William Phelps, of Windsor, CT

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William Phelps

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Crewkerne, Somerset, England, United Kingdom
Death: July 14, 1672 (72)
Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut
Place of Burial: Lot Founders Monument, Palisado Cemetery, Windsor, Hartford, CT, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Unknown father of William Phelps, of Windsor and Unknown mother of William Phelps, of Windsor
Husband of Anne Phelps and Mary (Elizabeth) Phelps
Father of Cornelius Phelps; Joseph Phelps, of Simsbury; Mary Phelps; Sarah Phelps Wade; Lt. Timothy Phelps and 6 others

Occupation: Magistrate, Farmer, Landowner and Magistrate
Managed by: Carol Ann Selis
Last Updated:

About William Phelps, of Windsor, CT

William's birthdate and birthplace are unknown. His birthdate is estimated to be ca 1593, based on his oldest son's birth. We know he was "of Crewkerne, Somerset, England", but we do not know if he was actually born there. No birth record has been found.

  • 1st wife, Mary, died on 13 Aug 1626 Crewkerne, Somerset, England..
  • 2nd wife, Anne Dover, married 14 Nov 1626, Crewkerne, Somerset, England.
<br/>

http://interactive.ancestry.com/49353/FLHG_SecondSuppTorreys-0070/100630 https://archive.org/stream/phelpsfamilyofam01phel#page/n3/mode/2up https://archive.org/stream/phelpsfamilyofam02phel#page/n3/mode/2up https://archive.org/stream/phelpsfamilyofam01phel#page/72/mode/2up William Phelps, son of William and Dorothy Phelps (Parentage contested.) "Phelps Family of America and Their English Ancestors" by Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps and Andrew T. Servin (1899) Vol. I, pp72-85, Ancestor No. 14.


William Phelps (c. 1599 – July 14, 1672) was a Puritan Englishman who immigrated in 1630 to the American Colonies. He was one of the founders of both Dorchester, Massachusetts and Windsor, Connecticut, foreman of the first grand jury in New England, served most of his life in early colonial government, and played a key role in establishing the first democratic town government in the American colonies. Noted historian Henry Reed Stiles said Phelps "was one of the most prominent and highly respected men in the colony.". Wikipedia

Name: WILLIAM PHELPS

Sex: M

Birth: 15 Aug 1599 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England

Christening: 19 Aug 1599 Abbey Church, Tewkesbury, Goucestershire, England

Immigration: 30 May 1630 Landed in Boston on the Ship Mary and John

Event: Note 1636 He was a member of the first court held in CT, and the court of 1637, which declared war with the Pequots.

Occupation: Magistrate (Senator) serving 20 sessions, and Deputy

Residence: 1635 Helped to found the town of Windsor, Hartford County, CT

Death: 14 Jul 1672 in Windsor, Hartford County, CT

Note:

Notes:

married in CT according to one source; England according to Phelps website

Mr. Phelps, his second wife, his four children William, Samuel, Nathaniel, and Joseph emigrated to New England in the ship Mary and John, of four hundred tons burden, commanded by Captain Squeb, with one hundred and forty passengers. This company had been organized into a church and selected their ministes the day before sailing. They sailed from Plymouth, England, March 20th, 1630, arriving and landing at Nantasket, now Hull, Mass., May 30th, 1630. This company settled Dorchester, Mass., the first settlers and founders of that place. Mr. Phelps took an active position in town matters, and during the first six months was made a freeman.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

William Phelps Sr. was born say ca1593, was of Crewkerne, Co. Somerset, England, his birthplace is unknown. His parents are unknown. William Phelps Sr. married Mary (?) say 1617. William Phelps Sr. married Anne Dover on 14 November 1626 at Crewkerne, Co. Somerset, England. William Phelps Sr. died on 14 July 1672 at Windsor, Hartford Co., CT.

William who was baptized in Tewkesbury Abbey on August 19, 1599, as son of William and Dorothy Phelps. He was twelve and his brother George was only five at the time of their father's death in 1611. Their mother died about two years later. There is no information on these brothers' lives in the next decade. William married about 1618, Mary (earlier texts say Elizabeth, see TAG), who may have been a Marshall. Their first son was baptized in Twekesbury on December 26, 1619. William of Tewkesbury was present at his uncle's estate in 1630s while William of Crewkerne was already in New England.

They may have left then for Exeter, Devon, for Marian Merritt says William Phelps was from the county town of Exeter. When they sailed for American in 1630 they brought their six children. Mr. George E. Phelps lists these as born in Tewkesbury but McBride saw no baptismal records for them there. It is possible they were on some of the ruined sheets and certainly, if born at Exeter, must have been on their lost sheets.

NOTE: Later research, especially by Robert Charles Anderson, finds error with the above assertion that William was from Tewkesbury, but places him from Crewkerne.

William's Wives

Henry R. Stiles in his History and Genealogy of Ancient Windsor, states that William Phelps married first Elizabeth (---), who died in Dorchester, that he married second in Windsor, Mary Dover, and that she died on 27 Nov. 1675, he having predeceased her on 14 July 1672.

These statements are repeated by Phelps Fam. 1:72-86, Maude Pinney Kuhns (The Mary and John, and other works such as Spear (7:63), with the addition of the years 1635 for Elizabeth's death and 1638 for the marriage to Mary Dover. Charles Edward Banks, however, gives the name of the wife with whom William Phelps emigrated as "Mrs. Anne Phelps," without, unfortunately, a citation (Planters p. 90).

No evidence has been found in American sources for these assertions. the Dorchester vital records do not include those families that left for Windsor before 1643 and have nothing on the death of any Phelps. Windsor records do not include the claimed marriage to Mary Dover, and we have no evidence of her first name. The death record simply names "William Phelps his wife".

The Crewkerne records prove that William Phelps had an apparent first wife, named Mary rather than Elizabeth, and that after her death he did indeed marry Ann Dover. The published assertion about Mary Dover may be a confusion of these two wives, or possibly the misapplication of an unidentified document in which Phelps mentioned a Dover as a relation.

Whatever the case, no evidence has been found for the claimed marriage to Elizabeth or for the claimed marriage to Mary Dover. The conclusion that the latter marriage occurred in 1638 probably came from the birth of Timothy, in August of September 1639. The gap of five years between Timothy and the last child Mary in 1644 suggests that Mary may have been a menopause baby.

THE MARY AND JOHN

The Phelps did sail from Plymouth about 40 miles from Exeter where they joined other families from the southwest counties of England led by the Rev. John White the "great patron of new England migration." The group selected John Maverick and John Wareham as their ministers. There is an inscription for Wareham in the Palisade Cemetery, Windsor, Connecticut. William Phelps was a member of the original congregation formed in England to establish its own colony and church in New England.

Before sailing they kept a solemn day of fasting, preaching and praying in the New Hospital in Plymouth. The party of 140 set out on March 20, 1630, in the Mary and John of 400 tons, described as Mr. Ludlow's vessel, with Capt. Squab, and arrived on May 30. A misunderstanding between the passengers and Captl. Squab led to the ship's company being put off at Natasket (Hull) instead of Charleston. Ten males set out afoot to Charleston Neck and Watertwon, were received, scantily fed and then returned to their group. They found pasturage for their sea-weary animals at Mattapan and named it Dorchester in honor of Rev. White and many of the group from Dorchester. of the man "past middle age and of good estates" were William Phelps, Henry Wolcott and Thomas Ford, and among the young men were Israel Stoughton, George Minot and Nathaniel Duncan. These families have a way of turning up in the Marshall family which is one clue that Elizabeth Phelps had been a Marshall. Their oldest son sailed to Barbgados in the company of other Marshalls soon after his mother's death.

Dorchester, Mass.

The Phelps stayed at Dorchester where, from the first, William Phelps was a prominent and highly respected citizen. On October 19, 1630, he applied as freeman. On November 9th he was on the jury for the trial of Walter Palmer for the murder of Austin Brotchus -- the first trial by jury in New England! He became Constable fo Dorchester on September 27, 1631, and on March 4, 1634, was appointed by the general court to go with a committee to arrange the boundary between Boston and Dorchester. On May 5, 1635, he was a member of the general court for Dorchester. From then on he has many mentions in both Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Windsor, Conn.

During this time the Dutch in New Amsterdam, having explored the Connecticut River to (now) Enfield Falls and wishing to have more settlers along the river to reinforce their settlements, sent an embassage to Plymouth. Soon each questioned the other's rights to be there and each reinforced their lines. In 1634 plans were made by the English to occupy the valley. In 1635 William Phelps was on a commission appointed to govern Connecticut as a separate colony. He signed the agreement with Mr. Prince of Plymouth for the Windsor lands, 7 miles west of the river, paying the Indians 2 coats, 40 shilllings in wampum for a third coat and 15 extra shillings. Later, not being able to prove full payment, he honestly bought it over again (1665) for 4 trucking coats or "whatever will satisfy."

William Phelps moved with his children to Windsor early in 1636. He had first built on the south side of a rivulet there with his brother George a little closer into the settlement. William's lot measured six rods wide, but "being drowned very deep in a flood of 1638" he removed to higher ground. When he moved to higher ground he described his new location as "bounded at one point 40 rods from my dwelling house where it is bounded South by a little brook that falls into the river (Farmington)." Samuel Phelps and John Bartlett witnessed the deed there. This was his meadow lot out on the Poquonock Road just before one comes to Stoughton House, the old stone fort.

William continued his responsible place in Windsor. As a member of the general court in 1637 he declared war against the Pequots. He was a magistrate from 1638 to 1642 and from 1658 to 1662 and foreman of the first grand jury in 1643. He was frequently mentioned as on the petit jury and in 1641 was appointed with a Mr. Welles of Hartford on a committee on lying! It is said that he was an excellent, pious upright man in his public and private life and truly a pillar of Church and State. By the time he had grown elderly and had a son of his name, he became known as "Ould Mr. Phelps" and as such the old church record enters his death on July 14, 1672, after a 42-year residence in New England of which 36 were spent in Windsor. He was buried on the 15th day of July. No probate has been found for William Phelps; he had probably distributed his property among his children before his death.

Children of William Phelps Sr. and Mary (?)

