Benjamin Wilson, Sr. (1747 - 1827) MP

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Birthplace: Shenandoah, Virginia
Death: Died in Clarksburg, Harrison County, (now West) Virginia
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About Benjamin Wilson, Sr.

Benjamin Wilson Sr.

from http://www.gencircles.com/users/statik/4/data/10231

Birth: 30 Nov 1747 in Shenandoah County, Virginia Death: 2 Dec 1827 in Clarksburg, Harrison County, West Virginia

Burial: Dec 1827 Old Brick Church Of Bridgeport, Near Clarksburg, Harrison County, West Virginia

Spouses & Children Ann Ruddell (Wife) b. 20 Sep 1754 in Lost River, Hampshire County, West Virginia Marriage: 4 Sep 1770 in Virginia Children:

  • Mary Bird Wilson b. 7 Jul 1771 in Cedar Creek, Shenandoah County, Virginia
  • William Wilson b. 23 Jan 1773 in Randolph County, West Virginia
  • Stephen Rudell Wilson b. 21 Oct 1775 in Tygart's Valley, Beverly Township, Randolph County, West Virginia
  • Benjamin Wilson Jr. b. 13 Jun 1778 in Randolph County, West Virginia
  • Sarah Wilson b. 11 Sep 1780 in Randolph County, West Virginia
  • Elizabeth Wilson b. 17 Aug 1782 in Randolph County, West Virginia
  • Ann Brice Wilson b. 17 Jan 1782 in Randolph County, West Virginia
  • John Wilson b. 5 Jul 1788 in Harrison County, West Virginia
  • Archibald Blackburn Wilson b. 25 Jul 1790 in Harrison County, West Virginia
  • Cornelius Ruddell Wilson b. 7 Apr 1795 in Harrison County, West Virginia

Phoebe Davisson (Wife) b. 29 Dec 1776 in Rockingham County, Virginia Marriage: 15 Dec 1795 Children:

  • Josiah Davisson Wilson b. 12 Oct 1796
  • David Wilson b. 18 Feb 1798
  • Edith Wilson b. 9 Nov 1799
  • Elizabeth Wilson b. 18 Oct 1801
  • Thomas W. Wilson b. 12 May 1803
  • Margaret Wilson b. 26 Mar 1805
  • Deborah Spencer Wilson b. 17 Oct 1806 in Harrison County, West Virginia
  • James Pindall Wilson b. 9 Jun 1808
  • Daniel Davisson Wilson b. 30 Jan 1810
  • Phoebe D. Wilson b. 29 Aug 1811
  • Martha Martin Wilson b. 23 Jan 1813
  • Phillip Doddridge Wilson b. 29 Jun 1814
  • Noah Lindley Wilson b. 9 Mar 1816
  • Julia Ann Wilson b. 28 Sep 1817
  • Harriett Baldwin Wilson b. 13 Nov 1818
  • Rachel Wilson b. 20 Jul 1820

Benjamin Wilson, the oldest son of William Wilson and Elizabeth Blackburn, was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, Nov. 30, 1747. He likely went with his father to Trout Run, Hardy County, where his early life was spent on his father's farm. At twenty-three he married Ann Ruddell, daughter of Stephen and Mary Ruddell. She was born Sept 20, 1754 and was barely sixteen at her marriage. For a few years they lived on Cedar Creek in Shenandoah County but soon went further west.

In the fall of 1774, young Benjamin made his first appearance in official and military life, serving as lieutenant and later as aide on the staff of Lord Dunmore in the expedition against the Ohio Indians in the Scioto Valley. He commanded the troops guarding the council when the treaty was made at Camp Charlotte. Benjamin described Chief Cornstalk as being majestic in appearance and impressive as a speaker, not being surpassed by the finest orators of Virginia.

At the conclusion of hostilities the Virginia troops returned in small bands by different trails. Colonel Wilson led his group by way of Tygart's Valley in (new) Randolph County and stopped near the site of (present) Beverly to examine the land. It so pleased him that he bought the "tomahawk rights" of two settlers and later moved to the county with his family an d built a fort in 1777 on his farm, as a place of refuge for the settlers during the bloody wars which began that year.

He was captain of the militia and later was colonel. At the beginning of the Revolutionary War he equipped and maintained his own company of troops. During this time his family had narrow: escapes from the Indians as related in Maxwell's History of Randolph County. At the close of the Revolutionary War Colonel Wilson took an active part in formulating representative government.

For several years he was delegate to the Virginia Assembly. In 1789 he and his brother John were delegates to the convention ratifying the Constitution of the United States. Upon the formation of Harrison County in 1784 he became justice of the peace and clerk of the county court, continuing t o serve for thirty years. By the act of the Virginia Legislature, when Randolph County was formed in 1786, it was ordered that the first court be held in his house.

Colonel Wilson then moved with his large family to Simpson Creek, near Clarksburg, in order to retain the position as clerk of Harrison County and his brother John became clerk of Randolph. After the death of his first wife, Benjamin, on Dec. 15, 1785, married Phoebe Davisson, daughter of Daniel and Prudence (Izard) Davisson. His later years were spent in peaceful pursuits connected with the development of his community. He was one of the members named in the charter of Randolph College in Clarksburg.

When the War of 1812 started, he was commissioned as Colonel of the third division, twentieth brigade, but owing to his advanced age he was soon given an honorable discharge. During his military visit to the Ohio he learned of the valuable land in Licking County and after the close of the War purchased a large tract near Newark. Several of hi s children and relatives settled in and around that city where many of their descendants still live.

http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Person:Benjamin_Wilson_(20):

Land Records in Virginia

  • 21 Sep 1773 Wm & Eliz Wilson of Hampshire to Benjamin Wilson of Dunmore County, 297 acres in N Mt adj Benj and Eliz Blackburn [Source: Shenandoah County Deed Book A pg. 425].
  • 25 March 1777 - Benjamin Wilson, Yeoman and wife Anne, late of Dunmore County but now of East Augusta to Isaac Zane of Frederick County, ironmaster, 425 acre tract. Wit: Jonas Friend & Jno. Wilson of East Augusta. [Source: Shenandoah County Deed Book B, pg. 459].
  • Mar 1778 - Benj Wilson entry 400 acres TV adj Jno Pringle and Isaac Wood opposite Westfall claim; 400 acres entry opposite Lambert on W side of riv. [Bushman. Land comm

Records in Virginia

19 & 20 Aug 1777 - Benj Wilson and John Hamilton recommended Captains of Tygart Valley, William Robertson rec for West Fork [Augusta Order Bk XVI Chalkley 1/196]

17 Mar 1778 - Benj Wilson qualified as Capt.

-------------------------------------------==

The following outstanding collection of records by David Armstrong is from a document posted online which can be retrieved at http://www.arfhs.org/armstrong/WILSON-notes-Benj.pdf:

Lt. Col. BENJAMIN WILSON - SOME MISC. NOTES by David Armstrong, 201 Graham St, Elkins, WV 26241 - heraldry@meer.net (Based on research completed as of Sept. 2010, subject to correction and update Not intended nor claimed to be a complete account of Benjamin Wilson.)

[Note from Geni Curator P. Wilson: David Houchin, frequently quoted in this document, is the Special Collections Librarian at the Clarksburg-Harrison Public Library, 404 West Pike Street, Clarksburg, WV 26301]


Born 1747 Shenandoah Co, VA 1751-1772 John Wilson one of Burgesses for Augusta County c1755 family move to Trout Run, Hardy County (near Wardensville) c1764-69 Elizabeth Cummins Jackson statement at age 91 said she married John Jackson in Md and move to South Branch about 1764 for 5 years total, 4 in George Wilson's Fort.

(c) Bryan Bruin assignee of Samuel Boyd had a survey in May of 1762 in Frederick County, VA.

This 279 acre tract was on Turkey Run a drain of Cedar Creek and ajoining neighbors were: Isaac White, S Boyd's other land including where Wiliam White lived, Lewis Stephens, Evan Pugh. Surveyed by Robert Rutherford

9 Aug 1766 John Sleeth, Jacob Hinkle & Christopher Armentrout witness bill of sale from John Strator to John Feint in exchange for tract "Major Wilson's mill dam"

4 Sep 1770 married Ann Ruddle, daughter of Stephen and Mary Ruddle of Hampshire. She was born 20 Sep 1754 and was age 15 at marriage. Lived on South Branch at present-day Ruddle, Pendleton Co in a house he built on land of Seriah Stratton and nearby is "Wilson Spring and "Wilson Hole" according to letter of 1931 from president of Pendleton Co Historical Society. Claude Wilson Maxwell wrote that Benjamin Wilson explored Tygart Valley 1770-1771

21 Sep 1773 Wm & Eliz Wilson of Hampshire to Benjamin Wilson of Dunmore Co 297 acres in N Mt adj Benj and Eliz Blackburn (Shen Co DB A p425)

1773 on Leading Creek? Benj. Wilson certificate 400 acres Leading Creek adjoining Thomas Skidmore in right of residence including his improvement of 1773 (Va Land Commission certificates in Ky Sec of State office)

1774 was date of David Wilson settlement at Buckhannon according to RCUL.

1774 LT in Capt Bowman Co Dunmore War came through Tygart Valley; Withers pg 186 says Wilson at speech given by Indian Chief Logan

1774 At Camp Charlotte took a branch from an elm and made a cane still in family in 1922 (Ohio Archeological and Historical Publications #31, 1922. Address by Mrs. Orson D. Dryer, great-grandaughter of Col Wilson)

1774 signed Ft Gower resolves (Ohio Archeological and Historical Publications #31, 1922. Address by Mrs. Orson D. Dryer, great-grandaughter of Col Wilson)Maxwell History of Randolph pg 490 when Benj Wilson visited valley in 1774 he found land he liked on both sides of the river 4 mi from Beverly but occupied by two squatters who claimed possession of their right. Such laws were always respected in early times although in law they would not have held. The squatters willing to sell and Wilson bought them out

1776 Benjamin Wilson sign petition in Tygart Valley

18 Sep 1776 Benjamin Wilson, Ephraim Richardson, Alexr. Maxwell, William Louther recommended by court of West Augusta at Augusta town as persons to be added to commission (Washington) (2, pg 211) (Note -there are two Benjamin Wilsons in the 1782 Mon Co tax list - one in Tygart Valley and one adjacent to George Wilson near Morgan and Prickett. Since the other one was a Pa. partisan the above is thought to be the one in Tygart Valley)

1776 Said to be delegate to Va Legisl from Mon Co (Maxwell pg 491) heard Patrick Henry and R. H. Lee (Withers pg 186). Actually did not take seat there until 1782 (see below)

25 Mar 1777 -Benjamin Wilson, Yeoman, and wife Anne late of Dunmore County but now of East Augusta to Isaac Zane of Frederick Co ironmaster 425A tract wit Jonas Friend & Jno Wilson of E Augusta (Shenandoah County Deed Book B pg 459) Query: EAST Augusta?

