Vladimir II of Kiev

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Vladimir II Vsevolodich Monomakh, Grand Prince of Kiev

Russian: Vladimir II Vsevolodich Рюриковичи Мономахи, Великий князь Киевски
Also Known As: "Владимир II Мономах", "Владимир-Василий Всеволодович Рюрикович", "Monomach", "Wladimir II. Monomarchos von Kiew", "Monomachus", "Włodzimierz", "Vsevolod II", "Monomachos", "Monomakh"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Kiev, Kiev city, Kyiv city, Ukraine
Death: Died in Kiev, Kiev city, Kyiv city, Ukraine
Place of Burial: Saint Sophia Cathedral, Kiev, Kiev, Kyivs'ka oblast, Ukraine
Immediate Family:

Son of Vsevolod I Yaroslavich prince of Kiev and Anastasia / Irene Maria Monomacha
Husband of Sofja Aepovna Princess Of The Polowezki; Gytha (Gyda, Gyða) Haraldsdóttir and a Byzantine noblewoman
Father of Sbislava of Kiev; Sophia of Kiev; Andryi Vladimirovych of Kiev; Malmfrid of Kiev; Ingeborg of Kiev and 15 others
Brother of Anna of Kiev
Half brother of Prince Rostislav Vsevolodovich of Vsevolodich, Duke Of Kiev and Eupraxia of Kiev

Occupation: Grand Duke of Kiev / Russian Prince, Storfyrste i Kiew cc.1113 - 1125, Grand Duke of Russia, Fyrste af Kiev
Managed by: Henn Sarv
Last Updated:

About Vladimir II of Kiev

AKA = Monomach ? _ http://fi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiovan_Ven%C3%A4j%C3%A4 _ --------------------

n 1053-1125

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Vladimir II Monomakh, Prince of Novgorod and Kiev (1)

M, #106696, d. 19 May 1125

Vladimir II Monomakh, Prince of Novgorod and Kiev was the son of Vsevolod I, Grand Duke of Kiev and Irene (?). (2), (3) He married Gytha (?), daughter of Harold II Godwinson, King of England and Eadgyth Swanneshals (?). (1)

He died on 19 May 1125.

Vladimir II Monomakh, Prince of Novgorod and Kiev gained the title of Prince Vladimir of Kiev. He gained the title of Prince Vladimir of Novgorod. (1) He succeeded to the title of Grand Duke Vladmir II of Kiev in 1113. (2)

Children of Vladimir II Monomakh, Prince of Novgorod and Kiev and Gytha (?)

-1. Euphemia of Kiev+ d. 1139 (4)

-2. Yurii I Dolgorukii, Grand Prince of Kiev+ d. 1157 (2)

-3. Yaropolk II, Grand Prince of Kiev d. 1139 (2)

-4. Vyacheslav, Grand Prince of Kiev d. 1154 (2)

-5. Mstislaw I, Grand Prince of Kiev+ b. 1076, d. 1132 (2)

Forrás:

http://thepeerage.com/p10670.htm#i106696

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http://www.rulex.ru/01030618.htm

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Vladimir II Monomakh ( Russian: Владимир Мономах; Ukrainian: Володимир Мономах; Christian name Vasiliy, or Basileios) (1053 – May 19, 1125) was a famous Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Prince) of Kievan Rus'.

He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) and Anastasia of Byzantium (d. 1067). Her father which some give as Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, is not attested in any reliable primary source.

Eupraxia of Kiev, a sister of Vladimir, became notorious all over Europe for her divorce from the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV on the grounds that he had attempted a black mass on her naked body.

In his famous Instruction (also known as The Testament) to his own children, Monomakh mentions that he conducted 83 military campaigns and 19 times made peace with the Polovtsi. At first he waged war against the steppe jointly with his cousin Oleg, but after Vladimir was sent by his father to rule Chernigiv and Oleg made peace with the Polovtsi to retake that city from him, they parted company. Since that time, Vladimir and Oleg were bitter enemies who would often engage in internecine wars. The enmity continued among their children and more distant posterity.

From 1094, his chief patrimony was the southern town of Pereyaslav, although he also controlled Rostov, Suzdal, and other northern provinces. In these lands he founded several towns, notably his namesake, Vladimir, the future capital of Russia. In order to unite the princes of Rus' in their struggle against the Great Steppe, Vladimir initiated three princely congresses, the most important being held at Lyubech in 1097 and Dolobsk in 1103.

When Sviatopolk II died in 1113, the Kievan populace revolted and summoned Vladimir to the capital. The same year he entered Kiev to the great delight of the crowd and reigned there until his death in 1125. As may be seen from his Instruction, he promulgated a number of reforms in order to allay the social tensions in the capital. These years saw the last flowering of Ancient Rus, which was torn apart 10 years after his death.

Vladimir Monomakh is buried in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev. Succeeding generations often referred to his reign as the golden age of that city. Numerous legends are connected with Monomakh's name, including the transfer from Constantinople to Rus of such precious relics as the Theotokos of Vladimir and the Vladimir/Muscovite crown called Monomakh's Cap.