William Phelps b. c 1618, d. 17 Feb 1681/82

Richard Phelps

Samuel Phelps+ b. c 1621, d. 15 May 1669

Deacon Nathaniel Phelps+ b. c 1624, d. 27 May 1702

Infant Phelps b. b 8 Jan 1623/24

Children of William Phelps Sr. and Anne Dover

Cornelius Phelps

Mary Phelps b. c 1628, d. young, twin

Joseph Phelps+ b. c 1628, d. 1684, twin

Mary Phelps b. c 1629, d. young

Sarah Phelps b. c 1632, d. 10 Jul 1659

Lt. Timothy Phelps+ b. 1 Sep 1639, d. 1719

Mary Phelps+ b. 2 Mar 1644, d. 13 Feb 1725/26

Citations

[S55] Maude Pinney Kuhns, The MARY AND JOHN, Page. 198.

[S74] Nancy S. McBride, Phelps-Marshall Kinship, Page 10.

[S134] F.A.S.G. Fyrtle Stevens Hyde, "unknown short article title."

[S240] Peter Haring Judd, The Hatch and Brood of Time, Page 301.

[S135] Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps Phelps Family, 1:72.

[S209] Myrtle Stevens Hyde, "William Phelps."


The first mention, yet discovered, of Andrew Moore, /\

of Poquonnock, Conn., is the record of his marriage, which is as

follows: "Andrew Moore & fara Phelpes yt was Dafter of

famuell Phelpes ware married by capten Newberry, february. 15,

1671."' Samuel Phelps was the son of William, the immigrant,

who came to Dorchester, Mass., in 1630, and thence to Windsor,

Conn., in 1636. He married Sarah (dau. of Edward) Griswold

Nov. 10, 1650, and "Sarah Phelps was born in March, the latter

end of 1653." (JV/ndsor Tcnun Record.') The Phelps family came

from Tewkesbury, England, on the ship Mary and John. Sarah

Griswold, b. Kenilworth, England, in 1628, came to America with

her father in 1639. The)' settled in Windsor, Conn.


Phelps Entries in 'The Great Migration Begins'

First published in Phelps Connections newsletter, Volume 6, No. 1, Winter 1997, Page 409. By Margaret P. Swanson(1)

Info from the remarkable site http://family.phelpsinc.com :

William Phelps of Crewkerne had two wives (1) Mary ____, buried 1626, and (2) Anne Dover who probably accompanied him and children by both wives to Dorchester, Massaschusetts. William Phelps of Crewkerne, his wife, and six children "emigrated to New England in the ship Mary and John, of four hundred totes burden, commanded by Captain Squeb, with one hundred and forty' passengers. This company had been organized into a church and selected their ministers the day before sailing, as previously stated."

The long-awaited Volume III of "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633", by Robert Charles Anderson (Boston NEHGS: 1995) has finally been released. Of particular interest to many PC members are the Phelps items.

The first of these is Richard PHELPS, origin and date of immigration unknown, who is mentioned in only two records. The earliest is in Dorchester, MA, 1633, and mentions his fence as a boundary. The second entry is a fine for drunkenness in 1635-36. Anderson states that no evidence exists for the hypothesis that Richard had a relationship to William PHELPS or George PHELPS who also lived in Dorchester. Indeed he states the possibility that each incident refers to a different individual.

Numbers in brackets (e.g, [W19]) or prefixing names refer to the Phelps & Servin ancestral numbers. Any links are to the excerpts scanned from the original book.

The second item, William PHELPS, has a far more extensive entry and is of special interest to many PC members. Of special significance is the recognition of his origin as Crewkerne, Somersetshire, and his birth date, about 1593. Twenty five years was the approximate age of the first marriage of a man so his estimated birth was calculated from his marriage date. This marriage date is unknown but is presumed to have occurred by 1618, since he had a child baptized at Crewkerne, 9 September 1618. Mary ( ) PHELPS, the first wife, was buried at Crewkerne, 13 August 1626. She was the mother of four children, all baptized at Crewkerne: William [W19] bapt. 9 Sep 1618; Samuel [W21] bapt. 5 Aug 1621; infant, bur. Crewkerne, Jan 1623-24; and Nathaniel [W22] bapt. 6 Mar 1624-25.

William married 2) at Crewkerne, 14 Nov 1626, Ann DOVER. Ann was the mother of seven children: Cornelius, bapt. 13 Oct 1627; Joseph (a twin) [W23] and Mary (a twin), bapt. 13 Nov 1628; another Mary, bapt. 6 Dec 1629, all baptized at Crewkerne. The first Mary died soon after birth and there is no further record of Cornelius and the second Mary, both of whom are presumed to have died young. Ann had three additional children born in America: Sarah [W20], b. about 1632; Timothy [W24]; and Mary [W25]. The latter of the two were born in Windsor, CT. See "The American Genealogist" 65:161-166 (1990) for Myrtle Stevens Hyde's article which resolves the problem of the identity of the wives of William Phelps and contains all the Crewkerne records cited by Anderson.

Of special note is the omission of George PHELPS as an immigrant on the Mary and John. Two George PHILLIPS are identified as immigrating before 1633. The first was George PHILLIPS, minister, from Boxted, Essex, who migrated in 1630 to Watertown. The second is George PHILLIPS, origins unknown, who migrated to Dorchester in 1632 and subsequently went to Windsor in 1635. This George was born by 1592 (estimated birth date based on the age of his wife) and died at Windsor, 9 Jul 1678. He had no children. Anderson comments that the earliest record that can be assigned to George PHELPS with confidence is dated 6 May 1635 when he was admitted a freeman in Dorchester. He also states that the town clerks in both Dorchester and Windsor seem to have been quite precise in distinguishing between George PHILLIPS and George PHELPS, and in no instance in those two towns has a record been noted PHELPS was called PHILLIPS or vice versa. Anderson also mentions that there may have been a relationship between William PHELPS and George PHELPS, but that it remains unestablished.

Perhaps the most important conclusion to come from this Great Migration Study is recognition by a consensus of recognized genealogical scholars that William PHELPS of Massachusetts and Connecticut is NOT the William PHELPS of Tewkesbury records. Their conclusions reinforce those reached through the research done by Burt Spear and The Mary and John Clearing House which some have refused to accept.

Several family genealogies were listed in the key to titles used in more than one biographical sketch. Where a title is used in only one sketch, the full bibliographic entry was contained in the sketch. The Phelps Family in America by Oliver Seymore Phelps and Andrew T. Servin was not identified as a source. This is only one more indication that any statement it contains needs careful verification from records which were not available to the authors one hundred years ago. Certainly errors it contains should not be perpetuated when those errors are identified and supported with evidence from primary sources.

—Margaret P. Swanson, Genealogist

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

^ 1 By Margaret P. Swanson "Phelps Entries in The Great Migration Begins," Phelps Connections newsletter. Volume 6, No. 1, Winter 1997, Page 409. Margaret Phelps Swanson is co-founder with Nancy Pennington of the Phelps Connections, the former family genealogy association, no longer in operation. Permission is granted to copy or reproduce information in "Phelps Connection" by any means with the following restriction:

All sources must be fully acknowledged.

Reproductions from this issue not to be sold for profit.

If any article is reprinted or edited, please send a copy before publication to either PC Newsletter Editor or PC Genealogist for proofreading. Also send a copy of article after it is published to the same PC officer.

A copy of these restrictions accompany each article copied.


http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~steeles/Steele/d126.htm#P2021

William PHELPS(18764) was born about 1593 in Somerset Co., ENG.(18765) (18766)(18767) (18768) He immigrated on 30 May 1630 to Nantasket Bay, Plymouth Co., MA.(18769) (18770)(18771) He was a Magistrate between 1638 and 1642 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. (18772)

  • He died on 14 Jul 1672 in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. (18773) (18774)(18775) (18776) He arrived on the ship Mary & John. (18777)
  • He was married to Mary (m. William Phelps) about 1617 in Crewkerne, Somerset Co., ENG. (18778)(18779)
  • Children were:
  1. William PHELPS,
  2. Samuel PHELPS,
  3. Nathaniel PHELPS.
  • He was married to Ann DOVER on 14 Nov 1626 in Crewkerne, Somerset Co., ENG.(18780) (18781)(18782) (18783)
  • Children were:
  1. Cornelius PHELPS ,
  2. Joseph PHELPS,
  3. Mary PHELPS ,
  4. Mary PHELPS,
  5. Sarah PHELPS ,
  6. Timothy PHELPS,
  7. Mary PHELPS.

William bpt. 19 Aug. 1599, Tewkesbury. (Phelps and Servin mistakenly believed that this William emigrated to Dorchester.)

  • parents: William Phelps b 1560 & Dorothy

Children of William Phelps & Elizabeth _____(1) (Phelps and Servin p. 95)

  1. Richard Phelps bpt. 26 Dec. 1619, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England. He possibly died in England. There was a Richard Phelps on the Mary & John in 1630, but it is unknown if he was the one bpt. in 1619, or another, bpt, 26 Dec. 1609. in Tewkesbury, probably the brother of William & George. This Richard had a house in Dorchester, Massachusetts in 1633 and he left for Barbados on 2 May 1635, Nothing more is known about him. If this was the Richard bpt. in 1619, he would have been only 14 in 1633 and 16 in 1635.
  2. William Phelps Jr. born after 1520, England. m. (1) Isabel Wilson, June 1645 (1616-1674) pod. a sister of Robert Wilson of Windsor. m. (2) Sarah Pinney, 20 Dec. 1676, Windsor (b, 1648) dau. of Humphrey & Mary Hull (Finny 4). William d. 7 Feb. 1681, Windsor. The Phelps Gen. p. 87 says his first wife was prob. on the Mary & John in 1630, but no supporting evidence has been found. No children.
  3. Sarah Phelps b. a. 1623, England. m. William Wade of Middletown, Connecticut. She d. 10 July 1650. No children.
  4. Samuel Phelps b. a. 1623, England. m. Sarah Griswold, 10 Nov. 1650, Windsor, dau. of Edward Griswold (emigrant) of Kenilworth. England. She m. (2) Nathaniel Pinney. 1670 (Pinney 2). Samuel d. 15 May 1669, Windsor.

