Joseph Rogers (c.1602 - c.1677) MP

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Birthplace: Stratford On Avon, Warwickshire, England
Death: Died in Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States
Occupation: Mayflower passenger
Managed by: Jeff Hurley
Last Updated:

About Joseph Rogers

Lieutenant Joseph Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger, was born Jan 1603 in Stratford-On-Avon, Warwickshire, England and baptized on 23 January 1602/3 at Watford, County Northamptonshire, England. He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth (Cape Cod, Massachusetts) and was buried in the Eastham Cove Burying Ground, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

Parents: son of Thomas Rogers, Mayflower Pilgrim, and Alice Cosford.

Married:

  1. 20 Jul 1631 in Duxbury, Plymouth Colony to Hannah (1609-1615 - 2 Jan 1678)

9 children of Hannah and Joseph Rogers include:

  1. Elizabeth Rogers (1639-Between 1677)
  2. Hannah Rogers (1652-1690)
  3. Sarah Rogers (1633-1633)
  4. Joseph Rogers (1635-1660) 12
  5. Thomas Rogers (1638-1678)
  6. John Rogers (1642-Between 1713)
  7. Mary Rogers (1644-1718)
  8. James Rogers (1648-1678)
  9. Timothy Rogers (1650-1728)

Notes

  • "The third person from the Mayflower to settle at Nawset was Joseph Rogers, a young lad, son of Thomas Rogers who died the first winter at Plymouth leaving said Joseph and five sons in England who later came to this country. He lived in Plymouth and Duxbury, then moved to Sandwich and in Pochet. His wife named Hannah. Five children born in Duxbury and three in Pochet. At Nawset, Joseph Rogers was commissioned a Lieutenant in 1647. He is buried at Old Cove Cemetery. [4][5]
  • 1643: Joseph Rogers was listed on the roster of those who could perform military duty for the Duxbury Company. [6]
  • 1647: Joseph Rogers was given the commission as "Lieutenant" in Eastham (Barnstable) Massachusetts. The companies at Barnstable, Eastham, Sandwich, and Yarmouth, were organized into a regiment, called "The Third Regiment" of which John Freeman, of Eastham, was commissioned Major Commandant. The company at Falmouth was added in 1689, and company of Rochester, 1690. A company at Harwich was added in 1694 and one at Chatham in 1712. The colonial regiment continued until June 2, 1685, when the colony was divided into 3 counties, and the militia of each county was made to constitute a regiment of itself, from that time. The militia of Plymouth Colony was called the "First Regiment". [7]
  • 1655: Joseph Rogers was an Eastham freeman.
  • 1678: Joseph Rogers died.

Brief Biography

From the Thomas Rogers Society: Lt. Joseph Rogers

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; . His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Mannasses Kempton and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family. Along with the cattle, Rogers shared 2 nanny goats.

Early on, Rogers tried his hand in the transportation business. A court record from 2 March 1635/36 states that he was granted permission to run a ferry over Jones River, which ran near his house. The charge was a penny per passenger.

Rogers may have possessed over 100 acres in Duxbury at one point, having been granted 60 acres of land in 1638 and an additional 50 in 1640. There are four known land deals involving him from the time of his arrival in Eastham. A 1658 purchase from the Potanumaquut Tribe totals six and one half acres. In 1662 Manasses Kempton sold Rogers 40 acres of upland in the area "Called the Barly necke…." In 1665 Rogers is mentioned as having rights to 100 acres of land that William Nicarson (Nickerson)had illegally purchased from the natives. It is not known whether Joseph Rogers actually bought the land he was entitled to. The Plymouth court gave him liberty in 1670 to purchase land from Indians living near Eastham.

It is also not known exactly how much land Rogers held at his death. In his will he mentions holdings "at the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elsewhere purchased or unpurchased…." An inventory of his household comes to 56 pounds, 9 shillings, and 11 pence. Rogers, like many Cape Cod families, owned a fishing boat in his case, two " canooes."

Joseph Rogers was an upstanding citizen in the colony. He was a purchaser in 1626, and he is listed as a freeman in 1633. His reputation was untarnished by any criminal accusations, although he does appear as a plaintiff in a 1632/33 civil case. (Edward Doty had not carried through on a contract involving six pigs. Rogers received 4 bushels of corn in compensation.)

He also had a history of community involvement. While in Duxbury, he was sworn into the post of constable for 1640. On June 1, 1647, he was sworn in as lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) an office he held until 1661, when he was released. In 1658, he served on the Council of War. He was re-sworn into his lieutenant's office in 1664, and held it until his death. Rogers was also often involved in community land transactions, serving as a trustee over a piece of Duxbury land in October 1646. In 1664 Lieutenant "Josepth Rogers" is given authority to survey a piece of land from Bridgewater to the Bay line, along with Josias Cooke, Gyles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. In 1670, Rogers served as a selectman along with Nicholas Snow, Daniel Cole, and Josias Cooke.

He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth, a few weeks short of his seventy-fifth birthday.

From the Thomas Rogers Society:

Joseph Rogers was born in Watford, Northhamptonshire. He is noted as being baptized on 23 January 1602/03.

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; he is not mentioned in any case for any sort of sexual offence. His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Mannasses Kempton and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family. Along with the cattle, Rogers shared 2 nanny goats.

Early on, Rogers tried his hand in the transportation business. A court record from 2 March 1635/36 states that he was granted permission to run a ferry over Jones River, which ran near his house. The charge was a penny per passenger.

Rogers may have possessed over 100 acres in Duxbury at one point, having been granted 60 acres of land in 1638 and an additional 50 in 1640. There are four known land deals involving him from the time of his arrival in Eastham. A 1658 purchase from the Potonumaquatt tribe totals six and one half acres. In 1662 Manasses Kempton sold Rogers 40 acres of upland in the area "Called the Barly necke…." In 1665 Rogers is mentioned as having rights to 100 acres of land that William Nicarson had illegally purchased from the natives. It is not known whether Joseph Rogers actually bought the land he was entitled to. The Plymouth court gave him liberty in 1670 to purchase land from Indians living near Eastham.

It is also not known exactly how much land Rogers held at his death. In his will he mentions holdings "at the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elsewhere purchased or unpurchased…." An inventory of his household comes to 56 pounds, 9 shillings, and 11 pence. Rogers, like many Cape Cod families, owned a fishing boat ¾ in his case, two " canooes."

Joseph Rogers was an upstanding citizen in the colony. He was a purchaser in 1626, and he is listed as a freeman in 1633. His reputation was untarnished by any criminal accusations, although he does appear as a plaintiff in a 1632/33 civil case. (Edward Doty had not carried through on a contract involving six pigs. Rogers received 4 bushels of corn in compensation.)

He also had a history of community involvement. While in Duxbury, he was sworn into the post of constable for 1640. On June 1, 1647, he was sworn in as lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham,) an office he held until 1661, when he was released. In 1658, he served on the Council of War. He was re-sworn into his lieutenant's office in 1664, and held it until his death. Rogers was also often involved in community land transactions, serving as a trustee over a piece of Duxbury land in October 1646. In 1664 Lieutenant "Josepth Rogers" is given authority to survey a piece of land from Bridgewater to the Bay line, along with Josias Cooke, Gyles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. In 1670, Rogers served as a selectman along with Nicholas Snow, Daniel Cole, and Josias Cooke.

He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth, a few weeks short of his seventy-fifth birthday.

Will

"I Joseph Rogers senior: of Eastham of Good understanding and perfect memory being weake in body; and not knowing the the day of my departure out of this life, doe thinke meet to Leave this as my Last will and Testament.

Impr: I Commend my soule to God that Gave it: whoe is my God, and father in Jesus Christ, and my body to the earth by decent buriall;

firstly and concerning my temporall estate that God hath possessed me off; I doe make my son Thomas Rogers whole and sole executor which I will should be disposed of as followeth:

Impr I doe Give unto my Loveing Son James Rogers and his heires Lawfully begotten of his body: or the next of kinn; my house and housing and Land with fences or the like appurtenances, that I now dwell in and Improve adjoining to my house be it more or lesse; as it is Recorded and bounded on the Towne book, I say I doe give it to him to his heires lawfully begotten of his body forever or the next kindred.

Item I doe give to my sonnes John and James Rogers all my meadow ground that I bought of the Indians Francis and Josiah, lying att Pottammacutt and therabouts; I say I doe give and will it to them and theire heires forever equally to be divided.

Item I doe give to my sonnes Thomas and John Rogers and theire heires all my meadow and sedge lying on the otherside of the Cove, on keeskagansett syde; I say I doe give it to them and theire heires lawfully begottenof theire bodys forever;

I doe give to my Daughter Elizabeth Higgens the wife of Jonathan Higgens six acrees of Land lying neare the Barly neck, by a swamp called Ceader Swamp; as it is recorded and bounded in the Towne book, I say I give this six acrees to her and her heires of her body for ever; shee nor they shall not sell hier farm it out, directly nor indirectly to any person whatsoever, execept in case of removall it shall be lawfull for my sonnes or theire heires to buy or purchase it;

Item I give to Benjah Higgens my grandchild on condition hee live with mee until I die; I say I give to him and his heires, one third parte of all my upland and meadow att Paomett, purchased and unpurchased.

