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Yehudi Menuhin, OM, KBE

<span class='language-label'>Hebrew: יהודי מנוחין, OM, KBE</span>
Also Known As: "Baron Menuhin of Stroke D'Abernon"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: New York, NY, United States
Death: March 12, 1999 (82)
Berlin, Germany
Place of Burial: London, United Kingdom
Immediate Family:

Son of Moshe Menuhin and Marutha Menuhin
Husband of Diana, Baroness Menuhin
Ex-husband of Nola Ruby Williams
Father of Private; Private; Private and Private
Brother of Hephzibah Menuhin-Hauser and Yaltah Menuhin-Rolfe-Ryce

Occupation: genial violonist, conductor
Managed by: Malka Mysels
Last Updated:
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Immediate Family

About Yehudi Menuhin

Yehudi Menuhin. A child prodigy in the U.S. in the 1920s, violinist and conductor Yehudi Menuhin was active not only in music, but also in promoting human rights and international understanding; as such, he is one of the world’s most admired, respected, and honored figures.

Yehudi Menuhin was born on April 22, 1916 in New York City, New York, to Russian Jewish parents from what is now Belarus. His sisters were the concert pianist and human rights worker Hephzibah Menuhin and the pianist, painter, and poet Yaltah Menuhin.

Through his father Moshe Menuhin, a former rabbinical student and anti-Zionist writer, Menuhin was descended from a distinguished rabbinical dynasty. Menuhin began violin instruction at age three under violinist Sigmund Anker.

He displayed extraordinary talents at an early age. His first solo violin performance was at the age of seven with the San Francisco Symphony in 1923. Menuhin later studied under the Romanian composer and violinist George Enescu, after which he made several recordings with his sister Hephzibah. He was also a student of Louis Persinger and Adolf Busch. When a child and an adolescent, his fame was phenomenal. In 1929 he played in Berlin, under Bruno Walter's baton, three concerti by Bach, Brahms and Beethoven. Albert Einstein is said to have exclaimed at the end of the concert, "Now I know that there is a God!"

Yehudi Menuhin performed for allied soldiers during World War II, and went with the composer Benjamin Britten to perform for inmates of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, after its liberation in April 1945. He returned to Germany in 1947 to perform with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler as an act of reconciliation, becoming the first Jewish musician to do so following the Holocaust. He said to critics within the Jewish community that he wanted to rehabilitate Germany's music and spirit. After building early success on richly romantic and tonally opulent performances, he experienced considerable physical and artistic difficulties caused by overwork during World War II as well as unfocused and unstructured early training. Careful practice and study combined with meditation and yoga (the latter he mostly learned from B.K.S. Iyengar) helped him overcome many of these problems. His profound and considered musical interpretations are nearly universally acclaimed. When he finally started recording, he was known for practicing by deconstructing music phrases one note at a time.

Menuhin continued to perform to an advanced age, becoming known for profound interpretations of an austere quality, as well as for his explorations of music outside the classical realm.

Menuhin credited the German-Jewish philosopher Constantin Brunner with providing him with "a theoretical framework within which I could fit the events and experiences of life."

In 1952, Menuhin met and befriended the influential yogi B.K.S. Iyengar before he had come to prominence outside India. Menuhin arranged for Iyengar to teach abroad in London, Switzerland, Paris and elsewhere. This was the first time that many Westerners had been exposed to yoga.

Menuhin made several recordings with the German conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler, who had been criticized for conducting in Germany during the Nazi era. Menuhin defended Furtwangler, noting that the conductor had helped a number of Jewish musicians to flee Nazi Germany.

In 1962 he established the Yehudi Menuhin School in Stoke d'Abernon, Surrey. He also established the music program at the Nueva School in Hillsborough, California sometime around then. In 1965 he received an honorary knighthood. In the same year, Australian composer Malcolm Williamson wrote a concerto for Menuhin. A deeply spiritual and profoundly moving work, he performed the concerto many times and recorded it at its première at the Bath Festival in 1965.