Notes

  • William Phelps’ mother Dorothy in Tewkesbury, probated on May 5, 1617, mentioned a brother-in-law, Edward Phelps. His will in turn, probated on July 1, 1637, named as overseer of his estate his nephew, William Phelps, likely placing William Phelps of Tewkesbury in England and not across the Atlantic in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

Links

William Phelps and Mary Dover [Phelps]

Husband William Phelps, Marriage Between 1637 and 1638 Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA, Death Jul. 14, 1672 Connecticut, USA Burial Jul. 15, 1672 Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA

  • Parents: UNPROVEN - William Phelps (#2876) (James2, Richard1) and Dorothy James [Phelps] (#59) (Henry1)

Wife Mary Dover [Phelps] (#1471)

Birth 1610 County of Gloucestershire, England

Death Nov. 27, 1675 Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA

Burial Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA

Children

1 Timothy William Phelps (#2875)

Gender Male

Birth Sep. 1, 1639 Connecticut, USA

Wife Mary Griswold [Phelps] (#1976)

Marriage Mar. 19, 1661 Windsor, Hartford, Connecticut, USA

Burial 1719 Hebron, Tolland, Connecticut, USA

Death About 1719 Connecticut, USA

Notes on William Phelps (#2877)

!Marr/1 Elizabeth in England, she died in 1636, Dorchester, Ma, 7 chi. "Search for the Passengers of the Mary & John, 1630", Vol 7 pge 63 to 84.

Chi;

Richard b 26 Dec 1619; William Jr., abt 1620; Sarah abt 1623; Samuel abt 1623; Nathaniel abt 1627; and Joseph abt 1629; all b Tewkesbury,

Glochester. Elizabeth died in the spring of 1636, Dorchester, Ma. See Vol 7 p 63.

Notes on Timothy William Phelps (#2875)

!"SEARCH for the Passengers of th Mary & John 1630", Vol 7, page 73; In 1707 he was a Lt. in Capt. Matthew Allyn's company of the Queen Anne's

War. Became a Lt. in 1690, chosen by his troops of Windsor to be their Capt., in 1696. 12 chi

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


ID: I05823


This William Phelps was the immigrant ancestor; from Tewksbury, Gloucestershire, England; in ship Mary and John, in 1630; Dorchester, Mass. About a year later moved to Windsor, Conn.


  Came to America in 1630 on the ship " John & Mary " Remarried  Ann Dover.  Died in Windsor,Conn.

William Phelps (c. 1599 – July 14, 1672) was a Puritan Englishman who immigrated in 1630 to the American Colonies. He was one of the founders of both Dorchester, Massachusetts and Windsor, Connecticut, foreman of the first grand jury in New England, served most of his life in early colonial government, and played a key role in establishing the first democratic town government in the American colonies. Noted historian Henry Reed Stiles said Phelps "was one of the most prominent and highly respected men in the colony.".

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http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=124678292

William Phelps Memorial Photos Flowers Edit Share Learn about removing the ads from this memorial... Birth: 1593 Somerset, England Death: Jul. 14, 1672 Windsor Hartford County Connecticut, USA

Mr. William PHELPS [14] was buried at his house in the area that is now Windsor Veterans Memorial Cemetery. His house stood on this land until the cemetery took over the land, including his house. His son's house is still standing nearby today,

William of Crewkerne, Somerset Co., England was probably born in the Yeovil area, in Dorset or Somerset County, England in about 1593; the approximate year was based on their oldest child's baptized year. His parents are UNKNOWN. He was "of Crewkerne" when he immigrated with his family to the New World. [NOTE: This William Phelps of Crewkerne is not to be conflated with William Phelps who was born in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England in 1599. Phelps & Servin was incorrect in assuming that William of Tewkesbury was the one. In fact, William Phelps of Tewkesbury was still in England and was present at his relative's estate well into 1640's. He never went to America.]

William married twice. 1) He first married MARY (surname unknown) in circa 1618, location unknown. The estimated marriage year was based on their first child's baptism date on 9 Sept 1618 in Crewkerne. She was buried at Crewkerne, Somersetshire, England on 13 Aug 1626. Her record was written as "Marie the wife of William Phelps was buried the xiii day of August". GMB Vol. 3:1445

William and Mary had 4 children, all baptized in Crewkerne, Somersetshire, England: 1) William PHELPS Jr [W19] bapt. 9 Sep 1618, Crewkerne, died 10 Feb 1681, Windsor. 2) Samuel PHELPS [W21] bapt. 5 Aug 1621 Crewkerne, died in 1669 Windsor. 3) Infant PHELPS ca1622–1623/4 bur. Crewkerne, Jan 1623-24

5) Deac Nathaniel PHELPS [W22] 1625–1702

2. married Anne DOVER on 14 Nov 1626 in Crewkerne, Somersetshire, England. The original record says: "William Phelps and Anne Dover were married the xiiii the day of November 1626". They had 7 children from this marriage: (The first 4 were born in Crewkerne, 3 born in America) 1) Cornelius PHELPS, bapt. 13 Oct 1627; no further record, presumed to have died young. 2) Joseph (twin) PHELPS [W23] 1628–1684 3) Mary (twin) PHELPS, bapt. 13 Nov 1628; died soon afterwards. 4) Mary PHELPS, bapt. 6 Dec 1629 at Crewkerne. No further record, presumed to have died young. 5) Sarah [W20] PHELPS Wade ca1632 Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA – 1659, Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. NOTE: The Phelps & Servin had her down as Sarah [W21] PHELPS c1622/3-1623/4, which is incorrect, she was not born in England in 1622 but in Dorchester in 1632. 6) Lt Timothy [W24] PHELPS I 1639 Windsor, Hartford, CT–1719 7) Mary [W25] PHELPS Barber 1644–1724

He and his second wife Anne and his children William, Samuel, Nathaniel, and Joseph boarded the ship "Mary and John" owned by Roger Ludlow, one of the assistants of the Massachusetts Bay Company. All the families, about 140 emigrants, were recruited by the Rev. John White of Dorchester, Dorset. Nearly all of them came from the West Country of England, which included the counties of Somerset, Dorset and Devon. They boarded the ship on March 20, 1630, under the command of a Capt. Squeb or Squibb, and sailed from Plymouth, England. It arrived at Nantasket, near present-day Hull, Massachusetts on May 30, 1630, two weeks before the Winthrop Fleet arrived. These passengers went ashore and founded Dorchester, Massachusetts (part of Massachusetts Bay Colony) in 1630. Many of these same people founded Windsor, Connecticut five years later. (From the Mary and John Clearing House) (In 1633 and again in 1634, "Mary and John" brought more emigrants from England to Massachusetts.)

In 1635 William moved his family to what is now Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut. It was formerly named Dorchester, but it soon changed to Windsor. He and several other men founded Windsor. Their names are engraved on the Founder's Monument on the Green Common, near Strong's House (formerly known as Flier's House), where Windsor Historical Society is situated.

Mr. Phelps was regarded as an important figure and a well respected man in Windsor.

More info to be added later. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I have a copy of the birth records from Crewkerne, Somerset County, England. Margaret Phelps Swanson, certified genealogist and I have worked together on this. She has been a Phelps guru for over 70 years and is currently working on updating the Phelps Index for the Phelps & Servin's two volumes.

Many assumptions about Mr. William Phelps' origins and parentage are still being perpetuated today. Please read below to get the facts straight. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Several descendants of William PHELPS have been DNA-tested and they all matched each other well. Thanks to DNA, it confirmed that William Phelps and George Phelps were NOT brothers. This mis-assumption was mentioned in the Phelps & Servin's Phelps Genealogy in America (two volumes) and other numerous Phelps genealogies. The DNA Phelps project also disproved that both William and George were not of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

William PHELPS's parents are UNKNOWN. Many have claimed that his parents William Phelps and Dorothy, and that his wives were Ann Mary Dover and/or Marie Elizabeth Marshall. These are all incorrect assumptions. He also did not have sons named George nor Richard.

The Phelps & Servin Phelps volumes cannot be considered as a primary source. They are considered secondary source, meaning that other records must be used to verify the information recorded in these two volumes. These two volumes were compiled based on correspondence, not by professional genealogists.


Family links:

Spouse:
 Anne Dover Phelps (____ - 1689)

Burial: Windsor Veterans Memorial Cemetery Windsor Hartford County Connecticut, USA


'Source: Nash, Elizabeth Todd (1922). Fifty Puritan Ancestors. The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Press; New Haven (pp 33-34). "Soon after birth of his first child in 1619 he probably moved south in England to either Somerset or Dorsetshire. With his wife, six children, and brother George, he left England on March 29, 1630 on board the Mary and John commanded by Capt. Squeb from Plymouth. Landed on May 30 at Nantasket, now Hull, Massachsuetts. The company of 140 on board the Mary and John had organized a church and selected ministers before sailing. They founded Dorchester, Massachusetts. William Phelps was representative at first general court of Massachusetts in 1634 and selectman in 1634 and 35. Went with Warham to Windsor. On March 4,1634, he and Ensign Gibbs were appointed by the General Court to arrange the bounds between Boston and Dorchester, and explain what each town wanted. On May 14, 1634, he was part of a committee of men who viewed the ground at Mount Wollaston for enlargement of Boston. He moved to moved to Windsor, Connecticut in 135-36 being one of the first to settle in that town. Was a member of the General Court of Connecticut in 1636 and 1637, the first court in Connecticut. One of the commissioners appointed to govern Connecticut and a member of the Council in 1636. Man of property who served as Magistrate from 1639 to 1649. Not being able to prove title for land brought from the Indian Sahat, he paid for it a second time (with wampum) and recorded this tranaction with Coggerynosset, Asuthew, Patackhouse, Amanawer, and Nassahegan on March 31, 1665. It has been said that William Phelps was one of the most efficient and valuable officers in the colony and that his whole time must have been occupied in the service of the public."

Fifty Puritan Ancestors has birth on Feb. 28, 1599.

______________________________________

www.phelprica/windsor-second-generation.aspsfamilyhistory.com/history/ame


William Phelps went to New England in 1630 on the ship "Mary & John", with his second wife Anne Dover and six children. George Phelps, who may have been a brother of William Phelps, sailed on the same ship. They sailed from Plymouth, England on 20 Mar 1630 and arrived at Nantasket (later renamed Hull), Massachusetts on 30 May 1630. This company founded a settlement at Dorchester, Massachusetts.

William Phelps applied to be made a freeman on 19 Oct 1630 and was admitted 18 May 1631. He was deputy from Dorchester to the Massachusetts Bay General Court on 9 May 1632 and 6 May 1635. While in Dorchester he served also as constable, selectman, and member of a boundary committee.

