John Howland, "Mayflower" Passenger

Is your surname Howland?

Research the Howland family

John Howland, "Mayflower" Passenger's Geni Profile

Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love

  • Build your family tree online
  • Share photos and videos
  • Smart Matching™ technology
  • Free!

Share

John Howland

Also Known As: "Mayflower 1620"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire, England
Death: Died in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts
Place of Burial: Burial Hill, Rocky Nook, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of Henry Howland, of Fen Stanton; Henry Howland, Sr.; Henry Howland; Anne Margaret Howland; ANN MARGARET Howland and 1 other
Husband of Elizabeth Howland and Elizabeth Howland, "Mayflower" Passenger
Father of John Howland, Jr.; Desire Gorham; Hope Chipman; Elizabeth Dickenson; Ruth Cushman and 6 others
Brother of Margaret Howland; Humphrey Howland; Arthur Howland, Sr., of Marshfield; Hannah Howland; Henry Howland, Jr. of Duxbury and 6 others

Occupation: manservant to Gov. Carver, arrived on Mayflower in 1620
Managed by: Jocelynn Elaine Oakes
Last Updated:

About John Howland, "Mayflower" Passenger

John Howland was born in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England between 1592/3-1599. [1] He died at Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, February 23, 1672/3 and "with honour interred" on Burial Hill , Rocky Nook (in Plymouth Colony), Plymouth, Massachusetts. He was a passenger on the Mayflower, 1620.

Parents: Henry and Margaret ______ Howland.

Married:

  1. by about 1624 in Plymouth to Elizabeth Tilley, (? - 1687) also a Mayflower Passenger, daughter of John Tilley (also a Mayflower Passenger) and Joan (Hurst) Rogers.

Children of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley:

  1. Desire, m. John Gorham
  2. John, m. Mary Lee
  3. Hope, m. John Chipman
  4. Elizabeth, m. 1st Ephraim Hicks, 2nd, John Dickerson
  5. Lydia, m. James Brown
  6. Hannah, m. Jonathan Bosworth
  7. Joseph, m. Elizabeth Southworth
  8. Jabez, m. Bethiah Thatcher
  9. Ruth, m. Thomas Cushman
  10. Isaac, m. Elizabeth Vaughn

Links

Sources

Brief Biography

Howland was born in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England around 1599. At the age of twenty-one, he was employed by John Carver, a Puritan minister who joined with William Bradford in bringing his congregation from Leiden, Netherlands to the New World. Howland, while formally a servant, was in fact Carver's assistant in managing the migration.

Although he had arrived on the Mayflower as a servant to the Carver family, Howland was a young man determined to make his mark in the new world, arriving as neither a "stranger", nor a "saint" as the Pilgrims termed themselves. The arduous voyage very nearly ended his life as he was thrown overboard, due to turbulent seas, but managed to grab a topsail halyard that was trailing in the water and was hauled back aboard safely.

The Carver family with whom John lived, survived the terrible sickness of the first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring, on an unusually hot day in April, Governor Carver, according to William Bradford, came out of his cornfield feeling ill. He passed into a coma and "never spake more". His wife, Kathrine, died soon after her husband. The Carvers had no children. For this reason, Howland is thought to have inherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately "bought his freedom" but no record has survived.

In 1623/24, Howland married Elizabeth Tilley, by then a young lady of seventeen and the daughter of John Tilley and his wife Joan (Hurst) Rogers. Her parents had died the first winter and she had become the foster daughter of Governor Carver and his wife who were childless. By then he had prospered enough to also bring his brothers Arthur and Henry to the colony as well, solidly establishing the Howland family in the New World.

The following year Howland joined with Edward Winslow exploring the Kennebec River, looking for possible trading sites and natural resources that the colony could exploit. The year after that he was asked to participate in buying out the businessmen who had bankrolled the settlement of Plymouth ("Merchant Adventurers" was the term used at the time) so the colony could pursue its own goals without the pressure to remit profits back to England.

Then in 1626 the governor, William Bradford selected him to lead a team building a trading station on the Kennebec river and in 1628, Howland was elevated to the post of Assistant Governor.

Finally, in 1633 Howland, then thirty-four, was admitted as a freeman of Plymouth. He and Elizabeth had by then acquired significant landholdings around Plymouth and after his being declared a freeman they diligently acquired more. Howland served at various times as Assistant Governor, Deputy to the General Court, Selectman, Surveyor of Highways and member of the Fur Committee.

John and his wife Elizabeth had ten children, all of whom lived and had descendants. Their four sons were officers of the Plymouth Colony Militia, and served in other capacities.

Howland died on 23 February 1673, and was "with honour interred" on Burial Hill. This was accorded only to the leaders of the Colony, and meant that a squad of soldiers fired a volley over his grave. He is described in the records as a "godly man and an ardent professor in the ways of Christ."

--------------------

John Howland (c. 1599 – 1673) was one of the Pilgrims who travelled from England to North America on the Mayflower, signed the Mayflower Compact, and helped found Plymouth Colony.

Howland was born in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England around 1599. At the age of twenty-one, he was employed by John Carver, a Puritan minister who joined with William Bradford in bringing his congregation from Leiden, Netherlands to the New World. Howland, while formally a servant, was in fact Carver's assistant in managing the migration.

Although he had arrived on the Mayflower as a servant to the Carver family, Howland was a young man determined to make his mark in the new world, arriving as neither a "stranger", nor a "saint" as the Pilgrims termed themselves. The arduous voyage very nearly ended his life as he was thrown overboard, due to turbulent seas, but managed to grab a topsail halyard that was trailing in the water and was hauled back aboard safely.

The Carver family with whom John lived, survived the terrible sickness of the first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring, on an unusually hot day in April, Governor Carver, according to William Bradford, came out of his cornfield feeling ill. He passed into a coma and "never spake more". His wife, Kathrine, died soon after her husband. The Carvers had no children. For this reason, Howland is thought to have inherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately "bought his freedom" but no record has survived.

In 1623/24, Howland married Elizabeth Tilley, by then a young lady of seventeen and the daughter of John Tilley and his wife Joan (Hurst) Rogers. Her parents had died the first winter and she had become the foster daughter of Governor Carver and his wife who were childless. By then he had prospered enough to also bring his brothers Arthur and Henry to the colony as well, solidly establishing the Howland family in the New World.

The following year Howland joined with Edward Winslow exploring the Kennebec River, looking for possible trading sites and natural resources that the colony could exploit. The year after that he was asked to participate in buying out the businessmen who had bankrolled the settlement of Plymouth ("Merchant Adventurers" was the term used at the time) so the colony could pursue its own goals without the pressure to remit profits back to England.

Then in 1626 the governor, William Bradford selected him to lead a team building a trading station on the Kennebec river and in 1628, Howland was elevated to the post of Assistant Governor.

Finally, in 1633 Howland, then thirty-four, was admitted as a freeman of Plymouth. He and Elizabeth had by then acquired significant landholdings around Plymouth and after his being declared a freeman they diligently acquired more. Howland served at various times as Assistant Governor, Deputy to the General Court, Selectman, Surveyor of Highways and member of the Fur Committee.

John and his wife Elizabeth had ten children, all of whom lived and had descendants. Their four sons were officers of the Plymouth Colony Militia, and served in other capacities.

Howland died on 23 February 1673, and was "with honour interred" on Burial Hill. This was accorded only to the leaders of the Colony, and meant that a squad of soldiers fired a volley over his grave. He is described in the records as a "godly man and an ardent professor in the ways of Christ."

--------------------

John was the only one of the three HOWLAND brothers to come on the Mayflower, the other two brothers came over in 1624.


His was the 13th name of 41 persons who signed the memorable compact in the cabin of the Mayflower in "Cape Cod Harbor" in Nov 1620. He signed on as a manservant Mr. John Carver. "A profitable instrument of good; the last man that was left of those that came over on the ship called the May Flower..." - Plymouth Col. Recs.


From "One Hundred and Sixty Allied Families" by John Osborne Austin - 'A lusty young man (called John Howland) coming upon some occasion above the grating was with a seele (Sail) of the ship thrown into the sea, but it pleased God that he caught hold of the topsail halyards which hung overboard, an ran out at length, yet he held his hold (though he was sundry fathoms under water) till he was hauled up by the same rope to the brim of the water, and then with a boat hook and other means got into the ship again.'


When the Mayflower was yet in Cape Cod Harbor, ten of her "principal men", including John, were sent out in a boat, manned by eight sailors, to select a place to establish a longed-for home for the weary band. A storm drove them into Plymouth harbor, and Plymouth was selected as the place of settlement.

--------------------

John Howland

Birth: About 1599 (see notes below), the son of Henry and Margaret Howland of Fenstanton, Huntington. Mike Haywood's painting, "Pilgrim Overboard," depicts John Howland near-death experience when he fell overboard during a storm on the Mayflower's voyage.

Marriage:

Elizabeth Tilley, about 1624, Plymouth.

Death: 23 or 24 February 1672/3, Rocky Nook, Kingston.

Children: Desire, John, Hope, Elizabeth, Lydia, Hannah, Joseph, Jabez, Ruth, and Isaac.

Biographical Summary

John Howland was born about 1599, probably in Fenstanton, Huntington. He came on the Mayflower in 1620 as a manservant for Governor John Carver. During the Mayflower's voyage, Howland fell overboard during a storm, and was almost lost at sea--but luckily for his millions of descendants living today (including Presidents George Bush and George W. Bush, and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt) he managed to grab ahold of the topsail halyards, giving the crew enough time to rescue him with a boathook.

It has been traditionally reported that John Howland was born about 1592, based on his reported age at death in the Plymouth Church Records. However, ages at death were often overstated, and that is clearly the case here. John Howland came as a servant for John Carver, which means he was under 25 years old at the time (i.e. he was born after 1595). William Bradford, in the falling-overboard incident, refers to Howland as a "lusty young man", a term that would not likely have applied to a 28-year old given that Bradford himself was only 30--Bradford did call 21-year old John Alden a "young man" though. Howland's wife Elizabeth was born in 1607: a 32-year old marrying a 17-year old is an unlikely circumstance. Howland's last child was born in 1649: a 57-year old Howland would be an unlikely father. All these taken together demonstrate that Howland's age was likely overstated by at least 5 years. Since he signed the Mayflower Compact, we can assume he was probably about 21 in 1620, so the best estimate for his birth would be about 1599.

John Howland had several brothers who also came to New England, namely Henry Howland (an ancestor to both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford) and Arthur Howland (an ancestor to Winston Churchill).

Additional Resources

Will of John Howland

Mayflower Families Through Five Generations

Volume 1: John Howland's Daughter Desire, for Five Generations

Volume 2: John Howland's Son John, for Five Generations.

The Five Generations series is the best genealogical research available on the first five generations of the descendants of John Howland.

MayflowerHistory.com, Copyright © 1994-2009. All Rights Reserved.

John Howland was the son of Henry Howland and was born about 1592/3. He died at Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, February 23, 1672/3. Plymouth Colony records state:

“The 23th of February Mr. John Howland Senir of the Towne of Plymouth Deceased…Hee lived until hee attained about eighty yeaes in the world…and was the last man that was left of those that Came over in the ship Called the May flower, that lived in Plymouth hee was with honor Intered att the Towne of Plymouth on the 25 of February 1672.”