Item it is my will that the remainder of my lands or marshes, both att the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elswher purchased or unpurchased not disposed of particularly in my will; I say it is my will that all those lands be equally divided betwixt my three sonnes Thomas, John and James Rogers; and the heires lawfully of theire bodyes for ever; noteing that my son Thomas his twenty acrees of upland that already hee hath in the barly necke ber parte of his division of my land in the barly necke;

Item I doe give unto my daughter Hannah Rogers, if shee be not disposed of in marriage before my decease, and my wifes decease, then I day I doe give to her my bed and beding with all the furniture therto belonging or that shall belonge therto att our decease;

Alsoe it is my will that shee shall have her choise of one cow before my cattle be distributed, and use of three acrees of Tillage ground, fenced in, with the arable ground of her bretheren in the barly necke if shee desires, it soe long as shee lives unmarryed;

Item it is my will that Benjah Higgens shall have on of my cowes after mine and my wifes decease

Item it is my will concerning my loveing wife Hannah Rogers that shee live in my house as longe as shee lives, and shall be comfortably maintained by my stocke and to have the use of all my hoshold stuffe, that shee needs as longe as shee lives for her comfort and that none of my household furniture or stocke be disposed of, as longe as shee lives, save onely Hannahs cowe.

Item I will that ten shillings of my estate be disposed off for the use of the Church of Christ in Eastham as shall be Judged most nessesarie.

Item I will that the remainder of my stocke estate houshold furniture that my wife shall leave att her decease not disposed of in my will before written; be equally divided between all my children; and Benjah Higgens to have an equall share with each of them; this is my last will and testament as witnes my hand and seale this 2nd of January 1677."

Joseph's inventory was taken 15 Jan. 1567/8 and the will was probated 5 Mar. 1677/8. Depositions of Jonathan Sparrow and Samuel Berry show that the grandson called Benjah Higgens in the will was also know as Beriah Higgens. Son Thomas Rogers died before completing the settlement of the estate and so Capt. Sparrow and remaining son John Rogers were impowered to handle the settlement.

Links

Primary Source References

  • 1602/03 23 January Anderson 1995, 3: 1598 Joseph Rogers baptized in Watford, Northhamptonshire.
  • 1620 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598
  • Rogers is a passenger on the Mayflower.1620/21 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598
  • Rogers' father, Thomas, dies.1623 No Specific Date PCR 12: 4
  • In the cast of lots for land, Rogers gets two acres on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." No Specific Date PCR 12: 6
  • Marie Buckett gets an acre adjoining Rogers' land. Her acre lies "on the other side of the town towards the eele-river."1627 22 May PCR 12: 12
  • In the division of cattle, Rogers gets a share in a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann." He also gets two nanny goats. William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Manasses and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family are in his group as well.1632/1633 2 January PCR 1: 6
  • Rogers sues Edward Doty for "non-performance of covenants in a contract between them wherein six pigges of five weeks old were due unto the plaintiff." Rogers wins 4 bushels of corn. 1633 No Specific Date PCR 1: 4
  • Rogers is listed as a freeman. No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221
  • Sarah Rogers born.25 March PCR 1: 11
  • Rogers is rated 9s in corn.1 July PCR 1:14
  • Rogers is ordered to mow "that which he mowed last yeare." 1634 27 March PCR 1: 28
  • Rogers is rated 9s in corn.1635 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221
  • Joseph Rogers, Jr. born. 1635/36 2 March PCR 1: 39
  • The court gives Rogers permission to run a ferry over Jones River near his dwelling house. He is allowed to charge a penny per head, in order to maintain "a sufficient ferry." 14 March PCR 1: 40
  • Rogers is ordered to mow hay along the Jones River. His mowing companions are Thomas Prence, Thomas Cushman, and Edward Dowty. 1636 7 June PCR 1: 42
  • Rogers serves on a jury. 1636/37 20 March PCR 1: 56
  • Rogers is ordered to shared his "old hay ground" with Thomas Prence, "to be decided apportionable to their cattle."1638 4 June PCR 1:85
  • Rogers is to be remembered for lands "on Duxborrow side" when they are surveyed.2 July PCR 1: 90
  • Rogers requests land around Iland Creeke Pond, "if it be not prejudiciall to Mr Bradford." 7 August PCR 1: 93
  • Rogers is granted land for corn fields in "the place where hee desireth." William Bradford would view the land and appoint it to him. 6 November PCR 1: 101
  • Rogers is granted 60 acres of upland and meadow, "lying about a mile and a half from the brooke beyond Mr Bradford farme, upon Mattachusetts Payth, on the west side thereof." 1639/40 3 March PCR 1: 141
  • Rogers is nominated for the post of constable of Duxbury. 5 March PCR 1: 117
  • Rogers is assigned to the Duxbury highway repair. 1639 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221
  • Elizabeth Rogers born. 1640 6 Apri PCR 1: 144
  • Rogers is granted land next to Mr. Vassells' farm at the North River. This land totals to 50 acres of upland and meadow ground. He also received some other small divisions of land, and a joint holding. His brother John also received 50 acres in the same area, together with Constant and Thomas Southworth. 2 Jun PCR : 155
  • Rogers is sworn in to his constabulary post in Duxbury. 1642 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221
  • John Rogers born. 1642/43 7 March PCR 2: 53
  • Rogers is granted four to five acres of meadow lying above Massachusett path. This land is noted as being two miles from the Bradford farm. 1644 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221
  • Mary Rogers born. 20 August PCR 2: 75
  • Rogers is appointed to lay forth a highway from William Bradford's farm to the Bay. He is appointed for Duxbury with John Rogers, and shares the commision with John Howland and John Cooke (who represent Plymouth.) The four men are instructed to pick a fifth if they can't agree on the plan. 1645 20 October PCR 2: 88
  • The people of Duxbury are granted "a competent pporcion" of land around Saughtuckquett. They will pick the center and from that mark the appointed land would stretch four miles out. Rogers was nominated to be a trustee of this land, along with Miles Standish, John Alden, George Soul, Constant Southworth, and William Brett. 1646/47 2 March PCR 2: 111
  • Rogers serves on a jury. 1647 1 June PCR 2: 117
  • Rogers is established as lieutenant of Nawset (later Eastham) to "exercise theire men in armes…" 1648 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221
  • James Rogers born.1651 10 June PCR 2: 177
  • Rogers is listed as a purchaser. 1652 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221-222
  • Hannah Rogers born.
  • Joseph Rogers moves to Sandwich. 1658 1 June PCR 3: 142
  • Rogers purchases some land from Pompmo of the Potonumaquatt tribe. He buys Aquaquesett, five acres, and Mattahquesett, one and a half acre of land. 2 October PCR 3: 153
  • Rogers is appointed to the Council of War. 1660/61 5 March PCR 3: 205
  • The verdict comes in on the trial of John Hawes, who had been accused of "violently and by force of armes" killing Joseph Rogers Jr. of Eastham by giving him "a most deadly fall" on December 25, 1660, from which he died forty-eight hours later. Hawes was found not guilty. 1661 1 October PCR 4: 5
  • Rogers is freed from his military office as Lieutenant of the military company of Eastham. 1663 1 June PCR 4: 37
  • Rogers serves on the Grand Enquest. 24 July Mayflower Descendant 17(3) 1915: 167-68
  • Manasses Kempton sells Rogers 40 acres of upland in the Barley Neck area. 1664 8 June PCR 4: 64
  • Rogers is reestablished into his old military office. 8 June PCR 4: 67
  • Rogers is given liberty to "looke out" a parcel of land between Bridgewater and the Bay line, together with Josias Cooke, Giles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. The land is "for their accommodation." 1665 7 June PCR 4: 96
  • Rogers is charged to "view a certain iland petitioned for by Richard Higgins" along with "Leiftenant Freeman." The pair can purchase the land and "depose of it" to Higgins if they see fit. 7 June PCR 4: 96
  • Rogers is assigned 100 acres of William Nicarson's land next to Mannamoiett. If he wants the land, he must pay Nicarson. (Nicarson's land had been illegally purchased from the natives. The court had let him keep 100 acres and confiscated the rest.) 1670 7 June PCR 5: 35
  • Rogers is named as a selectman for Eastham together with four others. 7 June PCR 5: 39
  • The Court gives Rogers liberty to purchase land from natives near Eastham, at a place called Naamcoyicke. 1674 7 July PCR 5: 150
  • The Court gives two Indians, John Gibson and Thomas Cloake, land near Rogers. 1677/78 2-15 January Mayflower Descendant 3(2) 1901: 67-71
  • Joseph Rogers dies.

Sources

  1. University of Virginia: USEM 170, Fall 1998
  2. Westgate, Alice W. A. & Reeves, Ann T., Family of Thomas Rogers, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2000, Mayflower Families: vol. 19, p. 3.

-------------------- Buried in The Family Lot- Cove Burial Ground, Eastham, Massachusetts.

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; he is not mentioned in any case for any sort of sexual offence. His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Mannasses Kempton and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family. Along with the cattle, Rogers shared 2 nanny goats.

Early on, Rogers tried his hand in the transportation business. A court record from 2 March 1635/36 states that he was granted permission to run a ferry over Jones River, which ran near his house. The charge was a penny per passenger.

Rogers may have possessed over 100 acres in Duxbury at one point, having been granted 60 acres of land in 1638 and an additional 50 in 1640. There are four known land deals involving him from the time of his arrival in Eastham. A 1658 purchase from the Potonumaquatt tribe totals six and one half acres. In 1662 Manasses Kempton sold Rogers 40 acres of upland in the area "Called the Barly necke…." In 1665 Rogers is mentioned as having rights to 100 acres of land that William Nicarson had illegally purchased from the natives. It is not known whether Joseph Rogers actually bought the land he was entitled to. The Plymouth court gave him liberty in 1670 to purchase land from Indians living near Eastham.

