John "the Surgeon" Greene

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John "the Surgeon" Greene

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Bowridge Hill, Gillingham, Dorset, England
Death: Died in Occupassnatuxet (aka Pastuxet, nka Warwick), Providence (now Kent) County, Rhode Island USA
Place of Burial: Conimicut Farm Cemetery, Warwick, RI, USA
Immediate Family:

Son of Richard Greene II and Mary Greene (Hooker)
Husband of Joan Greene; Joanne Greene; Joan "Alice Daniels" Greene and Phillippa "Phillis" Greene
Father of Major John Greene; Peter Greene; Richard Greene; James "of Potowomut" Greene; Thomas Greene of Stone Castle and 4 others
Brother of Rebecca Greene; Mary Greene; Anne Greene; Robert Greene; Rachael Perne and 3 others
Half brother of Judith Greene Swann

Occupation: Surgeon, commissioner to England, and co-founder of Warwick, RI, USA, Doctor
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About John "the Surgeon" Greene

AKA "The Surgeon"

Sailed from Southampton (England) on April 16, 1635, on the ship JAMES and landed in Boston, Massachusetts on June 3, 1635. They settled in Salem but were driven out by religious persecutions, and soon after went to Providence (Rhode Island). Here he was one of the twelve to whom Roger Williams conveyed land in his 'initial deed', thusly called because the men are mentioned only by their initials, and one of the twelve original members of the first Baptist Church in Providence. He was of the party who with Samuel Gorton purchased Shawomet, later called Warwick (Rhode Island), from the Indians. His is the only name of a white man signed as a witness to the deed. His own plot, called Occupassnatuxet, more commonly known as Pastuxet, remained in the family until 1782, when it was bought by Governor John Francis, whose heirs are still in possession.

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From: http://www.whosyomama.com/gabroaddrick3/4/26185.htm

"The Greene Family and it's Branches"; by Lora S. LaMance; Mayflower Publishing Company, Floral Park, New York, 1904, p 47,48.

"John Greene the Surgeon"

John Greene emigrated from Salisbury, Wiltshire, England to Salem, Massachusetts on board the ship "James" 3 June 1635, a surgeon. He followed Roger Williams to Rhode Island in 1637 and was one of the original proprietors of Providence RI. With Samuel Gorton he was one of the founders of Warwick RI. in 1643. He was a commissioner to England in 1644 when England granted Rhode Island it's first charter. In 1652 Surgeon John Greene came from Salisbury, England in the next company following Roger Williams and with his wife settled in Warwick, Kent Co., Rhode Island, where the Warwick branch of the Greene family was founded.

FIRST GENERATION. 1. JOHN GREENE, surgeon, the progenitor of the Warwick Greenes, was the son of Richard and Mary (Hooker) Greene, and was born on his father's estate at Bowridge Hill in the parish of Gillingham, County Dorset, England. about I590. ' Though not so recorded, dates before and after him would seem to determine this is the year of his birth.(1)

The mother of John Greene, surgeon, Mary Hooker, was the daughter of John Hooker (alias Vowell), who was born at Exeter, England, about I524, his father, Robert Hooker, having been mayor of that city in 1520. His parents died when he was about ten years old. His early education was acquired under Dr. Moseman, Vicar of Menhussin in Cornwall, and he afterward studied law at Oxford. Later he traveled in Germany and resided some time in Cologne and Strasburg, where he was the guest of Peter Martyne and attended the divinity lectures of that learned Reformer. He returned to England and after a short stay went to France, intending to extend his travels to Spain and Italy, but was prevented by the war. Returning to his native country he settled in Exeter, and was chosen first chamberlain of that city, 1555. He devoted himself after this to the study of history and antiquities. In 1568 was a member of the Irish Parliament, and in 1571 was one of the members of the English Parliament from Exeter (Wood). Price says he died 1601 (?), when about eighty years of age, and was buried in Exeter Cathedral, but had no monument. He was the author of several works, among them: "State of Ireland and Order of keeping a Parliament in that Country," the same being found in the British Museum under title, "Order and Usage of keeping Parliament in England" (MS. Harl., II73, vol. I9). (From History of Devonshire, by Rev. Thomas Moore, vol. ii. p. I 25)

John Hooker was uncle to the celebrated divine, Richard Hooker, Rector of Bascombe, County Wilts, 1591, and Prebendary of Sarum. John Greene removed early to Sarum (Salisbury), the county town of Wiltshire, (2) [IT:(2)((Leland's Itinerary (pp. 7-8, 31)gives the following: 'The city of Old Saresbyri standing on a hill is distant from the New a mile by north weste and d is incompace half a mile and mo. This city has been ancient and exceeding strong but syns the building of New Saresbyri it went totally to ruin. . . . In times of civil wars--insomuch as the castellanes of Old Saresbyri and the chanons could not agree, whereupon the bishop and they consulting together at the last began a church on their own proper soyle and then the people resorted strangers to New Saresbyrie and builded there and in continuance were a great number of the houses of old Saresbyri pulled down and set up at New Saresbyri."

