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British Army - The Queen's Royal Hussars

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Badges above from left 1. The Queen's Own Hussars; 2. The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars; (1&2 Courtesy of Military Badge Collection); 3. The Queen's Royal Hussars.(WIKI)

The Queen's Royal Hussars
British Army Including
(Reflecting historic name changes)

The Queen's Own Hussars

The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars

3rd The King's Own Hussars

7th Queen's Own Hussars

4th Queen's Own Hussars

8th King's Royal Irish Hussars

The Queen's Royal Hussars (The Queen's Own and Royal Irish) (QRH) is the senior United Kingdom armoured regiment. It was formed on 1 September 1993 from the amalgamation of The Queen's Own Hussars and The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars. The Queen's Royal Hussars were given the additional sub-title 'The Queen's Own and Royal Irish'.

Please link profiles of those who served in the The Queen's Royal Hussars (including those in the "included" list above), to this project regardless of rank, conflict or nationality. People of note can be individually listed in Alphabetical Order below.
See

Regiments and Corps of the British Army

The Royal Armoured Corps



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The Queen's Royal Hussars

Motto - Mente et Manu - "mind and hand"

Uniform -

Corps March -

Quick - Regimental Quick March of The Queen's Royal Hussars
Slow - 3rd Hussars Slow March/ Litany of Loretto/The Garb of Old Gaul/March of the Scottish Archers

Nick-name - 'Churchill's Own'

Mascot - Drum Horse (Alamein)

Colonel-in-Chief - HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, KG, KT, GBE
Colonel of the Regiment - WIKI Lt Gen Tom Beckett CBE

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The regiment traces its roots back to 1685 and during the past 320 years has been awarded 172 Battle Honours and 8 Victoria Crosses. The regiment is currently based in Sennelager, Germany, where it is the armoured regiment for 20th Armoured Brigade, part of British Forces Germany.

Ancestry

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3.4 - The Queen's Royal Hussars

(The Queen's Own and Royal Irish) (QRH)

The regiment traces its roots back to 1685 and during the past 320 years has been awarded 172 Battle Honours and 8 Victoria Crosses.
Formed on 1 September 1993 from the amalgamation (✽) of ...

3.4.1The Queen's Own Hussars
Formed November 1958 by amalgamation of ...

3.4.1.1 - 3rd The King's Own Hussars

Raised as regiment of Dragoons August 1685, command given to Charles Seymour, Duke of Somerset.

3.4.1.2 - 7th Queen's Own Hussars
Raised December 1690 from Independent Troops of Scottish Dragoons - Sir Albert Conyngham, raised a number of 'troops of horse', including the 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons. Sir Albert was murdered whilst a prisoner-of-war in 1691, and two years later his son, Major General Henry Conyngham, was appointed Colonel of a new regiment formed in 1693. The new regiment assumed the title Conyngham's Regiment of Dragoons.

3.4.2 ✽ - The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars

Formed October 1958 by amalgamation of ...
3.4.2.1 - 4th Queen's Own Hussars

Raised July 1685 by Colonel the Hon. John Berkeley from independent troops of dragoons.

3.4.2.2 - 8th King's Royal Irish Hussars

Raised February 1693 from Irish Protestants. Command given to Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Conyngham of the Inniskilling Dragoons.

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Timeline
1685 - Raised as Duke of Somerset's Regiment of Dragoons. Ranked as 3rd of Dragoons.
1685 - Named Queen Consoprt's Own Regiment of Dragoons
Also known by Colonels names until 1751

1714 Re-designated the 3rd King's Own Regiment of Dragoons
1751 - Officially confirmed as 3rd (King's Own) Regiment of Dragoons
1818 - Renamed 3rd (The King's Own) Regiment of Light Dragoons
1861 - Renamed 3rd (The King's Own) Hussars. 'The' later removed
WW1 - At the outbreak of the First World War, the regiment was stationed at Shorncliffe as part of the 4th Cavalry Brigade. On mobilisation, the brigade was assigned to the Cavalry Division of the British Expeditionary Force, and was sent to France. The 4th Brigade was assigned to the 2nd Cavalry Division in October, with which it remained for the remainder of the war, serving on the Western Front. 1921 - Name Simplified to 3rd The King's Own Hussars (Badge - image right)
1958 - Amalgamated with 7th Queen's Own Hussars forming The Queen's Own Hussars (3.4.1)
1993 - Amalgamated with The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars forming The Queen's Royal Hussars.


Timeline
1690 - Raised in Scotland as The Queen's Own Regiment of Dragoons The regiment was formed from Eglintoun's Horse and Cardross's Dragoons to be six troops strong.
1690 - Ranked as 8th Dragoons
1691 - Re-ranked as 7th Dragoons
Also known by Colonels names until 1751

1708 - Placed on English establishment.
1714 - Disbanded
1715 - Reformed as The Prince of Wales's Own Royal Regiment of Dragoons
1727 - Renamed The Queen's Own Royal Regiment of Dragoons
1751 - Officially named 7th (The Queen's Own) Regiment of Dragoons
1783 - Renamed 7th or (Queen's Own) Regiment of Light Dragoons
1807 - Names combined as 7th (The Queen's Own) Regiment of Light Dragoons
1861 - Renamed 7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars. 'The' later removed.
WW1 - Stationed at Bangalore until the start of the First World War, moving to Secunderabad with detachments keeping order in Delhi. In 1917 the regiment sailed to the river Tigris near Basra to fight against the Turks as part of 11th Indian Cavalry Brigade. They moved to Baghdad from where the first attack was launched in March 1918 against a division of the enemy in Action of Khan Baghdadi; the 7th in their Brigade had the role of cutting off the enemy retreat, first destroying the baggage column, then routing the enemy division in fifteen minutes. Six months of stagnation around Baghdad took place (as the Turks had withdrawn) until another offensive was mounted by the British and they again encircled the enemy at Battle of Sharqat. On 30 October, as they were preparing to attack again, news came through that Turkey had surrendered but the 7th were to remain as an occupying force until May 1919. 1921 - Name simplified to 7th Queen's Own Hussars. (Image right)
1958 - Amalgamated with 3rd The King's Own Hussars forming The Queen's Own Hussars (3.4.1)
1993 - Amalgamated with The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars forming The Queen's Royal Hussars.