It is also not known exactly how much land Rogers held at his death. In his will he mentions holdings "at the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elsewhere purchased or unpurchased…." An inventory of his household comes to 56 pounds, 9 shillings, and 11 pence. Rogers, like many Cape Cod families, owned a fishing boat in his case, two " canooes."

Joseph Rogers was an upstanding citizen in the colony. He was a purchaser in 1626, and he is listed as a freeman in 1633. His reputation was untarnished by any criminal accusations, although he does appear as a plaintiff in a 1632/33 civil case. (Edward Doty had not carried through on a contract involving six pigs. Rogers received 4 bushels of corn in compensation.)

He also had a history of community involvement. While in Duxbury, he was sworn into the post of constable for 1640. On June 1, 1647, he was sworn in as lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) an office he held until 1661, when he was released. In 1658, he served on the Council of War. He was re-sworn into his lieutenant's office in 1664, and held it until his death. Rogers was also often involved in community land transactions, serving as a trustee over a piece of Duxbury land in October 1646. In 1664 Lieutenant "Josepth Rogers" is given authority to survey a piece of land from Bridgewater to the Bay line, along with Josias Cooke, Gyles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. In 1670, Rogers served as a selectman along with Nicholas Snow, Daniel Cole, and Josias Cooke.

He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth, a few weeks short of his seventy-fifth birthday.

-------------------------------------------------

Collections and Proceedings of the Maine Historical Society, Volume 8 By Maine Historical Society Pg.275

http://books.google.com/books?id=yCQKi9JBQ-4C&pg=PA276&lpg=PA276&dq=Joseph+Rogers+January+10,+1678&source=bl&ots=IXP_dhxc9i&sig=cM6F1oEs94LEj1eHyYjGWiug1zc&hl=en&ei=vcWgTMvEO46asAOsw5zWAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBUQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=Joseph%20Rogers%20January%2010%2C%201678&f=false

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http://www.histarch.uiuc.edu/plymouth/JRogers4.html

The Plymouth Colony Archive Project

LT. JOSEPH ROGERS

(son of Thomas Rogers)

Compiled by Jessica Wolpert

University of Virginia

USEM 170, Fall 1998

Joseph Rogers was born in Watford, Northhamptonshire. He is noted as being baptized on 23 January 1602/03.

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; he is not mentioned in any case for any sort of sexual offence. His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Mannasses Kempton and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family. Along with the cattle, Rogers shared 2 nanny goats.

Early on, Rogers tried his hand in the transportation business. A court record from 2 March 1635/36 states that he was granted permission to run a ferry over Jones River, which ran near his house. The charge was a penny per passenger.

Rogers may have possessed over 100 acres in Duxbury at one point, having been granted 60 acres of land in 1638 and an additional 50 in 1640. There are four known land deals involving him from the time of his arrival in Eastham. A 1658 purchase from the Potonumaquatt tribe totals six and one half acres. In 1662 Manasses Kempton sold Rogers 40 acres of upland in the area "Called the Barly necke…." In 1665 Rogers is mentioned as having rights to 100 acres of land that William Nicarson had illegally purchased from the natives. It is not known whether Joseph Rogers actually bought the land he was entitled to. The Plymouth court gave him liberty in 1670 to purchase land from Indians living near Eastham.

It is also not known exactly how much land Rogers held at his death. In his will he mentions holdings "at the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elsewhere purchased or unpurchased…." An inventory of his household comes to 56 pounds, 9 shillings, and 11 pence. Rogers, like many Cape Cod families, owned a fishing boat ¾ in his case, two " canooes."

Joseph Rogers was an upstanding citizen in the colony. He was a purchaser in 1626, and he is listed as a freeman in 1633. His reputation was untarnished by any criminal accusations, although he does appear as a plaintiff in a 1632/33 civil case. (Edward Doty had not carried through on a contract involving six pigs. Rogers received 4 bushels of corn in compensation.)

He also had a history of community involvement. While in Duxbury, he was sworn into the post of constable for 1640. On June 1, 1647, he was sworn in as lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham,) an office he held until 1661, when he was released. In 1658, he served on the Council of War. He was re-sworn into his lieutenant's office in 1664, and held it until his death. Rogers was also often involved in community land transactions, serving as a trustee over a piece of Duxbury land in October 1646. In 1664 Lieutenant "Josepth Rogers" is given authority to survey a piece of land from Bridgewater to the Bay line, along with Josias Cooke, Gyles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. In 1670, Rogers served as a selectman along with Nicholas Snow, Daniel Cole, and Josias Cooke.

He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth, a few weeks short of his seventy-fifth birthday.

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http://www.thomasrogerssociety.com/p1.htm#i9

Joseph Rogers was baptized on 23 January 1602/3 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. He was the son of Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] and Alice Cosford.2 Joseph Rogers married Hannah.

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Genealogical and personal memoirs relating to the families of ..., Volume 2 By William Richard Cutter Pg.776

http://books.google.com/books?id=kFoLBC2TwFYC&pg=PA776&lpg=PA776&dq=Joseph+Rogers+January+10,+1678&source=bl&ots=7Xsq0sLHyO&sig=xKPX8f1U8jW8F7LK-I0TF0a4fTk&hl=en&ei=d8mgTKyUHIv6sAO5l6TWAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CB8Q6AEwBA#v=onepage&q=Joseph%20Rogers%20January%2010%2C%201678&f=false

Thomas Rogers, immigrant ancestor, was one of the Pilgrim Fathers. He was born in England, went to Holland with the Pilgrims and came to New England in 1620 on the "Mayflower." bringing with him his son Joseph, and taking a prominent part in the colony at Plymouth. His other children came afterward. He died in the first sickness at Plymouth. Among his children were 1. Joseph, Mentioned below. 2. John, weaver and planter of Duxbury; taxed there in 1632; admitted a freeman March 1, 1641-42; town officer and commissioner of jurors; married April 16, 1639, Ann Churchman; lived at Scituate about 1647; removed to Marshfield where he died; will dated February 1, 1660; wife Frances. 3. William. 4. Noah.

(II) Lieutenant Joseph Rogers, son of John Rogers (I), (THIS MUST BE A TYPO, AS STATES ABOVE JOSEPH IS SON OF THOMAS), was also a Pilgrim. He was born in England or Holland and came with his father in the "Mayflower" to Plymouth; was married and had six children in 1650. He had lands assigned to him in 1623 and was freeman in 1644. He removed to Duxbury. He was given permission by Plymouth colony to keep a ferry over Jones river near his house, March 2, 1635-36. He and his brother John had a grant of land April 6, 1640. He finally removed to Eastham, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. He was appointed Lieutenant of the military company at Nawsett in 1647. His will dated January 2, 1677-78, was proved March 5 of that year. He bequeathed to sons Thomas, John and James to daughters Elizabeth Higgins and Hannah Rogers and to his wife. He gave to Beriah Higgins a share with his children because Beriah had lived with him a great while, etc. Children: 1. Sarah, born August 6, 1633, died young. 2. Joseph, July 19, 1635, died 1660. 3. Thomas, March 29, 1637. 4. Elizabeth, September 29, 1639. 5. John, April 3, 1642. 6. Mary, September 22, 1644. 7. James, October 18, 1648. 8. Hannah, August 8, 1652.

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Collections and Proceedings of the Maine Historical Society, Volume 8 By Maine Historical Society Pg.275

http://books.google.com/books?id=yCQKi9JBQ-4C&pg=PA276&lpg=PA276&dq=Joseph+Rogers+January+10,+1678&source=bl&ots=IXP_dhA68i&sig=7cpEu_Tym0J3rDelpVg07GS177Y&hl=en&ei=FM-gTMe1I4yosAPBm4DWAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=8&ved=0CCkQ6AEwBw#v=onepage&q=Joseph%20Rogers%20January%2010%2C%201678&f=false

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1620, on the ship"Mayflower"

608. Westgate, Alice W. A. & Reeves, Ann T., Family of Thomas Rogers, General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 2000, Mayflower Families: vol. 19, p. 3.

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Joseph Rogers was baptized on 23 January 1602/3 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. He was the son of Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] and Alice Cosford.2 Joseph Rogers married Hannah. Joseph Rogers Joseph Rogers was born in Watford, Northhamptonshire. He is noted as being baptized on 23 January 1602/03.

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; he is not mentioned in any case for any sort of sexual offence. His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Mannasses Kempton and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family. Along with the cattle, Rogers shared 2 nanny goats.

Early on, Rogers tried his hand in the transportation business. A court record from 2 March 1635/36 states that he was granted permission to run a ferry over Jones River, which ran near his house. The charge was a penny per passenger.

Rogers may have possessed over 100 acres in Duxbury at one point, having been granted 60 acres of land in 1638 and an additional 50 in 1640. There are four known land deals involving him from the time of his arrival in Eastham. A 1658 purchase from the Potonumaquatt tribe totals six and one half acres. In 1662 Manasses Kempton sold Rogers 40 acres of upland in the area "Called the Barly necke…." In 1665 Rogers is mentioned as having rights to 100 acres of land that William Nicarson had illegally purchased from the natives. It is not known whether Joseph Rogers actually bought the land he was entitled to. The Plymouth court gave him liberty in 1670 to purchase land from Indians living near Eastham.

It is also not known exactly how much land Rogers held at his death. In his will he mentions holdings "at the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elsewhere purchased or unpurchased…." An inventory of his household comes to 56 pounds, 9 shillings, and 11 pence. Rogers, like many Cape Cod families, owned a fishing boat in his case, two " canooes."