Thomas's Church was built as a Chapel of Ease to the Cathedral by Bishop Bingham in the Year (?). It was dedicated to St. Thomas a Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, who was martyred in the reign of King Henry II., and is said to be in some respects more beautiful than the Cathedral.

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From: http://www.warwickonline.com/view/full_story/5352939/article-Then-and-Now--John-Greene--Surgeon-2--Mr--Green--a-peacemaker

One of the first six colonists to receive "home lots" in Providence was the remarkable John Greene, Surgeon. Like many of the other settlers, he wanted more land to begin his life in America. In 1642, a few years after settling in Providence, Greene purchased 700 acres of land from the Indian sachem Miantonomi. This land was south of the settlement of Pawtuxet and was called Occupasuetuxet. Later it was known as "Greene's Hold." When Providence merchant John Brown purchased it in 1782, he called it "Spring Green." Today, it is known as Spring Green and/or Governor Francis Farms.

According to the very informative The Greenes of Rhode Island (compiled from the manuscript of Major-General George Sears Greene), published in 1903, John Greene “was well respected by his contemporaries in Providence. Roger Williams, in 1637 wrote, "... Mr. Greene here is peaceable, a peacemaker, and a lover of all English that visit us."

It appears that while Greene took no active part in the Providence politics at the time, he became very friendly with Samuel Gorton, who did. Gorton became embroiled in the politics and quarrels in Providence and was called by William Arnold “a turbulent troublemaker." When Gorton and his followers left Providence, John Greene joined him and, with 10 others, purchased a tract of land directly below his Occupasuetuxet holdings. This was, of course, the Shawomet Purchase of 1642, the tract of land that was four miles wide and extended for about 20 miles west from Narragansett Bay. This later became the towns of Warwick, West Warwick and Coventry.

Life was very difficult in this early period, especially for many of the women who had left the security and comfort of Old England to eke out a living in the New World. One of those who succumbed to the rigors of Rhode Island's wilderness was Joanne Tattershall Greene, John Greene's first wife and the mother of his children.

Prior to his leaving Providence in 1642 to take up permanent residence in Warwick, John Greene married Alice Daniels, a widow with a young son and a tract of land in Providence. The newlyweds found little peace in that first year as the Massachusetts Bay Colony, claiming jurisdiction over Shawomet, invaded the fledging colony with "forty mounted and armed men" to arrest Gorton and his followers. Panic ensued and the women fled to the woods or the safety of the nearby islands as the soldiers descended upon Shawomet. The G.S. Greene manuscript tells us that the “fright and exposure caused the death of two of the women. One of them was Alice Daniels Greene. An unpublished and historically accurate manuscript by Hedley Smith, Stubborn Saint: A Portrait of Samuel Gorton, tells us that John Greene went to his wife's assistance on the island of Conanicut (Jamestown). He was too late, as Alice died before he could reach her.

When Gorton and the others barricaded themselves against the Massachusetts men, Greene was not with them. The siege lasted for several days and Gorton and his men were taken captive and sent to Boston. The trial was a travesty of justice as the legal aspect was ignored. The goal was to punish Gorton for his religious views and his criticism of the Boston magistrates and the Puritan preachers. Many historians call this episode in Warwick history the "Greatest Crime of the Colonial Period." The Shawomet men were whipped, shackled and given hard labor for a year. They were to be permanently banished from the colonies under Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth Colony jurisdiction. This, the court claimed, included Shawomet.

As John Greene was never taken captive (although placed on a wanted list) he was free to cultivate the good graces of the Narragansett Indians, and when the Gortonites were finally released he was there to help plan a petition to Parliament.

The story of John Greene's involvement to free Shawomet from Massachusetts rule will be continued.

