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  • Maj. General Bushrod Johnson (CSA) (1817 - 1880)
    Bushrod Rust Johnson (October 7, 1817 – September 12, 1880) was a teacher, university chancellor, and Confederate general in the American Civil War. He was one of a handful of Confederate generals wh...
  • Barron Gift Collier (1873 - 1939)
    Barron Gift Collier (23 March 1873—13 March 1939) was an American advertising entrepreneur who became the largest landowner and developer in the U.S. state of Florida, as well as the owner of a chain...
  • Maj. Gen. John C. Brown (CSA), Governor (1827 - 1889)
    John Calvin Brown (January 6, 1827 – August 17, 1889) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War and the Governor of Tennessee from 1871 to 1875, the first Democrat to be elected to that...
  • Governor Neill S. Brown (1810 - 1886)
    A founder of Whig Party. State Representative, 1837-39, 1855-57. Gov. of TN, 1847-1849. Minister to Russia, 1850-53. Member of state Constitutional Convention, 1870.
  • Gov. Aaron V. Brown, U.S. Postmaster General (1795 - 1859)
    Aaron Venable Brown (August 15, 1795 March 8, 1859) was an American politician. He served as Governor of Tennessee from 1845 to 1847, and as United States Postmaster General from 1857 until his d...

This subportal is part of the USA Portal.

This is the master project for Tennessee and its history.

State of Tennessee

  • Nickname(s): The Volunteer State
  • Motto(s): Agriculture and Commerce
  • Demonym Tennessean
  • Capital Nashville
  • Largest city Memphis

Welcome to the Tennessee project

The Tennessee project is created in order to facilitate those researching ancestors or relatives in Tennessee or elsewhere in the world but with roots in Tennessee.

We encourage everyone with links in Tennessee to communicate and explore a common ancestry.

In this portal you will find sources and discussions that will help you with your research. In case you have a particular genealogical challenge, or if you have interesting information to share, simply start a discussion about it.

Please add profile to sub projects, not to this portal. Thank you!

Brief History

The area now known as Tennessee was first inhabited by Paleo-Indians nearly 12,000 years ago.[29] The names of the cultural groups that inhabited the area between first settlement and the time of European contact are unknown, but several distinct cultural phases have been named by archaeologists, including Archaic (8000–1000 BC), Woodland (1000 BC–1000 AD), and Mississippian (1000–1600 AD), whose chiefdoms were the cultural predecessors of the Muscogee people who inhabited the Tennessee River Valley before Cherokee migration into the river's headwaters.

The first recorded European excursions into what is now called Tennessee were three expeditions led by Spanish explorers, namely Hernando de Soto in 1540, Tristan de Luna in 1559, and Juan Pardo in 1567. Pardo recorded the name "Tanasqui" from a local Indian village, which evolved to the state's current name. At that time, Tennessee was inhabited by tribes of Muscogee and Yuchi people. Possibly because of European diseases devastating the Indian tribes, which would have left a population vacuum, and also from expanding European settlement in the north, the Cherokee moved south from the area now called Virginia. As European colonists spread into the area, the Indian populations were forcibly displaced to the south and west, including all Muscogee and Yuchi peoples, the Chickasaw and Choctaw, and ultimately, the Cherokee in 1838.

The first British settlement in what is now Tennessee was built in 1756 by settlers from the colony of South Carolina at Fort Loudoun, near present-day Vonore. Fort Loudoun became the westernmost British outpost to that date. The fort was designed by John William Gerard de Brahm and constructed by forces under British Captain Raymond Demeré. After its completion, Captain Raymond Demeré relinquished command on August 14, 1757, to his brother, Captain Paul Demeré. Hostilities erupted between the British and the neighboring Overhill Cherokees, and a siege of Fort Loudoun ended with its surrender on August 7, 1760. The following morning, Captain Paul Demeré and a number of his men were killed in an ambush nearby, and most of the rest of the garrison was taken prisoner.

In the 1760s, long hunters from Virginia explored much of East and Middle Tennessee, and the first permanent European settlers began arriving late in the decade. The vast majority of 18th century settlers were English or of primarily English descent but nearly 20% of them were also Scotch-Irish.[31] These settlers formed the Watauga Association, a community built on lands leased from the Cherokee peoples. During the American Revolutionary War, Fort Watauga at Sycamore Shoals (in present-day Elizabethton) was attacked (1776) by Dragging Canoe and his warring faction of Cherokee who were aligned with the British Loyalists. These renegade Cherokee were referred to by settlers as the Chickamauga. They opposed North Carolina's annexation of the Washington District and the concurrent settling of the Transylvania Colony further north and west. The lives of many settlers were spared from the initial warrior attacks through the warnings of Dragging Canoe's cousin, Nancy Ward. The frontier fort on the banks of the Watauga River later served as a 1780 staging area for the Overmountain Men in preparation to trek over the Appalachian Mountains, to engage, and to later defeat the British Army at the Battle of Kings Mountain in South Carolina.

Three counties of the Washington District (now part of Tennessee) broke off from North Carolina in 1784 and formed the State of Franklin. Efforts to obtain admission to the Union failed, and the counties (now numbering eight) had re-joined North Carolina by 1789. North Carolina ceded the area to the federal government in 1790, after which it was organized into the Southwest Territory. In an effort to encourage settlers to move west into the new territory, in 1787 the mother state of North Carolina ordered a road to be cut to take settlers into the Cumberland Settlements—from the south end of Clinch Mountain (in East Tennessee) to French Lick (Nashville). The Trace was called the "North Carolina Road" or "Avery's Trace", and sometimes "The Wilderness Road" (although it should not be confused with Daniel Boone's "Wilderness Road" through the Cumberland Gap). Tennessee was admitted to the Union on June 1, 1796 as the 16th state.

Source: Wikipedia


Projects

Please add your projects both to this index and the Related Projects list at right.

Cemeteries

Counties, cities and towns

Education

Ethnic Groups

In 2000, the five most common self-reported ethnic groups in the state were: American (17.3%), African American (13.0%), Irish (9.3%), English (9.1%), and German (8.3%). Most Tennesseans who self-identify as having American ancestry are of English and Scotch-Irish ancestry. An estimated 21–24% of Tennesseans are of predominantly English ancestry. In the 1980 census 1,435,147 Tennesseans claimed "English" or "mostly English" ancestry out of a state population of 3,221,354 making them 45% of the state at the time.

Government

History

Honors

Religion

Sports

Miscellaneous


Research Resources