In 1997 Yehudi, along with Ian Stoutzker founded the charity Live Music Now, the largest outreach music project in the UK. LMN pays and trains professional musicians to work in the community bringing joy and comfort to those who rarely get an opportunity to hear or see live music performance.

Menuhin's pupils included Nigel Kennedy, Hungarian violist Csaba Erdelyi and violist Paul Coletti. Arguably the most famous of Menuhin's violins is the Lord Wilton Guarneri del Gesù made in 1742.

In the 1980s Menuhin wrote and oversaw the creation of a "Music Guides" series of books; each covered musical instruments with one on the human voice. Menuhin wrote some whilst others were edited by different authors.

Menuhin regularly returned to the San Francisco Bay Area, sometimes performing with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. One of the more memorable, later performances was of the violin concerto of Sir Edward Elgar, which Menuhin had recorded with the composer for HMV in London in 1932.

On 22 April 1978 along with Stéphane Grappelli, Yehudi played Pick Yourself Up, taken from the Menuhin & Grappelli Play Berlin, Kern, Porter and Rodgers & Hart album as the interval act at the 23rd Eurovision Song Contest for TF1. The performance came direct from the studios of TF1 and not that of the venue (Palais des Congrès) from where the contest was held.

He also hosted the PBS telecast of the gala opening concert of the orchestra from Davies Symphony Hall in September 1980.

During the 1970s, '80s and '90s, he made jazz recordings with Stéphane Grappelli, classical recordings with L. Subramaniam and albums of Eastern music with the great sitarist Ravi Shankar. In 1983 he founded the Yehudi Menuhin International Competition for Young Violinists in Folkestone, Kent.

His recording contract with EMI lasted almost 70 years and is the longest in the history of the music industry. He made his first recording at age 13 in November 1929, and his last in 1999 at age 82. In total he recorded over 300 works for EMI, both as a violinist and as a conductor.

In 1990 he was the first conductor for the Asian Youth Orchestra which toured around Asia, including Japan, Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong with Julian Lloyd Webber and a group of young talented musicians from all over Asia.

Yehudi Menuhin was married twice. He first married Nola Nicholas, daughter of an Australian industrialist, and sister of Hephzibah Menuhin's first husband Lindsay Nicholas. They had two children, Krov and Zamira. Following their divorce, he married the British ballerina and actress Diana Gould, with whom he had two sons, Gerard and Jeremy, a pianist.

The name Yehudi means 'Jew' in Hebrew. In an interview published in October 2004, he recounted to New Internationalist magazine the story of his name:

Obliged to find an apartment of their own, my parents searched the neighbourhood and chose one within walking distance of the park. Showing them out after they had viewed it, the landlady said: "And you'll be glad to know I don't take Jews."

Her mistake made clear to her, the antisemitic landlady was renounced, and another apartment found. But her blunder left its mark. Back on the street my mother made a vow. Her unborn baby would have a label proclaiming his race to the world. He would be called "The Jew."

In November 2005 his son Gerard was forced to resign from his post as chairman of the Yehudi-Menuhin-Stiftung for criticizing the exploitation of Holocaust expressing his opinion that "Germany was being blackmailed by an international Jewish conspiracy preying on the country’s war guilt".[2] Norman Finkelstein, a Jewish professor in politics, has written on the subject in his book The Holocaust Industry.

Lord Menuhin died in Berlin, Germany following a brief illness, from complications of bronchitis. Soon after his death, the Royal Academy of Music acquired the Yehudi Menuhin Archive, one of the most comprehensive collections ever assembled by an individual musician.