Marriages and children:

Vladimir was married three times. His first wife was Gytha of Wessex, daughter of Harold of England who fell at Hastings and Edith Swannesha. They had at least five children:

-Mstislav I of Kiev (1 June 1076 - 14 April 1132).

-Izyaslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Kursk (c. 1077 - 6 September 1096).

-Svyatoslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Smolensk and

Pereyaslav (c. 1080 - 16 March 1114).

-Yaropolk II of Kiev (1082 - 18 February 1139).

-Viacheslav I of Kiev (1083 - 2 February 1154).

The following daughter has been attributed to both the first and the second wife:

-Marina Vladimirovna (d. 1146). Married Leon Diogenes. A pretender to the throne of the Byzantine Empire, claiming to be a son of Romanos IV. Rose to the rank of khan of the Cumans in Ossetia.

The second wife is considered to have been a Byzantine noblewoman. The Primary Chronicle records her date of death on 7 May 1107. However the Chronicle does not mention her name. They had at least six children:

-Roman Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 6 January 1119).

-Eufemia of Kiev (d. 4 April 1139). Married Coloman of Hungary.

-Eupraxia of Kiev Vladimirovna (d. 1109).

-Agafia Vladimirovna. Married Vsevolod Davidovich, Prince of Gorodno. Her husband was a son of Davyd Igorevych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 1113).

-Yuri Dolgoruki (d. 15 May 1157).

-Andryi Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (11 July 1102 - 1141).

His third marriage is thought to have been to a daughter of Aepa Ocenevich, Khan of the Cumans. Her paternal grandfather was Osen. Her people belonged to the Kipchaks, a confederation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin.

However the Primary Chronicle identifies Aepa as father-in-law to Yuri Dolgoruki. With Vladimir negotiating the marriage in name of his son. Whether father and son married sisters or the identity of intended groom was misadentified is unclear.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_II_Monomakh

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Vladimir II Monomach, född 1053 i Kiev i dåvarande Kievriket, död i London den 19 maj 1125, var storfurste av Kievriket från 1113. Han var dotterson till den bysantinske kejsaren Konstantin IX Monomachos. Han blev prins av Smolensk 1077 och prins av Tjernigov 1078. Vladimir fortsatte som sina företrädare att dels hålla samman det kievryska riket, genom att bekämpa de hotande stäppfolken, framför allt polovtserna, dels centralisera den politiska makten till Kiev. Som ett av den fornryska litteraturens viktigaste dokument framstår Vladimirs testamente från cirka 1117, vilket i huvudsak utgörs av en självbiografi och en brevsamling.

Vladimir II var gift tre gånger. Han gifte sig år 1074 i London med Gytha av England, född i London 1053. De fick följande barn:

Mstislav I, född 1076, furste av Kiev.

Iziaslav, född 1077.

Svjatoslav, född cirka 1080.

Jaropolk II, född 1082.

Vjatjeslav, född 1083.

Marina, född ca 1087.

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Prince, Grand Duke of Kiev

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Familj med Gytha

Vigsel: omkring 1070 1)

Barn:

Mstislav I av Kiev (1076 - 1132)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Källor

1)  Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Hull, England

Wladimir married Storfurstinna av Kiev Gythe Gyda, daughter of Kung av England Harald II Goldwinsson and Unknown, in 1046.

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Fyrste av Smolensk 1067 - 1094.

Fyrste av Chernigiv 1078 - 1094.

Fyrste av Pereyaslavl 1094 - 1113.

Storfyrste av Kijev [Kiev] 1113 - 1125.

Vladimir (Volodymyr) ble fyrste av Pereyaslavl da hans far, Vsevolod I, døde og støttet sin kusine Sviatopolk som storfyrste av Kijev for å unngå krig mellom de russiske prinsene.

Han ble populær etter sine vellykkede kampanjer (1103-11) mot kumanene, nomadiske innvandrere som var en konstant trussel mot Russland.

Han etterfulgte Sviatopolk som storfyrste da denne døde. Under hans regjeringstid blomstret landet og vokste i styrke. Han innførte sosial lovgivning, utvidet koloniseseringen i de nordøstre skogene og bygde nye byer.

Fra Snorre Sturlasson: Magnus Erlingssons saga:

«2. ... Kong Valdemar var nær frende til kong Magnus. Ingelborg, kong Valdemars mor, og Malmfrid, mor til Kristin, som var Magnus's mor, var søstre og døtre til kong Harald [Mstislav I] øst i Gardarike, som var sønn til Valdemar [Vladimir] Jarisleivsson. ....

Datidens Gardarike omfattet de to byene Holmgard (Novgorod i Russland) og Kønugard (Kijev i nåværende Ukraina).