May 1777 John Wilson applied to Col John Dickenson for 6 men as a guard on his own for on Jackson River (Wm Green claim in McCallister)

1777 sign petition in Tygart Valley

1777 Daniel Fink pension say he served under Col Benj Wilson

19 & 20 Aug 1777 Benj Wilson and John Hamilton recommended Captains of Tygart Valley, William Robertson rec for West Fork (Augusta Order Bk XVI Chalkley 1/196) (See Below Mar 1778) Wm Lowther rec Captain

Other Officers: Capt. Jonas Friend (present-day Elkins), Elias Barker a Lt. (present-day Belington); William White Lt. (present-day Buckhannon); Capt. Ralph Stuart & ensign Joseph Crouch both present-day Huttonsville area) and Lt. William Westfall

20 Aug 1777 -Benj Wilson rec to commision to peace

1777 built Wilson Fort near present-day Elkins Airport (Maxwell pg 491)

Randolph Harper own old Benj Wilson farm in 1898 and it had one of the oldest orchards in the state, “Benny’s orchard” planted in 1777. Old mill dam still visible 1898 (Maxwell 402) "Strong dam of walnut logs is still standing and the homplace has never been out of the family" as of 1922 (Ohio Archeological and Historical Publications #31, 1922. Address by Mrs. Orson D. Dryer, great-grandaughter of Col Wilson)

Maxwell Barbour County page 509 says 2nd mill in Randolph Co built by Col. Benjamin Wilson Wilson Fort: Jacob Eberman, had a mill in 1777 near there when Jesse Hamilton applied for an entry on the land that is now Heavener Avenue and vicinity in Elkins. The entry mentions that the tract was on the War Path from Eberman's mill to Thomasins in Tygart Valley (Randolph Co entry book 1 pg 21 citing earlier certificate) It may be that Benjamin Wilson bought Eberman out some time in 1777 as Maxwell's "History of Randolph" says that Wilson Fort was built in 1777. Frontier forts varied in size and a 1782 letter written by Benjamin Wilson said that he at the time had 22 families in his fort. This would mean 100-150 people based on the 1782 census figures.

When one allows for shelter, supplies, arms, food, etc. a guess can be made as to the minimum size of Wilson’s Fort. Wilson was the legal and de facto military leader in the area and perhaps this also had a bearing on the size of the structure.

David Crouch Interview: Old Jacob Stallnicker and Adam his son lived in Jacob Westfall's fort. Adam had been to Col. Ben Wilson's mill and was returning, he and his father. They had gotten their flour and were returning home.(before 1778) Jac Eberman assign tract to Wm White Jr and White assign to Wilson where said Wilson (1780) now lives; (White was a cousin of Wilson according to sketch of the Wilson Family written by Dr. JN Wilson, a grandson of Benjamin and published in the 1881 History of Licking County, Ohio)

(before 1778) Wm Clifton assign tract to Saml Eberman, eberman assign to Wilson Eberman Ck adj Michael Haun

20 Aug 1777 tithables ordered in numerous companies include Patr Buchannans, Wm Hendersons, Wm Andersons, Jno Stephensons, Robt Craven, Geo Pence, Wm Nalle,Ralph Stewarts, Benj Wilsons, Wm Robertson, Saml Pringle, Jno McCoy, Jno Skidmores, Paul Teters,

Sep 1777 John Wilson in Hampshire militia wounded in the back of hand, arm broken at Foreman defeat at narrows near Wheeling. Disabled from wound (John Wilson pension file, Foreman list in DeHass)

Nov 1777 Leonard Petro and William White captured Braxton Co, Petro painted black, White escape, (Maxwell 183) September 1777 ref Withers pg 262 and Haymond, pp.64-65

Dec 1777 Wilson took 30 militia went in pursuit of Indians who killed Darby Connolly and John Stuart in upper Tygart Valley. David Crouch Interview: We never pursued the Indians much from our neighborhood. If they did mischief they could get away and couldn't be tracked and we never could do any good following them. If they had taken horses we could have followed them. I don't recollect of them ever taking any horses from the valley. While absent family attacked., While gone his wife, two children and a slave had close call with Indians on their farm on west of Tygart River, got to Wilson Fort in time Colonel Wilson owned a farm west of the river as well as a farm east of the river on Wilson's Creek, where his fort stood, four miles north of Beverly. At the time of the Indian raid his family were living in a cabin west of the river, about two miles distant, temporarily, while the men were busy gathering their corn crop. When he went up the river in pursuit of the Indians he left his wife and three children at the cabin, with a slave named Rose, a Guinea negress, whom he had bought. She was born in Africa and brought over in a slave ship. The three children were Mary aged six, William B. aged four and Stephen aged two. "Late in the afternoon while Mrs. Wilson and Rose were milking the cows, a young horse came dashing up from the range with wild excitement. Mrs. Wilson cried to to Rose, 'There are Indians near! The horse has seen them. That is the way he acts when he sees Indians. Catch him quick, we must fly to the fort or we will be massacred!' While Rose was catching the horse Mrs. Wilson with wonderful coolness and presence of mind, took one of her strong petticoats, tied both ends, put the two older children in it, with their heads out, and threw the petticoat across the horse's back like a saddlebag. Then with the baby in her arms she mounted the horse bareback and told Rose to run for her life and cross the river on the foot log. She gave the rein to the horse which was snorting and prancing as though it could see or smell the Indians. The horse was apparently as eager to escape as she was, and went at full speed toward the fort. The river was past fording on account of rain and melting snow, but it was a matter of life and death, and she with her precious burden did not halt, but plunged in and swam the horse for the other side. When in mid-stream she discovered the child on the up stream side, Mary, had struggled from the sack and was bobbing up and down against the horse's side, held there by the strong current. Mrs. Wilson caught her by the clothes and brought her safe to shore. Then re-adjusting the children in the bag, she rode with them to the fort. By this time the alarm had been given, and several families had arrived. The Indians plundered the settlement west of the river, and it is probable that Mrs. Wilson and her children would have been murdered in a few minutes had she not made her escape when she did. "A few minutes after Mrs. Wilson reached the fort, Rose put in an appearance carrying a churn of cream on her head and remarking, 'I did not mean that the Redskins should have this cream.' (Ohio Archeological and Historical Publications #31, 1922. Address by Mrs. Orson D. Dryer, great-grandaughter of Col Wilson)

In 1777 Lowther was commissioned a captain. I presume he was continued in that office when the West Fork valley was added to Monongalia, considering the reports we have of his activity. (Leading Creek pursuit,etc.) But what if Lowther and Jackson really functioned more or less as the affidavits say--with the connivance of Duvall and Wilson? What if Duvall and Wilson "farmed out" the command, as county officials tended to do with other, more mundane responsibilities? Third, I'm trying out the idea (again) that we had systems in conflict during the border warfare period. Lawfully sworn officials would carry out lawful procedures and be held accountable for their actions (e.g., Morgan and the drowned Tory). Meanwhile we were living on a half-lawless border where many actions might be taken under cover of darkness as far as the law was concerned. If afterward law was brought in to sort out the matter, further extralegal steps might be taken: to take the accused out of jail is a famous example. Meanwhile in the war years and just afterward I think the reality was that while Wilson and Duvall held the offices and commanded the militia in terms of its lawful operation, Lowther and his lieutenants acted as they saw fit. Under Augusta and Monongalia, Lowther was the only magistrate from the upper West Fork and the Buckhannon, so far as I can tell. I'd say he was in charge. In the years when Wilson was the commissioned colonel on the Tygart, Lowther was the unofficial "colonel" on the West Fork. I'd be willing to argue that if there was an extra-legal ranging-company defense-of-the-settlements plan in place, not conforming to the designs of the legislature, this would also have been Lowther's baby. At the moment I'm not really interested in cases at either extreme but instead in the divided middle ground. So I'm casting Benjamin Wilson in the role of defender of lawful processes, but standing only an inch or two to the right of center, with William Lowther as his antagonist in a sense, an inch or two to the left of center. I see both of them as ambitious men, but with Wilson situated closer to the usual channels for advancement. Wilson established his clan in the conservative stronghold of county administration while Lowther faded. But Lowther's Jackson associates rose on the strength of democratic politics and outran the Wilsons in the next generation. - David Houchin

1778 gave Elias Hughes commission as Capt according to 1835 dep of son Thomas W. Wilson (Draper 31J16-17 NOT SEEN)

Capt Craven and company 1st deployment to Tygart Valley to Wilson Fort

Mar 1778 Benj Wilson entry 400 a TV adj Jno Pringle and Isaac Wood opposite Westfall claim; 400a entry opposite Lambert on W side of riv.(Bushman. Land comm)

17 Mar 1778 Benj Wilson qualified as Capt. Estate of Darby Connolly to Benj Wilson and Wm. Hamilton get estate of Jno Stuart(See above Dec 1777). Samuel Cobb’s pension claim speaks of service in Craven’s expedition and that Wilson was then (1778) called Col. Compare to remarks in BORDER SETTLERS about he and Lowther being defacto commanders.