The John Howland Memorial Stone

Burial Hill, Plymouth, MAOn Burial Hill is a monument to John Howland erected in 1897 with funds raised by Mrs. Joseph Howland. This replaces a stone erected about 1836 by John and Henry Howland of Providence, Rhode Island. The earlier stone was buried under the new one. This earlier stone stated that John Howland’s wife was “a daughter of Governor Carver”, but after the discovery in 1856 of Governor William Bradford’s manuscript Of Plimoth Plantation, it was known that he married Elizabeth Tilley, daughter of John and Joan Tilley who were also passengers of the Mayflower.

John Howland boarded the Mayflower in England in September 1620, arrived in Provincetown Harbor, November 21, 1620 and, although called a man-servant of Governor Carver, he was the thirteenth signer of the Mayflower Compact in Plymouth Harbor on December 21, 1620.

Within a few years he married Elizabeth Tilley, built a house on First Street and gradually as land was allotted to each family, he acquired four acres on Watson’s Hill, Plymouth and considerable acreage in Duxbury. February 2, 1638/9 he bought from John Jenny the property called Rocky Nook (Kingston). Some of this land is still owned by our Society.

He served in the General court of Plymouth as Committeeman in 1637, 1639-1652 and as Deputy 1652, 1659, 1661-1668 and 1670.

He had two brothers, Arthur and Henry who arrived a few years later. Arthur Howland married Margaret Reed, settled in Marshfield and had five children. Sir Winston Churchill, an honorary member of the Pilgrim John Howland Society, was one of his descendants. Henry Howland married Mary (Newland) and lived in Duxbury. They had eight children. Both brothers joined the Society of Friends. For many generations the descendants of these two men remained Quakers, many settled around Dartmouth, MA where they became very prosperous.

TIMELINE

1620 – John Howland and Elizabeth arrive on the Mayflower.

1632 – They went to Maine.

1638/9 – Bought the Rocky Nook farm.

1670 – Jabez Howland bought the house at Plymouth. John and Elizabeth winter there.

1672/3 – John Howland died in the Plymouth home of his son.

Circa 1675 – The Rocky Nook Farm house burned to the ground. Elizabeth makes her home with Jabez' family.

1680/1 – Jabez sells the Plymouth house. Elizabeth signed the deed and moved to Swansea to live with her daughter, Lydia Brown.

1687 – Elizabeth Tilley Howland died and was buried in the Brown Family plot.

John Howland Overview

John Howland; Courage on the Kennebec

Elizabeth Tilley Overview

Elizabeth Tilley; a Widow for 15 Years

John & Elizabeth Howland

Notable Descendants

©2008 :: All Rights Reserved

The Pilgrim John Howland Society

info@PilgrimJohnHowlandSociety.org

By Robert F Huber Sept 1999

John Howland’s character was forged by danger and death and the result was courage on the Kennebec.

The young man from Fenstanton left England in 1620 as a Mayflwoer passenger and promptly showed his quick wit in a perilous situation when he was swept overboard during a violent storm and was able to grab some trailing halyards and hold on until rescued. When the Pilgrims landed on Cape Cod, Howland was among those who explored the strange land, braving terrible cold and Indian attack.

During the killer winter of 1620-21 he saw death deal a steady hand as half of the 102 settlers died. His inner strength helped him survive and do his part in caring for the sick and burying the dead.

And when his employer, Gov. John Carver, died of sunstroke Howland assumed the responsibility of managing his household. He soon became a leader in the colony and was placed in charge of Plymouth’s trading post in Maine. This was the colony’s most important assignment for the furs he got from the Indians went a long way in repaying the Pilgrim debt to the merchant adventurers who had financed the journey to the New World.

It was on the Kennebec River where Howland displayed raw courage when the fur-trade lifeline was threatened.

The Plymouth Pilgrims were always eager to trade with the Indians and was early as 1625 they sent a boatload of corn up the Kennebec.

Gov. William Bradford wrote that “God preserved them and gave them good success for they brought home 700 beaver, besides some other furs.” This expedition was made by Edward Winslow and some of the “old Standards” or first comers.

In 1627 Isaac Allerton was sent to London to secure a patent for the Kennebec and the Pilgrims then erected a trading house on the river at Cuchenoc in what is now Augusta. This patent was superseded by another in January 1630 under which Plymouth received exclusive jurisdiction over the Kennebec within a limit of 15 miles down the river from the falls where they had built a house.

The Shallop Elizabeth Tilley

In their trading they first used a shallop but soon found they needed a larger boat, so the Pilgrims cut the shallop in half, added six feet in the middle and decked it over. This vessel, called a barque, was used for the next seven years.

John Howland was put in charge of the trading post and in 1634 he and John Alden were the magistrates in authority there.

Unfortunately, Pilgrims and Indians were not the only ones on the Kennebec. Agents of Lord Say and Seal and Lord Brooke also were on hand to make a fast pound or two.

Now enter the hero and the villain.

One April day John Howland (the hero, of course) found John Hocking (the villain) riding at anchor within the area claimed by Plymouth. Hocking was from the nearby Piscataqua Plantation. Howland went up to him in their “barke” and politely asked Hocking to weigh anchors and depart.

Apparently Hocking used some strong language and the two exchanged some words not recorded, but the result of the conversation was that Hocking would not leave and Howland would not let him stay.

Howland then sent three of his men—John Irish, Thomas Savory and William Rennoles (Reynolds?) — to cut the cables of Hocking’s boat. They severed one but the strong current prevented them from cutting the other cable so Howland called them back and ordered Moses Talbott to go with them.

The four men were able to maneuver their canoe to the other cable, but Hocking was waiting on deck armed with a carbine and a pistol in his hand. He aimed first at Savory and then as the canoe swished about he put his gun almost to Talbott’s head.

Seeing this, Howland called to Hocking not to shoot his man but to “take himself as his mark.” Saying his men were only doing what he had ordered them to do. If any wrong was being done it was he that did it, Howland shouted. Howland called again for Hocking to aim at him.

What courage!

Hocking, however, would not even look at Howland and shortly afterwards Hocking shot Talbott in the head and then took up his pistol intending to shoot another of Howland’s men. Bradford continues the story in his history of Plymouth:

Howland’s men were angered and naturally feared for their lives so one of the fellows in the canoe raised his musket and shot Hocking “who fell down dead and never spake word.”

The surviving poachers must have skedaddled for home where they soon wrote to the bigwigs in England but failed to tell the whole truth including the fact that Hocking had killed a Plymouth man first. The lords “were much offended” and must have made known their anger.

The Hocking affair did have severe international implications. Colonists feared that King Charles might use it as an excuse for sending over a royal governor to rule all New England. This was a real threat for early in 1634 the king had created a Commission for Regulating Plantations with power to legislate in both civil and religious matters and even to revoke charters.

Not long after the killings Plymouth sent a ship into the territory of Massachusetts Bay and authorities there quickly seized john Alden who was aboard the ship. Alden was imprisoned although he had no direct part in the Kennebec tragedy.

When Alden was jailed Plymouth was quite obviously upset for Massachusetts Bay had no jurisdiction over the Kennebec area or over citizens of Plymouth. This was not of their business.

Plymouth dispatched Capt. Myles Standish to Boston to present letters explaining the situation and Gov. Thomas Dudley quickly freed Alden, and after a later court hearing all blame was laid to Hocking. The matter was settled.

©2008 :: All Rights Reserved

The Pilgrim John Howland Society

info@PilgrimJohnHowlandSociety.org

---

by Robert Jennings Heinsohn, PhD

Mayflower passengers John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley were married in 1623/4. John was about thirty-one and Elizabeth was about sixteen. They spent their entire lives in Plymouth, and between them participated in every aspect of the Pilgrim experience from its beginning in Leiden up to the merger of the Bay and Plymouth colonies. This article is a retrospective summary of their lives and their contribution to Plymouth.

John was born about 1592 to Henry and Margaret Howland of Fenstanton, nine miles northeast of Cambridge, England. Elizabeth Tilley was the youngest of several children born to John and Joan (Hurst) Tilley. She was baptized in 1607 in Henlow, Huntingdonshire, England. John Tilley and his family, and the family of his brother Edward Tilley and wife Ann (Cooper), were members of John Robinson's congregation in Leiden.

John Howland, John and Joan and Elizabeth Tilley, and Edward and Ann Tilley were passengers on the Mayflower. John Howland had at least five siblings. Arthur (d. 1675), his older brother, arrived in Plymouth after 1627 while Henry (d. 1671), his younger brother, arrived as early as 1633. Arthur Howland soon moved to Marshfield where he became a major landholder. Henry Howland was one of the original settlers of Duxbury and was chosen constable in 1635.

John Howland was pitched overboard

At age twenty-eight John Howland was recruited in England by John Carver to join his household and be his assistant in moving the Leiden congregation to America. Also included in Carver's household were a servant-girl Desire Minter (age fifteen), a servant-lad, William Lantham, and several other servants. During a storm in the crossing, John Howland was pitched overboard, but luckily was able to catch hold of a halliard and was hauled back aboard the Mayflower. John was the thirteenth signer of the Compact. While in Cape Cod Harbor, John Howland, John and Edward Tilley and others explored the New England coast for several days and chose Plymouth to begin a settlement.

Elizabeth Tilley's parents and aunt and uncle died in the winter of 1621. John Carver took Elizabeth in as one of his household. After John and Katherine Carver died in the spring of 1621, John Howland became the head of the household containing Elizabeth Tilley, Desire Minter, and William Lantham. The living arrangements for this household are unknown. After John married Elizabeth, he received four acres of land as the head of household in the 1623 Division of Land.

Desire Minter was the daughter of William and Sarah Minter, members of the Leiden congregation. Desire's father died in 1618, and she joined John Carver's family. Her mother remarried in 1622, and her new parents established an endowment that Desire would inherit at the age of twenty-one. After a few years in Plymouth, Desire returned to England to assume her inheritance. John and Elizabeth Howland were very fond of Desire and named their first child Desire in her honor. They had ten children: Desire, John, Hope, Elizabeth, Lydia, Hannah, Joseph, Jabez, Ruth and Isaac.

In 1625 John Howland accompanied Edward Winslow on an expedition of the Kennebec River in Maine to explore trading opportunities with the Indians. In 1626 John was asked to be one of the "Undertakers" to buy out the colony's debt to the "Merchant Adventurers" who had invested in the venture to establish Plymouth Colony.

In the 1627 division of Cattle agreement, John Howland acquired twenty acres for each member of his household. In addition, the colonists were organized in "companies" of thirteen members each. The livestock of the colony was divided equally among the companies. Listed in John's "company" were John and Elizabeth and their two children, John and Priscilla Alden and their two children, and five unattached men.

Isaac Allerton (1586-1658/9) negotiated a patent that granted Plymouth the exclusive right to trade with the Indians and to establish a trading station on the Kennebec River. In 1627 Governor Bradford placed John Howland in charge. In 1628 a trading station was built at Cushnoc (now called Augusta) on the east side of the Kennebec River. A year later, a permanent log-house was built, and Howland, then Assistant Governor, was asked to manage the trading station. For approximately seven years John Howland was in charge of the station. It is not known if Elizabeth and their family of three children lived at the station permanently or for short periods of time. During the time that John operated the station Elizabeth gave birth to three more children, but it is not known whether she gave birth while she was living at the trading station or in Plymouth.