Awards and Honours

  • In 1965, while he was still an American citizen, he was made an honorary Knight of the Order of the British Empire. This entitled him to use the postnominal letters KBE, but not to style himself Sir Yehudi. After gaining British citizenship in 1985, his knighthood was upgraded to a substantive one, and he became Sir Yehudi Menuhin KBE.
  • 1972 awarded the Léonie Sonning Music Prize (Denmark)
  • 1986 Kennedy Center Honors
  • In 1987 he was appointed a member of the Order of Merit
  • In 1987 his recording of the Edward Elgar: Cello Concerto in E Minor, Op. 85 with Julian Lloyd Webber won the BRIT Award for Best British Classical Recording. The recording was also chosen as the finest ever version by BBC Music Magazine.
  • In 1990 he was awarded the Glenn Gould Prize in recognition of his lifetime of contributions.
  • In 1993 he was made a life peer, as Lord Menuhin of Stoke d'Abernon in the County of Surrey [4].
  • He was awarded honorary doctorates by 20 universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews and Vrije Universiteit Brussel
  • In the European Parliament in Brussels, the room in which concerts and performances are held is called the "Yehudi Menuhin Space"
  • He was a Freeman of the cities of Edinburgh, Bath, Reims and Warsaw
  • He held the Gold Medals of the cities of Paris, New York and Jerusalem
  • in 1992 he was announced as an Ambassador of Goodwill by UNESCO.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yehudi_Menuhin


About Yehudi Menuhin (עברית)

יהודי מנוחין

''''''(באנגלית: Yehudi Menuhin;‏ 22 באפריל 1916 - 12 במרץ 1999) היה כנר, ויולן ומנצח יהודי, יליד ארצות הברית, שרוב הקריירה שלו כמבצע עברה עליו בממלכה המאוחדת. היה תלמידם של לואיס פרסינג'ר, ג'ורג'ה אנסקו ואדולף בוש, ונחשב לאחד מגדולי הכנרים במאה ה-20.

תוכן עניינים 1 חייו 1.1 ילדות ונעורים 1.2 קריירה בינלאומית 1.3 יוגה כמכשיר עזר 2 קריירה מאוחרת 3 עובדות היסטוריות 4 לקריאה נוספת 5 קישורים חיצוניים 6 הערות שוליים חייו ילדות ונעורים

מנוחין, בן 15, עם המנצח ברונו ולטר, ברלין, 1931 יהודי מנוחין נולד בעיר ניו יורק להורים יהודיים. אחיותיו היו הפסנתרנית חפציבה מנוחין והפסנתרנית, הציירת והמשוררת ילטה מנוחין. אביו, משה מנוחין, היה נצר לרבי שניאור זלמן מלאדי, שנולד בעיר גומל שברוסיה הלבנה, היה בוגר המחזור הראשון של הגימנסיה העברית "הרצליה" בתל אביב ונודע בדעותיו האנטי-ציוניות. אמו הייתה מרותה בת חיים נחום שור, שהיה שוחט בשכונת נווה צדק. באוקטובר 2004 סיפר מגזין "ניו אינטרנשיונליסט" את סיפורו של יהודי מנוחין על הדרך שבה קיבל את שמו:

הורי, שחיפשו דירה למגוריהם, מצאו בשכונה דירה במרחק הליכה מן הפארק. בעלת הבית, שליוותה אותם בצאתם אחרי שראו את הדירה, אמרה: 'תשמחו לדעת, שאינני מקבלת יהודים.' הזוג הבהיר לבעלת הבית האנטישמית את טעותה, סילק ידיו מן הדירה ומצא לו אחרת, אבל רישומה של האמירה נותר בעינו. בדרכם הביתה נדרה אמי נדר. תינוקה שלא בא עוד לעולם יישא תווית, שתכריז על מוצאו לעולם ומלואו. הוא ייקרא 'יהודי'.

מנוחין התחיל ללמוד נגינה בכינור בגיל שלוש, אצל הכנר זיגמונד אנקר. הופעתו הראשונה ככנר סולן הייתה בגיל שבע, עם התזמורת הסימפונית של סן פרנסיסקו. בהמשך למד אצל המלחין והכנר הרומני ג'ורג'ה אנסקו. בשנים הבאות ערך כמה הקלטות עם אחותו חפציבה.