Joseph Rogers was an upstanding citizen in the colony. He was a purchaser in 1626, and he is listed as a freeman in 1633. His reputation was untarnished by any criminal accusations, although he does appear as a plaintiff in a 1632/33 civil case. (Edward Doty had not carried through on a contract involving six pigs. Rogers received 4 bushels of corn in compensation.)

He also had a history of community involvement. While in Duxbury, he was sworn into the post of constable for 1640. On June 1, 1647, he was sworn in as lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) an office he held until 1661, when he was released. In 1658, he served on the Council of War. He was re-sworn into his lieutenant's office in 1664, and held it until his death. Rogers was also often involved in community land transactions, serving as a trustee over a piece of Duxbury land in October 1646. In 1664 Lieutenant "Josepth Rogers" is given authority to survey a piece of land from Bridgewater to the Bay line, along with Josias Cooke, Gyles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. In 1670, Rogers served as a selectman along with Nicholas Snow, Daniel Cole, and Josias Cooke.

He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth, a few weeks short of his seventy-fifth birthday.

LIEUTENANT JOSEPH ROGERS' CONNECTIONS

Alden, John named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Berry, Samuel testified about Rogers' bequests, 5 March 1677/78.

Bradford, William

" was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

" Rogers requests land in a certain area, if not prejudicial to Bradford, 2 July 1638

" Bradford to view and appoint land for Rogers, 7 Aug 1638

" buys land from Rogers for ten pounds, 31 July 1646

Brett, William named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Buckett, Marie gets land next to Rogers' in casting of lots, 1623

Cloake, Thomas received land near Rogers, 7 July 1674

Cole, Daniel served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Cooke, John appointed with Rogers to a highway commission, 20 August 1644

Cooke, Josias

" given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

" served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Cushman, Thomas

" was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

" assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March 1635/36

Done, Daniel appraised Rogers' goods, 15 January 1677/78.

Doty, Edward

" was sued by Rogers for breach of contract, 1 January 1632/33

" assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March

1635/36

Freeman, Lt. assigned to view island with Rogers, 7 June 1665

Gibson, John received land near Rogers, 7 July 1674

Higgins, Beriah Rogers mentioned living with him "a Greate while" to Jonathan Sparrow and Samuel Berry. Sparrow and Berry testified that Rogers had wanted to leave him a bed, two blankets, and his best suit of clothes to Higgens, but had forgotten to add it to his will. 5 March 1677/78

Hopkins, Giles given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Howland, John

" appointed with Rogers to a highway commission, 20 August 1644

" mentioned as exchanging land with Rogers, 31 July 1646

Latham, William was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

Kempton, Julian was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

Kempton, Manasses

" was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

" sold Rogers 40 acres of land in Barley Neck, 24 July 1662

Mitchell, Experience given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Nicarson, Willaim part of his lands assigned to Rogers, 7 June 1665

Pearse, Abraham exchanges land with Rogers, 31 July 1646

Pompmo sold land to Rogers, 1 June 1658

Prence, Thomas

" assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March 1635/36

" ordered to share his hay ground with Rogers, 20 March 1636/37

Sampson, Henry given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Snow, Nicholas served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Sparrow, Jonathan

" appraised Rogers' goods, 15 January 1677/78.

" testified about Rogers' bequests, 5 March 1677/78.

Soul, George named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Southworth, Constant named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Standish, Miles named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Tracye, Stephen mentioned as once sharing a meadow with Rogers, 25 October 1649

Twining, William witnessed Rogers' will, 2 January 1677/78.

LIEUTENANT JOSEPH ROGERS

PRIMARY SOURCE REFERENCES

1602/03 23 January Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Joseph Rogers baptized in Watford, Northhamptonshire.

1620 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Rogers is a passenger on the Mayflower.

1620/21 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Rogers' father, Thomas, dies.

1623 No Specific Date PCR 12: 4

In the cast of lots for land, Rogers gets two acres on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards."

No Specific Date PCR 12: 6

Marie Buckett gets an acre adjoining Rogers' land. Her acre lies "on the other side of the town towards the eele-river."

1627 22 May PCR 12: 12

In the division of cattle, Rogers gets a share in a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann." He also gets two nanny goats. William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Manasses and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family are in his group as well.

1632/1633 2 January PCR 1: 6

Rogers sues Edward Doty for "non-performance of covenants in a contract between them wherein six pigges of five weeks old were due unto the plaintiff." Rogers wins 4 bushels of corn.

1633 No Specific Date PCR 1: 4

Rogers is listed as a freeman.

No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Sarah Rogers born.

25 March PCR 1: 11

Rogers is rated 9s in corn.

1 July PCR 1:14

Rogers is ordered to mow "that which he mowed last yeare."

1634 27 March PCR 1: 28

Rogers is rated 9s in corn.

1635 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Joseph Rogers, Jr. born.

1635/36 2 March PCR 1: 39

The court gives Rogers permission to run a ferry over Jones River near his dwelling house. He is allowed to charge a penny per head, in order to maintain "a sufficient ferry."

14 March PCR 1: 40

Rogers is ordered to mow hay along the Jones River. His mowing companions are Thomas Prence, Thomas Cushman, and Edward Dowty.

1636 7 June PCR 1: 42

Rogers serves on a jury.

1636/37 20 March PCR 1: 56

Rogers is ordered to shared his "old hay ground" with Thomas Prence, "to be decided apportionable to their cattle."

1638 4 June PCR 1:85

Rogers is to be remembered for lands "on Duxborrow side" when they are surveyed.

2 July PCR 1: 90

Rogers requests land around Iland Creeke Pond, "if it be not prejudiciall to Mr Bradford."

7 August PCR 1: 93

Rogers is granted land for corn fields in "the place where hee desireth." William Bradford would view the land and appoint it to him.

6 November PCR 1: 101

Rogers is granted 60 acres of upland and meadow, "lying about a mile and a half from the brooke beyond Mr Bradford farme, upon Mattachusetts Payth, on the west side thereof."

1639/40 3 March PCR 1: 141

Rogers is nominated for the post of constable of Duxbury.

5 March PCR 1: 117

Rogers is assigned to the Duxbury highway repair.

1639 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Elizabeth Rogers born.

1640 6 Apri PCR 1: 144

Rogers is granted land next to Mr. Vassells' farm at the North River. This land totals to 50 acres of upland and meadow ground. He also received some other small divisions of land, and a joint holding. His brother John also received 50 acres in the same area, together with Constant and Thomas Southworth.

2 Jun PCR 1: 155

Rogers is sworn in to his constabulary post in Duxbury.

1642 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

John Rogers born.

1642/43 7 March PCR 2: 53

Rogers is granted four to five acres of meadow lying above Massachusett path. This land is noted as being two miles from the Bradford farm.

1644 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Mary Rogers born.

20 August PCR 2: 75

Rogers is appointed to lay forth a highway from William Bradford's farm to the Bay. He is appointed for Duxbury with John Rogers, and shares the commision with John Howland and John Cooke (who represent Plymouth.) The four men are instructed to pick a fifth if they can't agree on the plan.

1645 20 October PCR 2: 88

The people of Duxbury are granted "a competent pporcion" of land around Saughtuckquett. They will pick the center and from that mark the appointed land would stretch four miles out. Rogers was nominated to be a trustee of this land, along with Miles Standish, John Alden, George Soul, Constant Southworth, and William Brett.

1646/47 2 March PCR 2: 111

Rogers serves on a jury.

1647 1 June PCR 2: 117

Rogers is established as lieutenant of Nawset (later Eastham) to "exercise theire men in armes…"

1648 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

James Rogers born.

1651 10 June PCR 2: 177

Rogers is listed as a purchaser.

1652 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221-222

Hannah Rogers born.

Joseph Rogers moves to Sandwich.

1658 1 June PCR 3: 142

Rogers purchases some land from Pompmo of the Potonumaquatt tribe. He buys Aquaquesett, five acres, and Mattahquesett, one and a half acre of land.

2 October PCR 3: 153

Rogers is appointed to the Council of War.

1660/61 5 March PCR 3: 205

The verdict comes in on the trial of John Hawes, who had been accused of "violently and by force of armes" killing Joseph Rogers Jr. of Eastham by giving him "a most deadly fall" on December 25, 1660, from which he died forty-eight hours later. Hawes was found not guilty.

1661 1 October PCR 4: 5

Rogers is freed from his military office as Lieutenant of the military company of Eastham.

1663 1 June PCR 4: 37

Rogers serves on the Grand Enquest.

24 July Mayflower Descendant 17(3) 1915: 167-68

Manasses Kempton sells Rogers 40 acres of upland in the Barley Neck area.

1664 8 June PCR 4: 64

Rogers is reestablished into his old military office.

8 June PCR 4: 67

Rogers is given liberty to "looke out" a parcel of land between Bridgewater and the Bay line, together with Josias Cooke, Giles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. The land is "for their accommodation."

1665 7 June PCR 4: 96

Rogers is charged to "view a certain iland petitioned for by Richard Higgins" along with "Leiftenant Freeman." The pair can purchase the land and "depose of it" to Higgins if they see fit.

7 June PCR 4: 96

Rogers is assigned 100 acres of William Nicarson's land next to Mannamoiett. If he wants the land, he must pay Nicarson. (Nicarson's land had been illegally purchased from the natives. The court had let him keep 100 acres and confiscated the rest.)

