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Historic Buildings of Cheshire, England

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  • Sir Thomas Grosvenor, 3rd Baronet (1655 - 1700)
    Family and Education b. 20 Nov. 1655, 1st s. of Roger Grosvenor (v.p. s. of Sir Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Bt.) of Eaton Hall by Christian, da. of Sir Thomas Myddelton† of Chirk, Denb. educ. travelled abro...
  • Thomas Cowper (deceased)
    Served as the corporation’s mayor in 1641–2, remaining loyal to Charles I in the first Civil War.
  • Captain Hyde John Clarke (1777 - 1857)
    MailOnline article Lord Coe's shock as he discovers he is descended from a philandering Jamaican sugar baron who had sex with his slaves Clarke family of Hyde, Cheshire See more at this link "Hyd...
  • Lieut-Col. Harold Platt Sykes (1865 - 1942)
    1881 Census - aged 16, boarder in Rugby at Boarding house to Rugby School. He lived at Longford Hall, Newport, Shropshire and Beckbury Hall, Shifnal, Shropshire. Dragoon Guards 1897 First Name:...
  • Thomas Cholmondeley of Vale Royal (1627 - 1701)
    1660: Sheriff of Cheshire 1669: MP Source: CHOLMONDELEY OF VALE ROYAL " CHOLMONDELEY, Thomas (1627-1702), of Vale Royal, Cheshire. ", The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1660-1690...

Historic Buildings of Cheshire

England

Image right - Arley Hall, Northwich

The object of this project is to provide information about historic buildings in the county of Cheshire, with links to sub-projects for specific buildings as appropriate. GENi profiles of people associated with those establishments can be linked to this project and/or to individual projects where they have been set up.

See Historic Buildings of Britain and Ireland - Main Page

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If you have information about any of the Buildings mentioned below please share it here. If you have ancestors linked to any of the places please add them to the project.


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Names with Bold links are to Geni profiles or projects. Other links take you to external biographical web pages. Please copy and paste the bullet used - ● - instead of * when adding items to the list.

Historic houses in alphabetical order

Including Castles, Abbeys, Priories, Friaries, Manor Houses, Mansions, Stately Homes, Country houses, Estate houses, Courts, Halls, Parks and other listed buildings of historic interest

A

● Abbotsford

Adlington Hall

Alderley Old HallThe Hall was built in Alderley Park in the early 17th century for Sir Thomas Stanley, High Sheriff of Cheshire for 1571–72, who then made it his family seat. Stanley had purchased the manor of Nether Alderley and other lands from Sir Edward Fitton of Gawsworth for £2,000.[3] His son Sir Thomas Stanley, a barrister, was made a baronet at the Restoration, and was High Sheriff of Cheshire in 1630. He made many improvements to the hall, including the construction of a stone-arched gateway at the front, extensive stables and the planting of beech woods near the mere. Following a severe fire in 1779 the baroque frontage of the hall was demolished and a new hall constructed to the south of the park, which has also since been largely demolished.[4] Alterations were made to the remains of the old hall in 1912 by Edmund Warre and the building remains occupied. In 2011 the owner committed suicide in the barn after an armed robbery at the premises and financial pressures. The property was valued at £5m.

Alderley Park The manor of Over Alderley came into the Stanley family when heiress Elizabeth Weever married John Stanley, a brother of the Earl of Derby. In the 1580s John Stanley's descendant, Thomas Stanley, built a mansion house on a moated site near the mill at Nether Alderley. Thomas died in 1591. The adjacent manor of Nether Alderley had been confiscated by the crown in 1508 from the estate of Sir William Stanley after his conviction and execution for supporting Perkin Warbeck. It was sold in 1556 to Sir Edward Fitton of Gawsworth who sold it on for £2000 to Thomas Stanley, jnr in 1602.[1] Thomas was knighted by King James in 1603. The Stanley family subsequently occupied the hall for around two hundred years until it was severely damaged by fire in 1779. The 7th Baronet then commissioned a new hall to be constructed in 1818 in the south of the estate on a site then occupied by Park House. The new hall was subsequently occupied by further generations of the Stanley family until 1931, when it too was damaged by fire during the occupation of Edward Stanley, 6th Baron Stanley of Alderley and had to be partially demolished and left unoccupied. The sixth Lord's finances had suffered from the effects of two expensive divorces, gambling losses and death duties and in 1938 he decided to sell the estate piecemeal, involving the disposal of 77 farms and 166 houses. No offers were received for the hall itself and it stood empty for nearly twenty years. In 1950 the dilapidated hall and 350 acres (140 hectares) of surrounding parkland were purchased, with planning permission to develop, by ICI Pharmaceuticals for 55,000 pounds. Work began in 1957 on a site by Radnor Mere (the enlarged mill pond) to provide office and laboratory facilities, initially for ICI and latterly for AstraZeneca, and which now house some 3,500 staff. It is a global lead centre for cancer research and a number of anti-cancer treatments that have been developed at the site including Nolvadex, Zoladex, Casodex, Arimidex and Iressa. Work on the latest Alderley Hall began in 1963, and incorporates a surviving part of the previous building. Originally the ballroom, this part is now named the Sir James Black Conference Centre in honour of the discoverer of beta-blockers. The gardens and the woodlands have been restored and the nearby Grade II listed Home Farm buildings preserved. The latter includes coach-houses, cottages and barns of hand-made English orange brick and a six-sided columbarium or dovecote. In March 2013, AstraZeneca announced plans to cease R&D work at Alderley Park. A total of 1,600 jobs will be relocated over three years, mainly to Cambridge. The company plans to continue non-R&D work at the site.

Aldford Hall is a farmhouse to the south of the village of Aldford, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. The house was designed by John Douglas for Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster as part of a model farm, and built between 1876 and 1881. In about 1912 it was converted into two cottages with no alteration to its exterior. The lower storey is built in red sandstone and the upper storey is built in brown brick with blue diapering and sandstone dressings.

Alvanley Hallis in Manley Road, 0.25 miles (0.4 km) to the southeast of the village of Alvanley, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building.[1] The hall dates from various periods, mainly the 17th century, with some parts from earlier dates, and with later additions.[2] It is constructed in red sandstone, with later brick additions, and has a grey slate roof. It is an L-shaped building in two storeys and an attic.[1] It contains tall mullioned windows, and internal timber-framed partitions. In the cellar are two large medieval piers standing on polygonal concave-sided bases.[2] Some 180 metres (590 ft) to the southeast of the hall is a tithe barn dating from the late 17th century constructed in brick with a slate roof, and standing on a sandstone plinth. It is listed at Grade II

Antrobus Hall is a country house in the village of Mobberley, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1709, and a wing was added in about 1760. It was built for John Antrobus, a dissenter from Knutsford. The hall is constructed in brick, and has a stone-flagged roof. The house, together with its garden walls and gate piers, are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. The house has five bays on the ground floor, and four on its upper floor. The gate piers are rusticated.

Arley Hall Northwich. A country house in the village of Arley, Cheshire, England, about 4 miles (6 km) south of Lymm and 5 miles (8 km) north of Northwich. It is home to the owner, Viscount Ashbrook and his family. The Arley estate has been part of the land held by the Warburton family since the end of the 12th century. In 1469 Piers Warburton moved his principal seat from Warburton to Arley, and built the first house on the site.

Ashley Hall

● Aston Park

● Austerson Old Hall


B

Bache Hall The original house on the site was bought in 1610 by Edward Whitby, Recorder of Chester, but was demolished following the Civil War when it was occupied by Parliamentary troops during the Siege of Chester. It was rebuilt in the early 18th century.[1] During the 19th century it was the home of Robert Spear Hudson, manufacturer of soap powder.[2] From 1902 it was the clubhouse of Chester Golf Club.[3] In 1911 the house was sold to the hospital which was originally a lunatic asylum and is now the Countess of Chester Hospital.[1] It has since been acquired by the University of Chester and, as of 2013, provides residential accommodation for its students.