The trading station in Cushnoc was very successful. The Pilgrims traded corn and manufactured goods with the Indians for beaver, otter and other furs. The proceeds of this trade enabled the Undertakers to settle their debts with the Merchant Adventurers. In 1643 a colony in Piscataqua at the mouth of the Kennebec River under the control of London investors attempted to trade with Indians on the Kennebec River. Howland and men from Plymouth told the Piscataqua men under the command of John Hocking to leave since they were trespassing and the patent granted Plymouth exclusive trading rights. The Piscataqua men refused to pull up anchor and leave, and John Hocking shot and killed one of Howland's men. One of Howland's men returned fire and killed John Hocking. A meeting called by the General Courts of Plymouth and Bay Colony established that the Piscataqua men were trespassers and that Hocking's killing was justified. Following this, the two colonies agreed to honor each other’s patents and to curtail the activities of settlements poaching on these patents. It was feared that if the issue was not resolved satisfactorily, Parliament might appoint a single governor of all New England, which none of the colonies wanted.

In 1633 John (age forty-one) was admitted a freeman in Plymouth. John and Elizabeth acquired land and in time became major landholders in Plymouth and the surrounding towns. For nearly forty years, John Howland was actively involved in the governance of Plymouth through elected or appointed positions, viz. one of the seven Plymouth Assistant Governors—1632-35, 1638-39; one of the four Plymouth Deputies to the General Court for nearly thirty years—1641, 1645, 1647-56, 1658, 1659, 1661-68, 1670; one of the five selectmen of Plymouth—1665-66; one of the Plymouth Assessors—1641, 1644, 1647-51; committee on fur trading—1659; surveyor of highways—1650.

In 1637 John received forty acres of land, and in 1639 he was given a choice of additional land for himself or his heirs around Yarmouth, Dartmouth and Rehoboth. Part of the land he chose was in Yarmouth, which he gave to his son John and daughters Desire and hope and their respective families. In 1639 John purchased land and a house in Rocky Nook, where he spent the rest of his life. Also living in Rocky Nook were Thomas and Mary (Allerton) Cushman and their family.

Quaker missionaries arrived in Plymouth between 1655 and 1662 and attracted a considerable number of converts. Quakers opposed Puritan authority and religious beliefs and practices. They refused to attend church services, would not recognize ministers and magistrates or fidelity oaths, and would not support the church financially. They criticized Puritan beliefs and practices publicly and in such scathing terms as to anger the General Court. Governor Bradford had died in 1657 and was succeeded by Thomas Prence (1600-73), who would not tolerate Quaker criticism and took unusually strong measures to suppress Quaker activities, through fines, whipping, excommunication and expulsion from the colony. In the Bay Colony punishment was more severe, and included hangings.

Quakers wished to separate themselves from the prevailing religious beliefs and practices, just as the Pilgrims had done some fifty years earlier in England. Thus, the Quakers were to Plymouth what the Separatists were to England, except that now the Pilgrims were on the receiving end. Governor Prence and the General Court punished Plymouth residents who attended Quaker services or gave them support and protection.

The families of John Howland's brothers, Arthur and Henry, were two Plymouth families most identified as practicing Quakers. The families ceased attending Plymouth religious services and allowed their homes for the conduct of Quaker meetings. Arthur, Henry and Henry's son Zoeth were called before the General Court in 1657 and fined for using their homes for Quaker meetings. In 1660 Henry was again fined. In 1659 Arthur Jr.'s freeman status was revoked and in 1684 he was imprisoned in Plymouth. Throughout his life, John Howland remained faithful to Separatist belief and practice, but his compassion for Quakers is not known.

John and Elizabeth were highly respected citizens of Plymouth. In 1657 and again in 1664, serious issues concerning members of John Howland's family came before the Court of Governor's Assistants that resulted in judicial sanctions. John Howland was only a deputy for Plymouth to the General Court, and while he did not have to act on these cases personally, there is not way his standing in Plymouth could avoid being affected.

Governor Prence's actions toward Quakers took an ironic twist that can be appreciated by parents today. In 1657 Arthur Howland Jr., an ardent Quaker, was brought before the court. Thomas Prince's daughter and Arthur Howland Jr., fell in love. The relationship blossomed and matrimony seemed inevitable. However, it was illegal and punishable by court sanction for couples to marry without parental consent. Thomas Prence urged Elizabeth to break off the relationship, but to no avail. He then used powers available to him as Governor. Arthur Howland, Jr., was brought before the General Court and fined five pounds for "inveigling of Mistris Elizabeth Prence and making motion of marriage to her, and prosecuting the same contrary to her parents likeing, and without theire mind and will...[and] in speciall that hee desist from the use of any meanes to obtaine or retaine her affections as aforesaid." On July 2, 1667 Arthur Howland, Jr., was brought before the General Court again where he "did sollemly and seriously engage before the Court, that he will wholly desist and never apply himself for the future as formerly he hath done, to Mistris Elizabeth Prence in reference unto marriage." Guess what happened! They were married on December 9, 1667 and in time had a daughter and four sons. Thus a reluctant Thomas Prence acquired a Quaker son-in-law, Quaker grandchildren and innumerable Quaker in-laws of Henry Howland.

The second case involving John Howland's family occurred in 1664 when Ruth Howland (b. 1646), his youngest daughter, was the subject of a morals case brought before the Court of Governor's Assistants. Sexual mores, including chastity before marriage, were issues about which were strict codes of conduct. Ruth Howland fell in love with Thomas Cushman, Jr. (1637-1726), the first son of Plymouth's Ruling Elder Thomas Cushman (1607-91), and Mary (Allerton) Cushman (1616-1699), a Mayflower passenger. In 1664/5 Thomas Jr. was fined five ponds by the Court for carnal behavior "before marriage, but after contract." Once again John Howland was Deputy to the General Court for Plymouth and not involved personally in sentencing. Twenty-five years earlier punishment could have been severe, e.g. excommunication, fines, stocks for women and whipping for men. However, in 1664 harsh physical sentencing had been relaxed, and the social meeting of the parties became a factor in sentencing. In 1664 Thomas Jr. and Ruth were married. In addition to John Howland's embarrassment, Thomas Cushman, Jr. squandered the opportunity to be considered to succeed his father as Ruling Elder. In 1694, Thomas' younger brother Isaac was chosen to succeed his father as Ruling Elder. Thomas Jr. and Ruth remained in Plymouth. Ruth died as a young woman sometime after 1672, and Thomas Jr. married Abigail Fuller in 1679.

The Jabez Howlad House

Plymouth, MAJohn Howland died either in his home at Rocky Nook or at his son Jabez' house on February 23, 1672/3 at the age of eighty. He was buried in an unmarked grave in Burial Hill. In 1897, a headstone was erected on Burial Hill by the Howland Society. Elizabeth Howland spent her declining years and died on December 21, 1687 at the age of eighty in the home of her daughter Lydia Brown, in Swansea. Elizabeth is buried in East Providence, Rhode Island, with a memorial marker.

While not political leaders of Plymouth, John and Elizabeth were pillars of the community and played a major part in the colony's governance and development. They lived through every aspect of the Pilgrim experience beginning in Leiden—the Mayflower, the harsh first winter, the Undertakers, the trading station in Maine, the Quakers, King Philip's War—up to the merger of the Bay and Plymouth colonies. Descendants of John, Henry and Arthur Howland multiplied in number and influence to become one of New England's famous pioneer families.

Bibliography

Bradford, W., Of Plymouth Plantation 1620-1647. Modern Library College Editions, New York, 1981.

White, E.P., John Howland of the Mayflower vol. 1, Picton Press, Rockport, Maine, 3rd printing, 1999

Stratton, E.A., Plymouth Colony, Its History & People 1620-1691, Ancestry Publishing, Salt Lake City, UT, 1986

Howland, F., A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry and John Howland and Descendants of the United States and Canada, published by F. Howland, New Bedford, MA, 1885.

---

Source: wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Howland

John Howland (c. 1599 – 1673) was one of the settlers who travelled from England to North America on the Mayflower and helped found the Plymouth Colony.

Howland was born in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England. At the age of twenty-one, he was employed by John Carver, a Puritan minister who joined with William Bradford in bringing his congregation from Leiden, Netherlands to the New World. Howland, formally considered a servant, was in fact Carver's assistant in managing the migration.

Although he had arrived on the Mayflower as a servant to the Carver family, Howland was a young man determined to make his mark in the new world, arriving as neither a "stranger", nor a "saint" as the Pilgrims termed themselves. The arduous voyage very nearly ended his life as he was thrown overboard, due to turbulent seas, but managed to grab a topsail halyard that was trailing in the water and was hauled back aboard.

The Carver family with whom John lived, survived the terrible sickness of the first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring, on an unusually hot day in April, Governor Carver, according to William Bradford, came out of his cornfield feeling ill. He passed into a coma and "never spake more". His wife, Kathrine, died soon after her husband. The Carvers had no children. For this reason, Howland is thought to have inherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately "bought his freedom" but no record has survived.

In 1623/24, Howland married Elizabeth Tilley, by then a young lady of seventeen and the daughter of John Tilley and his wife Joan (Hurst) Rogers. Her parents had died the first winter and she had become the foster daughter of Governor Carver and his wife who were childless. By then he had prospered enough to also bring his brothers Arthur and Edward to the colony as well, solidly establishing the Howland family in the New World.

The following year Howland joined with Edward Winslow exploring the Kennebec River, looking for possible trading sites and natural resources that the colony could exploit. The year after that he was asked to participate in buying out the businessmen who had bankrolled the settlement of Plymouth ("Merchant Adventurers" was the term used at the time) so the colony could pursue its own goals without the pressure to remit profits back to England.

Then in 1626 the governor, William Bradford selected him to lead a team building a trading station on the Kennebec river and in 1628, Howland was elevated to the post of Assistant Governor.

Finally, in 1633 Howland, then thirty-four, was admitted as a freeman of Plymouth. He and Elizabeth had by then acquired significant landholdings around Plymouth and after his being declared a freeman they diligently acquired more. Howland served at various times as Assistant Governor, Deputy to the General Court, Selectman, Surveyor of Highways and member of the Fur Committee.

John and his wife Elizabeth had ten children, all of whom lived and had descendants. Their four sons were officers of the Plymouth Colony Militia, and served in other capacities.

Howland died on 23 February 1673, and was "with honour interred". This was accorded only to the leaders of the Colony, and meant that a squad of soldiers fired a volley over his grave. He is described in the records as a "godly man and an ardent professor in the ways of Christ."

Notable Decendands

President Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt → James Roosevelt → Mary Aspinwall → Susan Howland → Joseph Howland → Nathanial Howland Jr. → Nathanial Howland Sr. → Joseph Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

Presidents George H. W. Bush, and George W. Bush.

George W. Bush → George H. W. Bush → Prescott Bush → Flora Sheldon → Mary Butler → Elizabeth Pierce → Betsy Wheeler → Sarah Horton → Joanna Wood → Jabez Wood → Hannah Nelson → Hope Huckins → Hope Chipman → Hope Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

Alec Baldwin (and brother Stephen). Actor.

Alexander 'Alec' Baldwin → Alexander Baldwin → Alexander Baldwin → Sylvester Baldwin → Roswell Baldwin → Esther Brown → Eunice Palmer → Prudence Holmes → Joshua Holmes → Fear Sturgis → Temperance Gorham → John Gorham → Desire Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

Humphrey Bogart. Actor.

Humphrey Bogart → Maud Humphrey → John Humphrey → Elizabeth Perkins → Dyer Perkins → Bethia Baker → Prudence Jenkins → Lydia Howland → Joseph Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

Joseph Smith. Mormon founder and leader.

Joseph Smith → Lucy Mack → Lydia Gates → Lydia Fuller → Hannah Crocker → Hannah Howland → Joseph Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

President Richard Nixon, President Gerald Ford, and Winston Churchill are all descended from brothers of Mayflower passenger John Howland.