קריירה בינלאומית יהודי מנוחין ניגן לפני חיילי בעלות הברית בתקופת מלחמת העולם השנייה ויצא עם המלחין בנג'מין בריטן לנגן לאסירי מחנה הריכוז ברגן בלזן, אחרי השחרור באפריל 1945. הוא חזר לגרמניה בשנת 1947 לבצע מוזיקה בניצוחו של וילהלם פורטוונגלר כמחוות פיוס, והיה המוזיקאי היהודי הראשון שחזר לגרמניה אחרי השואה. בכך שניגן עם פורטוונגלר, עזר מנוחין לשיקום שלו לאחר המלחמה – עד שהחל לשתף פעולה עם מנוחין היה פורטוונגלר מוקצה מחמת מיאוס בשל עברו הנאצי.

בשנת 1956 יסד יהודי מנוחין את פסטיבל מנוחין גשטאד שבשווייץ. פסטיבל שחגג בשנת 2006 את 50 שנות קיומו.

בשנת 1962 הקים את בית ספר יהודי מנוחין בסטוק ד'אברנון, סארי, אנגליה. באותה תקופה בערך ייסד את תוכנית המוזיקה ב"בית הספר נואבה" בהילסבורו, קליפורניה.

ב-1965 קיבל תואר אבירות לשם כבוד.

יוגה כמכשיר עזר אחרי שביסס את הצלחתו המוקדמת על ביצועים שופעים ועתירי רומנטיקה, התנסה מנוחין בקשיים פיזיים ואמנותיים, שנבעו מעומס עבודה מופרז בשנות המלחמה ומהכשרה מוקדמת בלתי ממוקדת. משטר קפדני של תרגול ולימוד, בשילוב מדיטציה ויוגה, עזר לו להתגבר על רבות מבעיות אלה והוא המשיך לנגן עד גיל מתקדם ועשה לו שם בפרשנות מעמיקה, באיכות מחמירה וקפדנית. כשהחל לבסוף להקליט, התפרסם בכך, שהיה מתאמן ביצירות מוזיקליות בדרך של פירוק פסוקים ובנייתם מחדש מצלילים בודדים, בזה אחר זה.

בשנת 1952 פגש מנוחין את היוגי רב-ההשפעה ב. ק. ס. איינגר והתיידד עמו. מנוחין ארגן לאיינגר הוראה מחוץ לגבולות ארצו, בלונדון, בשווייץ, בפריז ועוד. לאנשים רבים במערב הייתה זו ההזדמנות הראשונה להיחשף ליוגה.

קריירה מאוחרת במהלך שנות ה-80 הקליט מוזיקת ג'אז עם סטפן גרפלי ומוזיקה מן המזרח הרחוק עם נגן הסיטאר הגדול ראווי שנקר. בשנת 1985 קיבל אזרחות בריטית ומכאן ואילך היה זכאי להיקרא "סר יהודי", שכן תואר האבירות שלו לא היה עוד לשם כבוד בלבד. בשנת 1993 קיבל תואר לורד לימי חייו, כברון מנוחין מסטוק ד'אברנון במחוז סארי.

ב-1991 קיבל את פרס וולף.

לורד מנוחין מת בברלין לאחר מחלה קצרה, מסיבוכים של דלקת הסימפונות.

מנוחין הותיר אחריו ארבעה ילדים - קרוב וזמירה מאשתו הראשונה נולה ניקולס (בתו של תעשיין אוסטרלי), שממנה התגרש, ושני בנים מאשתו השנייה, דיאנה גולד (שחקנית ובלרינה בריטית), ג'רארד וג'רמי, פסנתרן.

עובדות היסטוריות בין תלמידיו נמנו נייג'ל קנדי והוויולן ההונגרי סאבה ארדלי.

מנוחין זקף לזכותו של הפילוסוף היהודי-גרמני קונסטנטין ברונר הענקת "מסגרת תאורטית, שאליה אני יכול להכניס את האירועים וההתנסויות שבחיי" (שיחות עם מנוחין: 32-34).