1670 7 June PCR 5: 35

Rogers is named as a selectman for Eastham together with four others.

7 June PCR 5: 39

The Court gives Rogers liberty to purchase land from natives near Eastham, at a place called Naamcoyicke.

1674 7 July PCR 5: 150

The Court gives two Indians, John Gibson and Thomas Cloake, land near Rogers.

1677/78 2-15 January Mayflower Descendant 3(2) 1901: 67-71

Joseph Rogers dies.

SOURCES

PCR The Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, edited by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer (Boston: William White, 1855-61; New York: AMS Press, 1968). 12 v. in 6.

"I Joseph Rogers senior: of Eastham of Good understanding and perfect memory being weake in body; and not knowing the the day of my departure out of this life, doe thinke meet to Leave this as my Last will and Testament.

Impr: I Commend my soule to God that Gave it: whoe is my God, and father in Jesus Christ, and my body to the earth by decent buriall;

firstly and concerning my temporall estate that God hath possessed me off; I doe make my son Thomas Rogers whole and sole executor which I will should be disposed of as followeth:

Impr I doe Give unto my Loveing Son James Rogers and his heires Lawfully begotten of his body: or the next of kinn; my house and housing and Land with fences or the like appurtenances, that I now dwell in and Improve adjoining to my house be it more or lesse; as it is Recorded and bounded on the Towne book, I say I doe give it to him to his heires lawfully begotten of his body forever or the next kindred.

Item I doe give to my sonnes John and James Rogers all my meadow ground that I bought of the Indians Francis and Josiah, lying att Pottammacutt and therabouts; I say I doe give and will it to them and theire heires forever equally to be divided.

Item I doe give to my sonnes Thomas and John Rogers and theire heires all my meadow and sedge lying on the otherside of the Cove, on keeskagansett syde; I say I doe give it to them and theire heires lawfully begottenof theire bodys forever;

I doe give to my Daughter Elizabeth Higgens the wife of Jonathan Higgens six acrees of Land lying neare the Barly neck, by a swamp called Ceader Swamp; as it is recorded and bounded in the Towne book, I say I give this six acrees to her and her heires of her body for ever; shee nor they shall not sell hier farm it out, directly nor indirectly to any person whatsoever, execept in case of removall it shall be lawfull for my sonnes or theire heires to buy or purchase it;

Item I give to Benjah Higgens my grandchild on condition hee live with mee until I die; I say I give to him and his heires, one third parte of all my upland and meadow att Paomett, purchased and unpurchased.

Item it is my will that the remainder of my lands or marshes, both att the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elswher purchased or unpurchased not disposed of particularly in my will; I say it is my will that all those lands be equally divided betwixt my three sonnes Thomas, John and James Rogers; and the heires lawfully of theire bodyes for ever; noteing that my son Thomas his twenty acrees of upland that already hee hath in the barly necke ber parte of his division of my land in the barly necke;

Item I doe give unto my daughter Hannah Rogers, if shee be not disposed of in marriage before my decease, and my wifes decease, then I day I doe give to her my bed and beding with all the furniture therto belonging or that shall belonge therto att our decease;

Alsoe it is my will that shee shall have her choise of one cow before my cattle be distributed, and use of three acrees of Tillage ground, fenced in, with the arable ground of her bretheren in the barly necke if shee desires, it soe long as shee lives unmarryed;

Item it is my will that Benjah Higgens shall have on of my cowes after mine and my wifes decease

Item it is my will concerning my loveing wife Hannah Rogers that shee live in my house as longe as shee lives, and shall be comfortably maintained by my stocke and to have the use of all my hoshold stuffe, that shee needs as longe as shee lives for her comfort and that none of my household furniture or stocke be disposed of, as longe as shee lives, save onely Hannahs cowe.

Item I will that ten shillings of my estate be disposed off for the use of the Church of Christ in Eastham as shall be Judged most nessesarie.

Item I will that the remainder of my stocke estate houshold furniture that my wife shall leave att her decease not disposed of in my will before written; be equally divided between all my children; and Benjah Higgens to have an equall share with each of them; this is my last will and testament as witnes my hand and seale this 2nd of January 1677."

Joseph's inventory was taken 15 Jan. 1567/8 and the will was probated 5 Mar. 1677/8. Depositions of Jonathan Sparrow and Samuel Berry show that the grandson called Benjah Higgens in the will was also know as Beriah Higgens. Son Thomas Rogers died before completing the settlement of the estate and so Capt. Sparrow and remaining son John Rogers were impowered to handle the settlement.

He died between 2 and 15 Jan 1677/78. He was buried at Old Cove Burial Ground, Eastham.

Children of Joseph Rogers and Hannah

  * Sarah Rogers b. 6 Aug 1633, d. 15 Aug 1633
  * Joseph Rogers b. 19 Jul 1635, d. 27 Dec 1660
  * Thomas Rogers+ b. 29 Mar 1638, d. bt 5 Mar 1677/78 - 7 Aug 1678
  * Elizabeth Rogers+ b. 29 Sep 1639, d. bt 2 Jan 1677/78 - 4 Jul 1679
  * John Rogers+ b. 3 Apr 1642, d. bt 27 Apr 1713 - 10 Aug 1714
  * Mary Rogers+ b. 22 Sep 1644, d. a 19 Apr 1718
  * James Rogers+ b. 18 Oct 1648, d. 13 Apr 1678
  * Hannah Rogers+ b. 8 Aug 1652, d. a 18 Oct 1690

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Joseph Rogers was baptized on 23 January 1602/3 at Watford, co. Northamptonshire, England. He was the son of Thomas Rogers [Mayflower Pilgrim] and Alice Cosford.2 Joseph Rogers married Hannah. Joseph Rogers Joseph Rogers was born in Watford, Northhamptonshire. He is noted as being baptized on 23 January 1602/03.

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; he is not mentioned in any case for any sort of sexual offence. His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Mannasses Kempton and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family. Along with the cattle, Rogers shared 2 nanny goats.

Early on, Rogers tried his hand in the transportation business. A court record from 2 March 1635/36 states that he was granted permission to run a ferry over Jones River, which ran near his house. The charge was a penny per passenger.

Rogers may have possessed over 100 acres in Duxbury at one point, having been granted 60 acres of land in 1638 and an additional 50 in 1640. There are four known land deals involving him from the time of his arrival in Eastham. A 1658 purchase from the Potonumaquatt tribe totals six and one half acres. In 1662 Manasses Kempton sold Rogers 40 acres of upland in the area "Called the Barly necke…." In 1665 Rogers is mentioned as having rights to 100 acres of land that William Nicarson had illegally purchased from the natives. It is not known whether Joseph Rogers actually bought the land he was entitled to. The Plymouth court gave him liberty in 1670 to purchase land from Indians living near Eastham.

It is also not known exactly how much land Rogers held at his death. In his will he mentions holdings "at the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elsewhere purchased or unpurchased…." An inventory of his household comes to 56 pounds, 9 shillings, and 11 pence. Rogers, like many Cape Cod families, owned a fishing boat in his case, two " canooes."

Joseph Rogers was an upstanding citizen in the colony. He was a purchaser in 1626, and he is listed as a freeman in 1633. His reputation was untarnished by any criminal accusations, although he does appear as a plaintiff in a 1632/33 civil case. (Edward Doty had not carried through on a contract involving six pigs. Rogers received 4 bushels of corn in compensation.)

He also had a history of community involvement. While in Duxbury, he was sworn into the post of constable for 1640. On June 1, 1647, he was sworn in as lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) an office he held until 1661, when he was released. In 1658, he served on the Council of War. He was re-sworn into his lieutenant's office in 1664, and held it until his death. Rogers was also often involved in community land transactions, serving as a trustee over a piece of Duxbury land in October 1646. In 1664 Lieutenant "Josepth Rogers" is given authority to survey a piece of land from Bridgewater to the Bay line, along with Josias Cooke, Gyles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. In 1670, Rogers served as a selectman along with Nicholas Snow, Daniel Cole, and Josias Cooke.

He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth, a few weeks short of his seventy-fifth birthday.

LIEUTENANT JOSEPH ROGERS' CONNECTIONS

Alden, John named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Berry, Samuel testified about Rogers' bequests, 5 March 1677/78.

Bradford, William

" was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

" Rogers requests land in a certain area, if not prejudicial to Bradford, 2 July 1638

" Bradford to view and appoint land for Rogers, 7 Aug 1638

" buys land from Rogers for ten pounds, 31 July 1646

Brett, William named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Buckett, Marie gets land next to Rogers' in casting of lots, 1623

Cloake, Thomas received land near Rogers, 7 July 1674

Cole, Daniel served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Cooke, John appointed with Rogers to a highway commission, 20 August 1644

Cooke, Josias

" given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

" served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Cushman, Thomas

" was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

" assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March 1635/36

Done, Daniel appraised Rogers' goods, 15 January 1677/78.