--------------------

Howland, John Plymouth Colony, p.311 -The son of Henry Howland of Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, John came to Plymouth on the 1620 Mayflower as a servant to John Carver. After the death of Carver, he rose rapidly as a leader in the colony. In 1627 he was the head of one of the twelve companies which divided the livestock, and he was one of the eight Plymouth Undertakers who assumed responsibility for the colony's debt to the Adventurers in return for certain monopoly trade privileges He was on the 1633 freeman list, and by 1633, if not earlier, was an Assistant, being reelected to this position in 1634 and 1635 (PCR, passim). In 1634 he was in charge of the colony trading outpost on the Kennebec River when Talbot and Hocking were killed (see text). He received a good number of land grants, was elected a deputy for Plymouth, served on numerous special committees, and was an important lay leader of the Plymouth Church. The Reverend John Cotton related how at his own ordination as pastor of the church in 1669 'the aged mr John owland was appointed by the chh to Joyne in imposition of hands' (Ply. Ch. Recs. 1:144). Howland died on 24 February 1672/73 in his eightieth year, and John Cotton noted his passing, 'He was a good old disciple, & had bin sometime a magistrate here, a plaine-hearted christian' (Ply. Ch. Recs. 1:147; see also Nathaniel Morton's eulogy in the text). Plymouth Colony, p.311 John Howland married, probably ca. 1626, Elizabeth Tilley, q.v. In his will, dated 29 May 1672, inventory 3 March 1672/73, he mentioned his wife Elizabeth; oldest son John Howland; sons Jabez and Joseph; youngest son Isaac; daughters Desire Gorham, Hope Chipman, Elizabeth Dickenson, Lydia Browne, Hannah Bosworth, and Ruth Cushman; and granddaughter Elizabeth Howland, daughter of his son John (MD 2:70). His widow [p.312] Elizabeth died at the home of her daughter Lydia Browne, wife of James, at Swansea on 21 December 1687, and in her will, dated 17 December 1686, proved 10 January 1687/88, she said she was seventy-nine years old, and mentioned her sons John, Joseph, Jabez, and Isaac; daughters Lydia Browne, Elizabeth Dickenson, and Hannah Bosworth; son-in-law Mr. James Browne; and grandchildren James Browne, Jabez Browne, Dorothy Browne, Desire Cushman, Elizabeth Bursley, and Nathaniel the son of Joseph Howland (MD 3:54). Franklyn Howland, A Brief Genealogical and Biographical History of Arthur, Henry, and John Howland and their Descendants_ (New Bedford, Mass., 1885), contains many errors. It is debatable whether John Howland or John Alden has the greatest number of descendants living today, but certainly the number of both is high. Elizabeth Pearson White, former editor of the Mayflower Quarterly, is compiling a comprehensive family history of the first five generations of John Howland's family.

ORIGIN: Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England MIGRATION: 1620 on Mayflower FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth Freemen Massachusetts N: In the '1633' list of Plymouth freemen John Howland is near the head of the list, among the councillors [ PCR 1:3]. In the 6 March 1636/7 list of Plymouth Colony freemen [ PCR 1:52]. In the Plymouth section of the 1639, 1658 and 29 May 1670 lists of Plymouth Colony freemen [ PCR 5:274, 8:173, 197]. EDUCATION: His inventory included '1 great Bible and Annotations on the 5 Books of Moses' valued at £1 and 'Mr. Tindall's Works, Mr. Wilson's Works, 7 more books' valued at £1. OFFICES: Plymouth Colony Assistant, 1 January 1632/3, 1 January 1633/4, 1 January 1634/5 [ PCR 1:5, 21, 32]. Deputy for Plymouth to General Court, 1 June 1641, 28 October 1645, 1 June 1647, 7 June 1648, 8 June 1649, 4 June 1650, 5 June 1651, 3 June 1652, 7 June 1653, 7 March 1653/4, 6 June 1654, 1 August 1654, 8 June 1655, 3 June 1656, 1 June 1658, 4 June 1661, 1 June 1663, 1 June 1666, 5 June 1667 [ PCR 2:16, 94, 117, 123, 144, 154, 167, 3:8, 31, 44, 49, 63, 79, 99, 135, 214, 4:37, 122, 148]. In charge of the fur trading post at Kennebec, 1634 [ Maryland 2:10-11]. Committe on the fur trade, 3 October 1659 [ PCR 3:170]. In the Plymouth section of the 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms (as 'John Howland Sen.') [ PCR 8:187]. ESTATE: In the 1623 Plymouth division of land John Howland received four acres as a passenger on the Mayflower [ PCR 12:4]. In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle John Howland, his wife Elizabeth Howland, John Howland Junior and Desire Howland were the first four persons in the fourth company [ PCR 12:10].

In the Plymouth tax list of 25 March 1633 John Howland was assessed 18s., and in the list of 27 March 1634 £1 4s. [ PCR 1:9, 27]. John Howland was a Purchaser [ PCR 2:177].

On 4 December 1637 'forty acres of land are granted to Mr. John Howland, lying at the Island Creeke Pond at the western end thereof, with the marsh ground that he useth to mow there' [ PCR 1:70]. On 5 November 1638 the 'island called Spectacle, lying upon Green's Harbor, is granted to Mr. John Howland' [ PCR 1:102, 110, 168]. Granted six acres of meadow 'at the North Meadow by Jones River' [ PCR 2:49].

In his will, dated 29 May 1672 and proved 6 March 1672/3, 'John Howland Seni[o]r of the town of New Plymouth ... being now grown aged, having many infirmities of body upon me,' bequeathed to 'John Howland my eldest son besides what lands I have already given him, all my right and interest to that one hundred acres of land granted me by the court lying on the eastern side of Taunton River'; to 'my son Jabez Howland all those my upland and meadow that I now possess at Satuckett and Paomett'; to 'my son Jabez Howland all that my one piece of land that I have lying on the southside of the mill brook'; to 'Isaac Howland my youngest son all those my uplands and meadows ... in the town of Middlebery and in a tract of land called the Major's Purchase near Namassakett Ponds which I have bought and purchased of William White of Marshfield'; to 'my said son Isacke Howland the one half of my twelve acre lot of meadow that I now have at Winnatucsett River'; to 'my dear and loving wife Elizabeth Howland the use and benefit of my now dwelling house in Rockey Nooke in the township of Plymouth ... with the outhousing lands ... uplands and meadow lands ... in the town of Plymouth ... excepting what meadow and upland I have before given to my sons Jabez and Isacke Howland during her natural life'; to 'my son Joseph Howland after the decease of my loving wife Elizabeth Howland my aforesaid dwelling house at Rockey Nooke'; to 'my daughter Desire Gorum 20s.'; to 'my daughter Hope Chipman 20s.'; to 'my daughter Elizabeth Dickenson 20s.'; to 'my daughter Lydia Browne 20s.'; to 'my daughter Hannah Bosworth 20s.'; to 'my daughter Ruth Cushman 20s.'; to 'my grandchild Elizabeth Howland the daughter of my son John Howland 20s.'; 'these legacies given to my daughters [to] be paid by my executrix'; to 'my loving wife Elizabeth Howland my debts and legacies being first paid, my whole estate,' she to be executrix [ Maryland 2:70-73, citing PCPR 3:1:49-50].

The inventory of 'Mr. John Howland lately deceased' was taken 3 March 1672/3 and totalled £157 8s. 8d. [ Maryland 2:73-77, citing PCPR 3:1:51-54]. After the inventory, the appraisers noted that 'the testator died possessed of these several parcels of land following:' 'his dwelling house with the outhousing, uplands and meadow belonging thereunto lying at Rockey Nooke in the town of New Plymouth,' 'a parcel of meadow at Jones River meadow,' 'the one half of a house and a parcel of meadow and upland belonging thereunto lying and being at Colchester in the aforesaid township,' 'a parcel of meadow and upland belonging thereunto lying near Jones River bridge in the town of Duxburrow,' 'one house and 2 shares of a tract of land and meadow that lyeth in the town of Middleberry that was purchased by Captain Thomas Southworth of and from the Indian Sachem Josias Wampatucke,' and '2 shares of a tract of land called the Major's Purchase lying near Namassakett ponds' [ Maryland 2:77, citing PCPR 3:1:54]. (See also PCR 5:108, 110, 127.)

BIRTH: Say 1592, son of Henry and Margaret (_____) Howland of Fenstanton. DEATH: Plymouth 23 February 1672/3 'above eighty years' [ PCR 8:34]. Marraige: Plymouth by about 1624 Elizabeth Tilley, baptized Henlow, Bedfordshire, 30 August 1607, daughter of JOhioN TILLEY . She died at Swansea 22 December 1687, aged eighty [ SwVR 27]. ASSOCIATIONS: Brother of HENRY HOWLAND and Arthur Howland. COMMaineNTS: In his list of passengers on the Mayflower Bradford tells us that John Howland was one of the 'manservants' of JOhioN CARVER [ Bradford 441]. During a particularly bad storm on the crossing John Howland (characterized by Bradford as 'a lusty young man') went above deck and was swept overboard, but it pleased God that he caught hold of the topsail halyards which hung overboard and ran out at length. Yet he held his hold (though he was sundry fathoms under water) till he was hauled up by the same rope to the brim of the water, and then with a boat hook and other means got into the ship again and his life saved. And though he was something ill with it, yet he lived many years after and became a profitable member both in church & commonwealth [ Bradford 59].

In his 1651 accounting on the family of John Carver, Bradford reported that '[h]is servant John Howland married the daughter of John Tilley, Elizabeth, and they are both now living, and their eldest daughter hath four children; and their second daughter one, all living, and other of their children marriageable' [ Bradford 444].

In an undated deposition we learn that in April 1634 John Hocking came to Kennebec and challenged the rights of the Plymouth men to their exclusive trade in that place. Mr. John Howland, in charge of the trading post, went out in their bark with several other men and warned Hocking off, but was taunted and defied. Howland 'bid three of his men go cut his cable [Hocking's anchor],' but the flow of the stream was too strong and Howland called them back and added Moses Talbot to the crew. Hocking, seeing that their intent was to cut the cable, 'presently put his peice almost to Moyses Talbott's head, which Mr. Howland seeing called to him desiring him not to shoot his man but take himself for his mark saying his men did but that which he commanded them and therefore desired him not to hurt any of them, if any wrong was done it was himself that did it and therefore called again to him to take him for his mark saying he stood very fair, but Hocking would not hear nor look towards our bark, but presently shooteth Moyses in the head, and presently took up his pistol in his hand but the Lord stayed him from doing any further hurt by a shot from our bark himself was presently struck dead being shot near the same place in the head where he had murderously shot Moyses' [ Maryland 2:10-11]. BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: Because of the multitude of descendants of John Howland, through all ten of his children, the publication of the first five generations of descent from John Howland will occupy many volumes. Elizabeth Pearson White has prepared the first two volumes in this series: John Howland of the Mayflower: Volume 1, The First Five Generations, Documented Descendants Through his first child Desire Howland and her husband Captain John Gorham (Camden, Maine, 1990) and John Howland of the Mayflower: Volume 2, The First Five Generations, Documented Descendants Through his second child John Howland and his wife Mary Lee (Camden, Maine, 1993).