Tekst: Tore Nygaard

Kilder:

Snorre Sturlasson: Olav Trygvessons saga, avsnitt 6-8, 21, 46, 90. Snorre Sturlasson: Olav den helliges saga, avsnitt 93, 245. Snorre Sturlasson: Magnus Erlingssons saga, avsnitt 2. N. de Baumgarten: Généalogie et Mariage occidenteaux des Rurikides Russes du Xe au XIII Siècle. Mogens Bugge: Våre forfedre, nr. 552. Bent og Vidar Billing Hansen: Rosensverdslektens forfedre, side 89.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Monomakh

Vladimir II Monomakh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 (Redirected from Vladimir Monomakh)

Jump to: navigation, search

For the 2006 Russian animated feature film, see Prince Vladimir (film).

   For the cruiser see Russian armoured cruiser Vladimir Monomakh, for the submarine see RFS Vladimir Monomakh

Vladimir II Monomakh

Grand Prince of Rus

1000 Monomah.jpg

Vladimir II Monomakh at the Millennium Monument in Novgorod

Reign 1113-1125

Full name Vladimir Vsevolodovich

Titles Prince of Smolensk (1073-78)

Prince of Chernigov (1078-94)

Prince of Pereyaslav (1094-13)

Born 1053

Died May 19, 1125

Predecessor Sviatopolk II

Successor Mstislav I of Kiev

Dynasty Rurik Dynasty

Father Vsevolod I

Mother Anastasia of Byzantium

Vladimir II Monomakh (Russian: Владимир Мономах; Ukrainian: Володимир Мономах; Christian name Vasiliy, or Basileios) (1053 – May 19, 1125) was a famous Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Prince) of Kievan Rus'.

Contents

[show]

   * 1 Family
   * 2 Reign
   * 3 Marriages and children
   * 4 See also
   * 5 External links

[edit] Family

He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) and Anastasia of Byzantium (d. 1067). Her father which some give as Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, is not attested in any reliable primary source.

Eupraxia of Kiev, a sister of Vladimir, became notorious all over Europe for her divorce from the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV on the grounds that he had attempted a black mass on her naked body.

[edit] Reign

The Testament of Vladimir Monomakh to Children, 1125. Lithography of 1836.

In his famous Instruction (also known as The Testament) to his own children, Monomakh mentions that he conducted 83 military campaigns and 19 times made peace with the Polovtsi. At first he waged war against the steppe jointly with his cousin Oleg, but after Vladimir was sent by his father to rule Chernigiv and Oleg made peace with the Polovtsi to retake that city from him, they parted company. Since that time, Vladimir and Oleg were bitter enemies who would often engage in internecine wars. The enmity continued among their children and more distant posterity.

From 1094, his chief patrimony was the southern town of Pereyaslav, although he also controlled Rostov, Suzdal, and other northern provinces. In these lands he founded several towns, notably his namesake, Vladimir, the future capital of Russia. In order to unite the princes of Rus' in their struggle against the Great Steppe, Vladimir initiated three princely congresses, the most important being held at Lyubech in 1097 and Dolobsk in 1103.

When Sviatopolk II died in 1113, the Kievan populace revolted and summoned Vladimir to the capital. The same year he entered Kiev to the great delight of the crowd and reigned there until his death in 1125. As may be seen from his Instruction, he promulgated a number of reforms in order to allay the social tensions in the capital. These years saw the last flowering of Ancient Rus, which was torn apart 10 years after his death.

Vladimir Monomakh is buried in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev. Succeeding generations often referred to his reign as the golden age of that city. Numerous legends are connected with Monomakh's name, including the transfer from Constantinople to Rus of such precious relics as the Theotokos of Vladimir and the Vladimir/Muscovite crown called Monomakh's Cap.

[edit] Marriages and children

Vladimir was married three times. His first wife was Gytha of Wessex, daughter of Harold of England who fell at Hastings and Edith Swannesha. They had at least five children:

   * Mstislav I of Kiev (1 June 1076 - 14 April 1132).
   * Izyaslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Kursk (c. 1077 - 6 September 1096).
   * Svyatoslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Smolensk and Pereyaslav (c. 1080 - 16 March 1114).
   * Yaropolk II of Kiev (1082 - 18 February 1139).
   * Viacheslav I of Kiev (1083 - 2 February 1154).

The following daughter has been attributed to both the first and the second wife:

   * Marina Vladimirovna (d. 1146). Married Leon Diogenes. A pretender to the throne of the Byzantine Empire, claiming to be a son of Romanos IV. Rose to the rank of khan of the Cumans in Ossetia.

The second wife is considered to have been a Byzantine noblewoman. The Primary Chronicle records her date of death on 7 May 1107. However the Chronicle does not mention her name. They had at least six children:

Monomakh rests after hunting (painting by Viktor Vasnetsov, c. 1900).