On 3 Mar 1635/6, William Phelps was appointed by Massachusetts Bay as one of the commissioners for the new towns on the Connecticut River.

Rev. Mr. Warham and 60 members of the congregation in Dorchester moved to Connecticut to settle the new town of Windsor (at first also called Dorchester). William Phelps and his family and George Phelps were included in those moving to the new settlement, although it is probable that they made the move in the spring of 1636. He was second on the list of men who came from the Dorchester church to Windsor with Mr. Warham.

William served in a number of positions after moving to Windsor, including deputy for Windsor to the Connecticut General Court for a number of years. He was one of the magistrates who participated in the adoption of a constitution for the Connecticut Colony in 1638.

His first residence in Windsor was in an area that was covered by water in the great flood of 1639, so he moved to an area in the Highlands which came to be known as Phelps Meadows, on a road running to Poquonock.

There are records of other purchases and sales of lands by William Phelps in Windsor. A settlement deed which he signed on 22 Apr 1660, dividing his property among his family, was entered on the Windsor register on 26 Jul 1672.

Sources:

  • "The English Origin of William Phelps of Dorchester, Mass. and Windsor, Conn., with Notes on His Marriages," by Myrtle Stevens Hyde in The American Genealogist, Vol. 65, Jul 1990 p. 161.
  • "The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors," by Oliver Seymour Phelps and Andrew T. Servin (Eagle Publishing, Pittsfield, Massachusetts, 1899) p. 88-9
  • "The Great Migration: Immigration to New England 1620 - 1633," by Robert Charles Anderson in New England Historic Genealogy Society, Boston, Massachusetts, 1995, Vol. 3, p. 1444-6

Compiled and edited by Allen Alger, Alger Family Historian - e-mail: alger@alum.mit.edu [1]


Emigrated to New England in the Ship "Mary and John" commanded by Captain Squeb. Sailed from Plymouth England, March 20th 1630 and arrived in Nautasket (now Hull, Mass.) on May 30th 1630. This company settled/founded Dorchester, Mass.

Ref. The Phelps family of America and their English ancestors: with ..., Volume 1


GEDCOM Note

Category: Puritanism, North America Category:17th Century American Immigration Category:Puritan Great Migration Category: Mary and John sailed March 20 1630 Puritan Great Migration

NOTE==William Phelps of Crewkerne and William Phelps of Tewkesbury are NOT the one and same person. His parents are UNKNOWN. They were often conflated. He was always referred as "Mr. Phelps". PLEASE READ this thoroughly before making changes.

QUICK POINTS ON WILLIAM PHELPS OF CREWKERNE, ENGLAND==:<b>Birth</b> ca 1593, birthplace UNKNOWN. He was of CREKWERNE, SOMERSET Co., ENGLAND. His parents are UNKNOWN. [NOTE: birthdate 1599in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England is incorrect. Christening 19AUG 1599 Tewksbury, Gloucester, England is also incorrect.]

: <b>Marriages</b>*1st wife Mary UNKNOWN m. in ca 1618, based on first sonWilliam's birth.*2nd wife Anne DOVER m. on 14 Nov 1626, Crewkerne, Somerset Co., England <ref>Crewkerne Parish Records, Crewkerne, Somerset, England </ref> :<b>Arrival in the New World</b> Under the patronage of the Rev. John White, 130 passengers from the counties of Somerset, Dorset, and Devon arrived on May 1630 Nantasket Beach, Plymouth, Massachusetts on theship <I>Mary and John</I>, a week before the Winthrop fleet arrived from England. <ref>[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Phelps_(colonist) William Phelps - (colonist)]</ref> :<b>Who sailed?</b> William Phelps and his 2nd wife and his four surviving children, all sons:

  • William Phelps, the head
  • 2nd wife Anne Dover,
  • William Phelps,
  • Samuel Phelps,
  • Nathaniel Phelps
  • Joseph Phelps.

:<b>Residences in New England</b>

  • 1630-1635 Dorchester, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
  • 1635-1672 Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut

:<b>Children:</b> William had 4 children with his first wife Mary (Unknown) and 7 children with his 2nd wife Anne DOVER. <ref> Vital records Crewkerne Parish, Crewkerne, Somerset Co., England.</ref> <ref>The Great Migration Begins. Robert Charles Anderson, Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society. 1995. 3: 1444-1446. (also abbreviated as GMB 3:1445).</ref>

  • William PHELPS, father
  • Mary Phelps, first wife - they had four children:
    • William PHELPS, son
    • Samuel PHELPS, son
    • Infant PHELPS, died young
    • Nathaniel PHELPS, son
  • Anne DOVER Phelps, 2nd wife - they had seven children:
    • Cornelius PHELPS, b . 1627, son, died young
    • Mary PHELPS I, b. 1628 died young
    • Joseph PHELPS, b. 1629, twin son
    • Mary PHELPS II, b. 1629, twin daughter, died young.
    • Sarah PHELPS, daughter
    • Timothy PHELPS, son
    • Mary PHELPS III, daughter

All the surviving ones migrated to New England: William, 2nd wife Anne, and his kids: William, Samuel, Nathaniel, Joseph. The last 3 - Sarah, Timothy, & Mary were born in New England.

:<b>Death</b> 14 Jul 1672 Windsor, Hartford Co., ConnecticutAdditional info added by Dorothy Phelps, Sept. 17, 2014. Corrections made by Dorothy Phelps, Sept. 17, 2014. Info updated by Dorothy Phelps, Sept. 25, 2014.

Biography==William PHELPS was often called as "Mr. Phelps" because he was considered an important figure in both Dorchester and Windsor. According to a noted historian Henry Reed Stiles, noted, he "was one of the most prominent and highly respected men in the colony." (Note that William Phelps was given the title "Mr". This title was given only to men with distinction, while the military titles were always used.) Mr. William Phelps held this distinction because he wore many hats, and was veryinvolved in everything including founding both settlements in Dorchester and Windsor, helping rule the colony and so much more. He served continually his entire life. Both books Phelps & Servin's <I>Phelps Family in America and Their Ancestors</I> and Stile's <I>History of Ancient Windsor</I> often referred him as "Mr. Phelps."

Secondary Biography==MR. WILLIAM PHELPS was born around 1593 in England. His parents are unknown, but he is often confused with a William Phelps of Tewkesbury, England. He was first married to Mary (maiden name unknown) (unknown-1626), around 1618 in Crewkerne, Somerset, England. They had 4 children: William; Samuel; unamed (died young); and Nathaniel (~1627-5/27/1702). Mary died by 1626, as William remarried to Anne Dover. Togetherthey had 4 more children in England: Cornelius (died young); Mary (died young); Joseph (twin); Mary (twin, died young). William was a follower of Reverend Warham. William was with the Reverend on the journeyto America in 1630 on the ship “Mary and John.” He was an early settler of Dorchester, Massachusetts and was “among the first grantees of land.” William became a freeman in October, 1630. A month later he was on the jury that tried Walter Palmer and found him not guilty of manslaughter. In 1631 he was chosen as Constable for Dorchester. In America William and Anne had 3 more children: Sarah; Timothy; and Mary. In 1632 he served on a committee regarding whether the colonyshould raise public stock. He was a selectman in 1633 and Deputy in 1634 for Dorchester. He also served on other committees in 1634 to lay out the boundaries between Boston and Roxbury, the boundaries between Boston and Dorchester, and to view the expansion of Boston at Mount Wallaston. William was a member of the first General Court meeting, which was held in May, 1634. In 1635 also served on a committee to setthe boundaries between Wessaguscus and Barecove. Later in 1635 he was fined for drunkenness. In 1635 Reverend Warham’s congregation moved to create the town of Windsor, Connecticut. William likely moved in the spring of 1636 with the majority of settlers. William was one of8 governing commissioners for Windsor that was appointed by the Massachusetts Colony in 1636. When conflict began with the Pequot indians,William Phelps presided over the town meeting that gave the order forwar. When the constitution for the Colony of Connecticut was being created, William served as an advising magistrate for Mr. Roger Ludlow.In 1638 he was appointed to a Committee to help the Connecticut Colony settle claims to land on the Connecticut River with the Plymouth Colony. The result was the Connecticut Colony purchasing the lands, which were executed in 1637 and William was a signer. Around this time he also helped purchase land from the “Paquanick,” however he lost the agreement and the agreement was remade in 1665. In 1639 the Connecticut River flooded and his house was one of a few that were damaged.Soon after he moved his house northwest towards “Poquonock.” William held the office of magistrate from 1639 to 1643 and later from 1658 to 1662. In 1641 served as Governor of the Windsor Colony. Also in that year he was noted in Court records to go with the governor and Capt. John Mason to meet with indians to make salt in Rhode Island. He was on a Grand Jury in 1643. He served as Deputy for Connecticut insessions between 1645 and 1658. He participated in creating the “Blue Laws of Connecticut” which set out strict puritan rules on punishments for immoral behavior. In 1652 he, with 5 others, granted Thomas Parsons the right to operate a ferry on the Connecticut River for 1 year. The following year William advised the Constable in preparing 12 men for the “indian war.” In 1663 he was granted 200 acres of upland and 20 acres of meadow by the Connecticut Colony. William stillowned land in the Massachusetts Colony, as he was noted in a 1666 record. William died on 7/14/1672 in Windsor, Connecticut. William was often referred to “Mr.” Phelps, which was a title only held for prominent individuals of society.

Phelps Entries in "The Great Migration Begins"

First published in Phelps Connections newsletter, Volume 6, No. 1, Winter 1997, Page 409. By Margaret P. Swanson(1) The long-awaited Volume III of "The Great Migration Begins: Immigrantsto New England 1620-1633", by Robert Charles Anderson (Boston NEHGS: 1995) has finally been released. Of particular interest to many PC members are the Phelps items. The first of these is Richard PHELPS, origin and date of immigration unknown, who is mentioned in only two records. The earliest is in Dorchester, Massachusetts, 1633, and mentions his fence as a boundary. The second entry is a fine for drunkenness in 1635-36. Anderson states that no evidence exists for the hypothesis that Richard had a relationship to William PHELPS or George PHELPS who also lived in Dorchester. Indeed he states the possibility that each incident refers to a differentindividual.