Backford Hall is a country house in the village of Backford, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1863 on the site of earlier halls, and was designed by John Cunningham. Its style is described as "exuberant Elizabethan, Jacobean and Bohemian Rococo". The authors of the Buildings of England series describe the north front as being "wildly over-egged". The house is constructed in brick with slate roofs.Since 1946 it has been used as offices by Chester County Council, and in 2012 its sale was agreed for residential development if planning approval be granted. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building

Baddiley Hall is a country house in the settlement of Baddiley in Cheshire, England. Previously there was a half-timbered house on the site, but this had been replaced by the current house before the death of its owner, Sir Henry Mainwaring, in 1797. It is constructed in brown brick with a tiled roof, and has an L-shaped plan. Its architectural style is Georgian.The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. Figueirdo and Treuherz comment that it is "a modest Georgian brick manor house, hardly more than a farmhouse"

● Barrow Hall

Bear and Billet The house was built in 1664 as the town house of the Earls of Shrewsbury who held control of the nearby Bridgegate. It was also probably used as a grain warehouse because in the gable are double doors and a bracket for a hoist. The building became an inn in the 18th century, although it continued to be owned by the Shrewsbury family until 1867. Its name is taken from the heraldic device of the Earls that consist of a bear tied to a billet (or stake)

Beckbury Hall, Beckbury, Shifnal. Manor House. C16 or early C17, Listed 1984

Known Residents
Lieut. Col Arthur Campbell Yate (1853- )

Lieut-Col. Harold Platt Sykes

Tracey Taylor, the wife of Duran Duran guitarist Andy Taylor

Beeston Towers (now the Wild Boar Hotel) is a former country house near the village of Beeston, Cheshire, England. It stands on the A49 road some 1 mile (1.6 km) to the east of the village. It was built in 1886 for John Naylor, a timber merchant from Warrington. Extensive additions were made in the early part of the 20th century. The building is timber-framed, with additions in rendered brick. It is in three storeys, with a tower of four storeys. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. Figueirdo and Treuherz describe it as "an extravaganza in the Cheshire half-timbered style like a bad dream of Little Moreton Hall". During the 20th century the building was converted into use as a school. Later it was developed as a restaurant, and in 1998 an accommodation block was added, making it into a hotel

Belgrave Lodge The lodge was built in 1889 to a design by the Chester architects Douglas and Fordham for the 1st Duke of Westminster. The ground floor has since been converted into a restaurant

Belmont Hall The site for the house was bought in 1749 by John Smith Barry. He commissioned James Gibbs to design the house,[a] which was completed in 1755. Gibbs died in 1754, therefore the house's construction was probably supervised by a local architect. Some of the architectural features of the house are inconsistent with Gibbs' work elsewhere, and it is considered by de Figueiredo and Treuherz, and by Hartwell et al. that changes to the design, including the two-storey bow windows, were made by the executant architect.When John Smith Barry died in 1784 the house was inherited by his son James Hugh Smith Barry, an art collector. At his death in 1801 the house was sold to Henry Clarke, who sold it to the Leigh family. As of 2012, the estate was still in the ownership of the Leigh family, the house being let to Cransley School, and part of the surrounding land being used as a registered site by the Camping and Caravanning Club

Betchton Hall is a country house in the parish of Betchton, Cheshire, England. It was originally a timber-framed house, and was substantially rebuilt in brick in the 18th century for Richard Jackson, prebendary of Chester. In the early years of the following century it was extended for Richard Galley. The house is in two storeys. The southeast front has seven bays that include a round-headed doorway. The southwest front has three bays, and contains Venetian windows. The entrance hall is circular. In the house is an 18th-century fireplace moved from Faringdon House, then in Berkshire and now in Oxfordshire, in the 1960s. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building

Bexton Hall This charming old 17th century house seems to have left by the tide of history , isolated and forgotten. It is now known as Bexton Hall Farm. In earlier times it was probably the moated manor house of the de Bexton family whose name appears on medieval documents. Gary Bexton from Tasmania is sad that I cannot find much Bexton history for him. The land was divided between the Cholmondelys and the Daniels who owned Over Tabley Hall and Bexton Hall.

The last Daniel - Sir Samuel who died, I think in 1726, left Bexton Hall to his nephew Samuel Duckenfield who added Daniel to his name. Left a widow Lady Duckenfield Daniel had her portrait painted by John Astley and found him so attractive that she offered herself as the original rather than a copy! He lost no time in spending her money and adorned Bexton Hall with a pagoda or viewing platform on the roof so that the local gentry could view the hunt. He also painted scenes round the walls. When the hall came into possession of the Leicesters of Tabley Lady Leighton ( nee Leicester Warren) thought the scenes 'not nice' and had them painted over. They can not be recovered because the top was removed some years ago. More recenlty it has suffered from the lack of care as a fine old, oak staircase had loose and missing turned spindles. It now belongs to Manchester University.


Birtles Hall is a country house in the parish of Over Alderley, Cheshire, England. It was built in about 1819 for Robert Hibbert. The interior of the house was badly damaged by fire in 1938, and it was reconstructed by the Arts and Crafts architect James Henry Sellers. The exterior is constructed in buff ashlar sandstone. The roofs are of Welsh slate, and there are three brick chimneys. The house is in two storeys, with a south front of five bays. Along the top of the south front is a plain frieze and a cornice supporting a balustrade. Protruding from the central bay of the lower storey is a porch with Ionic columns and a balustrade. Figueirdo and Treuherz describe the style as "severe Neoclassical". The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. Also listed Grade II are terrace walls in front of the house, and the stable block.

Bishop Lloyd's House

Blackden Hall & Toad Hall, Blackden

Blackden Manor is a former manor house to the southeast of the village of Goostrey, Cheshire, England. It is a timber-framed building that was re-cased in brick in the late 19th century.[1] The house was restored in 1920 by the architect James Henry Sellers. He added new wings to the rear of the house, forming a courtyard.[2] The house is constructed in sandstone with a slate roof; it has two storeys and an attic. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[1] Also listed at Grade II is a two-storey brick farm building to the southeast of the house, dating from 1709

Bolesworth Castle


Bonis Hall is a former country house to the north of Prestbury, Cheshire, England. It was the seat of the Pigot family until 1746, when it was bought by Charles Legh of Adlington. In the early part of the 19th century it was remodelled and used by the Legh family as a dower house. In the early 20th century the exterior was pebbledashed, and castellations were added. It has since been converted for use as offices.[1] It is constructed in brick, with Kerridge stone-slate roofs. The house is in two storeys and has a seven-bay front with coped gables surmounted by ball and urn finials. On top of the building is a square tower with a pyramidal roof surmounted by a hexagonal bellcote with a copper cupola and weathervane. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building

Booth Mansion In 1700 George Booth rebuilt two medieval houses as his town house.[3] He built a frontage in Georgian style,[4] but behind this much of the medieval fabric was retained. The frontage was angled into the street so that the house could be seen better from Chester Cross; however as a result of this he was fined £10 for encroaching into the street.[3] In the 1740s and 1750s the building was used as the assembly rooms for the town's social functions.[5] Subsequently it has been used as an auction gallery[1] and, as of 2010, houses a firm of solicitors.[6] In Spring 2015, an art gallery opened here

Bostock Hall

Boughton Hall Boughton Hall has existied since at the least the early 17th century. For much of its history it was owned by the Currie family. The Hall has surviving elements dating from the seventeenth century. The fireplace in the entrance is dated 1655 and possibly records the rebuilding of the Hall after a fire in 1643. Boughton Hall is now much altered and includes eighteenth and nineteenth century additions, which are also significant, and some later twentieth century alterations. Between 1945 and 1982 Boughton Hall was used as a Dr Barnado children's home. From then until 2000 it was used in partnership with Cheshire Social Services for children involved in youth justice proceedings. In 2009 the Hall opened as a luxury retirement home. Boughton Hall when in use as a Barnado's Home The Hall is located within what was previously the village of Nether Broughton. The whole village suffered the same fate as Boughton Hall during the Civil War. The Chester garrison turned the inhabitants out of their homes and razed the entire village to the ground after their buildings were used to provide cover for Parliamentary forces.

Brereton Hall Fortified Manor House major building

Brimstage Hall, Brunstath Fortified Manor House major building

Broxton Old Hall Broxton Old Hall (or Broxton Higher Hall) is in Old Coach Road 0.5 miles (1 km) west of the village of Brown Knowl, in the civil parish of Broxton, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. The site has been occupied since before 1327. The oldest surviving part of the present house dates from 1595, when it was built for Thomas Dod. In 1873 the house was extended, incorporating fabric from the older house, by the Chester architect John Douglas. This was commissioned by Sir Philip de Grey Egerton of Oulton Park as a dower house. It was purchased by Malcolm Walker, owner of the Iceland Food Store Chain, in 1985 for £750,000, and re-modelled and extended for him by The Carnell Green Partnership in 1987–88."My main residence is Broxton Old Hall, a Grade II listed Elizabethan manor house in Cheshire, which I bought for £750,000 in 1985. It was in poor repair, so I knocked it down and rebuilt it. The renovations cost a lot more than I budgeted for." The house is timber-framed with oak frames and plaster panels. The roofs are of stone slates and have ornate bargeboards and finials. The chimneys consist of detached diagonal flues. The house is in two storeys. The original part of the house has four bays and two gables and a gabled porch. To the left of this part of the house is a recessed wing with one gable and to its right is a projecting wing with one gable. To the sides of each of these are further recessed wings, that to the left having a further gable. The windows are of oak; those in the upper storey have mullions and those in the lower storey have mullions and transoms. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner described it as being "an ornate gabled black and white house". The lodge to the hall is also listed Grade II. It is dated 1873, is a timber-framed building on a brick plinth and was designed by John Douglas. It has one storey and is in Jacobethan style