   * Roman Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 6 January 1119).
   * Eufemia of Kiev (d. 4 April 1139). Married Coloman of Hungary.
   * Eupraxia of Kiev Vladimirovna (d. 1109).
   * Agafia Vladimirovna. Married Vsevolod Davidovich, Prince of Gorodno. Her husband was a son of Davyd Igorevych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 1113).
   * Yuri Dolgoruki (d. 15 May 1157).
   * Andryi Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (11 July 1102 - 1141).

His third marriage is thought to have been to a daughter of Aepa Ocenevich, Khan of the Cumans. Her paternal grandfather was Osen. Her people belonged to the Kipchaks, a confederation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin.

However the Primary Chronicle identifies Aepa as father-in-law to Yuri Dolgoruki. With Vladimir negotiating the marriage in name of his son. Whether father and son married sisters or the identity of intended groom was misadentified is unclear.

[edit] See also

   * List of Ukrainian rulers
   * List of Russian rulers
   * Council of Liubech

[edit] External links

   * English biography
   * Karamzin's account of Monomakh
   * Instruction of Vladimir Monomakh
   * The Pouchenie of Vladimir Monomakh
   * The Pouchenie of Vladimir Monomakh (Russian)
   * His listing in "Medieval lands" by Charles Cawley.

Regnal titles

Preceded by

Sviatopolk II Rulers of Kievan Rus Succeeded by

Mstislav

This page was last modified on 15 July 2010 at 14:48.

--------------------

Vladimir II Monomakh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vladimir II Monomakh ( Russian: Владимир Мономах; Ukrainian: Володимир Мономах; Christian name Vasiliy, or Basil) (1053–May 19, 1125)—or Vladimir in English — was a famous Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Prince) of Kievan Rus'.

Family

He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) and princess Anastasia of Byzantium (d. 1067), daughter of Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, from whom he takes his nickname of Monomakh (Greek: "One who fights alone").

Through his maternal grandmother's family, Vladimir was apparently a descendant of the Argyros and Skleros families of the Byzantine Empire, and thus could have traced his bloodline to several other emperors such as Romanus I and Leo V. These Greek connections played an important role in his foreign affairs.

Eupraxia of Kiev, a sister of Vladimir, became notorious all over Europe for her divorce from the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV on the grounds that he had attempted a black mass on her naked body.

[edit]Reign

In his famous Instruction to his own children, Monomakh mentions that he conducted 83 military campaigns and 19 times made peace with the Polovtsi. At first he waged war against the steppe jointly with his cousin Oleg, but after Vladimir was sent by his father to rule Chernigov and Oleg made peace with the Polovtsi to retake that city from him, they parted company. Since that time, Vladimir and Oleg were bitter enemies who would often engage in internecine wars. The enmity continued among their children and more distant posterity.

From 1094, his chief patrimony was the southern town of Pereyaslav, although he also controlled Rostov, Suzdal, and other northern provinces. In these lands he founded several towns, notably his namesake, Vladimir, the future capital of Russia. In order to unite the princes of Rus' in their struggle against the Great Steppe, Vladimir initiated three princely congresses, the most important being held at Lyubech in 1097 and Dolobsk in 1103.

When Sviatopolk II died in 1113, the Kievan populace revolted and summoned Vladimir to the capital. The same year he entered Kiev to the great delight of the crowd and reigned there until his death in 1125. As may be seen from his Instruction, he promulgated a number of reforms in order to allay the social tensions in the capital. These years saw the last flowering of Ancient Rus, which was torn apart 10 years after his death.

Vladimir Monomakh is buried in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev. Succeeding generations often referred to his reign as the golden age of that city. Numerous legends are connected with Monomakh's name, including the transfer from Constantinople to Rus of such precious relics as the Theotokos of Vladimir and the Vladimir/Muscovite crown called Monomakh's Cap.

[edit]Marriages and children

Vladimir was married three times. His first wife was Gytha of Wessex, daughter of Harold of England who fell at Hastings and Ealdgyth Swan-neck. They had at least five children:

Mstislav I of Kiev (1 June 1076 - 14 April 1172).

Izyaslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Kursk (c. 1077 - 6 September 1096).

Svyatoslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Smolensk and Pereyaslav (c. 1080 - 16 March 1114).

Yaropolk II of Kiev (1082 - 18 February 1139).

Viacheslav I of Kiev (1083 - 2 February 1154).

The following daughter has been attributed to both the first and the second wife:

Marina Vladimirovna (d. 1146). Married Leon Diogenes. A pretender to the throne of the Byzantine Empire, claiming to be a son of Romanos IV. Rose to the rank of khan of the Cumans in Ossetia.

The second wife is considered to have been a Byzantine noblewoman. The Primary Chronicle records her date of death on 7 May 1107. However the Chronicle does not mention her name. They had at least six children:

Roman Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 6 January 1119).

Eufemia of Kiev (d. 4 April 1139). Married Coloman of Hungary.

Eupraxia Vladimirovna (d. 1109).

Agafia Vladimirovna. Married Vsevolod Davidovich, Prince of Gorodno. Her husband was a son of Davyd Igorevych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 1113).