1778 (after killing of Thomas Hughes and James Booth) William Lowther and Benjamin Wilson were principal military leaders in “West Augusta” and whether or not they held title of “Colonel” they had in fact such authority designated to them by the government and took upon themselves the organization of troops in that section and of paying the soldiers, recommending the appointment of officers, etc. (Elias Hughes pension testimony Licking Co Ohio 1834 McWhorter pg 228-230) Note: See above June 1777 letter Morgan to Hand - apparently there was a vacuum of leadership after the headwaters of the Mon was put back in East Augusta28 Mar 1778 John Stuart estate appraised by Benjamin Wilson, John Warwick; Wm Hamilton, admin. Vendue on 30th items sold to Alexander Maxwell, Benjamin Abbot (Chalkley 3 pg 152)

19 May 1778 Jonathan Smith, George Westfall, George Jackson appt constables (Chalkley) Query: where was Jackson then?

19 May 1778 Sampson Mathews qual Lt Col (sic) of the county; Jno Lambert summoned to show case why he does not provide for his children

19 May ; Patr Buchanan on vestry; Benj Wilson, Jonas Friend, Dvid Henderson, James Tremble commis of peace(Chalkley I)

Houchin: 19 May 1778 New petition received from the West Fork and TVR, presumably requesting that Augusta resume civil administration: Benjamin Wilson and Jonas Friend are recommended.[Chalkley, I, p.198; ]

1778 Wm Cleaver pension say he served in 1778 TV under Col Benj Wilson See also below(16 Jun 1778 John Wilson to take tithables “in Tyger’s Valley, Buchon and the West Fork of Monongahela.” [Chalkley, I, p.199 (Buckhannon, Tygart)

The magistrates in Staunton made their first recommendations on the 19th. On the 20th tithables were ordered to be taken in a long list of captains' companies, including those of William "Robertson" and Benjamin Wilson who had only been recommended the day before. (I take it that "Lowderson" and "Robertson" both refer to William Robinson.) Also on the 20th, Lowther was recommended as captain. Wilson took his oath in Staunton in March of '78 -David Houchin

19 August 1778 Houchin: Recommended as magistrates: Benj. Wilson, Jonas Friend Smith Tandy, William Lowther and Andrew Davidson. ”Militia recommendations: ‘Michael’ , John Davidson,Carpenter First Lieutenant, as Henry Flesher Lowther’s Company.” Second Battalion of Augusta militia created. Thomas Adams recommended Colonel ...as Second Lieutenant, and Thomas ‘Metter’ as ensign...All in William of Second Battalion, etc see Chalkley, I, p.200 .201: .]

Oct 1778 Benj Wilson on new Augusta Commission of peace

Oct 20 1778 new commis of peace include Michl Bowyer, Jonas Friend, Smith Tandy, Sampson Mathews, Benj Wilson, Jno Davidson, Wm Lowther, Andrew Davidson (Chalkley) (Wilson and Friend again!?) Jonas Fried qualify on Nov 17 1778

“Ben” Wilson in Cobb pension - need to check pensions for other mentions

Oct 20 1778 new commis of peace include Michl Bowyer, Jonas Friend, Smith Tandy, Sampson Mathews, Benj Wilson, Jno Davidson, Wm Lowther, Andrew Davidson (Chalkley)

Houchin 19 January 1779 Benjamin Wilson qualifies as justice; William Cleaver, Daniel Westfall, Francis Wire and John Warrick are appointed to locate a road from Jonas Friend’s to the plantation of the late Darby Connolly. [Chalkley, I, p.204] Randolph County entry Book 1 has a land entry (quoting an earlier record) in which Jesse Hamilton made a claim to a tract that is now the West Virginia Children‘s Home in Elkins. The entry says that the tract was “on the War Path between Eberman‘s Mill and Thomasin‘s in theTygart Valley.”

Feb 1786 Harrison Co Survey 300 acres Benj. Wilson assn Henry Banks adj. Isner has bearing S9E referred to as "county road."

Mar 1779 after death of Francis Wire near present Valley Bend Wilson took Francis’ son John to raise in a branch of the weavers trade

Hard march 16 days crossed Allegheny at Laurel Gap with 50 men. (Robert Carr pension claim) Teunis Mucklewain volunteer in Pendleton Co in Trimble Co as Indian spy ordered to Wilson Fort and ordered to spy the country towards Buckhannon and back every two weeks. (Mucklewain pension claim mentions Col Duvall, an anachronism.)

Houchin 21 May 1779Benj. Wilson to take tithables in the Tygart Valley; Andrew Davidson “on West Fork and in Buchanan’s.” [Chalkley, I, p.207]

May 1779 act of Va Legislature add present central WV to Monongalia (Core MONONGALIA STORY II pg 50)

David Houchin comment: I see from a 1780 letter of McCleery's that, as I suspected, Monongalia responded to the addition of so much territory in the way Augusta had done, by seeing to the creation of a second battalion of militia in the county. [Crumrine, pp.91-92] This second battalion would have involved Benjamin Wilson's men on the Tygart and William Lowther's on the West Fork, possibly with Duvall in a role senior to them both. That would accord reasonably well with Tunis Macelwain's assertion that command had been given to Duvall. Only not as county lieutenant. In the letter, McCleery describes his meeting with the (unnamed) officers of the second battalion in the fall of 1780 and their refusal to spare any men for Col. Brodhead's proposed campaign (As you know, I'm assuming that Wilson's 1784 command as colonel was limited to the Monongalia 2nd battalion, serving from an area that approximated the territory of the county of Harrison as created afterward.) David Houchin: The creation of the Monongalia 2nd battalion

David Houchin says: wouldn't have been delayed too long after the addition of all that territory in '79. William McCleery wrote to Brodhead in October of '80--I suppose in the second week--after att ending the general muster of the battalion and trying to enlist its officers in support of Brodhead's proposed campaign. With no luck, alas. Wilson at that time was still a captain under the Augusta establishment, while the act adding the Tygart to Monongalia was just about to be passed. So, I wonder who the principal officers of the 2nd battalion were?

[Crumrine pp.91-92, cited from a Pennsylvania Archives volume] I see from a 1780 letter of McCleery's that, as I suspected, Monongalia responded to the addition of so much territory in 1779 the way Augusta had done, by seeing to the creation of a second battalion of militia in the county. [Crumrine, pp.91-92] This second battalion would have involved Benjamin Wilson's men on the Tygart and William Lowther's on the West Fork, possibly with Duvall in a role senior to them both. That would accord reasonably well with Tunis Macelwain's assertion that command had been given to Duvall. Only not as county lieutenant. In the letter, McCleery describes his meeting with the (unnamed) officers of the second battalion in the fall of 1780 and their refusal to spare any men for Col. Brodhead's proposed campaign against the Indian towns. The officers' argument is familiar to a reader of subsequent correspondence from Harrison and Randolph: "...knowing that their frontiers were at 60 to 70 Mile in length...infested with the savages killing their People...at last obliged them to say they can't spare any men...they think their number is already too small without any division."

Oct 1779 Indians Kill John White in Tygart Valley (Maxwell 185) Wilson force-march militia Sandy Fork, Little Kanawha in pursuit (Withers 284; Haymond p 81)Oct 1778 went in pursuit of Indians who had killed John White in Tygart Valley, pursue to Sand Fork on Little Kanawha

The creation of the Monongalia 2nd battalion wouldn't have been delayed too long after the addition of all that territory in '79. William McCleery wrote to Brodhead in October of '80--I suppose in the second week--after attending the general muster of the battalion and trying to enlist its officers in support of Brodhead's proposed campaign. With no luck, alas. Wilson at that time was still a captain under the Augusta establishment, while the act adding the Tygart to Monongalia was just about to be passed. So, I wonder who the principal officers of the 2nd battalion were? - David Houchin

George Caplinger about 1800 bought land WEST of TVR known as “Old Benjamin Wilson Place” from Wm B. Wilson (Maxwell 328)

2_ Mar 1780 Land commissioners meet at home of Jacob Westfall; Sarah, orphan of John Fornelson given certificate for tract at present Elkins

28, 29 Mar 1780 Lan Commission meet Wilson house

27 Mar 1781 certified for 250 acres W TVR adjoin John Morris; Wilson assignee of Wm White Jr assn of John Carr assn George Whitman; also certified for 250 acres W TVR adjoining lands he holds of George Whitman; also certified as assignee of William White Jr assn Jac Everman for 400 acres where Wilson lives

28 March 1781 Benj Wilson assn Samuel Everman, assn Wm Clifton certified for 200 acres Eberman Creek adjoin Michael Haun

3 April 1780 Land Commission meet at Jacob Warwick’s on Greenbrier having traveled from TV

Mar 1780 certified for 400 acres assignee of Wm White Jr who was assn of Jac Eberman “where Wilson lives”

Jun 1780 Benj Wulson company mentioned 1/216

Sep 1780 Jac Westfall 1st Lt Conrad Bogart ens in Capt Benj Wilson Co Chalkley 1/217

Nov 1780 sign petition for joining Tygart Valley to Mon Co -joined to Monongalia County Dave Houchin thoughts: As for '81, if we think of Clark himself as a slightly loose cannon and the seizure of the western lands a controversial aspect of the war, then it might not be out of line to characterize the locals who went out with Clark as Lowther's people: favoring the bold stroke, impatient with official caution, etc. Naturally, if Wilson and company looked at the Clark expedition in a skeptical way--even after the fact when it was clearly a washout--they might resent Lowther for having promoted it and freeze him out at appointment time. I omitted to say it before but I'm guessing that there was politics involved in Lowther's not getting a commission in the militia when Harrison was organized. You could also say that in the spring of 1781 Lowther effectively withdrew his men from the frontier defense and put them on offense... Which was exactly the gamble our people had been unwilling to take when Brodhead proposed a campaign in the Indian lands the previous year. I have the luxury of changing my mind daily, I know, but for now I'm of the opinion that Benjamin Wilson rose, at least in part, because he played scrupulously by the rules.Coincidentally or not, the October session of the legislature took the Tygart settlements out of Augusta and added them to Monongalia. Benjamin Wilson's name was first on the list in the legislative petition soliciting the change, and whether or not he was its active promoter one result of the legislature's action was that Wilson was available to serve in Monongalia offices, which he very notably did. If I had to guess I would say that in short order Wilson replaced the former commander and found himself Lowther's superior even while he was obliged to rely on Lowther, to whom the men were loyal, and accept the decisions he might make. This arrangement presumably continued--growing cozier all the while--until Lieutenant Governor Wood complicated matters by placing the command in Lowther's hands in 1792-93. I think any way you look at it Wilson went right up the ladder. Had the Tygart remained in Augusta County he probably wouldn't have had a comparable chance against existing networks of political patronage, etc. So he surely had a motive to support the change - David Houchin