Buglawton Hall The village of Buglawton became the seat of Simon Touchet in 11th Century, shortly after the Norman Conquest. The manor remained with the Touchet family throughout the whole of the medieval period finally being granted to the Bagnall family in 1549 by Edward VI, following the death of Sir John Touchet. Randle Mainwaring of Over Peover bought the manor in 1596 (Elizabeth I was on the throne) from Henry Bagnall for the grand sum of £150! It is thought that the earliest remaining elements of Buglawton Hall date from 16th Century, so it would seem that Buglawton Hall's first expansion was either work carried out by the Bagnall family or Randle Mainwaring. The manor stayed in the Mainwaring family until it was conveyed to John Stafford of Macclesfield 1743 by James Mainwaring (George II on the throne). It then passed to Samuel Edgerton of Tatton Park in 1761 (George III on the throne). By 1816 the owner was R. Keymer Esq. Samuel Pearson, a silk merchant, bought it in 1823 (George IV had just come to the throne). Samuel died in 1871 having brought up 8 children in the hall. His widow continued to live here, followed by her eldest son, Samuel. Mary Faulder from Manchester and her sister owned the hall for 2 years, and by 1904 it was the residence of Joseph Maghull Yates. Maghull Yates was a Manchester barrister and became Mayor of Congleton in 1910. The hall had a new owner by 1914, a David Mosely, In 1939 the Hall had become the residence of Charles Johnson who put the house 'modernised throughout and in first class condition' up for sale in 1947. Manchester City Council eventually bought the hall and Buglawton Hall School was born.

Bulkeley Grange is a country house to the southeast of the village of Bulkeley, Cheshire, England. It replaced an earlier timber-framed house on the site, Bulkeley Old Hall, built by Thomas Brassey in about 1600. Bulkeley Grange was built in 1867 by his successor and namesake, the railway contractor Thomas Brassey for his son, a politician and another Thomas Brassey. The house is constructed in red brick with slate roofs in Jacobean style. Some half-timbering has been applied to the exterior. The entrance front is in two storeys and three bays with gables. It has a large, mainly stone, projecting porch with Jacobean-style pilasters and an openwork parapet. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building

Bulkeley Hall is a country house to the southwest of the village of Bulkeley, Cheshire, England. It dates from the middle of the 18th century, and was built for Thomas Bulkeley. The house is constructed in brick with a slate roof. Its architectural style is Georgian. The entrance front has three storeys, and is in seven bays. A service wing at right-angles gives it an L-shaped plan. The interior contains 18th-century plasterwork and joinery. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building

Burton Hall dates from the early 17th century, and was built by John Werden. There have been some small 19th-century additions. It is built in brick with buff sandstone dressings, it has a Welsh slate roof, and four stone-capped brick chimneys. Its plan is square and the house has three storeys over a basement, with a symmetrical three-bay front. The entrance is approached by ten stone steps.The hall, which had fallen into considerable disrepair throughout the late 20th century, has recently undergone an extensive restoration programme by the Rowton family

Burton Manor was built around 1805 for Richard Congreve and remodelled in 1904 by Sir Charles Nicholson for Henry Neville Gladstone, son of William Ewart Gladstone. An orangery was added in 1910 to a design by Arthur Beresford Pite.Formerly a private house, it became an adult education college with accommodation for resident students, operated by Liverpool City Council. It closed as an adult educational college in March 2011. Since its closure the organisation known as the Friends of Burton Manor has been formed to restore the manor and its associated buildings.

Butley Hall can be found in the Domesday Book. The original Butley Manor, which is believed to have stood on the site of the Hall, can be traced back to 1070 when William the Conqueror gave Chester to his nephew, one Hugh Lupus. In those turbulent times, Lupus’s son then ousted the Manor’s owner. Down the years, the Manor was largely held by two families. The Pigotts owned it for some 400 years, before the Leghs acquired the estate, and ultimately the Hall, in 1629. Their purchase included 24 dwellings, a water mill, 500 acres of arable land, 500 acres of pasture - a pair of gloves and a lance. Many years later the Hall became the home of the sitting MP William Brocklehurst, and at one time it was a girls’ school.


C

Calveley Hall is a country house to the west of the village of Milton Green, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1684 for Lady Mary Calveley. After Lady Mary's death the estate passed by marriage to the Leghs of Lyme. In 1818 it was remodelled for Thomas Legh, and further alterations have been carried out during the 20th century. The house is constructed in rendered brick with stone quoins. It stands on a stone plinth, has hipped roofs in Welsh slate, and three brick chimneys. The entrance front has three storeys, and is symmetrical with seven bays, the bays at the ends being slightly set back. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner describes it as being "absolutely plain". Inside the house is a broad staircase with double twisted balusters, and newels carved with coats of arms, including those of Lady Mary. One of the rooms in the upper floor has an overmantel carved with the Calveley arms. The hall is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. The gate piers and front garden walls are listed at Grade II. In 2006 the building was in a poor state of repair.


Capesthorne Hall


Castle Park House

Beeston Castle Castle of the Rock; Castle de Rupe Masonry Castle , Urban Defence masonry ruins/remnants

Checkley Hall is a small country house in the parish of Checkley cum Wrinehill, Cheshire, England. The house was built in 1694 by the Delves family of Doddington, replacing an earlier timber-framed house.[1] It was altered in the late 18th or early 19th century,[2] replacing a hipped roof with an attic.[1] The house is constructed in brick with a tiled roof.[2] It has 2½ storeys, and an entrance front with five bays.[3] The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building.[2] Its gate piers are listed at Grade II.

Chelford Manor House stands to the southeast of the village of Chelford, Cheshire, England. It dates from the early 17th century. An extension was made to it in 1671, and more alterations and additions were carried out in the 19th and 20th centuries.[1] The last addition was made for Colonel Dixon of Astle Hall.[2] The house is timber-framed on a stone plinth. The infill is either brick or rendered brick. It is roofed in slate and cement tiles.[1] It is a "complex" building,[2] with parts in two storeys, and other parts in three storeys.[1] The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building.[1] To the north of the manor house is a former tithe barn. This is also timber-framed with brick infill, and is listed at Grade II.

Chester Abbey of St Werburgh The city of Chester was an important Roman stronghold. There may have been a Christian basilica on the site of the present cathedral in the late Roman era, while Chester was controlled by Legio XX Valeria Victrix. Legend holds that the basilica was dedicated to St Paul and Saint Peter. This is supported by evidence that in Saxon times the dedication of an early chapel on this site was changed from Saint Peter to Saint Werburgh. During the Dark Ages Barloc of Norbury, a Catholic Celtic saint and hermit, was venerated at Chester Cathedral with a feast day on 10 September. He is known to history mainly through the hagiography of the Secgan Manuscript, he also occurs in a litany in the Tanner of the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In the 10th century, St Werburgh's remains were brought to Chester, and 907 AD her shrine was placed in the church. It is thought that Æthelfleda turned the church into a college of secular canons, and that it was given a charter by King Edgar in 968. The collegiate church, as it was then, was restored in 1057 by Leofric, Earl of Mercia and Lady Godiva. This church was razed to the ground around 1090, with the secular canons evicted, and no known trace of it remains. In 1093 a Benedictine abbey was established on the site by Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester, with the assistance of St Anselm and other monks from Bec in Normandy. The earliest surviving parts of the structure date from that time. The abbey church was not at that time the cathedral of Chester; from 1075 to 1082 the cathedral of the diocese was the nearby church of St John the Baptist, after which the see was transferred to Coventry. In 1538, during the dissolution of the monasteries, the monastery was disbanded and the shrine of Saint Werburgh was desecrated. In 1541 St Werburgh's abbey became a cathedral of the Church of England, by order of Henry VIII. At the same time, the dedication was changed to Christ and the Blessed Virgin. The last abbot of St Werburgh’s Abbey, Thomas Clarke, became the first dean of the new cathedral, at the head of a secular chapter.