Yuri Dolgoruki (d. 15 May 1157).

Andryi Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (11 July 1102 - 1141).

His third marriage is thought to have been to a daughter of Aepa Ocenevich, Khan of the Cumans. Her paternal granfather was Osen. Her people belonged to the Kipchaks, a confederation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin.

However the Primary Chronicle identifies Aepa as father-in-law to Yuri Dolgoruki. With Vladimir negotiating the marriage in name of his son. Whether father and son married sisters or the identity of intended groom was misadentified is unclear.

--------------------

Vladimir II Monomakh ( Russian: Владимир Мономах; Ukrainian: Володимир Мономах; Christian name Vasiliy, or Basil) (1053–May 19, 1125)—or Vladimir in English — was a famous Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Prince) of Kievan Rus'.

He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) and princess Anastasia of Byzantium (d. 1067), daughter of Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, from whom he takes his nickname of Monomakh (Greek: "One who fights alone").

Through his maternal grandmother's family, Vladimir was apparently a descendant of the Argyros and Skleros families of the Byzantine Empire, and thus could have traced his bloodline to several other emperors such as Romanus I and Leo V. These Greek connections played an important role in his foreign affairs.

Eupraxia of Kiev, a sister of Vladimir, became notorious all over Europe for her divorce from the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV on the grounds that he had attempted a black mass on her naked body.

Vladimir was married three times. His first wife was Gytha of Wessex, daughter of Harold of England who fell at Hastings and Ealdgyth Swan-neck. They had at least five children:

Mstislav I of Kiev (1 June 1076 - 14 April 1132).

Izyaslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Kursk (c. 1077 - 6 September 1096).

Svyatoslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Smolensk and Pereyaslav (c. 1080 - 16 March 1114).

Yaropolk II of Kiev (1082 - 18 February 1139).

Viacheslav I of Kiev (1083 - 2 February 1154).

The following daughter has been attributed to both the first and the second wife:

Marina Vladimirovna (d. 1146). Married Leon Diogenes. A pretender to the throne of the Byzantine Empire, claiming to be a son of Romanos IV. Rose to the rank of khan of the Cumans in Ossetia.

The second wife is considered to have been a Byzantine noblewoman. The Primary Chronicle records her date of death on 7 May 1107. However the Chronicle does not mention her name. They had at least six children:

Roman Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 6 January 1119).

Eufemia of Kiev (d. 4 April 1139). Married Coloman of Hungary.

Eupraxia Vladimirovna (d. 1109).

Agafia Vladimirovna. Married Vsevolod Davidovich, Prince of Gorodno. Her husband was a son of Davyd Igorevych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 1113).

Yuri Dolgoruki (d. 15 May 1157).

Andryi Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (11 July 1102 - 1141).

His third marriage is thought to have been to a daughter of Aepa Ocenevich, Khan of the Cumans. Her paternal granfather was Osen. Her people belonged to the Kipchaks, a confederation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin.

However the Primary Chronicle identifies Aepa as father-in-law to Yuri Dolgoruki. With Vladimir negotiating the marriage in name of his son. Whether father and son married sisters or the identity of intended groom was misadentified is unclear.

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Furste. Död omkring 1167. Volodar Glebovitj av Minsk var en furste av Minsk tillhörig den så kallade polotskdynastin (eller polovtserna) efter det vitryska staden och furstendömet Polotsk, varifrån den stammade. Han var son till Gleb Vseslavitj av Minsk (död 1119) och Anastasia Jaropolkova. Volodar dog efter 1167, möjligen 1176. Volodars familj hade sedan längre tid varit i strid med storfursten av Kiev, Vladimir Monomach, vilken 1113 (enligt vissa uppgifter 1119) erövrat Minsk från Volodars far. Senare hade polotskdynastins återstående besittningar erövrats av Vladimirs son Mstislav Vladimirovisj och dess medlemmar tvingats i landsflykt till bland annat Konstantinopel. Efter Mstislavs död 1132 föll dock Kiev-riket sakta samman och polotskdynastin kunde återvända till den ryska politiska scenen. Volodar gifte sig den 5 juni 1135 (troligen medan han befann sig i exil i Polen) med Rikissa av Polen, dotter till Boleslav III av Polen och änka efter den danske prinsen och kortvarige svenske kungen Magnus Nilsson av Danmark, vilken året innan stupat i slaget vid Fotevik. Volodar och Rikissa fick dottern Sofia av Minsk, vilken senare gifte sig med Valdemar den store av Danmark. Volodars och Rikissas äktenskap var ett politiskt drag av hennes far riktat mot den dåvarande alliansen mellan Erik Emune av Danmark och Monomachs ättlingar. Sedan ett flertal centrala aktörer i denna konflikt dött och monomachernas ställning i Ryssland kraftigt försvagats föll också grunden för äktenskapet vilket upplöstes i skilsmässa varefter Rikissa gifte om sig med Sverker d.ä. av Sverige. I äldre historieforskning förväxlades Volodar i regel (bland annat av Nikolaj von Baumgarten) med den halvt mytiske furst Vladimir Vsevolodisj av Novgorod.