In her first volume White argued that John Howland lived for several years in Maine, and that three of his children were born there. Robert S. Wakefield has gathered the evidence that this could not have been the case [ Maryland 42:15-16]. John Howland came over on the Mayflower as one of the indentured servants of a wealthy couple named John and Kathrine Carver and they landed in America in December of 1620. John Carver died in the spring of 1621 and his wife Kathrine died in the summer of 1621. John HOWLAND. Born in 1592 in Fen station, Huntingdonshire, England. John died in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts on 23 Feb 1672; he was 80. Buried in Burial Hill, Plymouth Massachusetts. Occupation: yeoman -Mayflower index #19,049 -there is a Pilgrim John Howland Society, with its membership director being: Robert M. Tatem, 7 Galway Lane, Cherry Hill, NJ 8003 in 1998 -sailed on the Mayflower 8/2/11620, was a Pilgrim and one of the founder of Plymouth, Massachusetts -he is best remembered for having fallen off the Mayflower during a mighty storm, as recorded by Bradford 'In sundry of these storms the winds were so fierece and the sea so high, as they could not bear a know of sail, but hwere forced to hull for divers days together. And in one of them, as they thus lay at hull in a mighty storm, a lusty (meaning good spirited) young man called John Howland, coming upon some occasion above the gratings was, with a seele of the ship, thrown into the sea; but it please God that he caught hold of the topsail halyards which hung overboard and ran out at length. Yet he held his hold (though he was sundry fathoms under water) till he was hauled up by the same rope to the brim of the water, and then with boat hook and other means got into the ship again and saved his life. And though he was something ill with it, yet he lived many years after and became a profitable member both in church and Commonwealth'. -another source relates as the Mayflower plowed westward through high seas in the fall of 1620 on its way to the New World, John Howland was suddenly swept overboard. Fortunately he grabbed a handy topsail halyard and although he was doused several fathoms deep, was hauled aboard with the aid of a a boat hook. -when the Mayflower reached Cape Cod, John was among the party of 10 who were sent out to select the locations of their new homes. They were driven by a storm into Plymouth Harbor which they choose for the settlement. Prior to landing, the passengers drew up the Compact which became the basis for their government. John Howland, then twenty-eight, was the 13th signer. -came on the Mayflower as a servant of John Carver. After the death of Carver, he rose rapidly as a leader in the colony. In 1627 he was the head of one of the twelve companies which divided the livestock, and he was one of the eight Plymouth Undertakers who assumed responsibility for the colony's debt to the London Merchant Adventures (the company that had lent them the money to emigrate to America) in return for certain monopoly trade privileges. He was on the 1633 freeman list, and by 1633, was an Assistant, being re-elected to this position in 1634 and 1635. In 1634 he was in charge of the colony trading outpost on the Kennebec River when Talbot and Hocking were killed. He received a good number of land grants, was elected a Deputy for Plymouth, served on numerous special committees, and was an important lay leader of the Plymouth Church. -there were 102 passengers on the Mayflower but only 23 left descendants and John Howland has more descendants than any of the others however. -there is a question to whether John Howland lived in Duxbury, Massachusetts full time- an article in Colonial Homes magazine states 'about 1/3 of the settlers in the Plymouth Colony moved to the place they named Duxburrow'. The town was incorporated in 1637 at Ducksborrow and became Duxbury in 1834. During their first few years in Duxbury, the Pilgrims settlers stayed only from spring planting through harvest, returning to Plymouth for the winter. Even during the farming season, they attended church services in Plymouth every Sunday, probably getting there by boat across the Duxbury Bay, rather than by the Indian trails that were the only overland routes. In 1632, Duxbury became their permanent home, and they established their own parish under Elder William Brewster, who has been spiritual leader of the Pilgrims ever since they left England for Holland. Among the settlers were Myles Standish, John Alden, his wife Priscilla and John Howland. -at present day (1997) the General Society of Mayflower Descendants is located in Plymouth, Massachusetts at 4 Winslow Street and is furnished with 17th, 18th, and 19th century antiques. -THE PILGRIM STORY- In 1620, a band of Pilgrims left England about the British wine ship, the Mayflower seeking economic opportunity and religious freedom. John Howland was Governor John Carver's servant (in those days, a servant was a person who was bound to a certain master for a definite time, as distinct from a person who worked for day wages.) The voyage was stormy as the 102 passengers crossed the Atlantic Ocean in two months. (John Howland fell overboard but was rescued). They landed in Plymouth on December 21, 1620 and established the first successful colony in the New World. Work was started on the new settlement on Christmas Day, 1620. Snow, sleet and rain hampered their efforts. More than half the group died during the first terrible winter, which was plagued by illness, exposure, cold, hunger and disease. On March 21, 1621, Samoset of the Wampanoag Indians walked into the settlement and surprised the Pilgrims in their own language. He later introduced them to Squant, who taught the Pilgrims how to plant corn and how to catch herring from Plymouth's town brook to use as fertilizer. He showed them how to tap maple trees for sap and where to find eels for food. The Colony began to thrive durning its first summer. The Pilgrims, who had feared for their lives durning the cruel winter, were now seeing the best of the New World. The Pilgrim's first autumn in New England was beautiful and the harvest was plentiful. They were grateful and set aside a day of Thanksgiving for a harvest festival. Governor Bradford asked Squanto to invite the Wampanoags to the feast. Four Pilgrims hunted for waterfowl and returned with ducks and geese for the celebration. On the appointed day, Massasoit arrived with 90 hungry braves. The Pilgrims were surprised by their numbers, knowing they could never feed them all. Massasoit saw the concern on their faces. With a simple gestured, he dispatched a few of his men into the forest. Soon, they returned with five deer as the Indians contribution to the feast. Goose, venison, lobster, eel pie, cornbread, fresh 'sallet herbes', wild plums, berries and red and white wines were served. The Indians enjoyed themselves so much that they stayed for three days. -John Howland was described by a fellow Pilgrim as a 'lusty man' (meaning lively and happy in those days). -there is a full scale reproduction of the Mayflower in the Plymouth Plantation, Massachusetts. -President of the United States George Herbert Walker Bush is a descendant of John Howland. -a photograph of the family headstone in Plymouth, Massachusetts in this sources file, along with a photograph of Johns' son Jabez original home in Plymouth, where John lived for some time before his death in 1672. -John Howland was among those who signed the Mayflower Compact on 21 November 1620. He became very active in the political and church live of the colony. He was a member of the Governors Council for several years, helped lay out land and highways, was on many different communities for the town and the church, was an assessor in 1633, and a town Deputy most of the years from 1652 to 1670. He lived in Rocky Nook which is about 3 miles northwest along the coast from Plymouth Rock. When his house there burned, he and his wife took shelter with their son Jabez in Plymouth in a house built in 1667 and which still stands today (it may be the only remaining house which echoed to a first comers steps to the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC Magazine FOR Aug. 1947). -from another source in Adele Gorhams file, John was frequently called to public office. From 1633-1636 he was a member of the Governors council, in 1633 and 1634 was an assessor, in 1636 served on the jury, and in 1666 was selectman of Plymouth. He represented the town as Deputy from 1652-1656 and in 1658, 1661, 1663, 1667, and in 1670. A few years after the founding of their colony the Pilgrims established a trading post on the Kennebec River in Maine, and of which John Howland was placed in charge. While there he was obliged to defend the post from the encroachment of John Hocking who attempted to trade within the limits of the Plymouth Patent and who killed Mose Talbot, one of Howlands men. The event caused considerable excitement at the time. His other public services consisted in laying out the land, settling disputes, constructing highways and serving on various town committees, and these helped make him a man of repute. He was appointed by the church to join in the imposition of hands at the time of the ordination of John Cotton, Jr. His home was at Rocky Nook, Plymouth, but he acquired land in other townships, including one hundred acres on the east side of Taunton River, some upland and meadows in Middlebury, and at Satuckett and Paoment, as well as several grants at Plymouth itself. His will is dated 1672 and was exhibited in court March 5, 1673. -source shows a marriage of 25 March 1623 -source shows a birth date as 1592/1593 and that there is a monument to John Howland erected in 1897 with funds raised by Mrs. Joseph Howland. This replaced a stone erected about 1836 by John and Henry Howland of Providence, Rhode Island. The earlier stone was buried in 1897 under the new one. The earlier stone stated that John Howlands wife was a daughter of Governor Carver, but after the discovery in 1856 of Governor William Bradfords manuscript of PLYMOUTH PLANTATION, it was known that he married Elizabeth Tilley, daughter of John Tilley and his wife who were, also, passengers on the Mayflower. John Howland boarded the Mayflower in England in September 1620, arrived in Provicetown Harbor, November 21, 1620 and although called a manservant of Governor Carver, he signed the Mayflower Compact in Plymouth Harbor on December 21, 1620. Within a few years he married Elizabeth Tilley, built a house on the First Street and gradually as land was allotted to each family he acquired 4 acres on Watsons Hill in Plymouth and considerable acreage in Duxbury. On February 2, 1638/1639 he bought from John Jenney the property called Rocky Nook, now in Kingston, and 20 acres of which were owned by our Pilgrim John Howland Society. He served in the General Court of Plymouth as Committeeman in 1637, 1639-165 and a Deputy 1652, 1659, 1661-1668, and 1670. -source shows a birth year as 1602 (this is in dispute with the Pilgrim John Howland Society as a John Howlett was baptized in 1602 in England on that date). -source shows John born in 1593 and died in 1673/1674 On 14 August 1623 when John was 31, he married Elizabeth TILLEY, daughter of John TILLEY, and Joan Hurst, in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts. Born on 30, August 1607 in Henlow, Bedford, England. Elizabeth died in at the home of his daughter, Lydia Browne in Swansea (now in East Providence, Rhode Island), Barnstable, Massachusetts on 21 December 1687; she was 80. -- Thirteenth signer of the Mayflower Compact. Came to America as an indentured servant of John Carver, possibly a scribe. Was to serve 7 years or until debt paid. Durning a storm, fell overboard and was rescued by Edward Doty. One of the exploring party after landing at Plymouth Rock. Member of the 'Undertakers' group of settlers that bought the rights of the colony from the original investors. In 1634 placed in command of the Kennebec Trading Post. In 1641 appointed Deputy of the General Court, Died February 23, 1672, but not buried until May 29, 1672. Join the Pilgrims of South Hampton in 1620, Upon the death of John Carver and his wife, indenture was ended and he became head of the Carver Household. Presided over only witch trial at the colony. The wife of William Holmes a Lt. of John Standish was accused of being a witch by Dinah Sylvester. Was asked what evidence she had, she replied that 'she came to me in the shape of a witch', when further questioned was determined that the shape was that of a bear. To discourage such nonsense, Dinah was fined 5 lbs and whipped.