NOTE: Numbers in brackets (e.g, [W19]) or prefixing names shown belowrefer to the Phelps & Servin ancestral numbers. Any links are to the excerpts scanned from the original book. The second item, William PHELPS, has a far more extensive entry and isof special interest to many PC members. Of special significance is the recognition of his origin as Crewkerne, Somersetshire, and his birthdate, about 1593. Twenty five years was the approximate age of the first marriage of a man so his estimated birth was calculated from his marriage date. This marriage date is unknown but is presumed to have occurred by 1618, since he had a child baptized at Crewkerne, 9 September 1618. Mary ( ) PHELPS, the first wife, was buried at Crewkerne, 13 August 1626. She was the mother of four children, all baptized at Crewkerne: ::William [W19] bapt. 9 Sep 1618; ::Samuel [W21] bapt. 5 Aug 1621; ::infant, bur. Crewkerne, Jan 1623-24; and ::Nathaniel [W22] bapt. 6 Mar 1624-25.

William married 2) at Crewkerne, 14 Nov 1626, Ann DOVER. Ann was the mother of seven children. The first four were all baptized at Crewkerne: ::Cornelius, bapt. 13 Oct 1627; ::Joseph (a twin) [W23] and ::Mary (a twin), bapt. 13 Nov 1628; ::Mary, bapt. 6 Dec 1629, died in or before 1630. Cornelius was buried on 9 Jan 1627/8 at age 2 months in Crewkerne. The first Mary died soon after birth and was buried on 29 Nov 1628 in Crewkerne. There is seems be no further record of the second Mary, sheis presumed to have died young.

Ann had three additional children born in America: ::Sarah [W20], b. about 1632; ::Timothy [W24]; and ::Mary [W25]. The latter of the two were born in Windsor, CT. See "The American Genealogist" 65:161-166 (1990) for Myrtle Stevens Hyde's article which resolves the problem of the identity of the wives of William Phelps and contains all the Crewkerne records cited by Anderson. Of special note is the omission of George PHELPS as an immigrant on the Mary and John. Two George PHILLIPS are identified as immigrating before 1633. The first was George PHILLIPS, minister, from Boxted, Essex,who migrated in 1630 to Watertown. The second is George PHILLIPS, origins unknown, who migrated to Dorchester in 1632 and subsequently wentto Windsor in 1635. This George was born by 1592 (estimated birth date based on the age of his wife) and died at Windsor, 9 Jul 1678. He had no children. Anderson comments that the earliest record that can be assigned to George PHELPS with confidence is dated 6 May 1635 when he was admitted a freeman in Dorchester. He also states that the town clerks in both Dorchester and Windsor seem to have been quite precise in distinguishing between George PHILLIPS and George PHELPS, and in no instance in those two towns has a record been noted PHELPS was called PHILLIPS or vice versa. Anderson also mentions that there may have been a relationship between William PHELPS and George PHELPS, but that it remains unestablished. Perhaps the most important conclusion to come from this Great Migration Study is recognition by a consensus of recognized genealogical scholars that William PHELPS of Massachusetts and Connecticut is NOT the William PHELPS of Tewkesbury records. Their conclusions reinforce those reached through the research done by Burt Spear and The Mary and John Clearing House which some have refused to accept. Several family genealogies were listed in the key to titles used in more than one biographical sketch. Where a title is used in only one sketch, the full bibliographic entry was contained in the sketch. The Phelps Family in America by Oliver Seymore Phelps and Andrew T. Servin was not identified as a source. This is only one more indication that any statement it contains needs careful verification from records which were not available to the authors one hundred years ago. Certainly errors it contains should not be perpetuated when those errors are identified and supported with evidence from primary sources.

—Margaret P. Swanson, Genealogist ^ 1 By Margaret P. Swanson "Phelps Entries in The Great Migration Begins," Phelps Connections newsletter. Volume 6, No. 1, Winter 1997, Page409. Margaret Phelps Swanson is co-founder with Nancy Pennington of the Phelps Connections, the former family genealogy association, no longer in operation. Permission is granted to copy or reproduce information in "Phelps Connection" by any means with the following restriction:

All sources must be fully acknowledged. Reproductions from this issue not to be sold for profit.If any article is reprinted or edited, please send a copy before publication to either PC Newsletter Editor or PC Genealogist for proofreading. Also send a copy of article after it is published to the same PC officer.A copy of these restrictions accompany each article copied. [[http://www.phelpsfamilyhistory.com/research/william/swanson_phelps_great_migration_entries.asp| click here]]

  • Parents for both William and George are simply UNKNOWN.*We know that this family came from Crewkerne, Somerset Co., England, but we do not know if they were born there. We can only say they were"of" Crewkerne. *William PHELPS hung around with Rev. WARHAM and his group. They wereall from Dorset/Somerset/Devon Counties. Crewkerne is a town in in Somerset Co., situated 9 miles southwest of Yeovil and 7 miles east of Chard in the south, close to the border of Dorset County.Submitted by Dorothy Phelps, March 14, 2014. Updated Sept. 17, 2014 by Dorothy Phelps.

:: We now know that this William PHELPS was NOT born in 1599, and wasNOT born in or was from Tewkesbury, Gloucester Co., England. Submitted by Dorothy Phelps, March 14, 2014.

William Phelps Sails to America==In 1630 William came to Dorchester, Massachusetts, on the "Mary and John", with Rev. Warham, of whose church, formed in Plymouth, England, he was an original member. He was accompanied by his second wife Ann and four children William, Samuel, Nathaniel, and Joseph. (They were NOT accompanied by "younger brothers, George and Richard"; there is no evidence for this "fact" and the yDNA has disproved the biological relationship between the descendants of William Phelps and George Phelps). In the spring of 1636 he removed with his wife and children to Windsor, Connecticut. He resided in Windsor about three-quarters of a milenorthwest of Broad St. on the road to Poquonock. William took a very active position in town matters and was made a freeman within six months of landing. In 1630, In the first jury trial in the New England Colony, William was one of a jury of twelve empaneled for the trial of Walter Palmer, who was found not guilty of manslaughter concerning the death of Austin Brotcher. On May 1, 1637, at the Court presided over byWilliam Phelps "it is ordered that there shall be an offensive war against the Pequots.". [found in one of the GEDCOM imports, no source given.]

More recent expert research has identified William Phelps of Crewkerne, Somersetshire, England as the probable immigrant.[3] He had two wives: (1) Mary (surname unknown), buried in England in 1626, and (2) AnneDover, who accompanied him and children from both marriages to Dorchester, Massachusetts, a town later subsumed as a neighborhood of Boston(part of South Boston). The names and birth dates of his children correspond to the records later found in the American colony. William Phelps of Crewkerne, England is estimated to have married his first wife Mary sometime between 1615-1618, as their first child William was baptized at Crewkerne on September 9, 1618. Mary and William had four children, all baptized before 1625 at Crewkerne: William, Samuel, an unnamed infant who died young, and Nathaniel.[4][5]:62 Mary was buried at Crewkerne on August 13, 1626.[6]

From the Great Migration Begins and Wikipedia:Oliver Seymour Phelps and his son-in-law, Andrew T. Servin, authors ofThe Phelps Family in America, ERRED in concluding that William Phelpsand a brother, George Phelps, both emigrated from Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England in 1630, to the New World.[1] Their identification of the origin of William Phelps of Dorchester, Massachusetts was based solely on an estimate of his birth date, derived from his known age of72 at death on July 14, 1672. Oliver Phelps located a William Phelps who was baptized in Tewkesbury on August 19, 1599, and thus identifiedhim as the original immigrant. He also believed that George Phelps ofWindsor, Connecticut, was William’s brother, despite the fact that they could not locate any records for a George Phelps in Tewkesbury.[1] Recent genetic research has shown no biological relationship betweenthe descendants of William and George Phelps.[2] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Phelps_(colonist) <b>SUMMARY: We now know that our own William PHELPS did not travel with his brothers George PHELPS and Richard PHELPS. Also, we now know that William PHELPS, b. 1599, of Tewkesbury never left England, in fact, he was still in England and was present at his relative's estate. He never immigrated to America. This William PHELPS of Tewkesbury was not the same person as Mr. William PHELPS of Crewkerne, Somerset, England. </B> Note submitted by Dorothy Phelps

Sources

<references/>* The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III. (Online database: AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2010), (Originally Published as: New EnglandHistoric Genealogical Society. Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Volumes I-III, 3 vols., 1995). The Great Migration Begins, profile for William Phelps, Vols. 1 - 3, page 1444 - 1446