Doty, Edward

" was sued by Rogers for breach of contract, 1 January 1632/33

" assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March

1635/36

Freeman, Lt. assigned to view island with Rogers, 7 June 1665

Gibson, John received land near Rogers, 7 July 1674

Higgins, Beriah Rogers mentioned living with him "a Greate while" to Jonathan Sparrow and Samuel Berry. Sparrow and Berry testified that Rogers had wanted to leave him a bed, two blankets, and his best suit of clothes to Higgens, but had forgotten to add it to his will. 5 March 1677/78

Hopkins, Giles given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Howland, John

" appointed with Rogers to a highway commission, 20 August 1644

" mentioned as exchanging land with Rogers, 31 July 1646

Latham, William was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

Kempton, Julian was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

Kempton, Manasses

" was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

" sold Rogers 40 acres of land in Barley Neck, 24 July 1662

Mitchell, Experience given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Nicarson, Willaim part of his lands assigned to Rogers, 7 June 1665

Pearse, Abraham exchanges land with Rogers, 31 July 1646

Pompmo sold land to Rogers, 1 June 1658

Prence, Thomas

" assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March 1635/36

" ordered to share his hay ground with Rogers, 20 March 1636/37

Sampson, Henry given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Snow, Nicholas served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Sparrow, Jonathan

" appraised Rogers' goods, 15 January 1677/78.

" testified about Rogers' bequests, 5 March 1677/78.

Soul, George named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Southworth, Constant named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Standish, Miles named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Tracye, Stephen mentioned as once sharing a meadow with Rogers, 25 October 1649

Twining, William witnessed Rogers' will, 2 January 1677/78.

LIEUTENANT JOSEPH ROGERS

PRIMARY SOURCE REFERENCES

1602/03 23 January Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Joseph Rogers baptized in Watford, Northhamptonshire.

1620 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Rogers is a passenger on the Mayflower.

1620/21 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Rogers' father, Thomas, dies.

1623 No Specific Date PCR 12: 4

In the cast of lots for land, Rogers gets two acres on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards."

No Specific Date PCR 12: 6

Marie Buckett gets an acre adjoining Rogers' land. Her acre lies "on the other side of the town towards the eele-river."

1627 22 May PCR 12: 12

In the division of cattle, Rogers gets a share in a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann." He also gets two nanny goats. William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Manasses and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family are in his group as well.

1632/1633 2 January PCR 1: 6

Rogers sues Edward Doty for "non-performance of covenants in a contract between them wherein six pigges of five weeks old were due unto the plaintiff." Rogers wins 4 bushels of corn.

1633 No Specific Date PCR 1: 4

Rogers is listed as a freeman.

No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Sarah Rogers born.

25 March PCR 1: 11

Rogers is rated 9s in corn.

1 July PCR 1:14

Rogers is ordered to mow "that which he mowed last yeare."

1634 27 March PCR 1: 28

Rogers is rated 9s in corn.

1635 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Joseph Rogers, Jr. born.

1635/36 2 March PCR 1: 39

The court gives Rogers permission to run a ferry over Jones River near his dwelling house. He is allowed to charge a penny per head, in order to maintain "a sufficient ferry."

14 March PCR 1: 40

Rogers is ordered to mow hay along the Jones River. His mowing companions are Thomas Prence, Thomas Cushman, and Edward Dowty.

1636 7 June PCR 1: 42

Rogers serves on a jury.

1636/37 20 March PCR 1: 56

Rogers is ordered to shared his "old hay ground" with Thomas Prence, "to be decided apportionable to their cattle."

1638 4 June PCR 1:85

Rogers is to be remembered for lands "on Duxborrow side" when they are surveyed.

2 July PCR 1: 90

Rogers requests land around Iland Creeke Pond, "if it be not prejudiciall to Mr Bradford."

7 August PCR 1: 93

Rogers is granted land for corn fields in "the place where hee desireth." William Bradford would view the land and appoint it to him.

6 November PCR 1: 101

Rogers is granted 60 acres of upland and meadow, "lying about a mile and a half from the brooke beyond Mr Bradford farme, upon Mattachusetts Payth, on the west side thereof."

1639/40 3 March PCR 1: 141

Rogers is nominated for the post of constable of Duxbury.

5 March PCR 1: 117

Rogers is assigned to the Duxbury highway repair.

1639 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Elizabeth Rogers born.

1640 6 Apri PCR 1: 144

Rogers is granted land next to Mr. Vassells' farm at the North River. This land totals to 50 acres of upland and meadow ground. He also received some other small divisions of land, and a joint holding. His brother John also received 50 acres in the same area, together with Constant and Thomas Southworth.

2 Jun PCR 1: 155

Rogers is sworn in to his constabulary post in Duxbury.

1642 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

John Rogers born.

1642/43 7 March PCR 2: 53

Rogers is granted four to five acres of meadow lying above Massachusett path. This land is noted as being two miles from the Bradford farm.

1644 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Mary Rogers born.

20 August PCR 2: 75

Rogers is appointed to lay forth a highway from William Bradford's farm to the Bay. He is appointed for Duxbury with John Rogers, and shares the commision with John Howland and John Cooke (who represent Plymouth.) The four men are instructed to pick a fifth if they can't agree on the plan.

1645 20 October PCR 2: 88

The people of Duxbury are granted "a competent pporcion" of land around Saughtuckquett. They will pick the center and from that mark the appointed land would stretch four miles out. Rogers was nominated to be a trustee of this land, along with Miles Standish, John Alden, George Soul, Constant Southworth, and William Brett.

1646/47 2 March PCR 2: 111

Rogers serves on a jury.

1647 1 June PCR 2: 117

Rogers is established as lieutenant of Nawset (later Eastham) to "exercise theire men in armes…"

1648 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

James Rogers born.

1651 10 June PCR 2: 177

Rogers is listed as a purchaser.

1652 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221-222

Hannah Rogers born.

Joseph Rogers moves to Sandwich.

1658 1 June PCR 3: 142

Rogers purchases some land from Pompmo of the Potonumaquatt tribe. He buys Aquaquesett, five acres, and Mattahquesett, one and a half acre of land.

2 October PCR 3: 153

Rogers is appointed to the Council of War.

1660/61 5 March PCR 3: 205

The verdict comes in on the trial of John Hawes, who had been accused of "violently and by force of armes" killing Joseph Rogers Jr. of Eastham by giving him "a most deadly fall" on December 25, 1660, from which he died forty-eight hours later. Hawes was found not guilty.

1661 1 October PCR 4: 5

Rogers is freed from his military office as Lieutenant of the military company of Eastham.

1663 1 June PCR 4: 37

Rogers serves on the Grand Enquest.

24 July Mayflower Descendant 17(3) 1915: 167-68

Manasses Kempton sells Rogers 40 acres of upland in the Barley Neck area.

1664 8 June PCR 4: 64

Rogers is reestablished into his old military office.

8 June PCR 4: 67

Rogers is given liberty to "looke out" a parcel of land between Bridgewater and the Bay line, together with Josias Cooke, Giles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. The land is "for their accommodation."

1665 7 June PCR 4: 96

Rogers is charged to "view a certain iland petitioned for by Richard Higgins" along with "Leiftenant Freeman." The pair can purchase the land and "depose of it" to Higgins if they see fit.

7 June PCR 4: 96

Rogers is assigned 100 acres of William Nicarson's land next to Mannamoiett. If he wants the land, he must pay Nicarson. (Nicarson's land had been illegally purchased from the natives. The court had let him keep 100 acres and confiscated the rest.)

1670 7 June PCR 5: 35

Rogers is named as a selectman for Eastham together with four others.

7 June PCR 5: 39

The Court gives Rogers liberty to purchase land from natives near Eastham, at a place called Naamcoyicke.

1674 7 July PCR 5: 150

The Court gives two Indians, John Gibson and Thomas Cloake, land near Rogers.

1677/78 2-15 January Mayflower Descendant 3(2) 1901: 67-71

Joseph Rogers dies.

SOURCES

PCR The Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, edited by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer (Boston: William White, 1855-61; New York: AMS Press, 1968). 12 v. in 6.

"I Joseph Rogers senior: of Eastham of Good understanding and perfect memory being weake in body; and not knowing the the day of my departure out of this life, doe thinke meet to Leave this as my Last will and Testament.

Impr: I Commend my soule to God that Gave it: whoe is my God, and father in Jesus Christ, and my body to the earth by decent buriall;

firstly and concerning my temporall estate that God hath possessed me off; I doe make my son Thomas Rogers whole and sole executor which I will should be disposed of as followeth:

Impr I doe Give unto my Loveing Son James Rogers and his heires Lawfully begotten of his body: or the next of kinn; my house and housing and Land with fences or the like appurtenances, that I now dwell in and Improve adjoining to my house be it more or lesse; as it is Recorded and bounded on the Towne book, I say I doe give it to him to his heires lawfully begotten of his body forever or the next kindred.

Item I doe give to my sonnes John and James Rogers all my meadow ground that I bought of the Indians Francis and Josiah, lying att Pottammacutt and therabouts; I say I doe give and will it to them and theire heires forever equally to be divided.

Item I doe give to my sonnes Thomas and John Rogers and theire heires all my meadow and sedge lying on the otherside of the Cove, on keeskagansett syde; I say I doe give it to them and theire heires lawfully begottenof theire bodys forever;

I doe give to my Daughter Elizabeth Higgens the wife of Jonathan Higgens six acrees of Land lying neare the Barly neck, by a swamp called Ceader Swamp; as it is recorded and bounded in the Towne book, I say I give this six acrees to her and her heires of her body for ever; shee nor they shall not sell hier farm it out, directly nor indirectly to any person whatsoever, execept in case of removall it shall be lawfull for my sonnes or theire heires to buy or purchase it;

Item I give to Benjah Higgens my grandchild on condition hee live with mee until I die; I say I give to him and his heires, one third parte of all my upland and meadow att Paomett, purchased and unpurchased.

