846

Kansas, admitted January 29, 1861

Kentucky, admitted June 1, 1792

Louisiana, admitted April 30, 1812

Maine, admitted March 15, 1820

Maryland, admitted April 28, 1788

Massachusetts, admitted February 6, 1788

Michigan, admitted January 26, 1837

Minnesota, admitted May 11, 1858

Mississippi, admitted December 10, 1817

Missouri, admitted August 10, 1821

Montana, admitted November 8, 1889

Nebraska, admitted March 1, 1867

Nevada, admitted October 31, 1864

New Hampshire, admitted June 21, 1788

New Jersey, admitted December 18, 1787

New Mexico, admitted January 6, 1912

New York, admitted July 26, 1788

North Carolina, admitted November 21, 1789

North Dakota, admitted November 2, 1889

Ohio, admitted March 1, 1803

Pioneers of the Northwest Territory. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before statehood in 1803.

Oklahoma, admitted November 16, 1907

Oregon, admitted February 14, 1859

Oregon Pioneers. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before the arrival of the railroad in 1872.

Pennsylvania, admitted December 12, 1787

Rhode Island, admitted May 19, 1790

South Carolina, admitted May 23, 1788

South Dakota, admitted November 2, 1889

Tennessee, admitted June 1, 1796

Pioneers of the Old Southwest Territory. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before statehood in 1796.

Texas, admitted December 29, 1845

Utah, admitted January 4, 1896

Mormon Pioneers (1847-1868) Master Project. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869.

Vermont, admitted March 4, 1791

Virginia, admitted June 25, 1788

Washington, admitted November 11, 1889

Washington Pioneers. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before statehood in 1889.

West Virginia, admitted June 20, 1863

Wisconsin, admitted May 29, 1848

Settlers of Wisconsin. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before statehood in 1848.

Wyoming, admitted July 10, 1890

Wyoming Pioneers. Pioneers are defined as those who arrived before statehood in 1890.