1781 Wilson get Col. commission under Monongalia Co (Maxwell 488)

1781 T Cotteral pension say he served under Benjamin Wilson

Apr 1781 Raise co of men to pursue Leading Creek raiders

David Minear pension in the month of April 1781 the Indians made an attack and killed three men one of which was the affiants father, Fredk. Cooper and Daniel Cannon (sic). This caused Col. Wilson to order out the militia and affiant was drafted and placed under the command of Capt. Salathial Goff

Apr 1781 Land commission recs pg 343 Benjamin Wilson and Jacob Conrad as tenants in common assignees of John Davis 400 acres Little Kanawha at place called Bulltown settle Sep 1775, Conrad assignment Aug 1781 to Wilson wit. John Gordon, Alexander Maxwell

10 Dec 1781 VA State Council name Monong. County commission Benjamin Wilson, Henry Delea, Nicholas Carpenter, William White, William Robinson, John Powers, William John, James Cockran, William Hamilton, Thomas Cheney; Sheriff: David Scott (Core MONONGALIA STORY II page 79)

19 December 1781 Benj. Wilson, Jonas Friend, Wm. Lowther, John Davidson and Andrew Davidson, out of the County—recommended to be left out of the Commission of the Peace. [Chalkley, I, p. 223] 1782 Mon Co tax list Benjamin Wilson 9 white souls, 2 black souls (Benjamin and Anne; children Mary, William B., Stephen, Benjamin, Sarah, Elizabeth and one other white person who is likely John Wire, son of Francis who had been bound to Wilson to learn the weaver trade. Slave Rose and one other black person)

March 9, 1782 Letter of John Evans to Governor Harrison. . . HAMPSHIRE MILITIA EXPEDITION March 26th 1782. Council of Va On considering a Letter from John Evans esq. Lieutenant of Monongalia County, the Board advise that the Commissioner of the War office be desired

The prayer of the people is that a company or two of Militia may be ordered to their relief, otherwise they will be under the necessity of vacating the country to order one Company of militia from theCounty of Hampshire to be stationed at such place or places as Colo Evans may think fit for the protection of the Western Country; that he order at the End of two Months a relief from the Counties of Rockingham and Augusta in proportion to the number of their Militia; David Ellington’s pension claim says that in March of 1782 he entered service as a substitute for Anthony Miller in under Capt. “Haverbock” (Tevebough) and Col Benjamin Wilson He rendezvoused at McNeal Mill Hardy County and marched by his capt to Wilson Fort the Tygart Valley and was stationed at Jacob Westfall’s fort to guard the inhabitants against the Indians and spying in the neighborhood for three months. Marched back to Hardy County and discharged in Jul 1782. The George Yokum interview (Draper Papers) mentions being in the same sortie but gives the date as 1781. Jacob New pension - Daniel Tevebaugh was his captain and ______ Davies his Lt., and Col. Benjamin Wilson ws commanding. Rend. At McNeal Mill from there across Allegheny to the head of the Monongahela in Tiger Valley at Col Benjamin Wilson fort at which place he continued for two months guarding the frontiers and was there discharged by Tevebaugh and returned home. Recollects major Williams, Capt Tevebaugh and Col Wilson were large, bony men the latter was red headed George Taff pension -in spring of 1782 volunteered under command of Capt Teaverbaugh of Hampshire County Va and marched on to Tigers Valley to guard the inhabitants from the attack of the Shawnee Indians, marching through Allegheny Mountains at which place he received a discharge from Capt. T after a servitude of 3 months

2 May 1782 Benjamin Wilson write patriotic letter to Col Wm Davis “the Indians have made 3 incursions in this part of the country since I left you on the 1st of April, Col Neville has marched out near one full company of his militia; I have a letter from Col Evans that I have enclosed asking for more men. The men is now divided among the different forts and get their subsistence from the people for provisions have not been transported

The George Yokum interview In the year 1781, I went down with 40 or 50 men under Captain Tiverbaugh, to supply the stations inTygertís Valley. We passed on our way one Greggís, on Seneca, a branch of the North fork of the South Branch. Two or three days before we came along, while the old man Gregg was out hunting his horses, the Indians came to the house, and shot Greggís weaver at the loom through the window. They then came in a tomahawked Greggís little daughter, that was quilling for him. While this was doing, another daughter (Jesse Greggís sister) and the only other person at home, came in, shut the door, went by the Indian, and stood in the jam, by the fire as if stunned with of fright: When she saw what was doing, she went out again, and ran over to Paul Keeterís (3 Miles) When old Mr. Gregg came towards home, from the back of the plantation and saw the house set on fire, and the Indians with the trenchers out in the yard, eating he hallowed out, cursed them for etc. When they got there from Paul Keeterís the little girl was scalped, and crawling away from the fire. She died in consequence of the heat of the fire before, or by the time she could be gotten to his house. There were but four forts in theValley -- Wilsonís, Westfallís, Cassidyís, and the first I forget. Two days before we got there, within a 1/2 mile of Westfallís we saw them laying the body of Captain Adam Stonemaker. [He] Had on an officerís coat and Maccaroni-hat. In the evening of the day before, they went to Wilsonís fort, and were on their return, when the Indians shot him right in the small of the back, missing his friend, who got into the Westfallís fort, and gave the alarm. His horse gave three jumps before he fell off. We crossed Cheat nine times before we got to Wilsonís and Westfallís. We went in March to Westfallís staid about half the time at Cassidyís and returned back in August. We were not interrupted any after was got to the Stations. David Allington was one of us, under David Tiverbaugh to Tygertís Valley, in 1781. His sister it was Nancy Allington, that was taken by the Indians and married and had three children by one. She then left them, and come home. (Had repeated wished to come, before she got off.) When she got here, she refused to go back. The Indian came twice after here, and then went? and made a threat to kill her, for not coming. Some Indian was afterwards killed out upon Licking which was thought to be him.

1782 Craycraft mention service under Wilson in 1782

Maxwell Randolph Co pg 494-495 at time of Dorman Raid in summer of 1782 Benj Wilson had a still house at his farm in Caplinger Settlement and after killing Adam Stalnaker they broke into the still house and while they were “carrying on” Wm B. Wilson happened into the farm on horseback and rode to fort to give alarm. Maxwell says on pg 339 that a settler followed the Indian who killed Stalnaker into the Caplinger Settlement(now lower Georgetown Road) and found the Indian drinking (Maxwell does not say drinking what) at a spring near the 1898 residence of Jehu Caplinger and shot him. The Indian went into the woods and died.

Apr 1782 Jac Warwick of Bath Co Company (Bath not formed then - company most likely from Augusta based on county formation maps)

John Dickinson pension, in company of Jacob Warwick of now Bath then West Augusta himself and the said Warwick set out from Warwick Ft on GB passed by Clover Lick Fort on to Mingo Flats then on head of elk and making no discovery of Indians after 8 or ten days they returned and then went to Westfall Fort in Tygart Valley where understands town of Beverly later located and then 4 mi lower to Wilson fort then cross Mt. To No Fk join John Phillips and Adam Rader 2 other spies continued till the November following, the nature of his service was to spy the mountains and trace leading into the infant settlement then forming and to guard and escort persons from Rockingham and Augusta who were engaged in packing flour and other supplies into the valley. He was frequently out five or six days at a time subsisting on such provisions as he could pack in his knapsack and such fruits and berries as the moutnain afforded as they were under strict injunction not to fire a gun unless in imminent danger or in defense of life but never to kill any game (John Dickinson pension, Dorman)

1 May 1782. Col BENJ: WILSON TO THE GOVERNOR OF VIRGINIA" Monongalia Col Joseph Nevill of Hampshire has sent a part of his militia to their "Tigers Valley" protection, but bringing provisions. He is not warranted in marching the men to "West Fork as ordered by Col: Evans "for the Inhabitants of that place can hardly subsist themselves. The provisions should have been sent forward at first, under guard to their posts. . He now has the militia "Divided amongst the Different Inhabitants at the Different Forts, and in General Borrows there Subsistence until the provisions arrive." A demand upon the "Specificks," of Rockingham County has been made, and Col Harrison has been requested to have the provisions raised in" (Note: see below 25 Jul letter) his County escorted by his militia to MonongaliaConcludes I humbly beg that I might be Enabled to call on Some of the Adjacent County Lieutenants for an Escort to guard us to the Interior Inhabitants. if necessary Relief is not Granted, the people in General .Informs me the will Break up about Harvest-My Earnest Desire is, we might be Enabled to keep our Country."