Item it is my will that the remainder of my lands or marshes, both att the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elswher purchased or unpurchased not disposed of particularly in my will; I say it is my will that all those lands be equally divided betwixt my three sonnes Thomas, John and James Rogers; and the heires lawfully of theire bodyes for ever; noteing that my son Thomas his twenty acrees of upland that already hee hath in the barly necke ber parte of his division of my land in the barly necke;

Item I doe give unto my daughter Hannah Rogers, if shee be not disposed of in marriage before my decease, and my wifes decease, then I day I doe give to her my bed and beding with all the furniture therto belonging or that shall belonge therto att our decease;

Alsoe it is my will that shee shall have her choise of one cow before my cattle be distributed, and use of three acrees of Tillage ground, fenced in, with the arable ground of her bretheren in the barly necke if shee desires, it soe long as shee lives unmarryed;

Item it is my will that Benjah Higgens shall have on of my cowes after mine and my wifes decease

Item it is my will concerning my loveing wife Hannah Rogers that shee live in my house as longe as shee lives, and shall be comfortably maintained by my stocke and to have the use of all my hoshold stuffe, that shee needs as longe as shee lives for her comfort and that none of my household furniture or stocke be disposed of, as longe as shee lives, save onely Hannahs cowe.

Item I will that ten shillings of my estate be disposed off for the use of the Church of Christ in Eastham as shall be Judged most nessesarie.

Item I will that the remainder of my stocke estate houshold furniture that my wife shall leave att her decease not disposed of in my will before written; be equally divided between all my children; and Benjah Higgens to have an equall share with each of them; this is my last will and testament as witnes my hand and seale this 2nd of January 1677."

Joseph's inventory was taken 15 Jan. 1567/8 and the will was probated 5 Mar. 1677/8. Depositions of Jonathan Sparrow and Samuel Berry show that the grandson called Benjah Higgens in the will was also know as Beriah Higgens. Son Thomas Rogers died before completing the settlement of the estate and so Capt. Sparrow and remaining son John Rogers were impowered to handle the settlement.

He died between 2 and 15 Jan 1677/78. He was buried at Old Cove Burial Ground, Eastham.

Children of Joseph Rogers and Hannah

  * Sarah Rogers b. 6 Aug 1633, d. 15 Aug 1633
  * Joseph Rogers b. 19 Jul 1635, d. 27 Dec 1660
  * Thomas Rogers+ b. 29 Mar 1638, d. bt 5 Mar 1677/78 - 7 Aug 1678
  * Elizabeth Rogers+ b. 29 Sep 1639, d. bt 2 Jan 1677/78 - 4 Jul 1679
  * John Rogers+ b. 3 Apr 1642, d. bt 27 Apr 1713 - 10 Aug 1714
  * Mary Rogers+ b. 22 Sep 1644, d. a 19 Apr 1718
  * James Rogers+ b. 18 Oct 1648, d. 13 Apr 1678
  * Hannah Rogers+ b. 8 Aug 1652, d. a 18 Oct 1690

Citations

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--------------------

Joseph Rogers was born in Watford, Northhamptonshire. He is noted as being baptized on 23 January 1602/03. Buried in Family Lot ,Cove Cemetery-Eastham, Massachusetts

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; he is not mentioned in any case for any sort of sexual offence. His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Mannasses Kempton and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family. Along with the cattle, Rogers shared 2 nanny goats.

Early on, Rogers tried his hand in the transportation business. A court record from 2 March 1635/36 states that he was granted permission to run a ferry over Jones River, which ran near his house. The charge was a penny per passenger.

Rogers may have possessed over 100 acres in Duxbury at one point, having been granted 60 acres of land in 1638 and an additional 50 in 1640. There are four known land deals involving him from the time of his arrival in Eastham. A 1658 purchase from the Potonumaquatt tribe totals six and one half acres. In 1662 Manasses Kempton sold Rogers 40 acres of upland in the area "Called the Barly necke…." In 1665 Rogers is mentioned as having rights to 100 acres of land that William Nicarson had illegally purchased from the natives. It is not known whether Joseph Rogers actually bought the land he was entitled to. The Plymouth court gave him liberty in 1670 to purchase land from Indians living near Eastham.

It is also not known exactly how much land Rogers held at his death. In his will he mentions holdings "at the barly necke, Pochett Iland Paomett Billingsgate or elsewhere purchased or unpurchased…." An inventory of his household comes to 56 pounds, 9 shillings, and 11 pence. Rogers, like many Cape Cod families, owned a fishing boat ¾ in his case, two " canooes."

Joseph Rogers was an upstanding citizen in the colony. He was a purchaser in 1626, and he is listed as a freeman in 1633. His reputation was untarnished by any criminal accusations, although he does appear as a plaintiff in a 1632/33 civil case. (Edward Doty had not carried through on a contract involving six pigs. Rogers received 4 bushels of corn in compensation.)

He also had a history of community involvement. While in Duxbury, he was sworn into the post of constable for 1640. On June 1, 1647, he was sworn in as lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham,) an office he held until 1661, when he was released. In 1658, he served on the Council of War. He was re-sworn into his lieutenant's office in 1664, and held it until his death. Rogers was also often involved in community land transactions, serving as a trustee over a piece of Duxbury land in October 1646. In 1664 Lieutenant "Josepth Rogers" is given authority to survey a piece of land from Bridgewater to the Bay line, along with Josias Cooke, Gyles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. In 1670, Rogers served as a selectman along with Nicholas Snow, Daniel Cole, and Josias Cooke.

He died between the 2nd and the 15th of January 1677/78, in Eastham, New Plymouth, a few weeks short of his seventy-fifth birthday.

LIEUTENANT JOSEPH ROGERS' CONNECTIONS

Alden, John named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Berry, Samuel testified about Rogers' bequests, 5 March 1677/78.

Bradford, William

   * was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627
   * Rogers requests land in a certain area, if not prejudicial to Bradford, 2 July 1638
   * Bradford to view and appoint land for Rogers, 7 Aug 1638
   * buys land from Rogers for ten pounds, 31 July 1646

Brett, William named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Buckett, Marie gets land next to Rogers' in casting of lots, 1623

Cloake, Thomas received land near Rogers, 7 July 1674

Cole, Daniel served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Cooke, John appointed with Rogers to a highway commission, 20 August 1644

Cooke, Josias

   * given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664
   * served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Cushman, Thomas

   * was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627
   * assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March 1635/36

Done, Daniel appraised Rogers' goods, 15 January 1677/78.

Doty, Edward

   * was sued by Rogers for breach of contract, 1 January 1632/33
   * assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March 

1635/36

Freeman, Lt. assigned to view island with Rogers, 7 June 1665

Gibson, John received land near Rogers, 7 July 1674

Higgins, Beriah Rogers mentioned living with him "a Greate while" to Jonathan Sparrow and Samuel Berry. Sparrow and Berry testified that Rogers had wanted to leave him a bed, two blankets, and his best suit of clothes to Higgens, but had forgotten to add it to his will. 5 March 1677/78

Hopkins, Giles given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Howland, John

   * appointed with Rogers to a highway commission, 20 August 1644
   * mentioned as exchanging land with Rogers, 31 July 1646

Latham, William was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

Kempton, Julian was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627

Kempton, Manasses

   * was in cattle division group with Rogers, 22 May 1627
   * sold Rogers 40 acres of land in Barley Neck, 24 July 1662

Mitchell, Experience given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Nicarson, Willaim part of his lands assigned to Rogers, 7 June 1665

Pearse, Abraham exchanges land with Rogers, 31 July 1646

Pompmo sold land to Rogers, 1 June 1658

Prence, Thomas

   * assigned to mow hay along Jones River with Rogers, 14 March 1635/36
   * ordered to share his hay ground with Rogers, 20 March 1636/37

Sampson, Henry given liberty to survey land between Bridgewater and Bay line with Rogers, 8 June 1664

Snow, Nicholas served as selectman with Rogers, 1670

Sparrow, Jonathan

   * appraised Rogers' goods, 15 January 1677/78.
   * testified about Rogers' bequests, 5 March 1677/78.

Soul, George named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Southworth, Constant named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Standish, Miles named trustee of Duxbury land along with Rogers, 20 October 1645

Tracye, Stephen mentioned as once sharing a meadow with Rogers, 25 October 1649

Twining, William witnessed Rogers' will, 2 January 1677/78.

LIEUTENANT JOSEPH ROGERS

PRIMARY SOURCE REFERENCES

1602/03 23 January Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Joseph Rogers baptized in Watford, Northhamptonshire.

1620 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Rogers is a passenger on the Mayflower.

1620/21 No Specific Date Anderson 1995, 3: 1598

Rogers' father, Thomas, dies.

1623 No Specific Date PCR 12: 4

In the cast of lots for land, Rogers gets two acres on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards."

No Specific Date PCR 12: 6

Marie Buckett gets an acre adjoining Rogers' land. Her acre lies "on the other side of the town towards the eele-river."

1627 22 May PCR 12: 12

In the division of cattle, Rogers gets a share in a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann." He also gets two nanny goats. William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, Manasses and Julian Kempton, and the Morton family are in his group as well.

1632/1633 2 January PCR 1: 6

Rogers sues Edward Doty for "non-performance of covenants in a contract between them wherein six pigges of five weeks old were due unto the plaintiff." Rogers wins 4 bushels of corn.

1633 No Specific Date PCR 1: 4

Rogers is listed as a freeman.

No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Sarah Rogers born.

25 March PCR 1: 11

Rogers is rated 9s in corn.

1 July PCR 1:14

Rogers is ordered to mow "that which he mowed last yeare."

1634 27 March PCR 1: 28

Rogers is rated 9s in corn.