טענה שאפשר לחלוק עליה היא, שהכינור המפורסם ביותר של מנוחין הוא "לורד וילטון", כינור גוארנרי דל ג'זו, שנבנה בשנת 1742.

כמו כן בשנת 1950 רכש מנוחין כינור סטרדיוואריוס משנת 1714 הידוע בכינויו "סוייל" Soil הנחשב לכינור הטוב ביותר של סטראדיווריוס ובשנת 1986 נרכש הכינור על ידי הכנר יצחק פרלמן ומשמש אותו עד היום.

בשנת 1990 ניתן לו פרס גלן גולד היוקרתי, לאות הוקרה והכרה במפעל חייו, וב-1991 זכה בפרס וולף באמנות.

בשנת 1996 תמך מנוחין יחד עם הצייר דן רובינשטיין בבית החולים משגב לדך בירושלים לרכישת מכשירים לפגייה.

זמן קצר לאחר מותו, רכשה האקדמיה המלכותית למוזיקה את ארכיב יהודי מנוחין, אחד האוספים המקיפים ויקרי הערך ביותר שנוצרו אי פעם בידי מוזיקאי יחיד.

בנובמבר 2005 פוטר בנו, ג'רארד, ממשרתו כיושב ראש עמותת יהודי מנוחין על דעות נאו נאציות לכאורה.

לקריאה נוספת נתן דונביץ', וירטואוזים: גדולי הכנרים מפגניני עד מידורי, זמורה-ביתן, 2003. The Menuhins :a family odyssey /Lionel Menuhin Rolfe (1978) יוסף שריק, "דוד אויסטראך היה אוהב לנגן בישראל" , דבר, 13 במרץ 1968(הקישור אינו פעיל, 11.03.2018) קישורים חיצוניים מיזמי קרן ויקימדיה ויקיציטוט ציטוטים בוויקיציטוט: יהודי מנוחין ויקישיתוף תמונות ומדיה בוויקישיתוף: יהודי מנוחין Green globe.svg אתר האינטרנט הרשמי

של יהודי מנוחין

Allmusic Favicon.png יהודי מנוחין , באתר AllMusic (באנגלית) MusicBrainz Logo 2016.svg יהודי מנוחין , באתר MusicBrainz (באנגלית) יהודי מנוחין , באתר Discogs (באנגלית) Songkick logotype.svg יהודי מנוחין , באתר Songkick (באנגלית) יהודי מנוחין , באתר בית לזמר העברי IMDB Logo 2016.svg יהודי מנוחין , במסד הנתונים הקולנועיים IMDb (באנגלית) כתבה, "האמת על הכנר יהודי מנוחין" , דבר, 31 במרץ 1950 סרטונים יהודי מנוחין בארכיון הסרטונים של AP | 

מקבץ | 
קונצרט, 1966 | 
נישואין, 1938 | 
הענקת צלב אביר מסדר האימפריה הבריטית, 1966 |

חגי חיטרון, מיהו יהודי מנוחין ומהי הבעיה שעינתה אותו , באתר הארץ, 26 ביולי 2016 דוד מלמד, הצד היהודי של יהודי מנוחין , באתר הארץ, 7 בנובמבר 2016 יהודי מנוחין , באתר "Find a Grave" (באנגלית) https://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%99%D7%94%D7%95%D7%93%D7%99_%D7%9E%D7%A0%D7%95%D7%97%D7%99%D7%9F

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Yehudi Menuhin. A child prodigy in the U.S. in the 1920s, violinist and conductor Yehudi Menuhin was active not only in music, but also in promoting human rights and international understanding; as such, he is one of the world’s most admired, respected, and honored figures.

Yehudi Menuhin was born on April 22, 1916 in New York City, New York, to Russian Jewish parents from what is now Belarus. His sisters were the concert pianist and human rights worker Hephzibah Menuhin and the pianist, painter, and poet Yaltah Menuhin.