Chester Castle Agricola tower; Cestre Timber Castle , Masonry Castle, masonry ruins/remnants

Chester City Wall, Urban Defence major building

Chester Dee Bridge, Handbridge Fortified Bridge masonry footings

Cholmondeley Castle

Chorley Old Hall The original part of the house was built around 1330 by Robert de Chorley. By 1523 the house was owned by the Davenport family and during the middle of the 16th century they constructed a half-timbered house adjoining the existing building's north-western corner. In the early 17th century the house was owned by the Stanley family who carried out alterations around 1640 and built a bridge across the moat. The two houses were joined by a brick link in the late 18th or the early 19th century. In 1915 the house was fully restored and further renovations were carried out in 1975

Chorlton Hall, Backford Chorlton Hall is a country house in the parish of Chorlton-by-Backford and stands to the east of the village of Backford, Cheshire, England. The house was built probably in the middle of the 18th century.[1] The original owners were the Stanley family of Hooton. In 1811 it was bought by the historian, George Ormerod, who wrote his History of Cheshire while living in the house. Ormerod sold the house in 1823 to the Wicksted family of Nantwich.[2] It was extended in 1845–46 by the architect Sir James Picton for James Wickstead Swan.[1] The plan of the house is U-shaped.[2] It is rendered with slate roofs and rendered chimney stacks. The house stands on a stone plinth and is in 2½ storeys. Its front is in three bays; the central bay has three windows, the lateral bays project forward, are gabled, and each has one window.[3] Internally, the dining room is plastered in Jacobean style, and the drawing room in Gothic style.[1] The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Chorlton Hall, Malpas is a country house in the parish of Chorlton, Cheshire, England. It stands some 1.5 miles (2.4 km) to the northwest of Malpas.[1] The house dates from the 17th century, with additions made in the second quarter of the 19th century.[2] Its entrance front is pebbledashed and it stands on a stone plinth. The roof is slated. The house is in 2½ storeys plus cellars. Across the front are three bays, each with a gable, and with the central bay protruding. On the gables are ball finials. The porch has an ogee-arched entrance. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[3] A stable block and two cottages to the southeast of the house have also been designated at Grade II.

Chorlton Old Hall is a country house in the parish of Chorlton, Cheshire, England. The house was built in 1666, with later additions and alterations. It is constructed in red-brown brick, and has slate roofs. The house has a T-shaped plan.[1] It formerly had an E-plan, but one wing has been demolished.[2] The house is in 2½ storeys and its entrance front has four bays. The right-hand bay projects and has a shaped gable. The second bay is the entrance bay; this also projects and has a shaped gable, but is smaller. Dormer windows have been inserted in the roof in the first and third bays. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building

Christleton Hall is a former country house in the village of Christleton, Cheshire, England. It was built in about 1750 for Townsend Ince.[1] The building was later used as a boarding school,[2] and since 1974 it has been a law college.[3] Additions were made to it in the middle of the 19th century, and in the early part of the 20th century. The house is constructed in red brick with stone dressings, and has a Welsh slate roof. It is in three stories, and has a south front of four bays, three of which are from the original house. The hall is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. The 20th-century additions are excluded from the listing

Christleton Old Hall

Churche's Mansion

Churton Hall the ancestral home of the Bamston Family. Churton Hall is a; Grade II listed building, a farm, and the home (since 1945) of the Crump Family. Churton Hall was described in the 1882 edition ofOrmerod as being an "Ancient timber mansion, environed with stately trees, and though long abandoned to farmers retaining much of its former respectable appearance" The double gabled house has an inscribed date above the front door of 1569 . The date of 1569 is preceded and succeeded by the initials W ? and E ? respectively. These letters refer to William Bamston (died 1620) and his wife Elizabeth Bamston. The front wall of the house has two oval tablets one bearing the arms of the Bamston family. The other tablet illustrates the crest of the Bamston family. Prior to the Crump family taking over the Hall, it has also been (at different times) the home of the Bellis family and the Parker family.

Clonterbrook House


● Cogshall Hall is a country house near the village of Comberbach, Cheshire, England. It was built in about 1830 for Peter Jackson. A kitchen wing was added to the rear during the early 20th century. It is constructed in red-brown brick, and has a slate hipped roof. It is rectangular in plan, and has two storeys. Its architectural style is Georgian. The entrance front has five bays and an Ionic portico. There is a similar, smaller portico on the right side. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. The lodge to the hall was built at about the same time. It has a Tuscan porch with a pediment, and is listed at Grade II. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner refers to the lodge as being "ambitious". From Comberbach History ".. A nurse who specialised in nursing subnormal children came to Cogshall Hall to nurse the owner. He was an adult but was away with the fairies! Cogshall Hall floors were covered in Turkish carpet with red medallions and he used to jump from one to another! My Mum used to make him bread and dripping. The owner of Cogshall Hall owned Ivy Lodge Farm too."

Colshaw HallCombermere AbbeyCowper House was built in 1664, following the destruction of many buildings in Chester during the Civil War.[2] It was built above undercrofts dating from 1350–75, or possibly earlier. Alterations have been made to the building in the 19th and 20th centuries. Thomas Cowper had been mayor of Chester in 1641–42 and a Royalist supporter in the Civil War. The rear undercroft was excavated in 1839, and it is thought that the front undercroft is older than that in the rear.


Crabwall Hall is a former country house, later a hotel, in the village of Mollington, Cheshire, England. The present building dates from the 18th century.It replaced an early 17th-century house built for the Gamul family. The house was originally a "modest brick cottage" and it was refaced in the early 19th century. Figueirdo and Treuherz comment that this give it "the appearance of a toy fort". The interior was remodelled in about 1900. It has since been converted into a hotel, with extensions added in 1987. It is constructed in orange and yellow brick with red sandstone dressings. The roof is in Welsh slate and there are three brick chimneys. The building is in two storeys, with an entrance front of three bays. At the corners are octagonal towers. The central bay protrudes and forms a two-storey porch; it is supported by diagonal buttresses. The tops of the porch and towers are crenellated. The building is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Crag Hall is a country house located to the east of the village of Wildboarclough, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1815 by George Palfreyman, the owner of a textile printing works nearby. It has since been extended by the addition of large curved bow windows at each end of the entrance front. The house is constructed in brick-sized blocks of brown sandstone, with ashlar quoins and dressings. It is roofed in slate. The house is in two storeys. The entrance front has five bays.In the centre is a raised portico with four Ionic columns. It is approached from each side by a flight of steps. Its base is rusticated and contains three arched recesses. Above the portico is a window with an entablature. About the house, Figueirdo and Treuherz comment that "it has an imposing air of millstone grit solidity".The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. Associated with the house are three structures listed at Grade II. These are the gateway with its wing walls, the retaining wall to the garden terrace, and a wall and summer house in the garden.

Cranage Hall is a former country house in the village of Cranage, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1828–29 for Lawrence Armitstead, and designed by Lewis Wyatt. In 1932 a parallel wing was added. Since the hospital closed, it has been used as a hotel and conference centre owned and run by the Principal Hayley hotel group. The building is constructed in red brick with blue brick diapering, and in yellow sandstone. It is roofed in slate. The architectural style is Elizabethan. The building is in two storeys plus a basement, and it has eight bays. The first and fourth bays are in stone; the others are in brick. In front of the sixth and seven bays is a two-storey stone porch with four fluted Doric columns, an entablature with a frieze, and a balcony with an openwork balustrade. Between the third and fourth bays is a slim octagonal tower with an ogee cap and a weathervane. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Crewe Hall


Crewe Hill is a country house in the parish of Crewe by Farndon, to the southeast of the village of Farndon, Cheshire, England. It was enlarged from a farmhouse for the Barnston family of Churton Hall in the early 19th century. In about 1890 it was extended, including the addition of a dining room to the rear. The building is rendered, and has slate roofs. It is in two storeys, and is symmetrical, with a central gable and wings with gables. A cottage is attached to its right. Internally there is a central Great Hall rising through both storeys. This has a gallery and contains a collection of items of antiquarianism. The house and the attached cottage are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade listed building.

Crewood Hall is a country house to the northeast of the village of Kingsley, Cheshire, England. It dates from the 16th century, and has a porch dated 1638. Initially timber-framed, the building was encased in brick and remodelled in the 19th century. It has stone dressings and tiled roofs, and is in two storeys. The house consists of a hall with two cross wings and a two-storey porch at the end of the left wing. The lower storey of the porch is in sandstone and in the upper storey the timber-framing is exposed. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. Associated with the house, and also listed at Grade II, are two farm buildings; stables, and a shippon and barn.


D

Daresbury Hall is a former country house in the village of Daresbury, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1759 for George Heron. The house is constructed in brown brick with stone dressings, and has a slate roof. Its architectural style is Georgian. The house is in three storeys and seven bays. It has a stone plinth and stone bands between the storeys. Framing the middle three bays are rusticated pilasters, and similar quoins at the corners. All the windows are sash windows. Along the top of the house is a plain parapet, with a pediment above the central three bays. For some years from 1955 it was used by a charity, now known as Scope, as a residential home for handicapped people. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. In April 2015, a huge cannabis farm containing six hundred plants with an estimated street value of £750 000 was discovered at the former county mansion in an annex at the estate.

Davenham Hall is a former country house to the southeast of the village of Davenham, Cheshire, England. It was built for Thomas Ravenscroft to replace a timber-framed house called Davenham Lodge. It dates from the middle or the later part of the 18th century, possibly from shortly before 1795, when Ravenscroft died. Substantial additions were made in the early 19th century. It is constructed in stuccoed brick, and has a slate roof. The house is in two storeys with a symmetrical entrance front of six bays. Occupying the middle two bays is a porch with four Tuscan columns and an entablature containing a triglyph. Above this, the central bays protrude slightly forwards and contain two windows, with a pediment above them and a parapet on each side. Figueirdo and Treuherz describe the interior as being "especially fine". The entrance hall contains Grecian plasterwork and a black marble chimneypiece. The drawing room has more delicate plasterwork, and a marble chimneypiece decorated with dancing figures. The central staircase hall is lit by a central dome, and has fan-shaped plasterwork. The staircase has a wrought iron baluster, and the first floor landing has a screen of four Doric columns. The house was converted into a nursing home in 1980. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building.


