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Hvar - Hrvatsko Rodoslovlje - Dalmacija

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  • Ivan Ostojić (c.1464 - d.)
    In 1514. as a result of the unrest during the Hvar Revolt moved to Poljica on mainland
  • Jerolim Ostojić (c.1430 - d.)
    in October 1463, went to Hvar with his father after his uncle was killed by the Turks. In 1463, the Great Council of Hvar council recognized the Charter of Nobility issued in 1548 by the Bosnian king g...
  • Ivan Ostojić (c.1400 - d.)
    Bosanski kralj Stjepan Tomaš Ostojić Poveljom potvrdio bosanskim kneževima Petru, Ivanu i Jerolimu Ostojiću 1458. godine kneževske a za vrijeme rata i vojvodske naslo...
  • Bertuccio Bertuzzi (c.1365 - d.)
  • Pietro Vitali (c.1765 - d.)

Hvar (in the local dialect: Hvor or For, Greek: Pharos, Latin: Pharus and Pharina, Italian: Lesina) is a city port on the island of Hvar, within the Split-Dalmatia County of Croatia. The municipality of Hvar has a population of 4,251 (2011) while the city itself is inhabited by 3,771 people, making it the largest settlement on the island of Hvar.

History of Hvar Town

The earliest known inhabitants were Illyrians, who had a settlement on the hill slopes to the north side of the town square, on a small bay that came up to where the cathedral now stands.

Around 384 BC, Greeks from the island of Pharos, invited by the Sicilian despot Dionysius the Elder, began to colonize the island, with a settlement on the site of today's Starigrad, which they named Pharos, in order to control the fertile agricultural area, now known as the Stari Grad Plain. It believed that there was concurrently a second Greek settlement called Heraclea, on the site of today's Hvar town. Ancient Hvar also witnessed the earliest recorded naval of the Adriatic, between a Greek fleet under the command of the eparch of Issa and the native Illyrian tribe of the Liburni, who were defeated and thus lost control of the area.

With the arrival of the Romans around 2nd century BC, settlement of the island was increased, but remained mainly rural, based around Roman villas (villa rusticae).

In the early Medieval era, Croats from Neretva valley region moved to Hvar, and for a time the island was controlled by the Duke of Neretva dukedom and later became part of Croatian kingdom. At this time, life on the coast was not safe because of raiding Saracens and pirates, and the inhabitants moved inland. By the Medieval period, the population was gathered in villages well away from the coast for safety.

Following this unsettled period, the islanders asked the Venetian Republic for protection in 1278. As part of the agreement, the southern settlement of Hvar was to be expanded and fortified as a safe base for the Venetian fleet. As the new administrative centre, the town assumed the name of Hvar, and the ancient Greek town became known as Stari Grad (literally Old Town). Hvar became the centre of the independent commune government, the residence of the prince, and the base of the new diocese (consisting of Hvar, and the neighboring islands of Brač, and Vis). The Republic of Venice thus controlled the island during the period between 1278 – 1358, after which it became a part of the Hungarian-Croatian kingdom. After a short time of acknowledging the sovereignty of the Bosnian kings, it again fell under the control of the Venetian republic for the period 1420 – 1797. The Venetians commissioned the construction of a new fortress, town walls, public buildings, and with the new prosperity, villages were gradually established along the nearby coastline.

By the 15th century, the town had become too confined within the old walls, so settlement extended onto the hill to the south. The medieval town was bounded to the east by the cathedral and to the west by the Arsenal, the Governor's Palace and marina. During this time, Hvar was the centre of the economic, political and cultural life on the island, and played an important role in Venetian shipping. Hvar Town and its nobles maintained close cultural and economic links with Trogir - refer to document here for further details and a list of nobles.