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Prince Volodar ? Minsk

Prins Volodar (--?--) of Minsk was also known as Wolodar. He died after 1167.

Konge (King) Valdemar I Knutsen den store was born in 1131 at Jylland, Denmark. He married Dronning Sofie Volodarsdtr of Polotzk, daughter of prins Volodar (--?--) of Minsk and Dronning Rikitsa Boloslavsdtr of Polen, in 1157. He was Konge av Danmark between 1157 and 1182. He died in 1182 at Denmark.

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Died : eft 1139

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Volodar of Minsk

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Vladimir II Monomakh ( Russian: Владимир Мономах; Ukrainian: Володимир Мономах; Christian name Vasiliy, or Basil) (1053–May 19, 1125)—or Vladimir in English — was a famous Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Prince) of Kievan Rus'.

He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) and princess Anastasia of Byzantium (d. 1067), daughter of Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, from whom he takes his nickname of Monomakh (Greek: "One who fights alone").

Through his maternal grandmother's family, Vladimir was apparently a descendant of the Argyros and Skleros families of the Byzantine Empire, and thus could have traced his bloodline to several other emperors such as Romanus I and Leo V. These Greek connections played an important role in his foreign affairs.

Eupraxia of Kiev, a sister of Vladimir, became notorious all over Europe for her divorce from the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV on the grounds that he had attempted a black mass on her naked body.

Vladimir was married three times. His first wife was Gytha of Wessex, daughter of Harold of England who fell at Hastings and Ealdgyth Swan-neck. They had at least five children:

Mstislav I of Kiev (1 June 1076 - 14 April 1132).

Izyaslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Kursk (c. 1077 - 6 September 1096).

Svyatoslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Smolensk and Pereyaslav (c. 1080 - 16 March 1114).

Yaropolk II of Kiev (1082 - 18 February 1139).

Viacheslav I of Kiev (1083 - 2 February 1154).

The following daughter has been attributed to both the first and the second wife:

Marina Vladimirovna (d. 1146). Married Leon Diogenes. A pretender to the throne of the Byzantine Empire, claiming to be a son of Romanos IV. Rose to the rank of khan of the Cumans in Ossetia.

The second wife is considered to have been a Byzantine noblewoman. The Primary Chronicle records her date of death on 7 May 1107. However the Chronicle does not mention her name. They had at least six children:

Roman Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 6 January 1119).

Eufemia of Kiev (d. 4 April 1139). Married Coloman of Hungary.

Eupraxia Vladimirovna (d. 1109).

Agafia Vladimirovna. Married Vsevolod Davidovich, Prince of Gorodno. Her husband was a son of Davyd Igorevych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 1113).

Yuri Dolgoruki (d. 15 May 1157).

Andryi Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (11 July 1102 - 1141).

His third marriage is thought to have been to a daughter of Aepa Ocenevich, Khan of the Cumans. Her paternal granfather was Osen. Her people belonged to the Kipchaks, a confederation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin.

However the Primary Chronicle identifies Aepa as father-in-law to Yuri Dolgoruki. With Vladimir negotiating the marriage in name of his son. Whether father and son married sisters or the identity of intended groom was misadentified is unclear.

--------------------

Vladimir II Monomakh ( Russian: Владимир Мономах; Ukrainian: Володимир Мономах; Christian name Vasiliy, or Basileios) (1053 – May 19, 1125) was a famous Velikiy Kniaz (Grand Prince) of Kievan Rus'.

He was the son of Vsevolod I (married in 1046) and Anastasia of Byzantium (d. 1067). Her father which some give as Emperor Constantine IX Monomachos, is not attested in any reliable primary source.

Eupraxia of Kiev, a sister of Vladimir, became notorious all over Europe for her divorce from the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV on the grounds that he had attempted a black mass on her naked body.

Reign

The Testament of Vladimir Monomakh to Children, 1125. Lithography of 1836.

In his famous Instruction (also known as The Testament) to his own children, Monomakh mentions that he conducted 83 military campaigns and 19 times made peace with the Polovtsi. At first he waged war against the steppe jointly with his cousin Oleg, but after Vladimir was sent by his father to rule Chernigiv and Oleg made peace with the Polovtsi to retake that city from him, they parted company. Since that time, Vladimir and Oleg were bitter enemies who would often engage in internecine wars. The enmity continued among their children and more distant posterity.

From 1094, his chief patrimony was the southern town of Pereyaslav, although he also controlled Rostov, Suzdal, and other northern provinces. In these lands he founded several towns, notably his namesake, Vladimir, the future capital of Russia. In order to unite the princes of Rus' in their struggle against the Great Steppe, Vladimir initiated three princely congresses, the most important being held at Lyubech in 1097 and Dolobsk in 1103.