Dee Hills House is in Dee Hills Park, Chester, Cheshire, England. It was built as a country house in 1814, and is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. It was designed by Thomas Harrison, and has since been altered and used as offices

Dee House was built in about 1730 as a town house for John Comberbach, a former mayor of Chester. Extensions were made in the 1740s to the south and southwest, giving the house an L-shaped plan. It continued in use as a private residence until about 1850, when it was sold to the Church of England. In 1854 it passed to the Faithful Companions of Jesus, a religious institute of the Roman Catholic Church, who used it as a convent school. They added a wing to the east, which incorporated in its ground floor a chapel designed by Edmund Kirby. The chapel is in Gothic Revival style, in contrast to the rest of the building in Georgian style. A west wing in Neo-Georgian style was added in about 1900. In 1925 the building was taken over by the Ursulines, another religious institute. In 1929 they added another block to the south of the building, and during the process the remains of a Roman amphitheatre were found beneath it. In the early 1970s the convent closed and the building was used as offices by British Telecom. They vacated the building in the early 1990s and it has been empty since.

Delves Hall This fortified tower was built by Sir John Delves in 1364, on the site of a former moated manor house. The tower was initially free-standing and was probably intended as a place of refuge for the family. In the 17th century it was incorporated into a range of domestic buildings which were known as Doddington Hall. In the Civil War the hall became a garrison for the parliamentary forces. It was taken for the king by Lord Byron in January 1644 but retaken shortly after. In 1727 the house and estate passed to the Broughton family.[4] The house was demolished around 1777 and replaced by the new Doddington Hall, leaving the tower as a landscape feature which was possibly used as a gazebo or a banqueting pavilion. The external staircase to the former house was retained when the house was demolished and it was attached to the tower.


Doddington Hall is a country house in Doddington Park in the civil parish of Doddington, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building. The house was built for Rev Sir Thomas Broughton between 1777 and 1798 to a design by Samuel Wyatt. It was built to replace an older house, of which Delves Hall was a part, a short distance to the north. The house is constructed of Keuper sandstone ashlar with a slate roof and lead flashings in three storeys. It is in neoclassical style with an entrance front of nine bays.

Dorfold Hall


Duddon Old Hallis a country house in the village of Duddon, Cheshire, England. It dates from the later part of the 16th century. Alterations and additions were made in the early 19th century, and later in the century the timber framing was restored. It is constructed partly in timber-framing, and partly in brick, on a stone plinth. It is roofed partly in stone-slate, and partly in Welsh slate. The plan consists of a hall with a cross wing. The house is in two storeys, and its south front has four bays. The bay at the left end is timber-framed; it projects and has a gable with a bargeboard. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner comments that the black-and-white decoration of this bay is "very rich". It consists of studding in the ground floor, lozenges and shaped balusters in the upper floor, and lozenges and serpentine struts in the gable. In the adjacent bay is a wooden doorcase with a triangular pediment. All the windows are casements. Internally, the main chamber is in the cross wing, which is open to the roof. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. To the northeast of the house is a 16th-century barn, constructed in timber-framing with brick infill, which is also listed at Grade II.


Dukenfield Hall is a country house located between Knutsford and Mobberley in Cheshire, England. Now a symmetrical brick building, it originated in the late 16th or early 17th century as a small cruck-framed house, entered at one end. During the 17th century it was faced with brick, cross wings were added and the roof was heightened. The house was originally called Podmore House. Further additions were made to the house in the 19th and 20th centuries. It is constructed in plum-coloured brick with stone dressings, and has a stone-slate roof. The house is in two storeys plus an attic. Its entrance front is E-shaped, and has three projecting wings with gables. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. Associated with the house are two structures listed at Grade II. These are the gate piers to the forecourt, and a barn.

	

E

Eaton Hall, Eccleston. Country house of the Duke of Westminster set within a large estate 1 mile (2 km) south of the village of Eccleston. It has been the country house of the Grosvenor family since the 15th century. The first substantial house was built in the 17th century - Between 1675 and 1683 much of the castle was taken away by Sir Thomas Grosvenor, 3rd Baronet used barges to carry the stonework of Holt Castle in Denbighshire, Wales downstream to rebuild Eaton hall after the English Civil War. In the early 19th century it was replaced by a much larger house designed by William Porden. This in turn was replaced by an even larger house, with outbuildings and a chapel, designed by Alfred Waterhouse. Building started in 1870 and concluded about 12 years later. By 1960 the fabric of the house had deteriorated and, like many other mansions during this period, it was demolished, although the chapel and many of the outbuildings were retained. A new house was built but its design was not considered to be sympathetic to the local landscape, and in the late 1980s it was re-cased and given the appearance of a French château.

Eccleston Hill was designed by the Chester architect John Douglas for the 1st Duke of Westminster.[1] It was built in 1881–82 as the residence for the Duke's secretary, Colonel David Scotland. The house, and in particular the service quarters, were altered by Douglas & Fordham for Scotland's successor, the Honourable Arthur Lawley in 1892–94. Eccleston Hill is "a large house, virtually a mansion". The house has two storeys plus attics. It is built in red brick, with blue brick diapering and stone dressings. The roof is in red tiles; it is hipped with gables and dormers. Tall shaped chimney stacks rise from the roof. The entrance front faces north and includes an oak timber-framed porch. A wall for growing fruit trees extends to the east from the south east corner of the house at the end of which is a timber conservatory with an octagonal lantern. Extending from the northeast corner of the house to the north is a single-storey stable wing. The gable over the entrance to the stable is also timber-framed. Although there have been alterations to the interior, Douglas' staircase and panelling to the hall remain "as an outstanding example of [his] domestic joinery".

Eccleston Paddocks Eccleston Paddocks was built in 1883 for Cecil Parker, the nephew and land agent of the 1st Duke of Westminster. It was designed by the Chester architect John Douglas. The full complex consisted of the house, estate offices and stables. The service wing was demolished in 1960. The house has 2½ storeys and a basement. The basement and ground floor are in red sandstone, with horizontal bands of lighter stone. The upper part of the house is in red brick with some blue-brick diapering and stone bands; the dressings are in carved stone. The roof is of red tiles, it is steep and hipped and rising from its apex is a massive brick chimney.

The entrance is on the north face. Above the projecting arched doorway is a mullioned and transomed staircase window. Over this a two-light window in a gable, flanked by two small turrets. The entrance bay is surmounted by two hipped roofs on each side of which are dormer windows. To the right of the entrance bay are three more bays, containing a small door, and irregularly placed windows. The left bay is surmounted by a steep conical roof and the other bays by gables containing windows. The truncated service wing is to the right of this. The east front overlooks the garden. On each corner is a large turret with a conical roof, between which are two gabled bays with windows. The south front has two projecting gabled bays. On the top of every gable and roof is a finial. The original service wing included an arched gateway with a pyramid roof and a turret with a conical roof.

Edge Hall

Endon Hall is a country house to the south of Bollington and to the west of Kerridge Hill in Cheshire, England. It was built for William Clayton who developed a quarry nearby. Building of the house started in the 1830s, and it was enlarged in the 1850s.[1] Associated with the house are two structures recorded in the National Heritage List for England as designated Grade X listed buildings. In the farm to the east of the house are stables, built at the same time as the house. They are constructed in coursed buff sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings, and have Kerridge stone-slate roofs. The stables are in two storeys, with a courtyard plan. They have a symmetrical front of five bays, with the central and end bays stepped slightly forward. In the centre bay is a coach entrance. The parapet is castellated. On the roof is a two-tier dovecote with a clock in the upper tier. Also on the roof is a hexagonal wooden open bellcote with a copper-domed roof and a weathervane.[2] In the garden to the south of the house is a sandstone icehouse, built in about 1840.