The 16th century brought a return to more unsettled times, with persistent conflicts between the nobles and citizens, and repeated attacks from the Ottoman Empire, which was by now occupying the mainland. In 1571, Hvar was sacked by the Turkish fleet on its way to the Battle of Lepanto, and only the fortress saved the townspeople. Just as the town was being rebuilt, it suffered further damage in 1579 as lightning struck the gunpowder magazine in the fortress. Many of the public buildings in Hvar today date back to this period of reconstruction..

In 1776, the Venetians moved their naval base, away from Hvar to Kotor on the mainland, and the town of Hvar stagnated. In 1797, Hvar fell under Austrian rule until the arrival of the French in 1806. The Austrians reoccupied the island in 1813 and retained control of it until the end of the First World War, this was a period of exceptional economic and cultural life for the town. In 1868, "The Hygienic Association of Hvar" was founded, to promote the development of tourist services. From 1918 to 1921 the island of Hvar was under Italian rule and in 1921 joined the Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenians, which was later called the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and succeeded by the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia after the Second World War. The island was modernized in the second half of the 20th century, with all the positive and negative aspects of the modern age. Hvar obtained a new administrative position in the territorial reorganization that took place after the recognition of Croatia as an independent state on January 15th, 1992.

"Census" of Hvar 1673

The information below was extracted from an article entitled THE CENSUS OF THE ISLAND OF HVAR FROM 1673 by Nevenka Bezić-Božanić, published in the magazine Čakavska rič, Split 1991, br.1.Care must be taken when referencing this document, as the original document dating back to 1673 was simply a list covering the distribution of salt to all the households on the island of Hvar. Each household was identified (usually) by the surname and name of the head of the household, occasionally only nicknames were used. This was not a formal census as we understand it, there are missing surnames, and the document has rather obvious transcription and translation errors.The partial and rather haphazard attempt made to translate the recorded surnames into their modern Croatian equivalents should not be relied upon. A number of the nobles as well as a few patricians of Hvar had houses also in Starigrad and elsewhere, so the same surnames (or similar) will be found among the lists for the other settlements on Hvar. It should be noted that the surname "Gariboldi" is missing from this "census" despite the mention of the surname in other historical sources.