Read more: Warwick Beacon - Then and Now John Greene Surgeon 2 Mr Green a peacemaker -------------------- http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=irisheyes&id=I09784

JOHN GREENE, Surgeon, was the first of my Green ancestors to come to America. He was the fourth son of Richard and Mary Hooker Green of Bowridge Hill, Gillingham, County of Dorsetshire, England. John Greene was born 1590 in England; died in January of 1659 in Warwick, Providence (now Kent) County, Rhode Island, in the America's; married first in 1619 to JOANNE TATTERSHALL, daughter of Richard and Margaret Fox Tattershall. He was the Surgeon of Salisbury, County of Wilkes, England. One page 234 of "A Family Genealogy" by William Henry Beck, III, is the following account of JOHN GREENE (1590-1659):

JOHN GREENE, the pioneer in this country, with his wife and children, sailed from Southampton on April 16, 1635, on the ship JAMES and landed in Boston (Massachusetts) on June 3, 1635. They settled in Salem but were driven out by religious persecutions, and soon after went to Providence (Rhode Island). Here he was one of the twelve to who Roger Williams conveyed land in his 'initial deed', thusly called because the men are mentioned only by their initials, and one of the twelve original members of the first Baptist Church in Providence. He was of the party who with Samuel Gorton purchased Shawomet, later called Warwick (Rhode Island), from the Indians. His is the only name of a white man signed as a witness to the deed. His own plot, called Occupassnatuxet, more commonly known as Pastuxet, remained in the family until 1782, when it was bought by Governor John Francis, whose heirs are still in possession.

In August 1637, he was accused of having spoken contemptuously against magistrates and stood 'bound in a 100 marks to appear at the next Quarter Court', by order of the Massachusetts authorities.

In September following, for the same offense, he was fined $20.00 and was to be committed until the fine was paid, and enjoined not to come into the jurisdiction of Massachusetts upon pain of fine or imprisonment at the pleasure of the Court. A few months later the same court of Massachusetts received a letter from Greene with which he charged the court with usurping the power of Christ over churches and men's consciences. The court again ordered him not to come into their jurisdiction under pain of imprisonment and further censure.

In 1643 came the summons to the Warwick men to appear in Boston to answer to the complaints of Pomham and Soconoco, 'as to some unjust and injurious dealing toward them by yourself'. Then soldiers were sent to bring them by force to Boston, after the accused refused to go, declaring they were legal subjects of the King of England, and beyond the limits of Massachusetts authority. On their arrival, there was a parley during which the officers declared that the Warwick settlers 'held blasphemous errors of which they must repent' or go to Boston for trial. Greene escaped capture but was banished like the rest.

After Joanne's death in 1643, John Greene returned to England and remarried. Three years later, however, when he and Gorton returned from England, he had the satisfaction of landing in Boston, justified by the King of England.

Like others of this company of Shawomet settlers, Greene held responsible positions under the charter and was magistrate, assistant member of the town council, representative in the assembly, and commissioner from 1654 to 1657.

John Greene died in Warwick (Rhode Island) in January of 1659.

"REF.: -- COLONIAL FAMILY OF AMERICA by McKenzie. Volumes I and 2, Pages 209 and 198." Paper arranged by Miss Mary A. Greene, Providence, Rhode Island USA.

"The Greene Family and it's Branches"; by Lora S. LaMance; Mayflower Publishing Company, Floral Park, New York, 1904, p 47,48.

"John Greene the Surgeon"

John Greene emigrated from Salisbury, County Wiltshire, England to Salem, Massachusetts on board the ship "James" 3 June 1635, a surgeon. He followed Roger Williams to Rhode Island in 1637 and was one of the original proprietors of Providence, Rhode Island. With Samuel Gorton he was one of the founders of Warwick, Rhode Island in 1643. He was a commissioner to England in 1644 when England granted Rhode Island it's first charter. In 1652 Surgeon John Greene came from Salisbury, England in the next company following Roger Williams and with his wife settled in Warwick, Kent Co., Rhode Island, where the Warwick branch of the Greene family was founded.

FIRST GENERATION TO AMERICA. JOHN GREENE, surgeon, the progenitor of the Warwick Greenes, was the son of Richard and Mary (Hooker) Greene, and was born on his father's estate at Bowridge Hill in the parish of Gillingham, County Dorset, England. about 1590. ' Though not so recorded, dates before and after him would seem to determine this is the year of his birth.(1)

John Greene removed early to Sarum (Salisbury), the county town of Wiltshire, (2) [IT:(2) ((Leland's Itinerary (pp. 7-8, 31)gives the following: 'The city of Old Saresbyri standing on a hill is distant from the New a mile by north weste and d is incompace half a mile and mo. This city has been ancient and exceeding strong but syns the building of New Saresbyri it went totally to ruin. . . . In times of civil wars--insomuch as the castellanes of Old Saresbyri and the chanons could not agree, whereupon the bishop and they consulting together at the last began a church on their own proper soyle and then the people resorted strangers to New Saresbyrie and builded there and in continuance were a great number of the houses of old Saresbyri pulled down and set up at New Saresbyri."