F

The Falcon, Chester

Frodsham Castle It is likely that the castle was built by Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester around 1070. This was probably a timber structure which completely collapsed during the 14th century. A new castle was built on the site which was occupied by the bailiff who administered the site on behalf of the Lord of the Manor, who was usually the Earl of Chester or the sovereign.[2] It is thought that the building was more a fortified manor house than a castle because there is evidence of only minimal fortification and there is no record of any attempt to obtain permission to crenelate.[1] Nevertheless the walls had "enormous thickness". It later became the gaol of the Manor. In the early 17th century Sir Thomas Savage of Clifton purchased from the Crown the Manor, the Lordship and the Castle of Frodsham ; these had previously belonged to the Frodsham family. Sir Thomas died in 1635 to be succeeded by his son, John, who four years later inherited the title of Earl Rivers.[4] During the Civil War, John Savage was living in the nearby mansion of Rocksavage. He was a Royalist and his house was damaged by Parliamentary forces. He died in Frodsham Castle in 1654 but while his corpse was still in the castle awaiting burial, the building was destroyed in a fire.[2] The ruins were bought by John Daniels of Daresbury and then in about 1750 by Daniel Ashley, a local solicitor. His son, Robert Wainwright Ashley, who was also a lawyer, demolished the ruins and built a house, Park Place.[2] Part of the foundations of the castle formed the cellars of this house


G

Gamul House

Gawsworth Halls & Rectory

God's Providence House

Great Moreton HallGreen Paddockswas built in 1872 for Hugh Grosvenor (then the 3rd Marquess of Westminster and later the 1st Duke of Westminster), and designed by the Chester architect John Douglas. In the Buildings of England series, the architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner states that it is "employed with inventiveness and virtuosity" and "meticulously detailed" . In his biography of Douglas, Edward Hubbard states that it is "remarkable ... for the care and expense. Green Paddocks is constructed of brown brick with red tile roofs; it has two storeys and attics. The entrance front is symmetrical in three bays, with the central bay projecting forwards. The central bay has an arched doorway with a twelve-panelled door. Above this is panelled brickwork and a mullioned window, and over this is a pargetted gable. The lateral bays have mullioned windows in both lower storeys, and in the attics. Above these are shaped gables. The roof is steeply hipped, and at the rear is a small turret-like roof. Internally, great care has been given to detail, particularly in the staircase, the doors, and the fireplace in the front room. Some of the panelled mahogany doors had been brought in from a demolished Victorian hotel.

● Greenbank


H

Hallwood Hallwood was a mansion house situated to the south of the village of Halton, Cheshire, England. One wing of the house remains and is a public house called the Tricorn. Its former stables have been converted into a function room for the public house. The remaining wing is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building; the former stables are listed at Grade II. It originated as a moated house which was possibly the home of a keeper in the deer park to the south of Halton, which was probably built in the second half of the 15th century. Hallwood Manor was later known as Hallwood Farm. By the 17th century it had become the birthplace and home of Sir John Chesshyre. In the 19th century the building was used as a school called Hallwood Academy. It is now a public house

Halton Castle, Runcorn Haiton, Timber Castle , Masonry Castle, masonry ruins/remnants

Halton Old Hallis a house in the former village of Halton, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. The house dates from 1693, and is built in sandstone with a slate roof. It has two storeys and an attic; a two-storey wing has been added to the back. The windows have mullions and the gables have corbels and copings. Both Starkey and Nikolaus Pevsner note that its style is older than its date.

Hampton Old Hallis a country house in the parish of Hampton, Cheshire, England. It is dated 1591, and was built for the Bromley family.There have been subsequent additions and alterations. Figueirdo and Treuherz describe it as "a puzzling and ambitious house, perhaps never completed". The main block is the earliest section, and consists of a close-studded timber-framed range with three gables. Adjoining it is a 17th-century timber-framed porch. Behind the porch is a south wing in brick and stone. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner comments "there must be quite an interesting story behind all this". The house has been "restored and furnished ... in a solid and traditional farmhouse manor". It is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II● listed building. A timber-framed barn to the north of the hall, dating from the 17th century, is listed at Grade II.

Handforth Hall is a former manor house in Handforth, Cheshire, England. It is dated 1562, and was built for Sir Urian Brereton. Alterations have been made to it in the 17th century, and subsequently. The hall is a timber-framed building and currently consists of a single range, with two storeys and five bays. Originally it was either E-shaped or quadrilateral in plan. The hall is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. It was at one time the home of Sir William Brereton, a Parliamentary commander in the English Civil War.Under a coved gable by the porch entrance there is an ornately carved inscription on the lintel, reading: "THIS HAULLE WAS BUYLDED IN THE YEARE OF OUR LORD GOD MCCCCCLXll BY URYAN BRERETON KNIGHT WHOM MARYED MARGARET DAUGHTER AND HEYRE OF WYLLYAM HANDFORTH OF HANDFORTHE ESQUYER AND HAD ISSUE VI SONNES AND II DAUGHTERS."

Hankelow Hall

Hapsford Hallis a country house located about 1 mile (1.6 km) to the south of Helsby, Cheshire, England. It was built in the late 18th or early 19th century.[1] The house incorporates a former farmhouse; additions and alterations have been made since it was built. It is constructed in brick and stone, stands on a stone plinth, has stone quoins, and a hipped slate roof. The house is in three storeys, with cellars and an attic, and has a symmetrical front of three bays. Most of the windows on the front are sashes, elsewhere are casement windows. An embattled stone porch projects from the centre. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. Also listed at Grade II is a barn to the south of the house. This was built at about the same date as the house. It is also constructed in brisk, stands on a stone plinth and has a slate roof. The barn has a five-bay north front. The second and fourth bays contain recessed arches and air-vents; the other bays have arched openings, one of which is blocked, above which are pitch holes. The south front is similar, but has square windows in the ground floor of the lateral bays, and its pitch holes are blocked.

Hare Hill was built in about 1800 for William Hibbert of Birtles Hall. It was extended and remodelled in the middle of the 19th century for the Brocklehurst family. The house is constructed in red brick and has Welsh slate roofs. The architectural style is Georgian. It has two storeys, and the east front has three bays. Along the whole of the east front, and extending to the south front, is a continuous verandah carried on cast iron Chinoiserie supports. It is decorated with a frieze and has a tented glass roof. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. The National Trust wooded garden contains over 70 varieties of rhododendron, plus azaleas, hollies, and hostas. At its centre is a walled garden containing a pergola and wire sculptures. A permissive path leads from the garden to the ridge of Alderley Edge. The garden is open to the public at advertised times; there is an admission charge.

The garden was owned by Col. Charles Brocklehurst until his death in 1981. Col. Brocklehurst was advised by the plantsman, James Russell. The Georgian mansion was sold by the Trust in 1978 to help finance the running of the gardens. The owner of the garden was a great rhododendron enthusiast and steadily introduced them into the garden from 1960 onwards. The climate and soil has allowed them to flourish here. The Trust has replaced many of the common purple variety with more colourful and exotic varieties and has extended the season for visiting the garden by planting roses, lacecaps, euchryphia and hydrangeas, although the early interest is already sustained by snowdrops, daffodils, a huge clematis montana, Skunk Cabbage and magnolia. The walled garden with its numerous climbers features a large lawn sadly without a centrepiece. The main feature of the garden however is the collection of over 50 hollies, silver and golden leaved and yellow and orange berried varieties, including the rare Highclere holly.

Hartford Manor Hartford was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, when the Manor was held by Gilbert de Venables as part of the Barony of Kinderton. Prior to the reign of Edward III it was held by a family who assumed the local name, from which it passed to the Horton, Massey, Holcroft, Marbury and Davies families.

Haslington Hall It is difficult to trace the early history of the hall, because all early documents relating to the hall were kept in a bank vault in Manchester. They were destroyed in 1940 during World War II bombing of Manchester. The manor of Haslington was acquired by the Vernon family as a consequence of the 14th-century marriage of Sir Thomas Vernon to Joan Lostock, heiress of Haslington. The house was built by Admiral Sir Francis Vernon in 1545, and contains parts of the original medieval manor house, which are said to date back to 1480. Additions and alterations were made to it in the 16th, 17th and 19th centuries. It is claimed that some of the timbers used in the early phase of construction were salvaged from ships of the Spanish Armada in 1588. In the late 19th century it was a farmhouse. In 1931 extensive repairs, alterations and additions were made.

Hassall Hallis a former manor house to the east of the village of Hassall, Cheshire, England. The house dates from the 17th century, and was re-fronted in the 19th century.[1] It has since been divided into two houses. It is constructed in rendered brick and has a slate roof.[2] The house has an H-plan.[1] The entrance front is symmetrical, in two storeys, with five bays. The central three bays are recessed and the middle bay contains a doorway. The doorway is flanked by Tuscan pillars, and above the door is an open pediment enclosing a fanlight. The houses are recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building more information:

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Haughton Hall is a country house to the east of the village of Haughton, Cheshire, England. It was rebuilt between 1891 and 1894 for the shipowner and art collector Ralph Brocklebank. The architect was J. F. Doyle, the design being influenced by the Old English picturesque style of Norman Shaw. The house was altered in about 1950, reducing it from three storeys to two, and replacing tile-hanging with roughcast. It is constructed in red brick, some of which has been roughcast, and has red tiled roofs. The house has an L-shaped plan. The garden front is in two storeys and has five bays; there is a single-storey five-bay wing to the east, and a three-storey three-bay service wing to the north. In the garden front are three bay windows, a Venetian window and a door. Above the door is a sundial. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Hawthorn Hall is a former country house in Hall Road, Wilmslow, Cheshire, England. It originated in about 1610 as a timber-framed yeoman house for John Latham of Irlam. It was "improved" and encased in brick for John Leigh in 1698. Its use changed in the 19th century, and in 1835 it opened as a boarding school.The building has since been used as offices. It is constructed in plum-coloured brick, with a Kerridge stone-slate roof, a stone ridge, and three brick chimneys. Parts of the timber-framing can still be seen in the roof gables, and in an internal wall. The plan consists of a long rectangle. The house is in 2½ storeys, and has a near-symmetrical north front. There are four gables with bargeboards and mace finials. Each gable contains a pair of wooden mullioned and transomed windows. In the centre is a doorway, flanked by plain pilasters, and surmounted by a segmental hood framing a cartouche containing the date 1698. At the top of the hall, above the door, is a small balustrade, behind which is a half-glazed lantern with a cupola and a weathervane. The south front is similar to the north front, although the door is not central. This door is flanked by fluted pilasters, and surmounted by a plaque with a lion rampant. The east front has two gables. The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner comments that the house is "good to look at, though conservative for its date". The house, together with parts of the garden walls, is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building.