  • Parish Records of St Bartholomew Parish, Crewkerne, Somerset, England, has birth, marriage, and death records, www.freereg.org.uk under Crewkerne, Somerset County, England, . Source submitted by Dorothy Phelps
  • The American Genealogist: "The English Origins of William Phelps of Dorchester, Mass. andWindsor, Conn., With Notes On His Marriages", by Myrtle Stevens Hyde, F.A.S.G., July 1990, Vol. 65., No. 3, pg. 161-166. Source submitted by Dorothy Phelps
  • Thistlethwaite, Frank, Dorset Pilgrims: The story of West country Pilgrims who went to New England in the 17th Century, (London, Barrie & Jenkins, 1989). Mr. William Phelps: pages 49, 135, 138, 140, 142, 159, 160, 164. NOTE: a scholarly work with 12 pages of sources, detailing the lives of the founders of Dorchester, Massachusetts and Windsor, Connecticut, particularly in their interrelationships.
  • <I>The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors: With copies of wills, deeds, letters, and other interesting papers, coats of arms and valuable records</I>, by Judge Oliver Seymour Phelps and Andrew T. Servin, 1899,[[https://archive.org/details/phelpsfamilyofam01phel|The Phelps Family of America and their English Ancestors: With copies of wills, deeds, letters, and other interesting papers, coats of arms and valuable records (1999)]] NOTE: While this 2-volume book is an invaluable guidebook, there are many errors and omissions and the information must be verified through PRIMARY records such as vital records, family bible records, wills, and such. This 2-volume set is considered as a SECONDARY source. Source submitted by Dorothy Phelps
  • Simsbury, Hartford Co., CT, Register of Marriages, Births & Deaths, Extracted from History of Simsbury, Granby and Canton, From 1642 to 1845, By Noah A. Phelps, Hartford, 1845. This outlines the Phelps family. Source submitted by Dorothy Phelps
  • Phelps Family History website [[http://www.phelpsfamilyhistory.com/research/william/swanson_phelps_great_migration_entries.asp |see this page in Phelps Family History website]]. Source submitted by Dorothy Phelps
  • Dunhamwilcox Website [[http://dunhamwilcox.net/ct/simsbury_ct_mbd.htm|see this page in this website]]. Source submitted by Dorothy Phelps
  • Find a Grave memorial #124678292 for William Phelps, Created by: Dorothy, Record added: Feb 05, 2014
  • "Pedigree Resource File," database, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.2.1/9981-9M2 : accessed 7 October 2012), entry for William PHELPS. This pedigree is INCORRECT.
  • "Geni" [William Phelps, of Windsor, CT] There is much information here, much of it duplicated from this Wikitree profile and Findagrave and other sources. Many errors.
  • Phelps, Noah Amherst. History of Simsbury, Granby, and Canton, from 1642 to 1845 (Case, Tiffany and Burnham, Hartford, 1845) Page 172
  • "Mary and John” 1630 Passenger "A List"*Hinman, Names of the First Puritan Settlers of the Colony of CT (1852) Vol. 1, Pg. 8, 235*Stiles, The history and genealogies of ancient Windsor, Connecticut (1891) Vol. 1, Pg. 21, 35, 54, 88, 92, 123-5, 146, 148, 151, 154, 159, 162-3, 174, 179, 229, 450, 482, 466, 547, 827, 878, 880, 882-6, 910, 917*Stiles, The history and genealogies of ancient Windsor, Connecticut (1891) Vol. 2, Pg. 562-64*Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut, Vol. 1, Pg. 1-3, 5-9, 11, 13, 16-7, 27-9, 32-4, 40-6, 49-50, 53-5, 58, 62, 64, 66-71, 73-4, 76, 80-3, 93, 124, 128, 130, 132, 138, 141, 145-7, 149, 157, 159, 161, 163, 166-70, 174, 178, 185, 188, 190, 192, 195, 199-201, 204-5, 211-3, 216, 218, 224-5, 229, 231, 234-8, 240, 243, 245, 247-52, 256, 261, 263-4, 272, 274, 288, 293, 297, 299-300, 306-8, 310, 313-4, 317, 321, 323, 330, 334, 337, 340, 343, 346-7, 353, 365, 369-72, 377-8, 419, 460-1,477, 581*Turmbull, A Complete History of Connecticut (1898) Pg. 54, 58, 70, 98, 119, 123, 242, 244*Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society (1860) Vol. 22, Pg.3, 4-7, 9-12, 15, 17-19, 41, 46, 53-55, 93, 191, 195, 197, 200, 205-207, 209-11, 214, 217, 237-40, 246, 252*History of the town of Dorchester, Massachusetts (1859) P. 17, 25, 27, 33-4, 39, 50, 60, 64, 70-1
  • Hull, History of Eastern Vermont (1858) Pg. 689*Savage, A genealogical dictionary of the first settlers of New England (1861) Vol. 2, Pg. 407

Notes on DNA Findings==Several descendants of William Phelps have DNA-tested through FTDNA. This William is from Crewkerne, Somerset Co., England. He was probably born in Dorset or in Yeovil area, Somerset Co. We are still trying to find relatives in England and ask them to participate in the yDNA Phelps surname project through FTDNA.

The assumptions in Phelps & Servin's two Phelps Genealogy in America that William Phelps, George Phelps, and Richard Phelps are brothers aretotally incorrect. The assumptions that they were from Tewkesbury, England connections are also totally incorrect. DNA also proved that William Phelps and George Phelps were NOT brothers, another long-held assumption that must be dispelled also. Because of the DNA findings, we had to re-evaluate Phelps & Servin books. Please keep in mind that this invaluable source is considered as a SECONDARY SOURCE. While it is still a great guide, we must verify the info with PRIMARY RECORDS. Due to the DNA findings, William's birth date is calculated to be ca 1593. His first wife Mary (Unknown) was buried in Crewkerne. He remarried to Anne Dover and had some more children with him. Please check out the website www.Phelpsfamilyhistory.com for more info:[[http://www.phelpsfamilyhistory.com/index.asp | Phelps Family History website]] I have vital records from the parish records of St Bartholomew Parish,Crewkerne, Somerset County, England.<ref>www.freereg.org.uk under Crewkerne, Somerset County, England.</ref> NOTE: Some parish entries arePhelps and others are Phelpes. This info can also be found in Great Migrations Series, published in 1995.

  • William PHELPS, father
  • Mary Phelps, first wife - they had four children:
    • William PHELPS, son
    • Samuel PHELPS, son
    • Infant PHELPS, died young
    • Nathaniel PHELPS, son
  • Anne DOVER Phelps, 2nd wife - they had seven children:
    • Cornelius PHELPS, b. 1627, son, died young
    • Mary PHELPS, b. 1628 died young
    • Joseph PHELPS, b. 1629, twin son
    • Mary PHELPS, b. 1629, twin daughter, died young.
    • Sarah PHELPS, daughter
    • Timothy PHELPS, son
    • Mary PHELPS, daughter

All the surviving ones migrated to New England: William, 2nd wife Anne, and his kids: William, Samuel, Nathaniel, Joseph. The last 3 - Sarah, Timothy, & Mary were born in New England.

Sources for the outlined family above

NOTES REGARDING ACCURACY

Written by Dorothy Phelps, Sept 17, 2014:Mis-assumptions still are being perpetuated today even though we (my aunt who is a Phelps genealogist for over 70 years and I) have known these facts for over 10 years now. Many do not yet know this or are notaware of this because they have not come across this info or did not want to accept it as the truth. Many took the Phelps & Servin as gospel without verifying with other sources of info. These two volumes are considered as secondary source, and primary records must be used to verify the info used in these two books. They can be vitals, land records, wills, etc. While Phelps & Servin's two volumes contain much valuable information,it does contain numerous errors and omissions. It should be noted that Phelps and Servin were not professional genealogists, instead they relied on correspondence and did not always verify the information first. We have found that sometimes some families were "stitched" in thewrong places. That said, these two volumes provide us great information, we can use it only as a guide and we must verify the info with primary sources and other sources. William Phelps is "of Crewkerne, Somerset Co., England". We cannot say with certainty that he was born in Crewkerne. He however did start his family in Crewkwerne, it was where his first wife died and where all of his children were baptized. Some of his children's deaths or burials were recorded. His 2nd marriage was also recorded. I have a copy of all records with me. Any notes regarding William's birth year and birthplace being in 1599,Tewkesbury and his parents have already been DISPROVEN. Many have conflated William of Tewkesbury, Gloucester, England and our own WilliamPhelps simply because Phelps & Servin erred big time. William of Tewkesbury, b. 1599, was never in America. He never left England and he was present for his relative's estate after his death in 1640s. Phelps & Servin sent a letter to England asking for help in finding Wm Phelps's origins. What they failed to do was to verify the info first before putting that in their book. Based on William of Crewkerne's oldest' baptism date, his birthyear was calculated to be circa 1593. We also do NOT know who William's parents are. Any reference to parents like William Phelps and Dorothy or Elizabeth Marshall, James, Joan, etc. need to be removed. Also any sons named George and Richard cannot be included because they belonged to a different William, i.e., William Phelps of Tewkesbury. William Phelps had sons named William, Nathaniel, Samuel, Cornelius, Joseph, and Timothy. They used the traditional naming patterns in those days and these names were recycled several times through the next several generations. Again, NOTE these names were repeated (i.e., recycled) several times in the next few generations, because they tended tofollow the traditional naming patterns back then) and that NONE of them named their sons George nor Richard. Nor Edward nor Thomas. Also, it was practice to name the next child after the first deceased one.For instance, William had THREE daughters named Mary. The first twodied and the third Mary survived. We are currently seeking descendants of William PHELPS and his two wives, with a solid paper trail to participate in the yDNA Phelps surnameproject. We also are seeking those who have difficult lineages to prove. The yDNA is the only way to verify your Phelps progenitor. We ask you to please participate in this important project. We are also currently looking for potential Phelps Brits in the Somerset, Dorset, and Devon counties for the yDNA Phelps surname project.

Please join two Phelps groups on Facebook:1) Phelps Genealogy in America - for ALL Phelps descendants, regardless of which Phelps tree you belong you. It is based on yDNA testing through FTDNA.2) Phelps Genealogy of New England - for descendants of William Phelpsof Windsor, CT, George Phelps of Windsor, CT and Westfield, MA, HenryPhelps (with sons Henry, Edward, and Nicholas) of Essex County, MA, and the Charles Phelps of Lyme, CT (nicknamed as the Related Line) thatis closely intertwined with William's line. And other Phelps who hadorigins in New England. I'm involved in the Phelps Surname yDNA project through FTDNA. If you're a male Phelps or know of some relative who descends from this William Phelps of Crewkerne, please consider joining and participating in the Family Tree DNA project. No other DNA testing company has that and please don't waste your money on Ancestry DNA test thinking it'll help prove your Phelps lineage. Only yDNA can do that. FTDNA's Family Finder test and AncestryDNA are autosomal DNA test and are excellent for confirming cousinships and more). Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

Dorothy Phelps


Mr. William PHELPS [W14 in P&S] and several of his family members were buried on the land behind his house on in the area that is now Windsor Veterans Memorial Cemetery. His land extended all the way to Farmington River, formerly called "The Rivulet". His house stood on this land (on East Street), until the village took over the land, including his house. His son William Phelps's house is still standing nearby today. The village razed William's house in 1960s and leveled the land and the ancient cemetery, pushing all the stones to the back toward the river and burying them. All the headstones are missing. William Phelps and his family were certainly not buried at Palisado Cemetery nor at the Palisado Green where the Founders of Windsor is situated.

William Phelps "of Crewkerne, Somerset Co., England" was born in about 1592-1593; the approximate year was based on their oldest child's baptized year. The birthplace of William Phelps is UNKNOWN, but he was probably born in the Yeovil area, in Dorset or Somerset County, England.

His parents are UNKNOWN. He was "of Crewkerne" when he immigrated with his family to the New World. [NOTE: This William Phelps of Crewkerne is NOT to be conflated with William Phelps who was born in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England in 1599. Phelps & Servin was incorrect in assuming that William of Tewkesbury was the one. In fact, William Phelps of Tewkesbury was still in England and was present at his relative's estate in 1637. He never went to America.]