Timeline
1685 - Raised by John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton as The Princess Anne of Denmark's Regiment of Dragoons
Also known by Colonels names until 1751

  • 1688 - Thomas Maxwell
  • 1688 - Viscount Fitzhardinge
  • 1693 - Earl of Essex
  • 1710 - Sir Richard Temple
  • 1713 - William Evans
  • 1735 - Sir Robert Rich

1751 - Officially known as 4th Regiment of Dragoons
1788 - Renamed 4th (Queen's Own) Regiment of Dragoons
1819 - Renamed 4th (Queen's Own) Regiment of Light Dragoons
1861 - Renamed 4th (The Queen's Own) Hussars. 'The' later removed.
WW1 - Served in France for the duration of the First World War, winning 21 battle honours and nearly 100 awards for gallantry. 1921 - Name simplified to 4th Queen's Own Hussars (Image right)
1958 - Amalgamated with 8th King's Royal Irish Hussars forming The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars
1993 - Amalgamated with The Queen's Own Hussars forming The Queen's Royal Hussars.


Timeline
1693 - Raised as Sir Albert Cunningham's Regiment of Dragoons to defend Inniskilling
Also known by Colonels names until 1751

  • 1706 - Robert Killigrew
  • 1707 - James Pepper
  • 1719 - Phineas Bowles
  • 1722 - Richard Munden
  • 1725 - Sir Robert Rich
  • 1732 - George Cathcart
  • 1733 - Adolphus Houghton
  • 1737 - Clement Neville
  • 1740 - Richatd St. George

1751 - Officially known as 8th Regiment of Dragoons
1775 - Re-designated 8th Regiment of Light Dragoons< br/> 1777 - Renamed 8th (The King's Royal Irish) Regiment of Light Dragoons
1822 - Renamed 8th (The King's Royal Irish) Regiment of Light Dragoons (Hussars)
1861 - Renamed 8th (The King's Royal Irish) Hussars. 'The' later removed.

WW1 - Entered the trenches on the Western Front for the first time on 9 December 1914, not having arrived in time to take any part in the Retreat from Mons. The first action that the 8th encountered was in December 1914 at the Battle of Givenchy. The majority of their time was spent sending large parties forward to dig trenches and this continued for the whole of the war. In May 1915, they took part in the Second battle of Ypres where the Germans first used chlorine gas. In September 1915 the 8th Hussars transferred to the 2nd Indian Cavalry Division. In July 1916, the King's Royal Irish Hussars fought at Bazentin, then Flers-Courcelette the following month, both battles being in the Somme area. They returned to the Somme area in March 1917 to clear the small pockets of machine guns left by the retreating Germans. They took part in what would be the Regiment's last mounted charge at Villers-Faucon when B and D Squadrons, supported by a howitzer battery and two armoured cars, attacked a heavily defended German position. B Squadron charged, then attacked on foot (the armoured cars were quickly put out of action) and drew the enemy's fire. D Squadron charged and captured the village with few casualties. The Squadron Commander, Major Van der Byl was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for the action. During the German spring offensive of 1918, "C" Squadron under Captain Adlercron, defended the village of Hervilly until being forced to retreat, only to recapture it later that day at the loss of sixty-six casualties. In March 1918 they were transferred to the 9th Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. On 11 March they came on the British War Establishment i.e. D squadron was absorbed into the others.[17] The Germans began to collapse soon after the allies began their final offensive in August, the 8th fighting at St Quentin, Beaurevoir and Cambrai and the Pursuit to Mons. On 11 November 1918 whilst camped at Maffles, the regiment heard that the Armistice had been signed. The 8th Hussars had 105 soldiers killed and countless wounded throughout the four years of the war.
1921 - Name simplified to 8th King's Royal Irish Hussars (Image right)
1958 - Amalgamated with 4th Queen's Own Hussars forming The Queen's Royal Irish Hussars
1993 - Amalgamated with The Queen's Own Hussars forming The Queen's Royal Hussars.

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Notable Personnel

Names with Bold links are to Geni profiles. Other links take you to external biographical web pages.

Holders of the Victoria Cross include:

A

B

C

  • Sir Winston Churchill, was commissioned as a Cornet into the 4th Hussars in January 1895. He later became the Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment from 1941 until amalgamation and was then Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment of the new Queen's Royal Irish Hussars until his death in 1965.

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

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Sources, References and Further Reading

  • Brereton, J M A Guide to the regiments and Corps of the British Army on the Regular Establishment (Bodley Head) 1985
  • Griffin, P D Encyclopedia of Modern British Army Regiments (Sutton Publishers) 2006
  • Lumley, Goff Amalgamations in the British Army 1660-2008 (Partizan Press 2009)
  • History - 8th (King's Royal Irish) Hussars

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