Heawood Hall is a country house, now divided into three houses, southwest of the village of Nether Alderley, Cheshire, England. It originated in the late 17th century; a tall wing was added in the 18th century.[1] Further alterations were made in 1899, and again in the 20th century. It is constructed in red brick with buff sandstone dressings, and is roofed with Welsh slate.[2] Figueirdo and Treuherz describe it as "a complicated and disjointed-looking house".[1] The three houses are named Heawood Chase, Heawood Hall and Heawood House. The building as a whole is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[2] Building the Alderley Edge bypass in 2010 cut off Heawood Hall from its former entry lodge on the (old) A34. Heawood Hall now has a new entry drive from the Frog Lane roundabout at the south end of the Alderley Edge bypass.

Hefferston Grange Country house built in 1741 for PH Warburton incorporating parts of a house of c1700. It stands on the site of a grange of Vale Royal. Rectangular block of brick and stone. Converted into a TB sanatorium between 1908 and 1938. A hospital laundry wing was added. In 1989 disused.

Henbury Hall

● Higher Hall

Higher Huxley Hall was a manor house, later a luxury 5-star hotel, in Cheshire, England, located about 7 miles southeast of Chester. It lies west of the village of Huxley. Lower Huxley Hall lies less than half a mile to the immediate north of the hall. It dates from at least the 13th century and today has a white facade.[1] Once in the possession of the Cholmondeley family, in 1850 it was owned by a Mr. R. Salmon.[2] Howevever, in 1896 it was reportedly in the hands of a Mr. Vere Cholmondeley.

Highfields Buerton is a small country house in the civil parish of Buerton, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building.

The house is dated 1615. It was built for the Dod family and additions were made in 1750 by William Baker, and again in 1897. It is timber-framed on an ashlar plinth with rendered infill and a plain tiled roof. The house consists of two storeys with an attic. The front elevation has five bays which are symmetrically disposed with projecting gabled wings on both sides. Both floors have close-studded walling with a middle rail. The first floor is jettied, as are the gables of the two lateral wings.

Hinderton Hall was built in 1856 for Christopher Bushell, a Liverpool wine merchant. The architect was Alfred Waterhouse. It was "an exceptionally early work", designed before his first major commission, the Manchester Assize Courts.Extensions to the house were built in the 20th century for Sir Percy Bates, chairman of the Cunard Line, and the estate now has cottages and a Chapter House. The building has since been used as offices and is available for weddings and corporate events.

Hockenhull Hall is a mansion house to the southwest of the village of Tarvin, Cheshire, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. Hockenhull Hall dates from the 17th century but was completely remodelled about 1715 for Hugh Wishaw of Chester. Its design is attributed to the architect Francis Smith. It is built in brick with sandstone dressings and has a square plan. The roof is in Welsh slate and is hipped. The hall is built in two storeys over a basement, with the main façades facing the south and the east. The hall is part of a working farm. In 2009 it was placed on the market with an estimated price of £4 million.

Holford Hall is a country house standing to the west of the village of Plumley, Cheshire, England. It consists of a fragment of a much larger timber-framed house, built in 1601 for Mary Cholmondeley on a moated site. Part of the building was demolished in the 1880s. The house is timber-framed with rendered infill. It has a stone-slate roof. The entrance front has two bays with gables and Ionic pilasters.The architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner describes this front as being "highly decorated". The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building. The stone bridge crossing the moat leading to the house is listed at Grade II. The moated site on which the house stands is a Scheduled monument.

Hollin Old Hall is a house in Bollington, Cheshire, England. The oldest part of the house dates from the 17th century. In the middle of the 18th century the roof was raised, and an addition was made to the rear of the house for Richard Broster. It was remodelled and expanded in about 1870 for the Ascoli family. The building has since been divided into two houses. It is constructed in coursed buff sandstone rubble, with a Kerridge stone-slate roof, a stone ridge, and stone chimneys. The house is in two storeys over a barrel-roofed cellar. The main front has three bays with 19th-century four-light windows, and two gables, each with a two-light window. Elsewhere the house is in Jacobean style, with windows that are mullioned and transomed, or just mullioned. In the cellar is a large slab inscribed "This must stand here forever, Richard Broster 1757". The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Hoole Hall Early documentation states that Hoole Hall was first occupied by John de Hoole, the Lord of Hoole. Further documentation suggests that Rev Sir William Bunbury purchased the hall in the 14th Century and the family owned it for the next 400 years. During the English Civil War (1642-1647) the hall was burnt to the ground by parliamentarian troops as they advanced upon Chester. It then remained derelict until Rev John Baldwin purchased the property and rebuilt the house over 100 years later in 1757. In 1793 the property was passed to Thomas Baldwin, a distinguished pioneer balloonist. In the 19th Century, the mansion acquired a floating staircase and a spacious Conservatory, now grade II listed. During this Century, the Hall saw many changes in residents and at some point during the 19th Century, one of them housed a family of monkeys in the Conservatory!! The last family residing were the Holmes family who stayed until the British Army took over the property for Western Command in 1940. After the second world war the Hall was passed over to British Telecommunications for offices, which subsequently stood empty for many years. The complete site was sold at auction on 30th June 1982 to Wolverhampton & Dudley Breweries who after nearly 2 years were granted planning permission to turn the grand hall into a Hotel, Bar and Bistro. Hoole Hall Hotel has now been re-branded as the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel & Spa Chester and has 140 bedrooms with 7 Conference & Banqueting Suites plus a Grade II listed Conservatory, and a choice of two restaurants, the Brasserie & Lounge and the Marco Pierre White Steakhouse Bar & Grill. The historical name of Hoole Hall has been retained within the Health Club and Spa which operates as theclubandspa at Hoole Hall. ● Hough Hole House

Hulme Hall

Hurdsfield House is a former country house, now surrounded by housing, in the town of Macclesfield, Cheshire, England. It was built for a branch of the Brocklehurst family.[1] During the 20th century it was used as a welfare clinic. The house dates from about 1800, with later additions and alterations. It is constructed in brick with stone dressings, and has Welsh slate roofs. The house is in three storeys, and its entrance front, facing west, has five bays. In the central bay is a porch with a Doric architrave, over which is a balcony with wrought iron railings. Behind and above this is a tall window with an entablature. The windows are sashes, and at the corners of the house are quoins. The south front originally had three bays, and a further bay has been added to the right. In the angle at the rear of the house is an extension added later in the 19th century. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[2] It has been divided into flats.

//s3.amazonaws.com/photos.geni.com/p13/ed/d5/70/6f/5344483f9e83cfcb/hyde_hall_cheshire__original.jpg Hyde Hall - Pigot & Company's Trade Directory of 1834 "... a building of some considerable antiquity; recent improvements have deprived the exterior of its ancient appearance, but a greater part of the interior is in its original state. It is pleasantly situated on the river Tame, but the rapid progress made in manufacture, and the introduction of machinery to such a vast extent and power has materially deteriorated from the beauties of the adjacent scenery'."