William married twice. 1) He first married MARY (surname UNKNOWN) by 1618, location unknown. The estimated marriage year was based on their first child's baptism date on 9 Sept 1618 in Crewkerne. She was buried at Crewkerne, County Somerset, England on 14 Aug 1626. Her record was written as "Marie the wife of William Phelps was buried the xiii day of August". Supplement to Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700, pg 59 states "PHELPS, William-1 (c1592-1672) & 1/wf Mary ___; m 13 Aug 1626 Crewkerne, co Somerset/Windsor[TAG 65:163]". Sources: Crewkerne Parish record, GMB Vol. 3:1445, Torrey Supplement, pg 50.

William and Mary had 4 children, all baptized in Crewkerne, Somersetshire, England:

1) WILLIAM PHELPS Jr [W19] bapt. 9 Sep 1618, Old Style (O.S.), Crewkerne. The September 1618 vital record says: "William the son of William Phelps was baptized the ix th day of September [1618]"; m. 1) Isabel WILSON on 4 Jun 1645 Windsor, no issue; m. 2) Sarah PINNEY on 20 Dec 1676 Windsor, no issue; died 10 Feb 1681,

2) SAMUEL PHELPS [W21] bapt. 5 Aug 1621 O.S., Crewkerne. The Auguste 1621 vital record says "Samuell the son of William Phelps was baptized the v th day of Auguste"; m. Sarah GRISWOLD 10 Nov 1650 Windsor; died in 1669, Windsor.

3) INFANT PHELPS bur. Crewkerne, 8 Jan 1623 O.S. (1623/4), The January 1623 record says "An infant of William Phelps was buried the viii th day of January". [(1624 is the modern date].

4) Deac. NATHANIEL PHELPS [W22] bapt. 6 Mar 1624 O.S. (1624/25), Crewkerne; the Marche 1624 record says "Nathaniell the son of William Phelps was baptized the vi th day of Marche"[1625 is the modern date]; m. Elizabeth (__) Copley 17 Sep 1650 Windsor; died 27 May 1702 Windsor, aged 75 yrs.

Wife MARY was buried on 13 Aug 1626 O.S., Crewkerne. The August 1626 record says "Marie the wife of William Phelps was buried the xiii th day of August".

2. William PHELPS married 2nd wife Anne DOVER on 14 Nov 1626 in Crewkerne, Somerset, England. Per Crewkerne record, the November 1626 record says: "William Phelps and Anne Dover were married the xiv the day of November 1626". In addition, Supplement to Torrey's New England Marriages Prior to 1700, pg 59 states "PHELPS, William-1 (c1592-1672) & 2/wf Anne DOVER (-1675); m 14 Nov 1626 Crewkerne, co Somerset [TAG 65:163]".

They had 7 children from this marriage: (The first 4 were born in Crewkerne, the next 3 were born in America) Sources: Crewkerne Parish records, GMB Vol. 3:1446, Windsor town records. Note that there were no Dorchester vital records on any of the Phelps members before they left for Windsor, CT.

1) CORNELIUS PHELPS, Bapt. 13 Oct 1627 O.S. at Crewkerne. The October 1627 record says "Cornelius son of William Phelps was bapt. the xiii th day of October". No further record, presumed to have died young. FOUND the burial record in Oct 2017. Buried on 9 Jan 1627/28 at Crewkerne: The January 1727 record states "Cornelius son of William Phelps was buried on ix th day of January 1627". (Because it occurred in Jan. it's necessary to write the double date 1627/28, not 1627.)

2) JOSEPH (twin) PHELPS [W23] Bapt. 13 Nov 1628 O.S., Crewkerne. The November 1628 record says: "Joseph and Marie son and daughter of William Phelps were baptized the viii th day of November." m. 1) Hannah NEWTON on 20 Sep 1660 Windsor, m. 2) Mrs. Mary (unk maiden surname) Salmon on 9 Jan 1676; died in 1684 Simsbury, Hartford Co., CT.

3) MARY (twin) PHELPS I, died in infancy. Bapt. 13 Nov 1628 O.S., Crewkerne. The November 1628 record says: "Joseph and Marie son and daughter of William Phelps were baptized the viii th day of November." Mary died soon afterwards, about 16 days later. Buried on 29 Nov 1628 O.S., Crewkerne: The November 1628 record shows "...the xxix th day of November 1826. Marie, daughter of William Phelps was buried the same date." (the entry for the person listed above her name says xxix).

4) MARY PHELPS II, bapt. 6 Dec 1629 at Crewkerne. The December 1929 record says "Maria Da: [daughter] of William Phelps bapt vi th day of December." No further record, presumed to have died young. It is possible she may have died anywhere between Crewkerne and the time her family sailed away in March 1630. Or she may have died in Dorchester, MA, but no vital records in Dorchester exist on any Phelps members. (No lives have been lost on this ship). Crewkerne Parish record, GMB Vol. 3:1446

5) SARAH PHELPS [W20] Wade b. c1632 (probably born in Dorchester, MA); m. William WADE on 9 Jun 1658 Windsor; died 1659, Windsor. No issue. (There were no Dorcester vital records on any of the Phelps family before they moved to Windsor, CT).

6) Lt TIMOTHY PHELPS [W24] b. Sep 1, 1639 Windsor; m. Mary GRISWOLD 19 May 1661 Windsor; died bef 28 Dec 1719 Windsor.

7) MARY PHELPS III [W25] Barber, b. 6 Mar 1644 Windsor; m. to Thomas BARBER on 17 Dec 1663 Windsor; d. 13 Feb 1724 Simsbury, Hartford Co., CT.

It should be noted that the Dorchester vital records do not include those families who left for Windsor before 1643. There are no vital records on any Phelps in Dorchester.

Mr. William Phelps died in Windsor, Hartford Co., CT. "Old Mr. William Phelps died" [CTVR27]

Sources for William PHELPS and his family: 1) The Great Migration Begins, Immigrants to New England 1620-1633, Vol. III, P-W, p. 1444-6 [GMB: 3, 1444-6]. Other sources were also mentioned here. 2) Vital records at Crewkerne Parish, Crewkerne, Somerset County, England. They were written in "Secretary's Hand", 3) Phelps & Servin, Vol. 1. pg 85--86. Note: The 2-volume book contains numerous errors and/or omissions. They must be verified with primary records. 4) Dates were from various sources such as vital records, wills, probate, grants, etc. (see GMB to see other sources) NOTE: Brackets [W_] indicate this person is a descendant of William and is numbered according to the Phelps & Servin's 2 volumes. 5) Numerous articles in genealogy magazines have been written about William's origins and his family, including TAG, NEHGS, and others.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Journey to America - Life in Dorchester, MA and Windsor, CT: William Phelps and his second wife Anne and four children William, Samuel, Nathaniel, and Joseph boarded the ship Mary and John, owned by Roger Ludlow who was one of the assistants of the Massachusetts Bay Company, on March 20, 1630. They and other families, about 140 emigrants in all, were all recruited by the Rev. John White of Dorchester, Dorset Co., England. They were from the "West Country" of England consisting of three counties Somerset, Dorset and Devon. Many came from the towns of Dorchester, and Bridport, Dorset, Crewkerene and Taunton, Somerset or Exeter, Devon. They were all part of the church led by the Rev. John Warham. Under the command of Capt. Squeb (or Squibb), they sailed from Plymouth, Devon Co., England. It arrived at Nantasket, near present-day Hull, Massachusetts on May 30, 1630 without casualty. Soon, other ships arrived. This was a part of the Great Migration. They settled at Columbia Point, which the native Americans called "Mattaponnock". They renamed it Dorchester in 1630 in honor of Rev. White who organized the Dorchester Company. Today, Dorchester later became part of South Boston. It was annexed by the city of Boston in 1970.(From the Mary and John Clearing House, other historical accounts.) [NOTE: Mary and John in 1630 was not part of the Winthrop Fleet that came two weeks later after it arrived at the American shores. Mary and John brought emigrants from England to Massachusetts two more times, in 1633 and again in 1634.

In 1635 William moved his family to what is now Windsor, Hartford Co., Connecticut. It was formerly named Dorchester, but they renamed it to Windsor in 1637 under court order presided by William. He and many other men who founded Dorchester were also founders and first settlers of Windsor. In other words, Mr. Warham's church moved to Windsor. They played various important roles in the community. These founding fathers' names are engraved on the Founder's Monument on the Palisado Green, near Strong's House (formerly known as Flier's House), where Windsor Historical Society is situated today.

Mr. William Phelps was regarded as an important figure in both Dorchester and Windsor. According to a noted historian Henry Reed Stiles, he "was one of the most prominent and highly respected men in the colony." (Note that William Phelps was given the title "Mr". This title was given only to men with distinction, while the military titles were always used.)

Mr. William Phelps devoted most of his life serving. He served in varying governing capacities including judicial matters and held offices in early colonial government.

  • On 19 Oct 1630, William Phelps applied to be made freeman. He was admitted on 18 May 1631. This allowed him to purchase land and to participate in juries. GMB 3:1444
  • On 9 Nov 1630, he was one of twelve jurors and he was selected as a foreman for the first grand jury trial in the New England Colony, on the death of Austin Bratcher.
  • On 27 Sep 1631, he was chosen Constable of Dorchester, MA, assigned to serve on committees given authority to settle land and boundary disputes, and given other key responsibilities in administering the affairs of the new town, including serving on the General Court.
  • He also was a Lot layer, Fence Viewer, and a Land Surveyor. He was twice a Deputy for Dorchester to Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1632 and in 1635.
  • Between 1633 and 1635, William and a few others were appointed as members of several committees by the General Court. They helped lay out boundaries between Boston and Roxbury, Wessaguscus and Barecove, and Hingham and Weymouth. He also surveyed Mount Wollaston in 1634.
  • In 1634, William Phelps became one of three delegates from Dorchester to the first General Court in the colony.
  • 5 May 1635, William Phelps was a member of the colony's General Court held in Newtown, now Charlestown, MA.
  • On 3 Mar 1635/6, appointed by the Massachusetts Bay Colony, William was one of the 7 commissioners to govern the new towns on the "The Great River" before emigrating to Windsor. He governed the new colony in Connecticut in its first year.
  • On 3 Mar 1636, the first legal committee was formed, consisting of William Phelps and 6 other men were authorized and given power to hear cases using witnesses, to evaluate, and to make impartial judicial decisions in Windsor.
  • On 21 Feb 1637, William presided over the colony's General Court and ordered the town name change: "It is ordered y the plantacon called Dorchester shall bee called Windsor."
  • On 1 May 1637, Mr. William Phelps, presiding over the committee, authorized them to start an offensive war against the Pequots. He helped organize the expedition to go after them. This conflict lasted two years.

