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Churches of South Africa/Kerke van Suid Afrika

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Churches of South Africa

' Christianity in South Africa

The first Christian Mass, celebrated perhaps in late December 1487 or early January 1488, was celebrated on the island of the Holy Cross (named as such by Diaz), just off Port Elizabeth.

''''''''''
  • When it was started?
  • What congregation? In the early years it was mostly the Dutch Reformed Church better known as either the Nederduitsche Hervormde Kerk or the Nederduitsche Gereformeerde Kerk both names were used by different Gemeentes/Congregations ..In 1860's the ZAR decided to only use the name NH Kerk to distinguish themselves from the Church controlled by the British. The Cape Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church ( NH Kerk and / or NG Kerk up to that date ) of 1842 decided explicitly and officially on the name Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk or NG Kerk from that date on . Before 1842 both Nederduitsche Hervormde Kerk -NH Kerk or Nederduitsche Gereformeerde Kerk - NG Kerk were used as same / interchangeable in the whole of Southern Africa. Also remember Dutch used as language in the Churches up to 1920’s SO divides into 3 Churches NG Kerk 1842 , NH Kerk 1842 ( NHKA ) and Gereformeerde Kerk ( Gereformeerde Kerke in Suid-Afrika ) 1859
  • Any history on the church.
  • Denomination of church and any changes
  • South African Churches have been widely used as places for sources of baptisms, marriages, etc. on Geni.
  • But do we know when churches was started?
  • You will also note a few Africa Churches, i.e. Zimbabwe and Kenya. The reason being that in the early 1900's the fell under the board of Transvaal Churches.
  • The aim of this project is to place the correct date so as to be sure that a certain profile could actually have been there.
  • Please add in profiles that were connected to the churches:
  • The first churches will be placed in year order with Province ( New 1995 Provinces please )
  • Please help with any later churches.

Sadly so many Church buildings changed denomination or the building not used as communities changed or moved away. On our property in Mqanduli an Anglican Chapel built 1905 used for 50 years then by 2000 a Goat shed.

Ds. Joan van Arckel

The first Christian Religious Leader at the Cape in what later became South Africa

Anglican Church

''''''

' The Anglican Church of Southern Africa, known until 2006 as the Church of the Province of Southern Africa, is the province of the Anglican Communion in the southern part of Africa. The church has twenty-nine dioceses, of which twenty-one are located in South Africa, three in Mozambique, and one each in Angola, Lesotho, Namibia, Swaziland and Saint Helena. In South Africa, there are between 3 and 4 million Anglicans out of an estimated population of 45 million

History : The first Anglican clergy to minister regularly at the Cape were military chaplains who accompanied the troops when the British occupied the Cape Colony in 1795 and then again in 1806. The second British occupation resulted in a growing influx of civil servants and settlers who were members of the Church of England, and so civil or colonial chaplains were appointed to minister to their needs. These were under the authority of the governor.

The first missionary of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel arrived in 1821. He was William Wright, a priest. He opened a church and school in Wynberg, a fashionable suburb of Cape Town. Allen Gardiner, a missionary of the Church Missionary Society went to Zululand, and arranged for a priest, Francis Owen to be sent to the royal residence of King Dingane. Owen witnessed the massacre of Piet Retief, the Voortrekker leader, and his companions, who had come to negotiate a land treaty with Dingane, and left soon afterwards.

The Anglican Church in Southern Africa at this time was under the Diocese of Calcutta, which effectively included the East Indies and the entire Southern Hemisphere. Bishops en route for Calcutta sometimes stopped at the Cape for confirmations, and occasionally ordination of clergy, but these visits were sporadic. It became apparent that a bishop was needed for South Africa, and in 1847 Robert Gray was consecrated as the first Bishop of Cape Town in Westminster Abbey. The new bishop landed in Cape Town in 1848. Desmond Tutu (born 1931), former Primate of the Anglican Church of the Province of South Africa, noted pacifist and a leading figure in the successful fight against apartheid

Some Anglican parishes in the then-Cape Colony refused to join the Church of the Province of South Africa when it was constituted in 1870; these parishes constituted themselves as the Church of England in South Africa (CESA). CESA has subsequently renamed itself as Reformed Evangelical Anglican Church of South Africa.

Desmond Tutu rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. Tutu was elected and ordained the first black South African Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa, and primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism, and the Magubela prize for liberty in 1986.

In 2006, the name Church of the Province of Southern Africa was dropped as the name was confusing to some people. The church was renamed the Anglican Church of Southern Africa.