  • ALFIERI Luka 6.
  • ANGELINI Gabrijel 6, Jelena 4. - should be " Anđelović"
  • ANTIGO Ivan 3. - more modern versions of this surname are "Starijanić" and "Antiquario"
  • BALETTA karmerlengo 3.
  • BARBARIĆ Jerolim 4, Kata 2.
  • BARBIS Glorija 2.
  • BARIŠIĆ Frane 5, Nikola 4.
  • BENEDETTI Marieta 3.
  • BERSILAVIĆ Ivan 3.
  • BERTO Nikola 9.
  • BERTUZZI Domina 6, Lukrecija 2. -should be "Bertučević"
  • BERVALDI (Berualdo) Antun 12, Marin 6, Nikola 7.
  • BIANCHIN Marin 7, Nikola 8. - should be "Biankini"
  • BILOBARKOVIĆ Antun 4.
  • BIONDI Margarita 5.
  • BIRETIĆ (Beritic ?) Visko pok. Anzola 4.
  • BLAŠKOVIĆ Stjepan 3.
  • BODLOVIĆ Ivan 3, Nikola 6.
  • BOGDANIĆ Frane 8, Margarita 1, Petar stariji 10, Petar mladi 2.
  • BOGLIĆ braća 11.
  • BRACISKOVIĆ (Braciscouich ?) Jela 2.
  • BUČIĆ Grgo 6, Margarita 3, Mate 3, Vicko 2.
  • BUDROVIĆ Antun 5, Jela ud Grge 4, Margarita ud Kuzme 2, Šime 5.
  • BUZOLIĆ Stjepan 13.
  • CANDIDO Nikola 4, Zanetto 2.
  • CARAMO Liječnik 7.
  • CARIĆ Tadija 3.
  • CECHINI Frane 1. - should be "Cecchini"
  • CEVIŠIĆ Luka 6, Margarita 2, Vicko 2.
  • CHIMERA Ivan 4, Juraj 8.
  • CHIARINA Juraj 1.
  • CINGANOVIĆ Tomo 5, Vicko 6. should be "Činganović "
  • CINISE (Cinis ?) Mihovil 6, Nikola 5.
  • CIRETEO Piroman 2 - this is an transcription error by Bezic-Bozanic, correct surname is "Piroteo" - modern is "Piretić"
  • CORNER Antun 6.
  • CVITKOVIĆ Margarita 1.
  • DAMIAN Antun 4.
  • DANIELOVIĆ Ivan 5.
  • DEŠKOVIĆ Vicko 2.
  • DOBRONIĆ Marko 3.
  • DOBRIŠIĆ Domina 1.
  • DOMIJANOVIĆ Dominik 4.
  • DOSCARA Jakov 4.
  • DRIVODILIĆ (Drivodilich) Juraj 3.
  • DUJMAČIĆ brača pok. Ivana 5.
  • DUJMOVIĆ Dominik 4, Juraj 11, Vicko pok, Ivana 5.
  • DULČIĆ Jakov 1.
  • DUSIGNARESI Nikola 3.
  • FABIANI Dominik 3. - should be "Fabijanic"
  • FASANEO Cecilija 8. - "Fazanic"
  • FERADI Franko 4.
  • FILIPČEVIĆ Filip 1, Ivan 10, Lucija 3.
  • FILIPOVIĆ Barbara 1.
  • FIO Petar 4.
  • FLORIO Franco 3, Ivan 2, Olivo 2, Rado 2.
  • FORMENTIN Jerolim 4.
  • GABELIĆ Frane 2, Luka 3, Stjepan 2.
  • GARBANČEVIĆ Anzola 3.
  • GARBATI braća 8, Ivan 1.
  • GRČIĆ (Garcichicua) Lukvica 1.
  • GARGURIĆ Dominik 6, Petar 8 Petronila 3, Šime 8.
  • GATOLIN Šime 4.
  • GAZZARI Aleksandar 12. - "Gazarovic"
  • GIURE Antun 7, Mihovil 5.
  • GIURETTA Nikola 3.
  • GLAVINA (Glavinoua) Domina 4, Magdalena 2, Margarita 4.
  • GORICIN reč Trumbetta Domínik 8.
  • GRISOGONI braća 3.
  • HANČEVIĆ (Hancevich) Dominik 3, Martin 1, Nikola 2, Nikola 1.
  • HANSIĆ Vicko 2.
  • HEKTOROVIĆ (Hettoreo) Archido 7, Antun pok. Frane 3. Antun pok. Ivana 2. Jakov 6, Julijan 5, Mate 7, Petar 4.
  • IVANEO braća 8, Ivan 5. - should be "Ivanić"
  • IVANCI (Iuanzi) Klara 4.
  • JAKŠA Marcela 2, Nikola 3.