Mr. William Phelps was a Magistrate , i.e., an old a term used for governor to govern a colony. By 1638, Massachusetts Colony admitted that the Connecticut Colony was out of its jurisdiction and it was practicing self-rule. The people of Windsor, Wethersfield, and Hartford met in Hartford on 2 Jan 1639 and adopted the constitution for the Connecticut Colony. This document made it clear that it does not recognize authority superior to that delegated by the people other than God. Mr. Roger Ludlow drew up the constitution, along with the assistance of Mr. William Phelps and other magistrates.

  • The first government consisted of five magistrates (officers) of a legislative, judicial and executive character, chosen by the freemen of the colony, and the house of assistants chosen by the towns. This continued until 1665.
  • Mr. William Phelps held of the Office of Magistrate from 1639 to 1645, making him the first Governor of Connecticut Colony. He again held the office from 1645 to 1649, and again from 1656 to 1662. He also served as an assistant, equivalent to Lieutenant Governor.
  • He was made a Deputy for Windsor to Connecticut General several times from 1645 to 1657.

Sources: P&S, Vol 1, pg. 72-80, GMB 3:1444-6, Dorchester, MA records, Massachusetts Colonial records, Connecticut State Library, Windsor records, etc.

[Note regarding the terms Magistrate, assistant: A Magistrate was what they were called back then to govern the Colonies. William Phelps and the others all took turns governing the Colony. John Winthrop was the head Governor in Boston and they were still under the Kings watch.]

In 1635 William first lived in Windsor, in the lowland of "the Rivulet" [Farmington River] that flows into "the Great River" [Connecticut River]. He was granted a lot that was 100 feet wide, next to Bray Rossiter, west of the Rivulet. This land was flooded in 1638-9. Due to its tendency to flood, he moved to higher ground above the First Meadows further north in 1639. This was known as Phelps Meadows. It is situated on the most northerly lot on the west side of the rivulet, on the east side of what is now East St leading north to Poquonock Road and north of west-east road Pleasant St.

Phelps purchased land from the Indians on more than one occasion. In a deed dated March 31, 1665, Phelps recorded that he had purchased a parcel of land about 30 years previously from Sehat, a Paquanick sachem. He was unable to provide title and prove his previous payment, forcing him to buy the land again. He paid to Sehat’s descendant "Nassahegan, an Indian sachem" and his kinsmen "four trucking coats" and wampum. He had previously paid "two coats and 40 shillings in wampum for a third coat, and six bushels of Indian corn, and fifteen shillings in wampum for the fourth coat; and fifteen shillings in wampum is at six a penny." Many records of purchase and sale of land by Mr. William Phelps are recorded in the Windsor land records.

Last Will and Testament of Mr. William Phelps, or properly speaking, his Settlement Deed

These presents testify, that I, William Phelps of Windsor, on Connecticut, in consideration of a marriage concluded between my son Timothy, on the one part, and Mary, the daughter of Edward Griswold, on the other part; have given and granted, and by these presents do give and grant unto my son, that he, the said Timothy, shall jointly enjoin and possess, together with me, all my housing, lands and accommodations, as also all my estate, both real and personal, both within door and without, with all the property emoluments, products, and income of the same, during my material life: And my said son in to inhabit and dwell in my house, with me and my wife, in joint way; and that it shall continue during my material life; and if my wife shall survive me, she have and enjoy in a joint way with my son the estate for her maintainence as before expressed. But if my wife chooses to settle in any place and to leave the house, then my son Timothy shall pay yearly to my wife, the sum of ten pounds during her material life, and in case I myself in my lifetime, or my wife after my decease, in her lifetime while she abides, to inhabit with my said son Timothy, she see cause or desire it, I do reserve power for both myself and for her, after my decease to dispose a barrel or two of cider and some apples yearly without any harm to the premises, and likewise I do reserve like liberty for myself and my wife, to dispose of my wearing apparel, and whom we shall meet to enjoy them after our decease. Also I do give full power of bequeathing the great brass pan at her decease; and my son Timothy is to carry the improvements of the whole Estate, and to order and dispose of the stock, so far as the necessity of our subsistance shall require, and after my decease and the decease of my wife, my said son Timothy shall have and enjoy all my whole Estate fore mentioned to him and his heirs forever; always provided that in case my said son Timothy shall die and leave no natural heirs begotten by him, that shall either not attain the age of twenty one years or marry, then the one-half of my lands excepting the orchard and pasture down to the bridge, that goeth into the meadow; also the upper pasture by the house that shall belong to the house, shall return to William, the son of my son Samuel. Also my son Timothy is to pay out of the Estate: Imprimis to discharge my daughter Mary, with that which is paid, the sum of thirty-four pounds, which is the full portion I allow her. To my son William twenty shillings, to Samuel ten pounds, to Nathaniel fifteen pounds, to Joseph five pounds – these legacies to my sons to be discharged within two years of my decease. In consideration of the premises we both have herunto set our hands this 22nd day of April Anno Dom, 1660.

Witnesses to the signatures: Daniel Clark, William Phelps James Alford, Timothy Phelps

Entered on the Windsor, Conn., Register, July 26th, 1672.

SOURCE: Last Will and Testament of Mr. Phelps, from Windsor, in the County of Hartford and Colony of Connecticut in New England, The Phelps family of America and their English Ancestors, Phelps & Servin, Vol. I, p. 84-85/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ William Phelps' Origins: Several assumptions and myths about Mr. William Phelps' birth ca.1593, origins and parentage are still being perpetuated today, in spite of discoveries since about 1982.

The reasons for these errors is from information in the The Phelps Family in America and their English Ancestors, compiled by Phelps & Servin, a two-volume genealogy, was published in 1899 and considered 100% factual information. Since 1987, discoveries including careful research by Robin Bush, Myrtle Stevens Hyde, Burton W. Spears and the Mary and John Clearing House , The Great Migration project by Robert Charles Anderson, the discovery of Crewkerne parish records and yDNA testing, have changed all that.

The major errors regarding William Phelps of Dorchester/Hull Massachusetts are as follows: 1. William Phelps born ca 1593 was from Tewkesbury.

  • A William Phelps existed in Tewkesbury but is not genetically linked to the aforementioned William Phelps. More likely, William Phelps was baptized in Crewkerne or environs, including Yeovil and Dorset.
  • William of Crewkerne was most likely born earlier than 1599, based on his eldest son.
  • William Phelps of Tewkesbury, baptized Aug 1599, had a son named Richard christened in Tewkesbury 26 Dec 1619. William of Crewkerne did not have a known son named Richard.

2. George Phelps is William Phelps' brother. DNA testing has proven that George Phelps is not a genetic match to William Phelps born 1593 with the result that William and George can not be brothers.

Other facts: William and George did not live near each other in Windsor, name their children the same, did not have the same education level, nor have the same occupation. All of these known facts added up to them NOT being brothers. George adopted the surname Phelps though he was NOT born a Phelps from Crewkerne, England. Around 1990, this fact was published in the New England Gen. Society journal.

3. William and George sailed together on Mary and John at the same time. William sailed on Mary and John with his wife and 4 children, George sailed on Recovery. George Phelps is mentioned in Great Migration series Vol 5, M-P, pg. 445-450.

4. William's parents are William and Dorothy Phelps. William's parents are still UNKNOWN. No evidence has yet been uncovered.

  • Widowed Dorothy Phelps, the mother of the William Phelps of Tewkesbury, named her brother-in-law Edward Phelps in her will. He in turn, in his 1636 will (when he was of Tewkesbury), "appointed as an overseer, William Phelps, almost undoubtedly his nephew, and certainly not the William living in far away New England.'

5. William's wife's was Mary Ann Dover. There is no evidence of this. The two wives' names were conflated into Mary Ann Dover. William Phelps had two wives named

  • *1) Mary unknown
    • 2) Anne Dover

6. William Phelps of Crewkerne had a brother named Richard Phelps. There is no evidence that supports this conclusion.

The naming patterns used by Mr. William Phelps and his children did not include George and Richard. Note that William's children named their children with names like William, Samuel, Nathaniel, Cornelius, Joseph, Timothy, Mary, and Sarah, but none of them were named George or Richard. Other names were introduced by the spouse's side

Also note that middle names were not used until around 1800 or later.

The Phelps & Servin Phelps' two volumes The Phelps family in America and their English ancestors unfortunately cannot be considered as a primary source. While it is a valuable resource, it contains numerous errors and omissions. They are considered secondary source, meaning that other records must be used to verify the information recorded in these two volumes. These two volumes were compiled by people who were NOT trained researchers and they were not professional genealogists. It was compiled primarily based on correspondence and belief.

Several other genealogy books including Families of Ancient Wethersfield, Connecticut, Consisting of Volume II of the History of Ancient Wethersfield, Comprising the Present Towns of Wethersfield, Rocky Hill, and Newington; and of Glastonbury Prior to its Incorporation in 1693, From Date of Earliest Settlement Until the Present Time, With Extensive Genealogies and Genealogical Notes on Their Families also contain numerous errors.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ NOTE: Additional information on William's origins was written to her niece (me) in Sept. 2013 in a series of emails. And with her permission, this info can be found in Phelps Family History and William Phelps (colonist). NOTE: This information must be fully acknowledged, not copied and pasted without reference. This credit goes to Margaret Phelps Swanson, certified genealogist and co-founder of “Phelps Connections." findagrave.com

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William Phelps, of Windsor, CT's Timeline

1599
August 19, 1599
Crewkerne, Somerset, England, United Kingdom
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury, Gloucester, England
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury, Gloucester, England
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
August 19, 1599
(The Abbey) Tewkesbury, Gloucester, England
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury, Gloucester, England
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury,Gloucester,England
August 19, 1599
Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England