When Sviatopolk II died in 1113, the Kievan populace revolted and summoned Vladimir to the capital. The same year he entered Kiev to the great delight of the crowd and reigned there until his death in 1125. As may be seen from his Instruction, he promulgated a number of reforms in order to allay the social tensions in the capital. These years saw the last flowering of Ancient Rus, which was torn apart 10 years after his death.

Vladimir Monomakh is buried in the Saint Sophia Cathedral in Kiev. Succeeding generations often referred to his reign as the golden age of that city. Numerous legends are connected with Monomakh's name, including the transfer from Constantinople to Rus of such precious relics as the Theotokos of Vladimir and the Vladimir/Muscovite crown called Monomakh's Cap.

Marriages and children

Vladimir was married three times. His first wife was Gytha of Wessex, daughter of Harold of England who fell at Hastings and Edith Swannesha. They had at least five children:

Mstislav I of Kiev (1 June 1076 - 14 April 1132).

Izyaslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Kursk (c. 1077 - 6 September 1096).

Svyatoslav Vladimirovich, Prince of Smolensk and Pereyaslav (c. 1080 - 16 March 1114).

Yaropolk II of Kiev (1082 - 18 February 1139).

Viacheslav I of Kiev (1083 - 2 February 1154).

The following daughter has been attributed to both the first and the second wife:

Marina Vladimirovna (d. 1146). Married Leon Diogenes. A pretender to the throne of the Byzantine Empire, claiming to be a son of Romanos IV. Rose to the rank of khan of the Cumans in Ossetia.

The second wife is considered to have been a Byzantine noblewoman. The Primary Chronicle records her date of death on 7 May 1107. However the Chronicle does not mention her name. They had at least six children:

Roman Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 6 January 1119).

Eufemia of Kiev (d. 4 April 1139). Married Coloman of Hungary.

Eupraxia of Kiev Vladimirovna (d. 1109).

Agafia Vladimirovna. Married Vsevolod Davidovich, Prince of Gorodno. Her husband was a son of Davyd Igorevych, Prince of Volhynia (d. 1113).

Yuri Dolgoruki (d. 15 May 1157).

Andryi Vladimirovych, Prince of Volhynia (11 July 1102 - 1141).

His third marriage is thought to have been to a daughter of Aepa Ocenevich, Khan of the Cumans. Her paternal grandfather was Osen. Her people belonged to the Kipchaks, a confederation of pastoralists and warriors of Turkic origin.

However the Primary Chronicle identifies Aepa as father-in-law to Yuri Dolgoruki. With Vladimir negotiating the marriage in name of his son. Whether father and son married sisters or the identity of intended groom was misadentified is unclear.

--------------------

Vladimir II Monomach var kievrysk storfurste från 1113. Dotterson till den bysantinske kejsaren Konstantin IX Monomachos. Vladimir fortsatte företrädarnas strävanden att dels hålla samman det kievryska riket genom att bekämpa hotande stäppfolk framför allt polovtserna dels centralisera den politiska makten till Kiev. Som ett av den fornryska litteraturens viktigaste dokument framstår Vladimirs testamente från ca 1117 vilket i huvudsak utgörs av en självbiografi och en brevsamling.

Källa: "Nationalencyklopedin"

Vladimir var gift 3 gånger. Han blev prins av Smolensk 1077 och prins av Chernigov 1078.

-------------------- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_II_Monomakh

-------------------- In adolescence, Vladimir was put to reign in Rostov, then maybe prince of Smolensk and certainly - in Chernihiv (with 1078 by 1094) and then - in Pereyaslavl Russian (from 1094). In 1113, after the death of Svatopluk Izyaslavich, Monomakh of Kiev nobility was invited to the grand table and ua remained there until his death in 1125, Vladimir was married to Geeta (Guide), daughter of the last Anglo-Saxon king Harold ca 1070. In baptism named Basil .. Maternal grandson of Greek king Constantine Monomakh. Preserved physical description of Vladimir Monomakh, who was considered a beautiful person: medium height, broad-shouldered and strong, his eyes large, dark, brown hair, curly, high forehead. He wore a broad "Russian" beard. There was a very unpretentious in life and extremely hard-working. Notable Vladimir endurance and physical strength. Died, leaving his wife from his third marriage. He was buried in St. Sophia Cathedral in Kiev

О {profile::pre} (Русский)