The Descendants of John Howland of the Mayflower for Five Generations Vol. 1: Through his First Child Desire Howland, and her husband, Captain John Gorham. by Elizabeth Pearson White, Picton Press (Camden, Maine, 1990) John Howland of Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England, a passenger on the famous ship Mayflower, which sailed from Plymouth, England, in the autumn of 1620, was the indentured servant of Mr. John Carver, a wealthy Londoner, who became the first governor of New Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts. On November 11, 1620, as the ship lay at anchor in Cape Cod Bay, John Holand was the thirteenth man to sign the Mayflower Compact, the agreement which laid the foundation for the new town that the able-bodied men on board the Mayflower planned to create when the group landed in what was to become Plymouth, Massachusetts. The son of Henry and Margaret Howland, John Howland was born about 1592 and grew up in Fenstanton, a town nine miles northwest of Cambridge on the old Roman Road. No baptismal record has been found for John Howland but he was said to have been 'above eighty years' when he died in Rocky Nook, Kingston, near Plymouth February 23, 1672. His father, Henry Howland, yeoman, died in Fenstanton May 17, 1635, and his mother, Margaret, was buried there July 31, 1629. Two of his brother, Arthur and Henry migrated to Plymouth Colony within the first twenty years, and left many descendants, making it more difficult to sort out and identify their many descendants. John Howland was called by Governor William Bradford 'a lusty younge man.' He was one of the hired hands amond the Mayflower company, being neither a 'Saint,' as the Pilgrims were called, nor a 'Stranger' engaged for a specific duty, as was the soldier, Captain Myles Standish. During the voyage across the North Atlantic, the Mayflower was buffeted by severe autumn storms during which she was forced to drop her sails and head into the wind, wollowing in the mountainous waves. John Howland ventured on deck and was washed overboard into the boiling sea. In Governor Bradford's words, 'It pleased God that he caught hould of ye halliards which hunge over board, and rane ou at length; yet he was held up. . . and then with a boat hooke and other mens got into ye ship again.' The Carver family, with whom John Lived, survived the terrible sickness of the first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring, on an unusually hot day in April, Governor Carver, according to Bradford, came out of his cornfield feeling ill. He passed into a coma and 'never spake more.' His wife, Kathrine, died soon after her husband. Since the Carvers had no children, John Howland is thought to have inherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately 'bought his freedom' but no record has survived. On or about what was then New Year's Day, March 25, 1623 (old style), John Howland married his fellow Mayflower passenger, Elizabeth Tilley. She was only fifteen years old. The early land records of the Colony of New Plymouth contain an account of the Division of Land in 1623 in which John Howland, as head of a household, received four acres 'on the Southside of the brook to the woodward.' As each settler was to receive one acre it is somewhat puzzling why he received four acres. According to Franklyn Howland, in his book, The History of Arthur, Henry and John Howland and Their Descendants, Governor Carver's family consisted of John Carver, himself, his wife, Kathrine, John Howland, a ward named Desire Minter, a man servant named Roger Wilder, a boy, Jasper More, a boy, William Latham, and an unnamed servant maid. When Elizabeth Tilley's parents John and Joan Tilley and her uncle, Edward Tilley, died the first winter, Elizabeth became part of the Carver household. Roger Wilder died the first winter. Governor Carver died a few months later in April of 1621, and his wife died in May 1621. The boy, Jasper More died December 6, 1621, and the servant maid died soon after. That left John Howland as the head of the household containing four people, the other three being Elizabeth Tilley, Desire Minter and the lad, William Latham. Desire Minter was a ward of Governor Carver and was probably about 15 years old when she sailed on the Mayflower in 1620. She was the daughter of her mother's first marriage. Her mother was one of the separatists at Leyden, married first in 1618 and was twice widowed before 1622. John and Elizabeth Howland were very fond of Desire Minter and named their first child after her. In 1626 John Howland became one of the forty-two colonists who assumed Plymouth Colony's debt of L1800 owed to the Merchant Adventurers of London. In order to pay off this mortgage, a monopoly in the Colony's trade was granted to William Bradford, Isaac Allerton and Myles Standish, who chose John Howland as one their partners, or undertakers, in the project. Later they established a trading post far to the northward, on the Kennebec River, at the present site of Augusta, Maine. John was put in charge of the trading post and a brisk trade developed there in beaver, otter and other furs gathered by the Indians. John's family may have spent some time with him in Maine, and some of his children may have been born there. When the Division of Cattle was made June 1, 1627, (new style), only fort-two of the original group of ninety-nine people who reached Plymouth in the Mayflower were still living there. All of the members of each family were listed in the records, including John and Elizabeth Howland, who now had two children, Desire and John, Jr. Eight more children were born to them in the ensuing years, whom they named Hope, Elizabeth, Lydia, Hannah, Joseph, Jabez, Ruth and Isaac. In 1633 John Howland was made a freeman of Plymouth. During his lifetime he was appointed or elected to many public offices. In 1641, 1645, 1647 and 1648 he represented Plymouth at the General Court. In August 1643 he and his son, John Jr. were listed among the men in Plymouth, aged 16 to 60 who were able to bear arms. In 1641 and 1644, and from 1647 to 1651, John Howland was one of the assessors of Plymouth. In 1650 he was a surveyor of highways. In 1652 and 1659, and from 1661 to 1668, and again in 1670, he was a Deputy to the General Court. In 1655 and 1666 he was a selectman of Plymouth. IN 1639 the Old Comers were given a choice of several additional plantations for themselves. 7 4 8

--------------------

Tombstone Inscription: Here ended the pilgrimage of John Howland who died February 23, 1672/3 aged above 80 years. He married Elizabeth daughter of John Tilley who came with him in the Mayflower Dec. 1620. From them are descended a numerous posterity. "Here was a godly man and an ancient professor in the ways of Christ. Hee was one of the first comers into this land and was the last man that was left of those that came over in the Shipp called the Mayflower that lived in Plymouth."


Noteable Descendants: Presidents George & George W. Bush & Franklin D. Roosevelt, and to First Lady Edith (Carrow) Roosevelt (Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt),& First Lady Barbara Bush, Poets: Ralph Waldo Emerson & Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Mormon prophet & founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints: Joseph Smith Jr. and his wife Emma Hale, prominent Mormon apostle: Parley P. Pratt, Continental Congress president: Nathaniel Gorham, former Florida governor: Jeb Bush, and actors/actresses: Humphrey Bogart, Alec Baldwin, Daniel Baldwin, William Baldwin, Stephen Baldwin, Maude Adams, Lillian Russell, & Victoria Rowell. The Bush, Smith, Longfellow & Roosevelt families are double cousins through another shared ancestor, Rev. John Lathrop who arrived in the colony some 16 years after the original Mayflower group. U.S. Presidents Richard Nixon & Gerald Ford, and British prime mimister Winston Churchill are descendants of john's brothers Arthur & Henry. 
The genealogical society, The Pilgrim John Howland Society, was established in 1897 and is open for membership to all who can claim Howland as an ancestor. It is based in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

 John was born between 1592 and 1604. At the age of 21 he was employed by John Carver, a Puritan minister who joined with William Bradord in bringing his congregation from Leiden, Netherlands to the New World. Howland, formerly a servant, was in fact Carver's assistant in managing the migration. He almost died on the trip over. During a storm in the middle of the Atlantic, he was thrown overboard, but he managed to grab a topsail halyard that was trailing in the water and was dragged under the waters before he was pulled to safety.He was a young man determined to make his mark in the new world, arriving as neither a "stranger", nor a "saint" as the Pilgrims termed themselves. The Carver family with whom John lived, survived the terrible sickness of the first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring, on an unusually hot dai in April, Gov. Carver came out of his ccornfield eeling ill. He passed into a coma and "never spake more". His wife, Kathrine, died soon ater her husband. The Carvers had no children. For this reason, Howland is thought to have inherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately "bought his freedom" but no record has survived. In 1623/4 he married Elizabeth Tilley, by then a young lady of seventeen. Her parents had died the first winter and she had become the foster daughter of Gov. Carver. By then he had prospered enough to also bring his brothers Arthur & Edward to the colony as well. The following year he joined with Edward Winslow exploring the Kennebec River, looking for possible trading sites and natural resources that the colony could exploit. The year after that he was asked to participate in buying out the businessmen who had bankrolled the settlement of Plymouth so the colony could pursue its own goals without the pressure to remit profits back to England. Then in 1626 the governor, Wm. Bradford selected him to lead a team building a trading station on the Kennebec River and in 1628, he was elevated to the post of Assistant Governor. Finally in 1633, he then 34, was admitted as a freeman of Plymouth. He and Eliz. had by then acquired significant landholdings around Plymouth and after his being declared a freeman they diligently acquired more. He served at various times as Assistant Governor, Deputy to the General Court, Selectman, Surveyor of Highways and member of the Fur Committee. John and his wife had 10 children, all of whom lived and had descendants. Their 4 sons were oficers of the Plymouth Colony militia, and served in other capacities. He died and was "with honour interred". This was accorded only to the leaders of the Colony, and meant that a squad of soldiers fired a volley over his grave. He is described as a "goodly man and an ardent professor in the ways of Christ."

John was the first person to sign the Mayflower Compact after the first twelve aristocrats had done so. It seems he was John Carver's business manager and was quite well educated. He was one of the key business people in the new colony.

--------------------

(Pres) Franklin D. Roosevelt → James Roosevelt → Mary Aspinwall → Susan Howland → Joseph Howland → Nathanial Howland Jr. → Nathanial Howland Sr. → Joseph Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

(Pres) George W. Bush → (pres) George H. W. Bush → Prescott Bush → Flora Sheldon → Mary Butler → Elizabeth Pierce → Betsy Wheeler → Sarah Horton → Joanna Wood → Jabez Wood → Hannah Nelson → Hope Huckins → Hope Chipman → Hope Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

(actor) Alexander 'Alec' Baldwin → Alexander Baldwin → Alexander Baldwin → Sylvester Baldwin → Roswell Baldwin → Esther Brown → Eunice Palmer → Prudence Holmes → Joshua Holmes → Fear Sturgis → Temperance Gorham → John Gorham → Desire Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

(actor) Humphrey Bogart → Maud Humphrey → John Humphrey → Elizabeth Perkins → Dyer Perkins → Bethia Baker → Prudence Jenkins → Lydia Howland → Joseph Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

(actor)Christopher Lloyd → Samuel R. Lloyd → Adele Ferrier Peck → Francis Peck → Sarah Gorham → Isaac Gorham → Isaac Gorham → Isaac Gorham → Jabez Gorham → Desire Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

(2008 VP Candidate) Sarah Palin → Sarah Sheeran → Helen Gower → James Gower → Arthur Gower → Abigail Hawes → Isaiah Hawes → Ebenezer Hawes → Ebenezer Hawes → Ebenezer Hawes → Desire Gorham → Desire Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

(Mormon leader) Joseph Smith → Lucy Mack → Lydia Gates → Lydia Fuller → Hannah Crocker → Hannah Howland → Joseph Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

(Dr.)Benjamin Spock → Louise Stoughton → Ada Hooper →Adeline Ripley → Sarah Denny → Lucretia Sargent → Phineas Sargent → Jonathan Sargent → Jonathan Sargent → Lydia Chipman → Hope Howland → JOHN HOWLAND

--------------------

JOHN HOWLAND

ORIGIN: Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire

MIGRATION: 1620 on Mayflower

FIRST RESIDENCE: Plymouth

FREEMAN: In the "1633" list of Plymouth freemen John Howland is near the head of the list, among the councillors [ PCR 1:3]. In the 6 March 1636/7 list of Plymouth Colony freemen [ PCR 1:52]. In the Plymouth section of the 1639, 1658 and 29 May 1670 lists of Plymouth Colony freemen [ PCR 5:274, 8:173, 197].

EDUCATION: His inventory included "1 great Bible and Annotations on the 5 Books of Moses" valued at £1 and "Mr. Tindall's Works, Mr. Wilson's Works, 7 more books" valued at £1.

OFFICES: Plymouth Colony Assistant, 1 January 1632/3, 1 January 1633/4, 1 January 1634/5 [ PCR 1:5, 21, 32]. Deputy for Plymouth to General Court, 1 June 1641, 28 October 1645, 1 June 1647, 7 June 1648, 8 June 1649, 4 June 1650, 5 June 1651, 3 June 1652, 7 June 1653, 7 March 1653/4, 6 June 1654, 1 August 1654, 8 June 1655, 3 June 1656, 1 June 1658, 4 June 1661, 1 June 1663, 1 June 1666, 5 June 1667 [ PCR 2:16, 94, 117, 123, 144, 154, 167, 3:8, 31, 44, 49, 63, 79, 99, 135, 214, 4:37, 122, 148].