Through his father Moshe Menuhin, a former rabbinical student and anti-Zionist writer, Menuhin was descended from a distinguished rabbinical dynasty. Menuhin began violin instruction at age three under violinist Sigmund Anker.

He displayed extraordinary talents at an early age. His first solo violin performance was at the age of seven with the San Francisco Symphony in 1923. Menuhin later studied under the Romanian composer and violinist George Enescu, after which he made several recordings with his sister Hephzibah. He was also a student of Louis Persinger and Adolf Busch. When a child and an adolescent, his fame was phenomenal. In 1929 he played in Berlin, under Bruno Walter's baton, three concerti by Bach, Brahms and Beethoven. Albert Einstein is said to have exclaimed at the end of the concert, "Now I know that there is a God!"

Yehudi Menuhin performed for allied soldiers during World War II, and went with the composer Benjamin Britten to perform for inmates of Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, after its liberation in April 1945. He returned to Germany in 1947 to perform with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler as an act of reconciliation, becoming the first Jewish musician to do so following the Holocaust. He said to critics within the Jewish community that he wanted to rehabilitate Germany's music and spirit. After building early success on richly romantic and tonally opulent performances, he experienced considerable physical and artistic difficulties caused by overwork during World War II as well as unfocused and unstructured early training. Careful practice and study combined with meditation and yoga (the latter he mostly learned from B.K.S. Iyengar) helped him overcome many of these problems. His profound and considered musical interpretations are nearly universally acclaimed. When he finally started recording, he was known for practicing by deconstructing music phrases one note at a time.

Menuhin continued to perform to an advanced age, becoming known for profound interpretations of an austere quality, as well as for his explorations of music outside the classical realm.

Menuhin credited the German-Jewish philosopher Constantin Brunner with providing him with "a theoretical framework within which I could fit the events and experiences of life."

In 1952, Menuhin met and befriended the influential yogi B.K.S. Iyengar before he had come to prominence outside India. Menuhin arranged for Iyengar to teach abroad in London, Switzerland, Paris and elsewhere. This was the first time that many Westerners had been exposed to yoga.

Menuhin made several recordings with the German conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler, who had been criticized for conducting in Germany during the Nazi era. Menuhin defended Furtwangler, noting that the conductor had helped a number of Jewish musicians to flee Nazi Germany.

In 1962 he established the Yehudi Menuhin School in Stoke d'Abernon, Surrey. He also established the music program at the Nueva School in Hillsborough, California sometime around then. In 1965 he received an honorary knighthood. In the same year, Australian composer Malcolm Williamson wrote a concerto for Menuhin. A deeply spiritual and profoundly moving work, he performed the concerto many times and recorded it at its première at the Bath Festival in 1965.

In 1997 Yehudi, along with Ian Stoutzker founded the charity Live Music Now, the largest outreach music project in the UK. LMN pays and trains professional musicians to work in the community bringing joy and comfort to those who rarely get an opportunity to hear or see live music performance.

Menuhin's pupils included Nigel Kennedy, Hungarian violist Csaba Erdelyi and violist Paul Coletti. Arguably the most famous of Menuhin's violins is the Lord Wilton Guarneri del Gesù made in 1742.

In the 1980s Menuhin wrote and oversaw the creation of a "Music Guides" series of books; each covered musical instruments with one on the human voice. Menuhin wrote some whilst others were edited by different authors.

Menuhin regularly returned to the San Francisco Bay Area, sometimes performing with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. One of the more memorable, later performances was of the violin concerto of Sir Edward Elgar, which Menuhin had recorded with the composer for HMV in London in 1932.

On 22 April 1978 along with Stéphane Grappelli, Yehudi played Pick Yourself Up, taken from the Menuhin & Grappelli Play Berlin, Kern, Porter and Rodgers & Hart album as the interval act at the 23rd Eurovision Song Contest for TF1. The performance came direct from the studios of TF1 and not that of the venue (Palais des Congrès) from where the contest was held.