Владимир-Василий Всеволодович, по прозванию Мономах, сын Всеволода Ярославича , один из замечательнейших русских князей Киевской Руси. Родился в 1053 г. При жизни отца был сначала князем в Смоленске, с которым позднее соединил Чернигов. Когда Всеволод умер, киевляне желали видеть Владимира своим князем, но он, соблюдая очередь старшинства, уступил Киев своему двоюродному брату Святополку Изяславичу . Вскоре он должен был оставить Чернигов, занятый другим его двоюродным братом, Святославичем, и удалился на первоначальный "стол отень", в Переяслявль. В 1113 г. умер Святополк Изяславич, и Владимир по новым настойчивым просьбам киевлян занял киевский стол, на этот раз нарушив право старшего в роде, Олега Святославича . Мирное население одинаково страдало тогда и от княжеских усобиц, и от нападений половцев. Владимир употребил много усилий на борьбу с теми и другими. Ранние его выступления против половцев были не вполне удачны; так, в 1093 г. он, действуя в союзе с Святополком Изяславичем, потерпел от них двойное поражение - на реке Стугне и при селе Желани. Точно так же не всегда удавались ему сначала и попытки сплотить русских князей для борьбы с общим врагом; благодаря его влиянию, было достигнуто объединение князей на Любечском съезде (1097), но вскоре оно было нарушено, и половцы снова появились на Руси, призываемые самими князьями. С течением времени, однако, усилия Владимира увенчались успехом: он добился того, что после ряда поражений, нанесенных объединившимися русскими князьями (например, на урочище Сутень и при Лубнах), половцы прекратили на время свои набеги. Не раз содействовал Владимир мирному исходу возникавших распрей, являясь, обыкновенно, защитником обиженной стороны. Когда, например, Василько Ростиславич был ослеплен Давыдом Волынским , с согласия киевского великого князя Святополка, Владимир предупредил грозившую стать общей усобицу, убедив князей восстановить нарушенную справедливость наказанием виновника. Эта миротворческая деятельность Владимира принимает особенно широкие размеры с того времени, как он становится великим князем Киевским. Отдельные его мероприятия теперь начинают складываться в определенную политическую систему. Он стремится к сосредоточению в своих руках наиболее важных русских областей, поручая их своим сыновьям; в Новгороде сажает Мстислава, в Переяславле - Святополка, а после его смерти - Ярополка , в Смоленске - Вячеслава , в Суздальской земле - Юрия . Путем брачных связей, а частью и с помощью силы, он подчиняет своему влиянию и более отдаленные земли - турово-пинскую, волынскую и полоцкую. В результате Владимир становится действительно "старейшим князем" в Русской земле, который мог направлять на общее дело разрозненные силы удельных князей и страхом наказания удерживать их в повиновении. С другой стороны, в политике Владимира заметно выступает желание закрепить достигнутое объединение владений, а с ним и старейшинство за своим родом, чтобы самую идею старейшинства поставить на более прочное династическое основание. В этих видах он еще при жизни переводит старшего сына своего Мстислава из Новгорода в Белгород, обеспечивая тем возможность передать ему киевский стол, уже по новому порядку. Большое внимание уделял Владимир и внутренней жизни населения, в частности - устройству суда и управления. С его именем, например, связаны вошедшие в состав "Русской Правды" постановления о процентах ("о резе") и закупах, принятые на созванном им в Берестове съезде "мужей" его и Олега Святославича. В его "Поучении" детям содержатся разнообразные наставления, явно внушенные ему собственным опытом. Блестящие результаты деятельности Владимира привлекли к нему симпатии населения и окружили его имя в народной памяти особым ореолом. Летописец называет его "чудным князем", "милостивым паче меры", "жалостливым". Название "Мономах" он получил, вероятно, по своему делу со стороны матери, которая, по некоторым известиям, была дочерью византийского императора Константина Мономаха. По другому объяснению, он получил это название потому, что, во время похода на генуэзцев, убил на поединке генуэзского князя (мономах-единоборец). Исключительное положение, какое Владимир занял среди русских князей, дало повод к образованию легенды, будто он был венчан на царство митрополитом Неофитом, который при этом возложил на него знаки царского достоинства - венец и бармы, присланные византийским императором. Поэтому и венец московских государей стал впоследствии называться шапкой Мономаха. Владимир умер 19 мая 1125 г. Он был женат три раза; первой его женой была английская королевна Гида Геральдовна. - См.: И. Лашнюков "Владимир Мономах и его время" ("Киев. Ун. изв.", 1873, № 11); С. Прозоровский "По вопросу о регалиях, приписываемых Владимиру Мономаху" ("Труды 3-го археологического съезда"); И. Жданов "Повести о Вавилоне и Сказание о князьях владимирских" ("Журнал Министерства Народного Просвещения", 1891); Костомаров "Русская история в жизнеописаниях"; Пресняков "Княжое право древней Руси". А. З.

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Vladimir II of Kiev's Timeline

1052
1052
Kiev, Kiev city, Kyiv city, Ukraine
1076
June 1, 1076
Age 24
Kyiv city, Ukraine
1076
Age 24
1077
1077
Age 25
Of, Kursk, Kursk, Russia
1080
1080
Age 28
Chernigov, Chernigov, Ukraine
1082
1082
Age 30
1082
Age 30
Of, Pereyaslavl, Kiev, Ukraine
1083
1083
Age 31
Turov, Polesye, Byelorussia
1087
1087
Age 35
Kiev, Kiev, Ukraine
1088
1088
Age 36
(Kiev, Russia), Kiev, Ukraine