In charge of the fur trading post at Kennebec, 1634 [ MD 2:10-11]. Committe on the fur trade, 3 October 1659 [ PCR 3:170]. In the Plymouth section of the 1643 Plymouth Colony list of men able to bear arms (as "John Howland Sen.") [ PCR 8:187].

ESTATE: In the 1623 Plymouth division of land John Howland received four acres as a passenger on the Mayflower [ PCR 12:4]. In the 1627 Plymouth division of cattle John Howland, his wife Elizabeth Howland, John Howland Junior and Desire Howland were the first four persons in the fourth company [ PCR 12:10].

  In the Plymouth tax list of 25 March 1633 John Howland was assessed 18s., and in the list of 27 March 1634 £1 4s. [ PCR 1:9, 27]. John Howland was a Purchaser [ PCR 2:177]. 
  On 4 December 1637 "forty acres of land are granted to Mr. John Howland, lying at the Island Creeke Pond at the western end thereof, with the marsh ground that he useth to mow there" [ PCR 1:70]. On 5 November 1638 the "island called Spectacle, lying upon Green's Harbor, is granted to Mr. John Howland" [ PCR 1:102, 110, 168]. Granted six acres of meadow "at the North Meadow by Jones River" [ PCR 2:49]. 
  In his will, dated 29 May 1672 and proved 6 March 1672/3, "John Howland Seni[o]r of the town of New Plymouth ... being now grown aged, having many infirmities of body upon me," bequeathed to "John Howland my eldest son besides what lands I have already given him, all my right and interest to that one hundred acres of land granted me by the court lying on the eastern side of Taunton River"; to "my son Jabez Howland all those my upland and meadow that I now possess at Satuckett and Paomett"; to "my son Jabez Howland all that my one piece of land that I have lying on the southside of the mill brook"; to "Isaac Howland my youngest son all those my uplands and meadows ... in the town of Middlebery and in a tract of land called the Major's Purchase near Namassakett Ponds which I have bought and purchased of William White of Marshfield"; to "my said son Isacke Howland the one half of my twelve acre lot of meadow that I now have at Winnatucsett River"; to "my dear and loving wife Elizabeth Howland the use and benefit of my now dwelling house in Rockey Nooke in the township of Plymouth ... with the outhousing lands ... uplands and meadow lands ... in the town of Plymouth ... excepting what meadow and upland I have before given to my sons Jabez and Isacke Howland during her natural life"; to "my son Joseph Howland after the decease of my loving wife Elizabeth Howland my aforesaid dwelling house at Rockey Nooke"; to "my daughter Desire Gorum 20s."; to "my daughter Hope Chipman 20s."; to "my daughter Elizabeth Dickenson 20s."; to "my daughter Lydia Browne 20s."; to "my daughter Hannah Bosworth 20s."; to "my daughter Ruth Cushman 20s."; to "my grandchild Elizabeth Howland the daughter of my son John Howland 20s."; "these legacies given to my daughters [to] be paid by my executrix"; to "my loving wife Elizabeth Howland my debts and legacies being first paid, my whole estate," she to be executrix [ MD 2:70-73, citing PCPR 3:1:49-50]. 
  The inventory of "Mr. John Howland lately deceased" was taken 3 March 1672/3 and totalled £157 8s. 8d. [ MD 2:73-77, citing PCPR 3:1:51-54]. After the inventory, the appraisers noted that "the testator died possessed of these several parcels of land following:" "his dwelling house with the outhousing, uplands and meadow belonging thereunto lying at Rockey Nooke in the town of New Plymouth," "a parcel of meadow at Jones River meadow," "the one half of a house and a parcel of meadow and upland belonging thereunto lying and being at Colchester in the aforesaid township," "a parcel of meadow and upland belonging thereunto lying near Jones River bridge in the town of Duxburrow," "one house and 2 shares of a tract of land and meadow that lyeth in the town of Middleberry that was purchased by Captain Thomas Southworth of and from the Indian Sachem Josias Wampatucke," and "2 shares of a tract of land called the Major's Purchase lying near Namassakett ponds" [ MD 2:77, citing PCPR 3:1:54]. (See also PCR 5:108, 110, 127.) 
  In her will, dated 17 December 1686 and proved 10 January 1687/8, "Elizabeth Howland of Swanzey ... being seventy nine years of age" bequeathed to "my eldest son John Howland the sum of £5 ... and my book called Mr. Tindale's Works and also one pair of sheets & one pair of pillowbeers and one pair of bedblankets"; to "my son Joseph Howland my stilliards and also one pair of sheets and one pair of pillowbeers"; to "my son Jabez Howland my featherbed & bolster that is in his custody & also one rug & two blankets that belongeth to the said bed & also my great iron pot & pothooks"; to "my son Isaack Howland my book called Willson on the Romanes & one pair of sheets & one pair of pillowbeers & also my great brass kettle already in his possession"; to "my son-in-law Mr. James Browne my great Bible"; to "my daughter Lidia Browne my best featherbed & boulster two pillows & three blankets & a green rug & my small cupboard one pair of andirons & my lesser brass kettle & my small Bible & my book of Mr. Robbinson's Works called Observations Divine & Moral & also my finest pair of sheets & my holland pillowbeers"; to "my daughter Elisabeth Dickenson one pair of sheets & one pair of pillowbeers & one chest"; to "my daughter Hannah Bosworth one pair of sheets & one pair of pillowbeers"; to "my granddaughter Elizabeth Bursley one pair of sheets and one pair of pillowbeers"; to "my grandson Nathanael Howland (the son of Joseph Howland) ... my lot of land with the meadow thereto adjoining ... in the township of Duxbury near Jones River Bridge"; to "my grandson James Browne one iron bar and one iron trammell now in his possession"; to "my grandson Jabez Browne one chest"; to "my granddaughter Dorothy Browne my best chest & my warming pan"; to "my granddaughter Desire Cushman four sheep"; "my wearing clothes linen and woollen" and the residue to "my three daughters Elisabeth Dickenson, Lidia Browne and Hannah Bosworth to be equally divided amongst them"; "my loving son-in-law James Browne and my loving son Jabez Howland" executors [ MD 3:54-57, citing BrPR 1:13-14]. 

--------------------

Mayflower Passenger

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Howland

--------------------

John Howland was a passenger on the "Mayflower" that sailed from England and arrived in Massachusetts in 1620. There are, obviously, extensive public historical records of him and the Plymouth Colony. (Frank J. Arrison 11/11/2008)

--------------------

Howland, John Birth: 16 JAN 1602/03 in Cambridgeshire, Ely, England .Death: 23 FEB 1672/73 in Plymouth , Plymouth, MA. The son of Henry Howland of Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, John came to Plymouth on the 1620 Mayflower as a servant to John Carver. After the death of Carver, he rose rapidly as a leader in the colony. In 1627 he was the head of one of the twelve companies which divided the livestock, and he was one of the eight Plymouth Undertakers who assumed responsibility for the colony's debt to the Adventurers in return for certain monopoly trade privileges. He was on the 1633 freeman list, and by 1633, if not earlier, was an Assistant, being reelected to this position in 1634 and 1635 (PCR, passim). In 1634 he was in charge of the colony trading outpost on the Kennebec River when Talbot and Hocking were killed (see text). He received a good number of land grants, was elected a deputy for Plymouth, served on numerous special committees, and was an important lay leader of the Plymouth Church. The Reverend John Cotton related how at his own ordination as pastor of the church in 1669 "the aged mr John Howland was appointed by the chh to Joyne in imposition of hands" (Ply. Ch. Recs. 1: 144). Howland died on 24 February 1672/73 in his eightieth year, and John Cotton noted his passing, "He was a good old disciple, & had bin sometime a magistrate here, a plaine-hearted christian" (Ply. Ch. Recs. 1 -.'147).

--------------------

John Howland - was born about 1592 and died on 23 Feb 1673 in Plymouth, Mass. . He was the son of Henry Howland and Anne-Margaret Aires.

John married Elizabeth Tilley on 4 Aug 1623 in Plymouth, Mass.. Elizabeth was born about 1604 in Scroobay, Nottingham, England. She was the daughter of John Tilley and Joan Hurst. She died on 21 Dec 1687 in Swanzey, Bristol Co., Mass. and was buried in Brown lot, Little Neck, Riverside, Ri. .

Elizabeth - came to America on the Mayflower with her parents and future husband.

John - was the only one of the three HOWLAND brothers to come on the Mayflower, the other two brothers came over in 1624.


His was the 13th name of 41 persons who signed the memorable compact in the cabin of the Mayflower in "Cape Cod Harbor" in Nov 1620. He signed on as a manservant Mr. John Carver. "A profitable instrument of good; the last man that was left of those that came over on the ship called the May Flower..." - Plymouth Col. Recs.


From "One Hundred and Sixty Allied Families" by John Osborne Austin - 'A lusty young man (called John Howland) coming upon some occasion above the grating was with a seele (Sail) of the ship thrown into the sea, but it pleased God that he caught hold of the topsail halyards which hung overboard, an ran out at length, yet he held his hold (though he was sundry fathoms under water) till he was hauled up by the same rope to the brim of the water, and then with a boat hook and other means got into the ship again.'


When the Mayflower was yet in Cape Cod Harbor, ten of her "principal men", including John, were sent out in a boat, manned by eight sailors, to select a place to establish a longed-for home for the weary band. A storm drove them into Plymouth harbor, and Plymouth was selected as the place of settlement.

--------------------

Sailed on Mayflower. Noted for falling overboard.

--------------------

Came on the MAYFLOWER...Howland was born in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England. At the age oftwenty-one, he was employed by John Carver, a Puritan minister whojoined with William Bradford, in bringing his congregation from Leiden,Netherlands to the New World. Howland, formally considered a servant,was in fact Carvers assistant in managing the migration.

Although he had arrived on the Mayflower as a manservant to the Carverfamily, John Howland was a young man determined to make his mark inthe new world, arriving as neither a stranger, nor a saint as thePilgrims termed themselves. The arduous voyage very nearly ended hislife as he was thrown overboard, due to turbulent seas, but managed tograb a top sail halyard that was trailing in the water and was hauled backaboard.

The Carver family with whom John lived, survived the terrible sickness ofthe first winter, during which many Pilgrims died. But the following spring,on an unusually hot day in April, Governor Carver, according to WilliamBradford, came out of his cornfield feeling ill. He passed into a coma andnever spake more. His wife, Kathrine, died soon after her husband. TheCarvers had no children. For this reason, John Howland is thought to haveinherited their estate. It has been said that he immediately bought hisfreedom but no record has survived.

In 1624 Howland married Elizabeth Tilley, by then a young lady ofseventeen and the daughter of John Tilley and his wife Joan (Hurst)Rogers. Her parents had died the first winter and she had become thefoster daughter of Governor Carver and his wife who were childless. Bythen he had prospered enough to also bring his brothers Arthur andEdward to the colony as well, solidly establishing the Howland family inthe New World.

The following year Howland joined with Edward Winslow exploring theKennebec River, looking for possible trading sites and natural resourcesthat the colony could exploit. The year after that he was asked toparticipate in buying out the businessmen who had bankrolled thesettlement of Plymouth (Merchant Adventurers was the term used at thetime) so the colony could pursue its own goals without the pressure toremit profits back to England.

Then in 1626 the governor, William Bradford selected him to lead a teambuilding a trading station on the Kennebec river and in 1628, Howlandwas elevated to the post of Assistant Governor.

Finally, in 1633 John Howland, then thirty-four, was admitted as afreeman of Plymouth. He and Elizabeth had by then acquired significantlandholdings around Plymouth and after his being declared a freemanthey diligently acquired more. Howland served at various times asAssistant Governor, Deputy to the General Court, Selectman, Surveyor ofHighways and member of the Fur Committee.