2 May 1782 Benjamin Wilson write patriotic letter to Col Wm Davis “the Indians have made 3 incursions in this part of the country since I left you on the 1st of April, Col Neville has marched out near one full company of his militia; I have a letter from Col Evans that I have enclosed asking for more men. The men is now divided among the different forts and get their subsistence from the people for provisions have not been transported from Rockingham; I have directed Mr. Little to wait in Rockingham until Capt Maxwell returns Since I saw you there was mischief done 40 miles east of where I live in Rockingham; I am apprehensive I will be reduced to move into the interior unless I can have a sufficient guard constantly kept at my fort where I now have 22 families in the fort (Wilson to Davis manuscript letter in VA state archives)[Haymond, p. 95]

9 May 1782 Commis of war is desired to order 30 men to march to Tygers Valley from the counties of Augusta and Rockingham ?(Cain and McKitrick)? in addition to the twenty already sent, having regard to the numbers of militia in those counties. These men will take charge of the Specifics of to be sent to Tygers Valley agreeable to the request of Col. Wilson. They will take with them ten days provisions. Col Harrison of Rockingham will furnish pack horses for the purpose of transporting the necessary supplies to Col Wilson. The specifics of the frontier battalion of Augusta may be may be appropriated for the subsistence of the troops under command of Col Wilson and the specifics of Rockbridge are to be applied in their stead to the support of Col Armand’s Corps. The commanding officer of Augusta will furnish horses for transportation of the specificks from thence. Capt Young, the QM, is directed to advance ten dollars to Alexander Maxwell express from Monongalia on Public business to enable him to return. (Council 3/86)

May 1782 1 Co of militia order to march toMon Co and be disposed as Col Evans directs; and officer and 23 pvts from Augusta to be stationed Tygart Valley for 2 months also 31 rank and file from Rockingham to rendezvous Tygart Valley under immediate orders of Lt Col Wilson but subject to direction of Col Evans for 2 months (22 May letter from William Davies, sec of war to Irvine in Wash-Irvine Correspondence 274)

Cornelius Cain Expedition c May 1782 council minutes and letters indicate full company guarding North Fork and Rockingham militia ordered to relieve Hampshire (by c end May) and that Rockingham to escort provisions. Lt Cornelius Cain in Co at Hinkle Fort and also to Tygart Valley and Clarksburg according to McLaughlin declaration in Chalkley. Jul letter of Evans say some provisions were del to Wilson from Rockingham. More research is needed to sort out confusion as to when and if Cain came to the west. Oct 1780 Cornelius Cain I -Cornelius Cain rec1st Lt. by Rockingham County court (McCallister) 1780 Augusta (Lt. in Capt. Wm Herring Company militia, ensign B. Erwin

29 Apr 1783 Cornelius Cain I appointed Capt. Vice Wm.

John McLaughlin declaration 1782 or 83 drafted 6 months Rockingham to go against Indians, march from Capt. Wm Smith’s to Hinkle Fort on North Fork. Next year went out under Lt. Niel Cain to Tygart Valley, Clarksburg ordered out by Col. Benjamin Harrison

Richard Bennett pension testimony that in Mar 1781 he enlist at Richmond for the war in Capt Hamilton Co but in spring of 1782 express arrive with order from Gov for him and a dozen others to go to Armacosh’s (Arbogasts) a private garrison at Crab Bottom scout North Fk and Greenbrier under Peter Hull and toward fall ordered over to Tygart Valley scouting till danger over under direction of Benj Wilson (See also Maxwell History of Randolph pg 491 Benjamin Wilson assigned to defense of the valley but furnished with no regular soldiers he depended on volunteers from the surrounding settlements and one summer he had part of one company of Hampshire Co militia)CJul 1782 Lt. Henry Brinker deployed to Tygart Valley with platoon. Henry Brinker pension served two months as Lt. against the Indians as appear from an order from Col. Smith and discharge from Col. Wilson in the year 1782 (Note: See below Sept. for discharge) 25 Sep 1782 This is to certify that Henry Brinker, Lt. of militia from Frederick County hath performed a tour of duty under my command in Monongalia County and is hereby discharged with honour. You are directed to discharge your men as soon as you return to Col. John Smith’s where your public arms is to be delivered. Signed Benj. Wilson, Lt. Col. George Brunner pension drafted Jul 1780(82) serve a tour of three months and marched to Tygart Valley in the western part of Va under Lt. Henry Brinker and stationed at a block house or fort called John Work’s station and was discharged at Wilson’s station in the month of November of 1780(82) -in this tour he served from the time of marching from Winchester until discharge fully four months being retained in consequence of not having been relieved by other soldiers at the expoiration of his time; Jacob Lockhart testify that he marched out with Brunner and was his messmate

July 25, 1782. Col Evans to Hon. Benjamin Harrison, Governor, Richmond. May last, HONORED SIR: Agreeable to your orders of the 22nd of to me directed, I have called on General Irvine, and he informs me it is out of his power to give any assistance except in ammunition. The horrid barbarity of the enemy has 'struck the inhabitants of this County with such a panic that they are determined to quit the country unless your Honor will interfere and give them the necessary aid. The men you ordered to our assistance were obliged to be discharged before the expiration of their time for want of provisions. Colonel Wilson informs me he has repeatedly applied for provisions To Colonel Harrison of Rockingham, but has received but very trifling. The Militia from Berkley, Frederick and Shenandoah r expect will be here soon and no provisions for them and none to be had. I hope your Honor will take it under consideration and adopt some mode for our relief, particularly in that of provisions, and how and in what manner the men are to be supported. I could get beef and flour by impressing, but we have no salt, and that of taking people's property I am very loath to undertake could any other method be adopted. concerning the murder committed on the Muskingham and find only one man that went from this county, I have made the strictest inquiry and since, he is dead. About the 20th of May last Colonel William Crawford with five hundred men went against Sandusky, and a few miles from the town the enemy met them, and from the best accounts our loss was not less than one hundred men. Colonel Crawford himself and Colonel William Harrison with many others by a prisoner who was taken at the time and made his escape, informs me that he saw Colonel Crawford tied to a stake and burnt. Since that the enemy attacked Hannah's town in Westmorland County, killed a great number and burnt the town. Yesterday I was creditably informed that the enemy had burnt Fort Henry at the mouth of Wheeling, but I do not assert it, though I have reason to believe it is true. These instances cause our frontier to be very ticklish as we are so scattering, the small settlements so great a. distance apart. I received a line from your Honor dated 9th May concerning men who, being enrolled, who lived in forts. I can assure your Honor that since I had had the honor to command the County such a practice has never been allowed. that this part of the State will not be allowed to fall a prey to so barbarous an enemy as those savages, and * Upon the whole I submit to your Honor's superior judgment, hoping am with great esteem your excellency's most obedient servant,

9 September 1782' Colonel Charles Cameron (Col Augusta 2nd Bat) in a letter to Colonel William Davies of the War Office, Richmond, dated Staunton, states: He is grieved to hear of the distressed situation of Colonel Wilson and the people in that quarter. He has given them every assistance in his power and had instructed the commissioners of Rockingham County to reserve the "Specifecks" raised in that County for the troops on the frontier under Colonel Evans or Colonel Wilson, and, although be had notified Colonel Armand of this, his wagons had several times been supplied upon their applying to Colonel Harrison for those very articles. For this reason Colonel ·Wilson's command is now suffering, and he has not the means of affording him any relief. He has no money with which to purchase salt ordered for him, and if he had it, could not afford transportation, as there is no such thing here as public credit.

25 Sep 1782 This is to certify that Henry Brinker, Lt. of militia from Frederick County hath performed a tour of duty under my command in Monongalia County and is hereby discharged with honour. You are directed to discharge your men as soon as you return to Col. John Smith’s where your public arms is to be delivered. Signed Benj. Wilson, Lt. Col. (Brinker pension file)15 Oct 1782 Mon County Public Claims Benjamin Wilson 72 rations for the state; 1 ____ corn for state; 1/2 bushel of wheat (?Wilson no doubt had fed militia stationed at his fort possibly in that year?) William Wilson 75 pounds pork, 1 horse for 2 days.

16 Oct 1782 Evans Colonel-John Evans, in a. letter dated in Monongalia County, October 16, 1782, addressed to Colonel William Davies, War Office, Richmond, writes: I am under the necessity of acquainting you in some measure in what manner your requisitions have been complied with in and getting the aid ordered for our defense." The few men who had gone out were without provisions. 'T'he frontiers are in a wavering condition and will undoubtedly break in the Spring if not time aided. Colonel Wilson, the bearer, would give further particulars as he was in command of the men sent, etc. Note: See also Maxwell History of Randolph pg 491 Benjamin Wilson assigned to defense of the valley but furnished with no regular soldiers he depended on volunteers from the surrounding settlements and one summer he had part of one company of Hampshire Co militia.

Evans wrote a response on 16 October 1782 saying he had only the day before received a copy of the act of assembly from the previous session... "On the 15th Instant came to my hand An act of Assembly for the Recruiting this States Quota of Troops to Serve in the army of the United States, Which is out of my Power to put into Execution under the present circumstances as our Court have not yet Ascertained the taxable property in this County, Therefore I have thought proper to inform your Excellency of the true state of the matter, by Lieut. Col. Wilson Who I refer to you for farther Particulars, the other parts of the act I will Endeavour to Comply with as Soon as in my Power. I have the Honor to be," etc.

Evans wrote a response on 16 October 1782 saying he had only the day before received a copy of the act of assembly from the previous session..."On the 15th Instant came to my hand An act of Assembly for the Recruiting this States Quota of Troops to Serve in the army of the United States, Which is out of my Power to put into Execution under the present circumstances as our Court have not yet Ascertained the taxable property in this County, Therefore I have thought proper to inform your Excellency of the true state of the matter, by Lieut. Col. Wilson Who I refer to you for farther Particulars, the other parts of the act I will Endeavour to Comply with as Soon as in my Power. I have the Honor to be," etc.

Ben Wilson would have taken his seat as a delegate from Monongalia some days after this, the Assembly convening on the 21st.

May ... 1782; Oct - Dec 1782 session of legislature Charles Martin and Benj Wilson represent Monongalia. First time Wilson seated. John P Duvall senator for dist of Monongalia, Ohio and Yohogania (Register of General Assembly in Report of the Library Board of the Virginia State Library 1917 pg 16)

BENJ: WILSON TO GOVERNOR HARRISON. Decem. 9th 1782 . There is about Sixty Eight effective men in Trigg's Tigers Valley, Eighteen at the horse-shoe, eighty at West Fork, 25 at Dunkard Bottom, and about 160 at Forks of Cheat River, and Sandy Creek Glades. Settlements to Break up &, Leave ye County Should the Indians pursue the war with the Rigor the Did Necessity for Last Spring, Unless Timely Relieved by your Excellency's Interposition. relief Colo. John Evans by a Letter to Colo. William Davies, Dated October 16th 1782 Requests aid for his county by the first of February next. I could not wish to have men marched over the mountains at that season of the year, unless absolutely needed, and Humbly Begs that Instructions may be given at this time to Col, Evans or my Self empowering one of us to Call on Some of the adjacent county for Relief upon the first Incursion made or positive appearance of the Indians in the Spring. I believe aid of Fifty men would be a number sufficient to keep the people Together until you could be Informed the True State of the case. I believe provisions may be got in the County for fifty men two month. 1782 Indian forces under Dorman go to stillhouse of Benjamin Wilson on present-day Georgetown Road, break in, and are drinking when discovered.