  • JELUŠIĆ Stjepan 4.
  • KARKOJEVIĆ Dominik 5, Mate 5.
  • KASANDRIĆ braća 7.
  • KATARINIĆ Antun l.
  • KAVRINOVIĆ Alvis 2.
  • KONČARIĆ (Concarich) Juraj 1.
  • KOVAČEVIĆ Mate.
  • KRAJSIĆ (Craisich) Jakov 4.
  • KRALJEVIĆ (bez imena) 1.
  • KRAVARIĆ Ivan 7, Jerolim 3, Nikola 2, Tomo 6.
  • KRISINOVIĆ Perica pok. Vicka 1.
  • LASCARI Dmitar 9.
  • LAVRETIĆ Julija 2.
  • LEPORINI Ivan Krstitelj 6, Jerolim 3, Julije 2. - should be "Zečić" or "Zecković"
  • LETUNOVIĆ Vicko 4,
  • LISICA. (Lisizza) Stjepan 5.
  • LONČARIĆ (Loncarich) Graciosa 1.
  • LUCIS Jakov 3, Piroman 4 - should be "Lučić"
  • LUKOJEVIĆ Mate 3.
  • LUNIĆ Vicko 8.
  • LUPI Budimir 15, Jakov 1, kanonik (bez imena) 9.
  • MAFFEI Vicko 3.
  • MARAVIĆ Ivan 8.
  • MARČIĆ (Marcich i Marchieh) Diana 1, Šime 7.
  • MARCHIOLI Margarita 2.
  • MARINČEVIĆ Nikola 5.
  • MARINIĆ braća 7.
  • MARKOVIC Vicko .
  • MARTINOVIĆ Lukrecija 3.
  • MARUŠIĆ Ante 5.
  • MATIJAŠEVIĆ Ivan 1.
  • MAZZOLENI Ivan 3.
  • MILATIĆ Ivan 8.
  • MILOŠEVIĆ Jerolim 6.
  • MURATTI Gabrijel 3, Kata (Mutarova) 1.
  • NEGRI Jakov 4.
  • NICHOLINI Jerka 2, Nikola 1, Petar 3 - "Nikolić"
  • NOVAK Dominik 6, Martin 5, Mate 11.
  • ORMA Jakov 4.
  • OSTOJIĆ (Ostoia, Ostojich, Ostogich) Ivan Krstitelj 11.
  • PARŠIĆ (Parssich) Vicko 1.
  • PERASTI braća 15.
  • PERIBONIO Ivan 4, Ruder 7. - also known as "Pribojević "
  • PERUTIĆ Ettore 2.
  • PIEROTIĆ Reamo 11.
  • PIRANESE Marija 1.
  • PLANČIĆ Stjepan 5.
  • POLIĆ Luka 10.
  • POLOVINOVIĆ Frane 3, Ivan 6, Jakov 6.
  • PONEO kanonik 4.
  • PULITEO Vicko 6. - "Politeo"
  • RADOSSIO braća 15.
  • RADUHNIĆ Luka 5.
  • RADUTOVIĆ braća 6, Petar 4.
  • RAIN Petar 2.
  • RASKOVIĆ (Ruscouich ?) Stjepan.
  • RINALDI Tibaldo 3.
  • ROSSI Liječnik (bez imena) 3.
  • RUGHIN Dominik 4.
  • RUJANOVIĆ (Rugianouich) Dominik 4, Ivan 3.
  • SALVETOVIĆ Kata 2.
  • SAMOHOD braća l7, Šime 2.
  • SANTOR Antun 4.
  • SBRAGUARIN Vicko 2.
  • SCAGLIERA. Nikola 5.
  • SCUTARI Mate 6.
  • SIBISCHINI Lukrecija 3, Vica 6. - should be "Sibiškini"
  • ŠIMUNIĆ Ivan pok. Nikole 7, Nikola 4, Petar 7.
  • SOHE (?) Petar 2.
  • STALIO Petar 8.
  • STANOJEVIĆ Dmitar 1.
  • ŠESTAN Ivan 6, Nikola 4.
  • SKALIĆ (Scalich) braća 6.
  • TOMBA Nikola 9.
  • TOMIĆ Pavao 3.
  • TREVISAN Mihovil 2.
  • TUDOROVIĆ Dominik 2.
  • TURKEŠIĆ (Turchessich) Ivan 6.
  • UŠATIĆ Nikola 6.
  • VALLE Jerka 3, Kata 1, Kata 2.
  • VAULIĆ Marko 3.
  • VAULIČIĆ Nikola 1.
  • VESIR Guglielmo 5.
  • VIDALI Alvis 6, Andrija 2, Ivan Krstitelj 12, Jerolim 7.
  • VINIS Ivan 3, Nikola 6.
  • VLAHINIĆ Šimica 1. - modern version is "Vlahović"
  • VISIĆ Ivan 2.
  • ZAPPARIN Paškva 2.
  • ZLATARIĆ Andrija 4, Petar 2.
  • ZORZI Karlo 2.
  • ZUDENIGO Kata pok. Pia 3.