He also hosted the PBS telecast of the gala opening concert of the orchestra from Davies Symphony Hall in September 1980.

During the 1970s, '80s and '90s, he made jazz recordings with Stéphane Grappelli, classical recordings with L. Subramaniam and albums of Eastern music with the great sitarist Ravi Shankar. In 1983 he founded the Yehudi Menuhin International Competition for Young Violinists in Folkestone, Kent.

His recording contract with EMI lasted almost 70 years and is the longest in the history of the music industry. He made his first recording at age 13 in November 1929, and his last in 1999 at age 82. In total he recorded over 300 works for EMI, both as a violinist and as a conductor.

In 1990 he was the first conductor for the Asian Youth Orchestra which toured around Asia, including Japan, Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong with Julian Lloyd Webber and a group of young talented musicians from all over Asia.

Yehudi Menuhin was married twice. He first married Nola Nicholas, daughter of an Australian industrialist, and sister of Hephzibah Menuhin's first husband Lindsay Nicholas. They had two children, Krov and Zamira. Following their divorce, he married the British ballerina and actress Diana Gould, with whom he had two sons, Gerard and Jeremy, a pianist.

The name Yehudi means 'Jew' in Hebrew. In an interview published in October 2004, he recounted to New Internationalist magazine the story of his name:

Obliged to find an apartment of their own, my parents searched the neighbourhood and chose one within walking distance of the park. Showing them out after they had viewed it, the landlady said: "And you'll be glad to know I don't take Jews."

Her mistake made clear to her, the antisemitic landlady was renounced, and another apartment found. But her blunder left its mark. Back on the street my mother made a vow. Her unborn baby would have a label proclaiming his race to the world. He would be called "The Jew."

In November 2005 his son Gerard was forced to resign from his post as chairman of the Yehudi-Menuhin-Stiftung for criticizing the exploitation of Holocaust expressing his opinion that "Germany was being blackmailed by an international Jewish conspiracy preying on the country’s war guilt".[2] Norman Finkelstein, a Jewish professor in politics, has written on the subject in his book The Holocaust Industry.

Lord Menuhin died in Berlin, Germany following a brief illness, from complications of bronchitis. Soon after his death, the Royal Academy of Music acquired the Yehudi Menuhin Archive, one of the most comprehensive collections ever assembled by an individual musician.

Awards and Honours

  • In 1965, while he was still an American citizen, he was made an honorary Knight of the Order of the British Empire. This entitled him to use the postnominal letters KBE, but not to style himself Sir Yehudi. After gaining British citizenship in 1985, his knighthood was upgraded to a substantive one, and he became Sir Yehudi Menuhin KBE.
  • 1972 awarded the Léonie Sonning Music Prize (Denmark)
  • 1986 Kennedy Center Honors
  • In 1987 he was appointed a member of the Order of Merit
  • In 1987 his recording of the Edward Elgar: Cello Concerto in E Minor, Op. 85 with Julian Lloyd Webber won the BRIT Award for Best British Classical Recording. The recording was also chosen as the finest ever version by BBC Music Magazine.
  • In 1990 he was awarded the Glenn Gould Prize in recognition of his lifetime of contributions.
  • In 1993 he was made a life peer, as Lord Menuhin of Stoke d'Abernon in the County of Surrey [4].
  • He was awarded honorary doctorates by 20 universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews and Vrije Universiteit Brussel
  • In the European Parliament in Brussels, the room in which concerts and performances are held is called the "Yehudi Menuhin Space"
  • He was a Freeman of the cities of Edinburgh, Bath, Reims and Warsaw
  • He held the Gold Medals of the cities of Paris, New York and Jerusalem
  • in 1992 he was announced as an Ambassador of Goodwill by UNESCO.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yehudi_Menuhin

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Yehudi Menuhin's Timeline

1916
April 22, 1916
New York, NY, United States
1999
March 12, 1999
Age 82
Berlin, Germany
March 1999
Age 82
London, United Kingdom