1782 Jacob New in company of Hampshire militia under Tevebough to Tygart Valley. In his pension deposition he described (the then 35 year old) Wilson as a large bony man with red hair.

16 Apr 1783 public claims Benjamin Wilson 168 pounds of flour for state

1784 appointed first county clerk of Harrison Co

1784 Augusta Co Land Grants -Benj. Wilson:

  • 200 waters Mon River
  • 200 Waters Mon River (sic)
  • 170 Leading Creek
  • 150 Eberman Run (part of certificate in right of settlement given by commrs for Augusta,
  • Greenbrier and Botetourt on Eberman Ck adj John Wilson)
  • 400 Eberman Ck on settlement certificate surveyed 9 Nov 1780 adjoin Henry and Nicholas Petro
  • and Michael Isner (?why not in Simms?)

Page 1,--Be it remembered that at the house of George Jackson on Buckhannon River the 20th day of July 1784 tax commissioner of the Peace and, a commission of Oyer and Terminer for the said County directed to John P. Duvall, Benjamin Wilson, Wm Lowther, James Anderson, Henry Delay, Nicholas Carpenter, Wm Robinson, John Powers, Thos Cheney, Jacob Westfall, Salathia1 Goff and Patrick Hamilton was presented and read, and thereupon the oath of allegiance to the commonwealth as administered by Benj Wilson, Gent. to the said John P. Duvall and by him to the above named Justices and also the oath of Office as directed by law.

Page 1, --Ju1y 20, 1784. Wm Lowther, Gent. produced commission from Governor with George Jackson Benjamin Wilson assecurities and took oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth and oath of office accordin10 Jun 1784, Commonwealth of West Virginia to Elizabeth Shaver, assignee of Jacob Shaver who was assignee of Benjamin Wilson and Samuel Westfall who were executors of Francis Weir deceased, 179 acres east side of Tygart Valley River adjoining Alexander Maxwell and William Currans.

Page 1,--July 20, 1784. Benjamin Wilson was chosen clerk of County Court

1784 Tax List Benjamin Wilson listed Tygart Valley

Sep 1784 Jonas Friend appointed Surveyor of the public highway from his own house to Ebermans Creek and the tithables on Leading Creek and on both sides of the Valley River up to Ebermans Creek and across the River to Hezekiah Rosencrans land is required to aid the Surveyor in keeping the same in repair. Henry Petro appointed Surveyor of the highway from Ebermans Creek to Jacob Westfall’s Mill and the tithables from said Creek upwards to Files Creek and William Smith’s Run to aid in keeping the same in repair.(Harrison Co Minute Bk) Petro later replaces by Hezekiah Rosencrans appointed of highway in room of Henry Petro. Nov 1785Sep 1784 Page 9,--John Duva1l took oath of office for Lieutenant for County, Benjamin Wilson took the oath of office for Co1onel for County, Henry Delay, Lieutenant Co1onel and William Robinson, Major took oath of office As directed by law.

c1785 Shortly after Harrison was formed Patrick Henry, a strong supporter of the militia, replaced Benjamin Harrison as governor. In a few months' time the court met in Clarksburg on a day when, for the first time, John P. Duvall (who was county lieutenant) was absent. Also absent was county clerk (and colonel of the regiment) Benjamin Wilson--or so I contend. James Anderson going missing as well, the presiding justice on that day was Nicholas Carpenter. (We happen to have the original minutes with Carpenter's signature.) The other sitting justices were John Powers, Thomas Cheney and George Jackson. And what did the court do? It put forward a new slate of senior officers to command the militia in Harrison County: William Lowther as county lieutenant, George Jackson as colonel, Jacob Westfall as lietenant colonel and John McColly (Carpenter's son-in-law) as major. The clerk was instructed to forward this list to the governor

The February 1785 recommendation of new commanders for the militia is found on p. 40 of the same volume. Lowther to be County Lieutenant, George Jackson Colonel of the regiment, Jacob Westfall Lieutenant Colonel, and John McColly, Major (replacing John P. Duvall, Benjamin Wilson, Henry Delay and William Robinson, in that order). As far as I can tell, the February recommendations were meant to convey a message to the actual office holders. Benjamin Wilson continued to live on the Tygart until the separation of Randolph County. But in any case he was still on the Tygart when he got the command of the local militia and when he was elected to the legislature.

Benjamin Wilson began to refer to Lowther as "Major" in official correspondence at about this time. (No such mention of Major William Robinson ever seems to occur.) As you know, I'm assuming that Wilson's 1784 command as colonel was limited to the Monongalia 2nd battalion, serving from an area that approximated the territory of the county of Harrison as created afterward. The February recommendation of new commanders for the militia is found on p. 40 of the same volume. Lowther to be County Lieutenant, George Jackson Colonel of the regiment, Jacob Westfall Lieutenant Colonel, and John McColly, Major (replacing John P. Duvall, Benjamin Wilson, Henry Delay and William Robinson, in that order). As far as I can tell, the February recommendations were meant to convey a message to the actual office holders. In 1787 Henry Delay was replaced as Lieutenant Colonel by George Jackson--presumably due to the separation of Randolph from Harrison.- David Houchin

Aug 1785 Cornelius Bogard to survey highway from Wilson Mill to Rockingham County line and tithables to labor and keep road in repair. (Harrison Co Minute Book)

Nov 1785 Joseph Friend, William Smith, Jno. Smith and Benjamin Wilson appointed viewers of road from Anglin Fort to Jonas Friends and render report at next court. (Harrison Co Minute Book)

1785 Harrison Co Tax List Benjamin Wilson 9 whites souls, 2 dwellings, 5 other buildings

Feb 1786 Harrison Co Survey 300 acres Benj. Wilson assn Henry Banks adj. Isner.

1786 Harrison Co land grants Benj Wilson:

  • 200 Waters Tygart Valley River (east of TVR adjoin John Truby & James Westfall)
  • 799 Waters Little Kanawha
  • 174 Waters Little Kanawha
  • 175 Eberman Creek ( at head of rt fk of Eberman Creek on a knob of Cheat Mt including an
  • improvement made by Wilson )
  • 300 Tygart Valley River (on LOTW as assn of H Banks adj. Isner, Harrison Co Survey 7 Feb
  • 1785)

Mar 1786 John Wilson to take a list of all aforesaid from Benjamin Jones’ downward including the whole of the Valley River including Wilmouth’s settlement and Dry Fork settlement. (Harrison County Minute Book)

Jul 1786 George Westfall and David Crouch given letters of administration on the estate of Jonathan Crouch, dec’d, with Jacob Westfall and Jonathan Coburn as securities. Aaron Richards, Chas. Fornelson, Patrick Hamilton and Jno Wilson to appraise the personal estate and slaves if any, of Jonathan Crouch, dec’d and report to next court.

Wilson was already in possession of the (Grundy property Simpson Ck) land in the fall of '86, when he was about to build a milldam on the property. And yet he didn't get a deed for almost five more years. (see below 1791) This means there was a longstanding contract between the two men. All in all, this looks more like cooperation than rivalry to me. - David Houchin comment

Sep 1786 Page 117—William Wilson, Cornelius Westfall, Andrew Skidmore, and Nicholas Petro are appointed to view way for wagon road from Tygart Valley road the Mud Lick the nearest and best way to Cheat River at Philip Minear’s Ford at the Horseshoe Settlement if conditions are favorable, report at next court. Page 117—The above viewers to be exempted for number of days from working on road that they are employed in viewing same

Oct 1786 legislature order justices for new county of Randolph meet at house of Benjamin Wilson and hold first court (Book Title: History Of West Virginia In Two Parts By Virgil A. Lewis)

Jun 1787 George Stump, George See and Stephen Ruddel appraise estate of Jacob Miller (Hardy Co Will Bk 1 pg 16)

1787 Harrison Co Land Grants Benj Wilson

  • 124 Cheat River Mountain
  • 1787 Monongalia County Land Grants Benj Wilson
  • 400 Meadow Run

Aug 1787 Benjamin Wilson in public claims for 16 pounds of bacon. (listed near Evans, Pindall suggest this is the other Benjamin of the New Geneva area)

Page 150,--Court met April 18, 1787. Harrison County after Randolph County is taken off, to be divided into three districts as follows, to-wit:--Begin ing at the mouth of Brown's Creek of the east side of the West Fork River thence up said Creek to head thereof and so allong the dividing ridge of Lost Creek and Elk Creek and so along the dividing ridge to Randolph Lineand tence along said line and the Greenbrier line to the Ohio River, thence up said River to the Ohio County line, thence along the last mentioned line to the ahead of Tenmile creek thence down along the dividing ridge between said creek and the waters of the West Fork to the head of Davissons Run, then down said run to its, junction with the West Fork River thence up said river opposite Brown's Creek, then crossing the West Fork River to th beginning, shall be the first distict. (other districts described) John Wilson appointed Commissioner of the First District, Nicholas Carpenter of the Second District and John Powers of the Third District.28 May 1787 first court of Randolph County held at house of Benjamin Wilson.

Though politically coherent, Harrison County was not a geographical unit. Diverse elements came into existence almost with the formation of the county. The fixing of the county seat at Clarksburg was almost as much of an inconvenience for the people of the upper Tygart's Valley section as the former location at Mor- gantown. The people of that section were almost as well off before the formation of the new county. The objection early took form, and three years after the creation of Harrison, an act of the General Assembly was passed cutting off all that portion of the county east of the Tygart's Valley and Buckhannon rivers and establishing it as the county of Randolph. Both sections were gainers by the separation. On the one hand the people of Randolph were able to transact their legal business without the inconvenience of a long journey to the county seat; on the other hand the people of the West Fork watershed were relieved from the burden of having to share the expenses of government with a section which lagged in its development as compared with the more favored valleys toward the Ohio.

Henceforth the officials of Harrison County could devote their whole attention to the more and more complex problems of making the administrative machinery keep pace with the rapid course of development of the county.