1635 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Joseph Rogers, Jr. born.

1635/36 2 March PCR 1: 39

The court gives Rogers permission to run a ferry over Jones River near his dwelling house. He is allowed to charge a penny per head, in order to maintain "a sufficient ferry."

14 March PCR 1: 40

Rogers is ordered to mow hay along the Jones River. His mowing companions are Thomas Prence, Thomas Cushman, and Edward Dowty.

1636 7 June PCR 1: 42

Rogers serves on a jury.

1636/37 20 March PCR 1: 56

Rogers is ordered to shared his "old hay ground" with Thomas Prence, "to be decided apportionable to their cattle."

1638 4 June PCR 1:85

Rogers is to be remembered for lands "on Duxborrow side" when they are surveyed.

2 July PCR 1: 90

Rogers requests land around Iland Creeke Pond, "if it be not prejudiciall to Mr Bradford."

7 August PCR 1: 93

Rogers is granted land for corn fields in "the place where hee desireth." William Bradford would view the land and appoint it to him.

6 November PCR 1: 101

Rogers is granted 60 acres of upland and meadow, "lying about a mile and a half from the brooke beyond Mr Bradford farme, upon Mattachusetts Payth, on the west side thereof."

1639/40 3 March PCR 1: 141

Rogers is nominated for the post of constable of Duxbury.

5 March PCR 1: 117

Rogers is assigned to the Duxbury highway repair.

1639 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Elizabeth Rogers born.

1640 6 Apri PCR 1: 144

Rogers is granted land next to Mr. Vassells' farm at the North River. This land totals to 50 acres of upland and meadow ground. He also received some other small divisions of land, and a joint holding. His brother John also received 50 acres in the same area, together with Constant and Thomas Southworth.

2 Jun PCR 1: 155

Rogers is sworn in to his constabulary post in Duxbury.

1642 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

John Rogers born.

1642/43 7 March PCR 2: 53

Rogers is granted four to five acres of meadow lying above Massachusett path. This land is noted as being two miles from the Bradford farm.

1644 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

Mary Rogers born.

20 August PCR 2: 75

Rogers is appointed to lay forth a highway from William Bradford's farm to the Bay. He is appointed for Duxbury with John Rogers, and shares the commision with John Howland and John Cooke (who represent Plymouth.) The four men are instructed to pick a fifth if they can't agree on the plan.

1645 20 October PCR 2: 88

The people of Duxbury are granted "a competent pporcion" of land around Saughtuckquett. They will pick the center and from that mark the appointed land would stretch four miles out. Rogers was nominated to be a trustee of this land, along with Miles Standish, John Alden, George Soul, Constant Southworth, and William Brett.

1646/47 2 March PCR 2: 111

Rogers serves on a jury.

1647 1 June PCR 2: 117

Rogers is established as lieutenant of Nawset (later Eastham,) to "exercise theire men in armes…"

1648 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221

James Rogers born.

1651 10 June PCR 2: 177

Rogers is listed as a purchaser.

1652 No Specific Date Davis 1883, II: 221-222

Hannah Rogers born.

Joseph Rogers moves to Sandwich.

1658 1 June PCR 3: 142

Rogers purchases some land from Pompmo of the Potonumaquatt tribe. He buys Aquaquesett, five acres, and Mattahquesett, one and a half acre of land.

2 October PCR 3: 153

Rogers is appointed to the Council of War.

1660/61 5 March PCR 3: 205

The verdict comes in on the trial of John Hawes, who had been accused of "violently and by force of armes" killing Joseph Rogers Jr. of Eastham by giving him "a most deadly fall" on December 25, 1660, from which he died forty-eight hours later. Hawes was found not guilty.

1661 1 October PCR 4: 5

Rogers is freed from his military office as Lieutenant of the military company of Eastham.

1663 1 June PCR 4: 37

Rogers serves on the Grand Enquest.

24 July Mayflower Descendant 17(3) 1915: 167-68

Manasses Kempton sells Rogers 40 acres of upland in the Barley Neck area.

1664 8 June PCR 4: 64

Rogers is reestablished into his old military office.

8 June PCR 4: 67

Rogers is given liberty to "looke out" a parcel of land between Bridgewater and the Bay line, together with Josias Cooke, Giles Hopkins, Henry Sampson, and Experience Mitchell. The land is "for their accommodation."

1665 7 June PCR 4: 96

Rogers is charged to "view a certain iland petitioned for by Richard Higgins" along with "Leiftenant Freeman." The pair can purchase the land and "depose of it" to Higgins if they see fit.

7 June PCR 4: 96

Rogers is assigned 100 acres of William Nicarson's land next to Mannamoiett. If he wants the land, he must pay Nicarson. (Nicarson's land had been illegally purchased from the natives. The court had let him keep 100 acres and confiscated the rest.)

1670 7 June PCR 5: 35

Rogers is named as a selectman for Eastham together with four others.

7 June PCR 5: 39

The Court gives Rogers liberty to purchase land from natives near Eastham, at a place called Naamcoyicke.

1674 7 July PCR 5: 150

The Court gives two Indians, John Gibson and Thomas Cloake, land near Rogers.

1677/78 2-15 January Mayflower Descendant 3(2) 1901: 67-71

Joseph Rogers dies.

SOURCES

PCR The Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, edited by Nathaniel B. Shurtleff and David Pulsifer (Boston: William White, 1855-61; New York: AMS Press, 1968). 12 v. in 6.

Mayflower Descendant

The Mayflower Descendant, CD ROM Legacy Edition, 1996.

Anderson 1995

Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England 1620-1633 (Boston: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1995). 3v.

Davis 1883

Davis, William T. Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth (Boston: Williams, 1883). -------------------- Joseph came with his father, Thomas, on the Mayflower on September 6/16, 1620. Joseph's siblings came to Plymouth at a later date.

He married, possibly, a woman named Hannah. They had eight children. -------------------- One of the original Mayflower Passengers, Joseph was 17 years old when he traveled on the Mayflower to Plymouth Colony, accompanied by his father, Thomas Rogers. The Rogers family had left England due to religious persecution (they were Separatists of the Church of England) and fled to Leyland, Holland. Thomas and Joseph were among the passengers that boarded the Mayflower in Holland, leaving Thomas' wife and the other children in Holland. Thomas died from the general sickness in the winter of 1620/1621. Alice and the remaining children arrived in Plymouth Colony circa 1623 aboard the Anne. -------------------- Born 1609/1610 -------------------- Joseph Rogers was born in Watford, Northhamptonshire. He is noted as being baptized on 23 January 1602/03.

Before coming to the New World, Rogers was part of the Leiden congregation in the Netherlands. He came to the Plymouth colony on the Mayflower, in the company of his father, Thomas Rogers. By 1639 he had moved to Duxbury; he is noted as requesting land in that area in 1638 and is named on a committee for the Duxbury highway repair in 1638/39. He is mentioned as "of Duxborrow" in the records of a 1646 land sale. Rogers probably moved very soon after this mention, as he is named lieutenant of Nauset (later Eastham) in 1647. In Eastham, he might have taken up residence with Beriah Higgens, as in his will he mentions that he "lived with him a Greate while." Rogers lived in Eastham until his death.

Although his father did not survive the first winter, Joseph's brother John took his chances in the New World and at an unknown date joined his brother in Plymouth. It is uncertain whether Rogers' sisters Elizabeth and Margaret ever came to the colony; they were listed as living in Leiden in 1622.

Rogers married a woman named Hannah, whose surname is unknown. They had four sons and four daughters: Sarah (1633), Joseph (1635), Thomas, Elizabeth (1639), John (1642), Mary (1644), James, (1648), and Hannah (1652.) Joseph seems to have had a clean bill of health concerning his marriage; he is not mentioned in any case for any sort of sexual offence. His home life was not one of unmarred happiness, though. Sarah died in infancy, and Joseph predeceased his father. Roger's eldest son had suffered from "a most deadly fall" on 25 December 1660, and lingered for two days before dying. John Hawes was indicted for "violently and by force of armes" killing Rogers Jr. (The two might have been wrestling when Rogers Jr. suffered his fatal injury.) Hawes was found not guilty of the crime on 5 March 1660/61.

Had Rogers lived longer, he would have seen his family greatly diminished. Thomas, the second son and the executor of Rogers' will, died a few months after his father, along with the youngest son James. By October of 1678, only John Rogers was left to administer his father's estate.

In the first land division in 1623, Rogers received two acres, on "the South side of the brooke to the baywards." He added cattle to his goods in 1627, sharing a heifer "of the last yeare" from the "Greate white back cow that was brought over in the Ann" with William Bradford, Thomas Cushman, William Latham, M

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Lt. Joseph Rogers, "Mayflower" Passenger's Timeline

1602
January 23, 1602
Stratford On Avon, Warwickshire, England
1603
January 23, 1603
Age 1
Watford, Northamptonshire, England, (Present UK)
1620
September 6, 1620
- November 9, 1620
Age 18
Cape Cod, Massachusetts, United States
November 21, 1620
Age 18
On Mayflower
1630
1630
Age 27
Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States
1631
July 20, 1631
Age 29
Plymouth, (Present Plymouth County), Plymouth Colony (Present Massachusetts), (Present USA)
1633
August 6, 1633
Age 31
Duxbury, Plymouth Colony
1635
July 19, 1635
Age 33
Duxbury, Plymouth Colony
1638
May 9, 1638
Age 36
Probably Duxbury, Plymouth Colony
1639
September 29, 1639
Age 37
Probably Duxbury, Plymouth Colony