Captain Hyde John Clarke


I

Ingersley Hall later Savio House, stands to the east of the town of Bollington, Cheshire, England. The house was built in about 1775 for John Gaskell. Extensions were added to it in 1833 for John Upton Gaskell.[1] The house was sold by the Gaskell family in 1933. In the 1950s it was taken over by a religious order, the Salesians of Don Bosco, and renamed Savio House.[2] As of 2011 the house is used as a retreat and activities centre for young people.[3] The front of the house is constructed in ashlar, with the remainder in coursed sandstone rubble. The house is roofed in Welsh slate and has stone chimneys. It has a rectangular plan and is in two storeys. The architectural style is Greek Revival. The north front is symmetrical with five bays divided by pilasters. The porch is in Doric style. The west front has eight bays, the central three of which were in the original house. All the windows in the north and west fronts are sashes with 12 panes. The south door is in Tuscan style, and was probably moved from the west front. The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[4] Also listed at Grade II is a former coach house to the south of the hall, built in about 1850, and converted into a conference hall in about 1950. ● Inglewood s a house to the north-west of the village of Ledsham, Cheshire, England. It was built in 1909, but is dated 1915.[1] The house was built for F. H. Fox, a Liverpool millionaire who made his fortune in marine insurance. The house later became a training centre.[2] As of 2011 it is a hotel called Inglewood Manor Hotel.[3] The house is mainly half-timbered, with stone dressings, and brick chimneys decorated with diapering. It is roofed with Lakeland slate. Its architectural style is late Arts and Crafts.[2] The house has a rectangular plan, with three fronts in two and three storeys. The entrance is on the east front, which has eight bays; the south and west fronts each have five bays.[1] On the south side is a balcony overlooking the gardens.[2] The house is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[1] Also listed Grade II are the south and west terrace walls of the garden,[4] and the east terrace walls and a pergola.

Ince Grange/ Manor


J

Jodrell Hall is a mansion in Jodrell Bank in the parish of Twemlow, Cheshire, England, and is now used as a school known as Terra Nova School. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. The east window of St. Luke's, Goosetry Church was given in memory of Egerton Leigh, the second of that name to live at Jodrell Hall,


K


L

Langley Hall and Sutton Hall


//s3.amazonaws.com/photos.geni.com/p13/f4/3e/da/7a/5344483f15e70fe0/lawton_hall_original.jpg Lawton Hall







Lea Hall is a former country house standing to the northwest of the village of Wimboldsley, Cheshire, England. It dates from the early part of the 18th century, and was built for the Lowndes family. During the 19th century the house was owned by Joseph Verdin.[1] Additions, including dormer windows, were made in the 19th century. During the 20th century the house was divided into three flats. The house is constructed in red brick with ashlar dressings and a tiled roof. It is in two storeys, with an attic and a basement.[2] The roof is large and hipped, with a viewing platform.[1] The entrance front is symmetrical, in five bays, the central bay protruding slightly forward. This bay contains a doorway with a swan's nest pediment decorated with scrolls, and containing a crest with the initials J V (for Joseph Verdin).[2] The authors of the Buildings of England series describe the house as a "perfect brick box, delightful if just a little funny to look at".[3] It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II● listed building.

Leche House

Legh Hall Legh Hall stands to the east of the village of Mottram St Andrew, Cheshire, England. It was built in the middle of the 18th century for William Brocklehurst of Macclesfield. The house was built to replace Legh Old Hall.

Legh Old Hall now known as Legh Hall Cottage, stands to the east of the village of Mottram St Andrew, Cheshire, England. It was built in the later part of the 16th century, with rebuilding in the 17th century. Alterations were made during the 20th century. It is constructed in coursed buff sandstone rubble, and has a Kerridge stone-slate roof. The house has an H-plan, and there is evidence that it was originally timber-framed. It is in two storeys, with a four bay front. The house was replaced by Legh Hall. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.

Limefield is a house standing to the north of Bollington, Cheshire, England. It was built in about 1830 for Joseph Brook.[1] It is constructed in ashlar brown sandstone, and has a pyramidal roof of Welsh slate with a large stone central chimney. Its plan is square, with an extension to the rear. The house has two storeys, with a symmetrical three-bay front. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building.[2] Its stables and coach house are also listed at Grade II.

Little Moreton Hall

//s3.amazonaws.com/photos.geni.com/p13/68/cc/27/7f/53444840fd023e75/longford_hall_cheshire_large.jpg Longford Hall - in Longford, near Newport, Cheshire, built in 1785 for Colonel Ralph Leeke who was political agent of the British East India Company, designed by Joseph Bonomi; today Grammar School boarding house. Grade 11 listed Georgian mansion, the Hall has 20 acres of grounds. During medieval times the Longford estate was owned by Lord Shrewsbury’s family. In 1789 it was purchased by local wealthy businessman Ralph Leeke, who then employed Italian architect Joseph Bonomi to significantly rebuild the house after a disastrous fire. Longford remained in the ownership of the Leeke family until Colonel Leeke’s three sons were all killed in World War 1. The Hall was later occupied by the Royal Artillery during the Second World War and also became a hospital for the wounded soldiers.

Longford was subsequently bought by the Hall family who restored the house and lived in it during the 1950s and 1960s. In 1966 it was put up for sale and subsequently purchased in 1967 by the Worshipful Company of Haberdashers’ for Adams’ Grammar School. It was officially opened as a boarding house for the school by Princess Margaret, Honorary Freeman of The Haberdashers’ Company, in May 1968.

Adam de Brompton had a park at Longford in 1275.

WIKI Longford Hall

Known Residents

Lieut-Col. Harold Platt Sykes 1911 Census

Lower Carden Hall

● Lower Huxley Hall

● Lower Kinnerton Hall

● Lyme Cage, Uncertain , Pele Tower major building

● Lyme Park

● Lymm Hall


M

● Manley Knoll

● Manor House, Hale

● Marbury Hall, Anderton with Marbury

● Mere New Hall

● Mere Old Hall

● Middlewich Manor

● Mill House, Adlington

● Mobberley Old Hall

● Moore Hall

● Model Cottage, Sandiway

● Moss Hall, Audlem

● Mottram Hall

● Mottram Old Hall, Fortified Manor House masonry ruins/remnants


N

Nantwich High Street

● Newton Hall, Mobberley

● Norcliffe Hall

● Norley Hall

● Normans Hall

● North Rode Manor

● Norton Priory


O

● Oakfield Manor

● Oakmere Hall

● Ollerton Hall

● Orford Hall

● Oughtrington Hall

● Oulton Hall

● Over Tabley Hall

● Overton Hall


P

//s3.amazonaws.com/photos.geni.com/p13/53/3b/8a/87/5344483f15e70fe1/peckforton_castle_original.jpg Peckforton Castle








● Peel Hall

● Peover Hall

● Poole Hall

● Pownall Hall

● Puddington Hall

● Puddington Old Hall

Q


R

● Radbroke Hall

● Ramsdell Hall

● Ravenscroft Hall

● Reaseheath Old Hall

● Rocksavage

● Rode Hall

● Rowton Hall

● Ruloe House

● Runcorn Town Hall


S

● Saighton Grange, Salghton; Abbey Gate College,Fortified Manor House,masonry ruins/remnants

● Saltersley Hall

● The Homestead, Sandiway

● Shavington Hall

● Shotwick Hall

● Shotwick House

● Shrigley Hall

● Somerford Booths Hall

● Somerford Park, Cheshire

● Soss Moss Hall

● Stanley Palace

● Stanthorne Hall

● Stapeley House

Stockport Castle The first mention of Stockport Castle comes from 1173, when Geoffrey de Costentyn held it against Henry II during the barons' rebellion of 1173–1174. There is a local tradition that Geoffrey de Constentyn was the son of Henry II, Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany; in fact, Geoffrey de Constentyn was a local lord who not only owned the manor of Stockport, but land in Staffordshire and Ireland.The bailey would originally have been defended by a wooden palisade and earthworks; these were replaced by stone walls at the beginning of the 13th century. Two fragments of the wall survive. Dent suggests that the castle began to decline in the 14th century when the Warren family became Lords of the Manor of Stockport; Stockport was not the only manor that the family owned, and they favoured the manor of Poynton over that of Stockport. The castle falling out of use mirrors a trend with the other castles in the Greater Manchester area; by the 13th century, apart from Dunham Castle, there was no indication of activity in castles in Greater Manchester. According to antiquarian John Leland, the castle lay in ruins by 1535. At this stage, the gaol was still present and a market was held in the castle's bailey. The castle grounds had been divided and rented out by the Lord of the Manor. The ruins were levelled in 1775 by Sir George Warren, the lord of the manor, and a cotton mill built on the site. In 1974, excavations of the motte were carried out to establish how long the castle had been occupied

● Stretton Hall

● Stretton Lower Hall

● Stretton Old Hall

● Sutton Hall, Little Sutton

● Sutton Hall, Sutton Lane Ends

● Sutton Hall, Sutton Weaver

● Swettenham Hall

● Swineyard Hall


T

● Tabley House

● Portal, Tarporley

● Tattenhall Hall

● The Rookery, Tattenhall

● Tatton Hall

● Tatton Old Hall

● Tatton Park

● Tilstone Lodge

● Tirley Garth

● Toft Hall

● Trafford Hall

● Tushingham Hall

● Twemlow Hall

● Tytherington Old Hall


U-V

● Utkinton Hall


W

● Walmoor Hill

● Walton Hall

● Warford Hall

● Weaver Hall, Darnhall

● Whatcroft Hall

● Whirley Hall

● Willington Hall

● Winnington Hall

● Willot Hall

X-Y-Z

References and Sources

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