Apparently JOANNE "JOAN" TATTERSHALL GREENE did not die at sea in 1635 as was previously believed. JOAN sought refuge with the Indians in Occupassnatuxet (aka Pastuxet, now Warwick), Rhode Island, from the Massachusetts authorities in 1643. She died there from shock that year.

The following year (1644), JOHN GREENE, with other leading men of the plantation, went to England and succeeded in obtaining a just assertion of their rights. We find in JOHN GREENE that sturdy spirit of freedom which burned in the breasts of so many of our ancestors, in his reply to the Legislature of the Bay, wherein he charged them with usurping the power of Christ over the Churches and men's consciences in definance of either secular or ecclesiastical authority .....

....(JOHN GREENE) made his Will on the 28th of December 1658 which was proved on the 7th day of January the following year (1659), and was witnessed by JOHN WICKES and ANTHONY LOW, and in it he gave to his 'beloved wife PHILLIPPA GREENE yet part of buildings, being all new erected, and containg a large hall and chimni with a little chamber joing yet with a large garden wit ha little dary room which butts against ye olde house to enjoy during her life. Allso I give unto her half ye orchard, allso I give unto her my Lott adjoing to ye orchard together with ye swamp which the towne granted me.' (sic) After some ofther bequests to his wife, he gave to his son JOHN, the neck of land called Occupasnetuet with an adjoing meadow, and a small island, all of which he says he bought of Miantonomi. To his children he bequeathed other other tracts of land, including his portion of the Warwick purchase and appointed his wife sole executrix of the will. He left a large estate to his descendants, much of the property being still in the possession of his posterity. He enjoyed the confidence and respect of his associates through a long and active political life of many years. He was buried by the side of his first wife at Conanicut. His children were all born before coming to (America).

SOURCE: "Ancestors of Forrest Greene In England and America"

Robert Potter of Warwick, Rhode Island (USA) Deed from the Sachem Myantonomy to Samuel Gorton, Robert Potter, and others of Shawomett (now Warwick), January 12, 1642: "Know all men; that I Myantonomy, chiefe sachem of the Nanheygansett, have sould unto the persons here named, one parsell of lands with all the rights and privileges thereoff whatever, lyinge uppon the west syde of that part of the sea called Sowhomes Bay, from Copassanatuxet, over against a little island in the sayd Bay, being the north bounds, and the outmost point of that neck of land called Shawomett; beinge the south bounds from the sea shoare of each boundary uppon a straight lyne westward twentie miles. I say I have truly sould this parsell of lands above sayde, the proportion whereof is according to the mapp under written or drawne, being the forme of it to Randall Holden, JOHN GREENE, John Wickes, Francis Weston, Samuel Gorton, Richard Waterman, John Warner, Richard Carder, Sampson Shotton, Robert Potter, and William Waddall for one hundred and fortie-foure ffathom of Wampumpeage, I say I have sould it, and possession of it given unto the men above sayed, with the ffree and joynt concent of the present inhabitants, being natives, as it appears by their hands hereunto annexed.

Dated ye twelfth day of January, 1642.

Beinge enacted uppoon the above sayed parsell of land in the presence off

PUM HOMM JANO

MYANTOMY, Sachem of Shawhommett

TOTANOMANS, his marke."

SOURCE: Local and Family Histories: New England, 1600-1900s, page 151, FTM CD-ROM #449

Other interesting notes about JOHN GREENE: It is presumed (by some) that he made no settlement in Massachusetts. Probably because of the church 'authorities' problems? --------------------

John "the Surgeon" Greene Disc #141 Pin #2148032 Marriage: 4 Nov 1619 St. Thomas Church, Salisbury, County Wiltshire, ENGLAND to Joane Tattersall.

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John "the Surgeon" Greene's Timeline

1591
February 9, 1591
Bowridge Hill, Gillingham, Dorset, England
1619
November 4, 1619
Age 28
Gillingham, Dorset, England, United Kingdom
1620
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
August 15, 1620
Age 29
Salisbury, Wiltshire, England