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Lott Fayard Indian School Project

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  • Mahlon Holden (c.1785 - bef.1846)
    Mahlon Beeson HoldenBirth: 1788 - Spartanburg District, Laurens County, South Carolina Death: Dec 1846 - Gainesville, Hancock County, Mississippi, United States Parents: Thomas Simon Holden, Sr., Marg...
  • Jesse Lott (1835 - 1923)
    Profile Picture mentions children of Jesse Lott: Lott-Fayard Indian School Ledger of 1883, one of a few ledgers that survived Katrina. The Pearlington School teacher was Miss Johnston, an itinerant tea...
  • Edward Lott (1879 - d.)
    Profile Picture: Lott-Fayard Indian School Ledger of 1883, one of a few ledgers that survived Katrina. The Pearlington School teacher was Miss Johnston, an itinerant teacher who was at each school in t...
  • Samuel David Lott (1874 - d.)
    Profile Picture mentions sibling group: Lott-Fayard Indian School Ledger of 1883, one of a few ledgers that survived Katrina. The Pearlington School teacher was Miss Johnston, an itinerant teacher who ...
  • wife of John Lott, Jr. (1724 - bef.1764)
    Name seen as Delilah, birth name unknown. Adding to . John Lott II (John1) was born abt 1722 probably at Isle of Wight County, Virginia (of Edgecombe County,33 North Carolina, later Duplin County, Nort...

Collaborators can take information and apply here. Please follow and go through the existing collaborators. Please don't add collaborators.==Lott Fayard Indian School was a consortium of schools in southern Mississippi begun for girls as well as boys and the registries of 2 of 5 the schools remain unaffected by flooding that destroyed the other ledgers. The Marion Co schools' had an itinerant Ms Johnson was the teacher 3 month at each school;, we know from the pictures and family history matching to the Leony Lott family who were Cheraw out of Cheraw SC lineage and of Cheraw, MS Cooper Roll 1855 families. The other of the ledgers destroyed by flooding during Hurricane Katrina's damage to the basement of the Hancock Historical Societies' records. For each of the five years of the Bayou LaCroix School, the teacher was Maryann Zengarling. It is known that her family resided at least in part near Bayou LaCroix, and the family burials are in evidence in the cemetery of that area. There is also a marker commemorating all the Choctaws buried there.

This project put in the information for those with profiles attached directly or communally to the Pearlington, Logtown/Gainesville, Bayou La Croix, Lee's Creek, and Ford's Creek attending students who were descendants of the Marion County, MS "Old Churrah Regulator" group who were passported to Ft. Adams to await their personal reservations, over from their 2nd Reserve on the Little PeeDee, SC after their diaspora there from their Nottoway removals and Ft. Christanna forced schooling days --they wound up as Regulators in the Cherokee Wars after helping in the Colonial Wars at Hodges Ferry and Holden's Beach, NC after having been, in part, removed to a 1724 Small Pox Camp in Charleston, SC; after having been giving their first land reserves in Coropeake, Va; which meant quite a long diaspora that ended with reservations by Presidents Jackson and Van Buren in what was then Indian Territory and what is now Hinds Co, MS of which lands they flipped and name their new place: Cheraw, MS This was in the district that was to become the first seat of government by 1822, after Capt John Lott, Patriot under Pugh and his Southern Tuscororans had fought in the Rev War and about 10 years after the War of 1812.

Some representative profiles known to be attached to the area schools:

Lees Creek: Rev. Joseph Edmund Pounds Log Town / Gainsville: Harold Pete Carver, Sr. Bayou La Croix: Louis I Fayard, Sr Pearlington Jesse Bully Lott Buckbranch, Old Camp Road: Mahlon Beeson Holden, III

More at: https://www.facebook.com/oldcheraw/

https://www.facebook.com/Lott-Lightfoot-Family-of-MS-1942667172477784/

INDIAN SCHOOL
May 23, 2010
….. for the Hancock County Historical Society, February 2008

Russell B. Guerin

A while ago, the historical society was offered several old books and documents that were being discarded from the courthouse in advance of its reconstruction after hurricane Katrina. Most had little historical value, but one stood out as a reminder that Hancock County still counted many Native Americans in its population in the latter part of the 19th century.

Though damaged from the storm’s waters and still mildewed, it was collected with thanks and studied.

It is a thin ledger type book, marked “Attendance Records – Indian School.” It covers only a few years, 1882 to 1886, but interesting information can be gleaned. At the outset, it is evident that not all Choctaws were relocated during the period of Indian removal of the 1830’s and 1840’s. Some chiefs were actually awarded land under the treaties, while other, less fortunate tribesmen chose not to leave and hid out in places like Bayou LaCroix swamp.

In the period covered by the attendance book, it is evident from the 1880 census that groupings of Choctaws resided in some locations. Under Gainesville, for example, two pages are devoted to a section titled “Indian population,” listing approximately 80 people in 18 households. Another half page listed those in Pearlington.

Unfortunately, the ledger does not identify the locations where classes were held. While records were kept for three schools, only one clearly is shown as the Indian School.

On average, the Indian school had less than 30 students, with girls outnumbering boys two to one. Both groups seemed to have excellent attendance. In some months, no absences are evident. Age range was 5 to 18. Last names are predominantly Favre, Taylor and Yarby. From the census reports, it is clear that the latter also appears as Yarber and Zorba.

For each of the five years the teacher was Maryann Zengarling. It is known that her family resided at least in part near Bayou LaCroix, and the family burials are in evidence in the cemetery of that area. There is also a marker commemorating all the Choctaws buried there.

One oddity is that the Zengarling family does not appear in the census for the period studied.

Perhaps the most remarkable observation is that each school year consisted of only three months, and those were not always the same.

Although the ledger is identified as the attendance record for the Indian school, two other schools are included, but with different names. They were the Fayard and Lott schools, which also were for three-month periods. Both of these were taught by a Mrs. C.V. Johnston.

It is not certain that the Fayard and Lott schools were for the Choctaws children. However, because of the similarity of scheduling and the fact that their attendance records are in the same ledger as the first described school, it may be assumed that they were. Names that show prominently are Fayard, Carver, Fournier, and Lott.

A photo in the Lobrano House collection shows children in a Bayou LaCroix class of 1920, almost 40 years after the above-described schools. An observer may note a few similarities, however. One is the mix of ages in the group, and another is the presence of several children who may be assumed to be at least part Choctaw.

The history of Hancock County’s Indian population is at best sketchy. Any information which would add to our knowledge of this important part of our heritage would be welcomed.

This article was written by Russell B. Guerin. An enthusiastic researcher of Hancock County's rich history, he wrote many an article for the Hancock County Historical Society and started publishing online in 2009 on his blog "A Creole in Mississippi." All articles from that blog have been transferred to this website at his request.

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