The settlements near the mouth of the Little Ka- nawha river, which began about the time of the close of the Revolution, developed rapidly in their favored locations on the rich Ohio river bottoms in contiguity to the New Englanders who had settled around Marietta. The likelihood of a further rapid increase all along the Virginia side of the Ohio river made it clear that a separate county government would be necessary within a short time, especially since the new center of settlement was separated from the court house at Clarksburg by a wide expanse of unbroken forest. The General Assembly in 1799 formed Wood County from parts of Harrison and Kanawha. The new county was a narrow strip extending all the way from the Great Kanawha river to Middle Island creek. After the cutting off of the Ohio river settlements, the inhabited portions of Harrison County formed a fairly homogeneous district, embracing most of the valley of the West Fork river from Buffalo creek in what is now Marion County to Bulltown.

The most thickly settled portion of the county was around Clarksburg, on Elk creek, Simpson's creek, Lost creek and the country along the West Fork river. Few settlements had been made along the Little Kanawha or its tributaries, and the West Fork settlements had not extended far enough southward to make Clarksburg inconvenient as the county seat. The population of Harrison County in 1790 was 2,080. (Smith's History of Lewis County)

1787 Wilson move to Harrison Co (Clarksburg) (Ref Maxwell) After his removal to his home in Harrison County, he gave his attention not only to his office and the clearing and developing of his large landed estate, but also engaged in business transactions of various kinds. He established a grist and a saw mill, that the people might grind the corn instead of parching and crushing it between stones as formerly, and sawed timber in place of hewing it with an axe. Then, in order to use the raw material so abundant, he added to his other mills a machine for carding wool, so that soon in the pioneer homes spinning and weaving could be done. The long distance from the seaboard rendered it very difficult to get cloth for-wearing apparel, etc. There was sore need for a factory to make these goods. He sent to Scotland, the land of his kindred, and secured Mr. Wiley, a practical factory weaver, and through him purchased looms and other machinery for making cloth, which was done at his mill on Simpson Creek, to which place the people brought their wool where it was converted into cloth, colored, stretched and ready to use. "Realizing the need of higher education, Colonel Wilson and his associates applied to the General Assembly for a charter for the Randolph Academy, at Clarksburg, which was granted in 1787. Eight years later the Academy doors were opened under the auspices of Reverend George Towers, a Presbyterian' minister and graduate of Oxford, England, who was brought here by these gentlemen for this purpose. The opening address was made by Colonel Wilson, which can be found in Colonel Henry Raymond's History of Harrison County. He was responsible for Withers' Border Warfare, which was written upon his solicitation. He went to Alexandria, Virginia, Mr. Withers' home, and induced the author to undertake this important literary work, which he did; it was written at Colonel Wilson's in Harrison County, where Mr. Withers spent two years. (Ohio Archeological and Historical Publications #31, 1922. Address by Mrs. Orson D. Dryer, great-grandaughter of Col Wilson)

1788 Benjamin Wilson and his brother John Wilson serve as delegate to Virginia Convention that ratify Constitution, being Federalist in politics. -Represented Randolph County Mar 1788 convention accoring to Grigsby's "History of the Virginia FederalConvention of 1788"

1788 Commonwealth to Harr Co Sheriff command you that to be made out of goods of Henry Flesher sum which Peter Puffinberger late of said Co signed by Benj Wilson Co Clk (see Flesher File) (A & M 1827)

William Lowther tok assignment of the Grundy homestead on Simpson Creek, where the blockhouse was that probably predated Powers Fort. Lowther got a survey and in 1787 a patent, and in '91 he executed a deed to Benjamin Wilson for the property. (Wilson lived there to the end of his life.) David Houchin comment Know all men by these presents, That I, William Lowther, Late Captain of the voluntier Militia, ordered into service under the Instructions of the Executive of Virginia of the 12th of December, 1791, Do make, Constitute, and appoint Benjamin Wilson, of Harrison county and state of Virginia, my true and lawful! attorney for me and in my mime and behalf to apply to the Executive of the State of Virginia for a full and final settlement of all my accounts as Captain of said voluntier militia, Jan. 30th Including Scouts as pr. Muster Rolls and pay-abstracts, will appear Together, with lull power to apply for and receive the ballance of money arising Therefrom, also with full powers to alter, change, or make out new abstracts, as may appear necessary to the Executive in order to their being Justly and duly settled, so that he may be enabled to Receive the money, and in my name to attest for me, and to give and Receive such receipts and Instruments of writing as may be required to effect the premises hereby ratifying and confirming all that my said attorney shall do therein by virtue of the powers hereby granted.In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this Eleventh Day of January. 1793. WM. LOWTIIER. [Seal.] Signed, sealed, & delivered in presence of— MAX. ARMSTRONG, HEZ. DAVISON, DANIEL DAVISON.x

Meanwhile there had been a further shuffling of the actual defense plan. Rangers on the state establishment would be stationed at points on the frontier. Lowther was commissioned a Captain of Rangers for the counties of Harrison and Randolph in the spring of 1792, as his letter of May 1st accepting the commission shows. On May 6th of that year Benj. Wilson writes to the governor as follows, "...our protection is by your commission to Capt. William Lowther forty privates and two scouts with an addition of two scouts from the Secretary of War or yourself..." - David Houchin

1792 Randolph County Land Grants Benj Wilson 400 Bill's Creek

29 February 1792 Benjamin Wilson to the President, includes the letter of John Haymond, clerk of the militia council. Wilson also recommends the addition of four scouts each in Randolph and Monongalia. [Haymond, p. 123]

April 1792 In Randolph: “Major John Wilson urged that the Rangers should be embodied and posted in such order as would enable me to Range, and proposed that I should be stationed about forty miles back on Salt Lick Creek, a place that would command every known Rout that the Enemy used in coming into this county. However a majority were against it, and the Rangers were scattered in smaller parties than before.” [Whitman, op cit.]

7 April 1792 Secretary of War Henry Knox responds to Wilson’s February letter, assuring him that as many as eight scouts are allowed, as already arranged. Also rangers on the continental establishment, not to exceed a full company, “upon application to the executive of Virginia,” but to forestall delay Knox authorizes these, as well as the requests for additional scouts in Randolph and Monongalia. [Haymond, p. 124]

6 May 1792 Benjamin Wilson to the governor. Reports the death of two men on the Little Kanawha in April—as reported by Lowther, above—and the killing or capture of “eleven persons” in Monongalia the same month. Duvall is preparing his departure or already absent. “I have been repeatedly applied to for two more scouts. I have not yet granted them, although I believe them to be absolutely necessary.” [Haymond, p. 125]

Wilson has presumably not yet received the War Department letter of April 7th. . 7 June 1792 General James Wood convenes the militia officers of Harrison, Monongalia and Randolph counties at Morgantown to assess the situation. Benjamin Wilson reports the strength of militia in Harrison as 400 men. (Randolph County, 174 or 200; Monongalia, 730.) [Haymond, p. 122]

Benjamin Wilson to the governor. Reports militia strength as above, along with resignation of County Lieutenant Duvall. “Two scouts were appointed by orders of General James Wood.” [Haymond, p. 126]21 July 1792 Benjamin Wilson to the governor. “Please accept my sincere thinks... Since General Wood left this part of our country no person has been killed.” Theft of horses continues and pursuit has been unsuccessful. [Haymond, p. 127]

22 March 1793 Benjamin Wilson to the governor. Reports that he has returned from Richmond with money from the treasury for the pay of scouts, etc. Offers several opinions of the situation, represented as views of the settlers, especially that “faith cannot be put in treaties made with the Indian tribes previous to the communication being cut off with the British Posts.” [Haymond, p. 128]

Note: This is the last piece of official correspondence by Wilson cited in Haymond. With the reorganization of the militia in ’93 Wilson’s military role ends.

c 1794 House of John Wilson and wife Mary (nee Houston, former Westfall) attacked by Indians on Kings Run Tygart Valley (1850 letter Henry Fry Westfall to Draper)

1795 Randolph County Land Grants Benj Wilson

150 Dotson Run

?date? Mon Co Court 2 pg 144 law suit Jacob, Isaac and John White heirs of John White vs Benjamin Wilson

18 Jun 1795 Ann Wilson died

15 Dec 1795 Benjamin Wilson married Phoebe Davisson, she age 19 and he was 48

1796 Monongalia County Land Grants Benj Wilson 1000 Three Fk Ck

1880 tombstones of William and Elizabeth Blackburn Wilson standing and legible in portion of Trout Run Farm that later belonged to Solomon Wilson near a church in what was known as 'Wilson Graveyard' Hardy County (1881 History of Licking County, Oh)

1801 Harrison Co Land Grants Benj Wilson Jr 160 Simpson Ck

1803 Randolph County Land Grants Benj Wilson 145 Eberman Ck

1803-1808 courthouse in Beverly not in use, court held at John Wilson house in Beverly from: http://www.walthertree.com/JohnWilsonTree.html

12 Aug 1805 Benjamin Wilson brother David died at Benjamin's house at Clarksburg en route from Ohio back to HardyCounty. David's son George had died at the home of Benj.'s brother Archibald in Wood County on the same trip, just two weeks earlier. (1881 History of Licking Co, OH.)

1806 Harrison Co Land Grants Benj Wilson "Sr or Jr"91 Sugar Camp Run

1815 HarrisonCo Land Grants Benj Wilson 500 West Fk

1816 Harrison Co Land Grants Benj Wilson et al 650 Murphy Run

1817 Harrison Co Land Grants Benj Wilson 9 3/4 Simpson Ck

1822 Harrison Co Land Grants Benj Wilson "Sr" 7 1/2 Simpson Ck

12 Apr 1827 John Wilson died at Beverly (from Walther Tree above) (died in Harrison Co per widow's statement in John Wilson pension)

2 Dec 1827 Col. Benjamin Wilson died.

{END of Armstrong's document]

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In 1827, Benjamin Wilson received a small injury from which he died on December 2. He is buried in the burial ground of the Old Brick Church of Bridgeport, near Clarksburg, W. Va.

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From Allyn Campbell's Rootsweb tree at http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=allie&id=I3120:

Will of Benjamin Wilson as recorded in Harrison County, West Virginia, in Will Book 4, page 70.