John and his wife Elizabeth had ten children, all of whom lived and had descendants. Their four sons were officers of the Plymouth Colony Militia,and served in other capacities.

John Howland died on the 23rd of February 1673, and was with honourinterred. This was accorded only to the leaders of the Colony, and meantthat a squad of soldiers fired a volley over his grave. He is described inthe records as a godly man and an ardent professor in the ways ofChrist.

--------------------

John Howland was born about 1599, probably in Fenstanton, Huntington. He came on the Mayflower in 1620 as a manservant for Governor John Carver. During the Mayflower's voyage, Howland fell overboard during a storm, and was almost lost at sea--but luckily for his millions of descendants living today (including Presidents George Bush and George W. Bush, and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt) he managed to grab ahold of the topsail halyards, giving the crew enough time to rescue him with a boathook.

It has been traditionally reported that John Howland was born about 1592, based on his reported age at death in the Plymouth Church Records. However, ages at death were often overstated, and that is clearly the case here. John Howland came as a servant for John Carver, which means he was under 25 years old at the time (i.e. he was born after 1595). William Bradford, in the falling-overboard incident, refers to Howland as a "lusty young man", a term that would not likely have applied to a 28-year old given that Bradford himself was only 30--Bradford did call 21-year old John Alden a "young man" though. Howland's wife Elizabeth was born in 1607: a 32-year old marrying a 17-year old is an unlikely circumstance. Howland's last child was born in 1649: a 57-year old Howland would be an unlikely father. All these taken together demonstrate that Howland's age was likely overstated by at least 5 years. Since he signed the Mayflower Compact, we can assume he was probably about 21 in 1620, so the best estimate for his birth would be about 1599.

John Howland had several brothers who also came to New England, namely Henry Howland (an ancestor to both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford) and Arthur Howland (an ancestor to Winston Churchill).


--------------------

  1. D: I04446
  2. Name: John HOWLAND , Sr 1 2
  3. Sex: M
  4. Title: Capt.
  5. Birth: BEF 23 FEB 1592/93 in or from Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England
  6. Birth: 16 JAN 1602/03 in or from Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England ("Howland Quarterly", Jan-Oct 1937 and Jul 1944)
  7. Death: 23 FEB 1672/73 in Rocky Nook now Kingston, Plymouth County, MA, USA "above 80 yeares of age"
  8. Immigration: 11 NOV 1620 The Mayflower left Plymouth, England September 6, 1620, sighted land November 9, 1620, and landfall was made November 11, 1620
  9. Burial: Burial Hill, Rocky Nook, Plymouth County, MA, USA
  10. Will: 29 MAY 1672 mentions wife Elizabeth and children John "eldest son", Jabez Isaac and Joseph; his married daughters Desire Gorham and Hope Cushman; and his grandchild Elizabeth Howland "daughter of son John."
  11. Event: Mayflower 1620 Mayflower passenger
  12. Reference Number: 4459

Footnotes

  1. The traditional birth date that has been ascribed to John Howland's bi rth is 1592, and this date has not been questioned even in scholarly journ al publications and books such as Elizabeth White's "John Howland of the M ayflower" or "The Great Migration Begins" by Robert C. Anderson. This da te may be significantly faulty for the following reasons:
   John Howland's wife was born in 1607, and it seems difficult to imagi ne having a first wife that is 15 years younger.
   Most men married first between the ages of 21 and 25. John Howland w as married about 1624. This would put his
   birth range at 1599-1603. A first marriage at age 32 is most unlikel y.
   John Howland is called a "manservant" in William Bradford's passeng er list, suggesting he was an apprentice in 1620.
   Apprentices (servants) were almost always under 25 years old, meani ng Howland must have been born after 1595.
   John Howland's last child was born in 1649. If the 1592 date is acce pted, he would have been an unlikely 57 years old.
   William Bradford writes that John Howland was a "lusty young ma n" in 1620. Unlikely Bradford would call a 28 year
   old a "young man."
   John Howland signed the Mayflower Compact, and to do so he would ha ve had to be at least 18 years old, and probably 21.
   This means he was at least born before 1602.
   2. John came on the Mayflower as a servant to John Carver. He is best re membered for having fallen off the Mayflower during a mighty storm, as rec orded by Bradford:
   "In sundry of these storms the winds were so fierce and the seas so h igh, as they could not bear a know of sail, but were
   forced to hull for divers days together. And in one of them, as th ey thus lay at hull in a mighty storm, a lusty young man called
   John Howland, coming upon some occasion above the gratings was, wi th a seele of the ship, thrown into the sea; but it
   pleased God that he caught hold of the topsail halyards which hung ov erboard and ran out at length. Yet he held his hold
   (though he was sundry fathoms under water) till he was hauled up by t he same rope to the brim of the water, and then with
   boat hook and other means got into the ship again and his life save d. And though he was something ill with it, yet he lived
   many years after and became a profitable member both in church and co mmonwealth."
   John Howland's wife was Elizabeth Tilley, the daughter of John Tilley a nd Joan (Hurst) Rogers (all were Mayflower passengers). Elizabeth (Tille y) Howland died on 21 December 1687, in Swansea, Massachusetts.
   3. John Howland's Will:
   The Last Will and Testament of mr John howland of Plymouth late Decea sed, exhibited to the Court held att Plymouth the fift
   Day of March Anno Dom 1672 on the oathes of mr Samuell ffuller a nd mr William Crow as followeth
   Know all men to whom these prsents shall Come That I John howland sen ir of the Towne of New Plymouth in the Collonie of
   New Plymouth in New England in America, this twenty ninth Day of M ay one thousand six hundred seaventy and two being of
   whole mind, and in Good and prfect memory and Remembrance prais ed be God; being now Grown aged; haveing many
   Infeirmities of body upon mee; and not Knowing how soon God will ca ll mee out of this world, Doe make and ordaine these
   prsents to be my Testament Containing herein my last Will in manor a nd forme following;
   Imp I Will and bequeath my body to the Dust and my soule to God th at Gave it in hopes of a Joyfull Resurrection unto Glory; and
   as Concerning my temporall estate I Dispose thereof as followeth;
   Item I Doe give and bequeath unto John howland my eldest sonne besid es what lands I have alreddy given him, all my Right and
   Interest To that one hundred acres of land graunted mee by the Cou rt lying on the eastern side of Tauton River; between Teticutt
   and Taunton bounds and all the appurtenances and privilidges Therun to belonging, T belonge to him and his heirs and assignes
   for ever; and if that Tract should faile, then to have all my Right t itle and Interest by and in that Last Court graunt to mee in any
   other place, To belonge to him his heires and assignes for ever;
   Item I give and bequeath unto my son Jabez howland all those my upla nd and Meadow That I now posesse at Satuckett and
   Paomett, and places adjacent, with all the appurtenances and privilid ges, belonging therunto, and all my right title and Interest
   therin, To belonge to him his heires and assignes for ever,
   Item I Give and bequeath unto my son Jabez howland all that my one pe ece of land that I have lying on the southsyde of the Mill
   brooke, in the Towne of Plymouth aforsaid; be it more or lesse; a nd is on the Northsyde of a feild that is now Gyles Rickards senir
   To belonge to the said Jabez his heirs and assignes for ever;
   Item I give and bequeath unto Isacke howland my youngest sonne all th ose my uplands and meddows Devided and undivided with
   all the appurtenances and priviliges unto them belonging, lying and b eing in the Towne of Middlebery, and in a tract of Land Called
   the Majors Purchase near Namassakett Ponds; which I have bought and p urchased of William White of Marshfeild in the Collonie
   of New Plymouth; which may or shall appeer by any Deed or writinges T ogether with the aformentioned prticulares To belonge to
   the said Isacke his heirs and assignes for ever;
   Item I give 

-------------------- John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley arrived from England in 1620 on the Mayflower. They were later married. A daughter Hope, married John Chipman of Barnstable, MA. A direct descendant of theirs was Huldah Chipman, who was born in 1789. She was the daughter of Timothy Fuller Chipman, and the granddaughter of Thomas Chipman and Stephen Smith- all three of whom served in the Revolutionary War. -------------------- ohn Howland was born about 1599, probably in Fenstanton, Huntington. He came on the Mayflower in 1620 as a manservant for Governor John Carver. During the Mayflower's voyage, Howland fell overboard during a storm, and was almost lost at sea--but luckily for his millions of descendants living today (including Presidents George Bush and George W. Bush, and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt) he managed to grab ahold of the topsail halyards, giving the crew enough time to rescue him with a boathook.

It has been traditionally reported that John Howland was born about 1592, based on his reported age at death in the Plymouth Church Records. However, ages at death were often overstated, and that is clearly the case here. John Howland came as a servant for John Carver, which means he was under 25 years old at the time (i.e. he was born after 1595). William Bradford, in the falling-overboard incident, refers to Howland as a "lusty young man", a term that would not likely have applied to a 28-year old given that Bradford himself was only 30--Bradford did call 21-year old John Alden a "young man" though. Howland's wife Elizabeth was born in 1607: a 32-year old marrying a 17-year old is an unlikely circumstance. Howland's last child was born in 1649: a 57-year old Howland would be an unlikely father. All these taken together demonstrate that Howland's age was likely overstated by at least 5 years. Since he signed the Mayflower Compact, we can assume he was probably about 21 in 1620, so the best estimate for his birth would be about 1599.

John Howland had several brothers who also came to New England, namely Henry Howland (an ancestor to both Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford) and Arthur Howland (an ancestor to Winston Churchill). --------------------

   

Birth: 1591 Death: Feb. 23, 1673

American history legend from the voyage of the Mayflower and founding of Plymouth Rock in 1620. American children discover John Holland when they learn of the Pilgrims, Plymouth Rock, and the first Thanksgiving. The Pilgrims' leader Governor Willia

view all 67

John Howland, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1592
February 23, 1592
Fenstanton, Cambridgeshire, England

Who is this John Howland and where did you dig them up? Jess

1602
January 16, 1602
Age 9
Holy Trinity, Ely, Cambridge, England
January 16, 1602
Age 9
Holy Trinity, Ely, Cambridge, England
January 16, 1602
Age 9
Holy Trinity, Ely, Cambridgeshire, England
January 16, 1602
Age 9
(Holy Trinity) Ely, Cambridge, England
1603
January 16, 1603
Age 10
Holy Trinity, Ely, Cambridge, England
January 16, 1603
Age 10
Holy Trinity,Ely,Cambridge,England
1607
August 30, 1607
Age 15
Henlow, Bedfordshire, England
1620
September 16, 1620
- November 21, 1620
Age 28
Plymouth, MA, USA
November 11, 1620
Age 28

The separatist had considered hiring John Smith to provide military leadership in their new settlement, but opted for Myles Standish instead. They had also considered heading for New England, the coast of which was mapped several years earlier by Smith, but were unable to secure a patent, or grant from the king. So they set out for the mouth of the Hudson River, present day New York, which was the northern most part of the Virginia Colony.
In order to finance the voyage to the New World, the separatist had investors back in England, they also had accepted non-separatists to join them on the journey. These passengers, whom the separatists referred to as "strangers", made up half of those on the Mayflower. When it became apparent that they were going to land in territory for which they had no patent, tension began to arise between the two groups. It was decided that before they set foot on the continent, they had to draw up some type of governing document. On November 11, 1620, the Mayflower Compact was signed. John Howland was the thirteenth of the 41 "principal men" to sign.
--Philbrick, Nathaniel (2006). Mayflower: a story of courage, community, and war. Viking. pp. 59