Noble families of Hvar

  • Andrievich
  • Angeli
  • Angelini
  • Antiquario
  • Anzoli
  • Arneri
  • Balci
  • Barbis
  • Bassa
  • Bassich
  • Bencovich
  • Berislavi, Berislavich
  • Beroevich
  • Bertuzzi
  • Bevilacqua
  • Bobozoblich
  • Bogdano
  • Boglich
  • Bonini
  • Briganti
  • Bucchich, Buchich, Bucich
  • Cacich
  • Calafati
  • Canavelli
  • Candia
  • Caravana
  • Casotti
  • Cassio
  • Castriotto
  • Cerdon
  • Cerineo
  • CerIich
  • Chiaxich
  • Chischich
  • Cressa
  • Cipriano
  • Clesanich
  • Clessa
  • Colombini
  • Cubra
  • Damiani
  • Damiano
  • Dechoevich, Descoevich
  • Destrich
  • Dimitri
  • Dobratich
  • Dobrinovich
  • Dobroslav, Dobroslavi
  • Dojeni
  • Domiceo
  • Domus
  • Dragomanich
  • Duimiceo, Duimicich
  • Ettorei
  • Fasanei, Fasaneo
  • Fozza
  • Fumati
  • Fumatis
  • Gazzari
  • Gazzelata
  • Giaxa, Giaxich
  • Givich
  • Golubich
  • Gottifredi
  • Griffico
  • Hettoreo
  • Ismaelli
  • Ivaneo (Ivanich)
  • Jaxa, Jaxich
  • Jovich
  • Juanei
  • Jubalci
  • Kacić, Kacich
  • Leporini
  • Lompre, Lompu
  • Lubalcis
  • Lucich, Lucio, Lucis
  • Lucoevich
  • Lupi
  • de Lupis
  • Lupo
  • Luxio
  • Machiabelli
  • Machiedo
  • Medin
  • Mixa
  • Nicolich
  • Nicolini
  • Nicolo
  • Obradich
  • Ozori
  • Palladini
  • Pellegrini, Peregrini
  • de Petris
  • Piretich
  • Piritei
  • Pontealto
  • Prodan
  • Radossio
  • Rafaldini
  • Raffaeli
  • de Rusehis
  • Scanderbech, Scanderbegh
  • Simonetti
  • Slavogost
  • Slosich
  • Slovignia
  • Sovignia
  • Spinetti
  • Stanoe
  • Stanoy
  • Stipichievich
  • Teodoro
  • Uzinich
  • Vidali
  • Vidossio
  • Vranyczany
  • Vucich
  • Vukassinovich
  • Zamberlini
  • Zecich
  • Zescovich
  • Zorzi
  • Zovis
  • Zucca
  • Zupanich

Information extracted from Rosenfeld - Der Adel des Königreichs Dalmatien, 1871'

Documents

Notable inhabitants

  • Hanibal Lucić (1485–1553) - author
  • Luca Pappafava (1851-1925) - bishop
  • Mikša Pelegrinović (1500–1562) - author
  • Petar Hektorović (1487–1572) - poet, author
  • Vinko Pribojević (16th century) - historian, author
  • Martin Benetović (1553–1607) - playwright, author, musician, painter
  • Marin Gazarović (17th century) - poet, playwright, author
  • Ivan Vučetić (1858–1925) - criminologist, pioneered the use of fingerprinting
  • Grga Novak (1888–1978) - historian, archaeologist
  • dr.Niko Duboković Nadalini (1911-1991),historian
  • Dinko Fio (1924–2011) - composer, founder of Klapa Nostalgija
  • Gabi Novak (born 1936) - singer
  • Marin Carić (1947–2000) - theatre director
  • Kuzma Kovačić (born 1952) - sculptor
  • Slobodan Prosperov Novak (born 1951) - professor, historian

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