In the name of God Amen this twentieth day of March, One thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven, I Benjamin Wilson, Sr., of the County of Harrison and Commonwealth of Virginia, calling to mind the uncertainty of this life, and being of sound mind and disposing memory, do make, ordain, and constitute this and this only to be my last will and Testament in manner and form following; that is say

first I commit my soul to Almighty God my Savior and Redeemer , and my body to the earth to be decently buried and where as it hath pleased God to bestow on my hands Goods, Chattels, these I dispose of in manner and form following to wit:

My sons William B. Wilson, Stephen R. Wilson, Benjamin Wilson, John Wilson, Cornelius R. Wilson, Thomas Wilson, and Josiah D. Wilson and my daughters Mary Sarah Ann, Edith Elizabeth and Deborah hath received as much of my estate as I intend they shall receive. Therefore I exclude this thirteen children from any further part estate either real or personal.

My son Archibald B. Wilson having received an education at my expense which is sufficient to enable him to pass profitably through life if rightly improved. Nevertheless should he be reduced to what occasioned by Bodily Infirmity in that case only my executors is to find him food and raiment and comfortable accommodation provided he will live with them and refrain from the intoxicating use of spirituous liquors and conduct himself with common decency. I also will him all my wearing apparel and not ark more of my estate either real or personal.

I give and bequeath to my son Phillip D. Wilson one tract of land in Randolph County upon the waters of Bills Creek adjoining my brother Williams survey on the upper side, which tract on same Creek contains 400 acres, also one other tract of land containing l?5 acres on the head waters of the right hand fork of Ebermans Creek near the top of Cheat Mountains, also one Negro boy named David Which lands is to be enjoyed by him and his Heirs forever. But not to have a fee simple in said lands until he arrives to the twenty-third year of his age.

I give and bequeath to my son Noah L . Wilson a part of the tract I now live on to include Humphreys and Halls Improvements beginning at a white oak a corner of the original survey near Halls fences and run and the line to run with Halls fence leaving the on the left hand to the upper ridge thence with my several lines to the beginning also one other tract of land I bought from James Belly adjoining, also one tract of land on the head waters of the left-hand fork of Files Creek in Randolph County containing 145 acres. Also one other tract on Shavin River in said county above the branch road containing 124 acres to be enjoyed by him and heirs forever. But not to have a fee simple in said lands until he arrives to the 23rd year of his age. But the rents issues and profits of those lands is to belong to my estate to aid my executors to pay the several legacys in this will mentioned until Noah arrives to said 23rd years of his age.

I give and bequeath to my daughters Margaret, Phebe , Martha, Julia, Harriet and Rachel each and every one of them a Negro girl to be of the age of five years or upwards, also a horse, creature of middle price, a new saddle and bridle, one feather bed and furniture, too milk cows, six sheep, and fifty dollars worth of household furniture to be paid or delivered to them when they shall respectively marry or arrive at the age of twenty-one years, but not any more of my estate real or personal. But should any of my daughters depart this life before they marry or arrive to the age of twenty years, in that case their intended Legacys is to belong to my estate.

I also give and bequeath to my two sons David B. Wilson and James D. Wilson the tract of land on which I now live, Noah's part excepted. By interest in the Hickman place and the Stewart place and a small tract adjoining Wilkinson Baxters and Amos Stouts lands and one acre for the abutment of my mill dam and a small piece of land on the side of the hill below the mill dam and a small piece of land I bought from John Wilkinson, which includes the coal bank, also a piece of land containing 49 acres willed to me by Robert Licks and a tract of land adjoining John Slocum, called the Sugar Camp also all my lands in the County of Harrison, Randolph, Lewis, and Wood deeded to my by Joseph Scott Marshall of Virginia to be enjoyed by them and their Heirs forever, but subject to the following provisions and corrections hereafter mentioned.

I also give and bequeath to my two sons David and James and my widow Phebe Wilson all my mills, carding machines, and all the utensils to them belonging and all my Negroes slaves except Dinah and David, and all my personal property of all and every kind, both animate and inanimate which lands slaves and other property is put into their hands to pay my debts raising and schooling my children, and paying off all the legacys and bequeathed in this will mentioned and after all the debts, legacys and bequeaths are fully paid off, then the unsold lands, the Negroes and their increase, and all the personal property that may be on hand is to belong to David and James, except so much thereof as will give my widow a decent and plentiful maintenance during her widowhood, which is to consist of her raiment, bed, and furniture and cupboard furniture, a riding horse creature a good saddle and bridle, and ten dollars annually in cash during her life and two milk cows wool and flax for her own use and such diet as she may choose for her comfort. She is to have Negro Dinah to wait on her or any other female Negro she may choose. But should my sons David and James or their successors refuse, neglect or delay to give my Widow such necessary support, it is my will and she is fully empowered and authorized after all the Legacies are paid off to claim her dower in my lands which allowance is made to her provided she don't remove.

This is my will, but should my widow renounce my will, it will disable my sons David and James from giving my daughters the legacies I wish and intend they should have. In case my widow doth renounce my will, my two sons David and James will be only bound and required to give my daughters only the one-half of the amount of legacy before mentioned and that in property only. Whereas it appears to me my son David is laboring under a pulmonary complaint and may depart this life before my youngest child arrives to lawful age -- in that case I will and direct that my son Daniel D. Wilson is then to stand in the room of my son David and enjoy all that part of my estate both real and personal that David was to enjoy and to be clothed with the power of an executor and to do and perform all thirds in this will required in union with the other executors and the tract of land which I will to David is to revert back to my estate and to be the property of James & David in common forever. But if James or Daniel depart this life before the will is fully executed, in that case my son Philip Doddridge Wilson is to succeed in the room of the deceased and to do and perform all matters and things required of the deceased brothers. But should Phillip and Noah depart this life under the age of 21 years, not having a lawful child or children, the deceased one landed estate is to descend to the survivor .

I will and bequeath to my son Daniel D. Wilson that tract of land I bought from Levi Smith, but subject to the aforesaid reservation, otherwise to be the sole property of said Daniel and his heirs forever, but he is not to fee simple therein until the Cord year of his age and the land to remain a part of my estate until he arrives to said age.

I will and bequeath to my acting executors one tract of land in Randolph County containing 170 acres, known by the name of the Salt Lick Place, to be sold if need should require it to enable them to pay off my children's legacies, and they are hereby empowered to make a deed of Conveyance, but if not sold to be the property of my acting executors When all the Legacies are paid off. I will and bequeath and make over to my executors and executrix all my money and book accounts, bonds notes, covenants, and contracts, etc . to enable them to pay my debts, school and clothe my younger children, and pay land taxes and to aid in discharging the several legacies and devices in this will mentioned. I also direct that a note due by James Martin pay no interest until six years after its date.

It is my earnest desire and Will that my widow and executors make no division of my estate but for it to remain their common stock until my youngest surviving children arrives lawful age, and all the legacies paid off and that they in all their transactions about my estate cooly and deliberately consult one another and be strictly governed by reason, justice, frugality, and economy.

I will and direct my executrix and executors to give out of my estate to my three sons Daniel, Phillip, and Noah each and every one of them a good horse, creature of middle price, a new saddle and bridle, and a single set of farming utensils and twenty dollars in money, and it is my wish and desire that each one of them live with my executors and be subject to them until they arrive to the twenty-third year of their age and if my estate and their own industry will justify it at said age I allow each and every one of them to have one yoke of oxen, two milk cows, six sheep and a common feather bed, and furniture in addition to what is heretofore willed to them. But should Phillip or Noah be disobedient to their mother or my executors during their nonage, my executors is to bind them to masters to teach them good morals and industry.

I will, give, and bequeath to my grandchildren the sons and daughters of my son William B. Wilson and Elizabeth his Wife share and share alike of two tracts of land in Randolph County on the waters of Eberman's Creek on which my son William now lives which two tracts of land was conveyed to me by my son William on the 28th day of October 1811 as will more fully appear by the records of Randolph County Court, but reserves to my Son William B. Wilson and Elizabeth his wife a life estate in said two tracts of land which is bequeathed to said children and their heirs forever.

I do hereby give and bequeath to my grand-daughter Prudence Duncan all my right title and interest in Jude, a mulatto girl, now in the possession of said Duncan and her increase if any to be at the disposal of said Duncan.

I will and direct that any Negroes given to any of my seven daughters viz.; Margaret, Deborah, Phoebe, Martha, Juliann, Harriet, and Rachel and in their possession and ark of my said daughters departs this life not leaving a lawful living child or children at their decease, in that case the Negroes is to return to my estate to be disposed of by my executors as they may think proper.

I will order and direct that all disputes or controversies that may arise between my legatees, devisees, my widow and executors about or concerning my estate or anything relating thereto within the meaning of this my last Will and testament is to be finally settled by honest men chosen by the parties concerned. I hereby desire and request that there shall be no sale of my personal property and that my executrix and executors be not required to give bond or security for the management or administration thereof neither appraisement nor inventory.

I will and bequeath to my son Benjamin my silver headed cane and silver seal.

I hereby constitute and appoint David B. Wilson and James Pindall Wilson my two sons Executors and my wife Phebe Wilson Executrix of this my last will and testament hereby revoking and making void all former trills and bequests by me heretofore made and declaring this and this only to be my last will and testament

in Witness thereof I have unto set my hand and seal day and year before written.

N. B. This will is in the handwriting of the Testator.

B. Wilson sent

Benjamin Wilson sen. (seal)

view all 36

Benjamin Wilson, Sr.'s Timeline

1747
November 30, 1747
Shenandoah, Virginia
1770
September 4, 1770
Age 22
VA
1771
July 7, 1771
Age 23
Cedar Creek, Shenandoah County, Virginia
1773
January 23, 1773
Age 25
Randolph County, West Virginia or Cedar Creek, Shenandoah, VA
1775
October 21, 1775
Age 27
Tygart's Valley, Beverly Township, Randolph County, West Virginia
1778
June 13, 1778
Age 30
Randolph County, West Virginia
1780
September 11, 1780
Age 32
Randolph County, West Virginia
September 11, 1780
Age 32
1782
August 17, 1782
Age 34
August 17, 1782
Age 34
Randolph County, West Virginia