  • St Paul's, Komga 1866

Reference source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglican_Church_of_Southern_Africa

Apostolic Faith Mission of South Africa / Apostoliese Geloofsending van Suid Afrika

'

--1908

AFM stands for “Apostolic Faith Mission” (in Afrikaans: “AGS – Apostoliese Geloofsending“). The AFM exists since 1908 and is the first and largest Pentecostal church in the country – with 1.4 million members in SA and currently established in 29 countries of the world. “Pentecostal” means that it is a church who believes that the Spirit of God is given to believers to live dynamic and overcoming lives. It also implies that believers can demonstrate the character, love and power of their Lord, Jesus Christ, in their daily lives.

5th largest Christian community in South Africa

Early history: 1908–1912 John G. Lake and Thomas Hezmalhach after they established the Apostolic Faith Mission in South Africa. Hezmalhalch was the first President and Lake was his successor.

While the Apostolic Faith Mission was founded in 1908 and Pentecostalism brought to South Africa by American missionaries, several factors helped create a favorable climate for the Pentecostal movement to spread in the country. First, revivals in the Dutch Reformed Church in South Africa (DRC) in 1860, 1874 and 1884 were characterized by deep conviction of sin followed by conversion, fervent prayer and some ecstatic phenomenon. Thus in 1908, some older DRC members were familiar and open to Pentecostalism. Second, the Dutch Reformed minister Andrew Murray was a prominent holiness teacher and helped create a climate for revival. A third factor was the Zionist churches, led by John Alexander Dowie from Zion City, Illinois, United States.

In May 1908, five American missionaries—John G. Lake and Thomas Hezmalhalch, along with their wives, and A. Lehman—arrived in South Africa from Indianapolis. Lake and Hezmalhalch had links to Dowie's Zion City and had been baptized in the Holy Spirit at the Azusa Street Mission in Los Angeles. Despite these influences, however, the missionaries had no organizational affiliation. Arriving in Pretoria, Lake felt that the Holy Spirit was leading him to Johannesburg because they found no doors open in Pretoria. In Johannesburg, a Mrs Goodenough met them and invited them to stay in her house. She witnessed that the Holy Spirit had sent her to the train station to meet the American missionaries. They first began ministry at a rental hall in Doornfontein, a Johannesburg suburb, on 25 May 1908. The services consisted of a mixed racial group, and many who attended the first services were Zionists.The missionaries moved to the Central Tabernacle, Bree Street, Johannesburg as the young Pentecostal movement grew. It was there that the Apostolic Faith Mission developed, initially as a committee first meeting in September 1908. It was not registered as a legal entity until 1913, however.

By 1909, it had spread to the Orange River Colony. In South Africa, as at Azusa Street, the movement was initially multi-racial, appealing to both Boers and blacks. It expanded rapidly among African farm workers in the Orange River Colony and Wakkerstroom, where Pentecostal beliefs in divine healing through prayer would have made it an attractive alternative to traditional or medical treatment. Lake made contact with the Wakkerstroom Zionists led by Pieter Louis Le Roux, and many Zionists joined the Apostolic Faith Mission. Their influence can be seen in the AFM's practice of baptism by triple immersion, once each in the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit. There was also interaction with other churches, such as the Plymouth Brethren and International Holiness movement, which often resulted in individuals or whole congregations joining the AFM. Most AFM converts, however, came from the Dutch Reformed churches.

John Graham Lake (March 18, 1870 – September 16, 1935) was a Canadian-American leader in the Pentecostal movement that began in the early 20th century, and is known as a faith healer, missionary, and with Thomas Hezmalhalch, co-founder of the Apostolic Faith Mission of South Africa. Through his 1908–19 African missionary work, Lake played a decisive role in the spread of Pentecostalism in South Africa, the most successful southern African religious movement of the 20th century.[1]:98[2]:34 After completing his missionary work in Africa, Lake evangelized for 20 years, primarily along the west coast of the United States setting up "healing rooms" and healing campaigns, and establishing churches. Lake was influenced by the healing ministry of John Alexander Dowie and the ministry of Charles Parham

Thomas Hezmalhalch (October 5, 1847–1934), usually known as Tom Hezmalhalch, was an American missionary, who together with John G. Lake founded the Apostolic Faith Mission of South Africa and was its first chairman and president. He was influenced by the healing ministry of John Alexander Dowie.

Ref : https://afm-ags.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostolic_Faith_Mission_of_South_Africa

LUTHERAN CHURCH

' Lutheran settler congregations in the Cape

   • After Jan van Riebeeck landed in the Cape in 1652, an increasing number of German Lutherans came to settle in the colony, where they were given permission to participate in the services of the Dutch Reformed Church but not to establish their own Lutheran churches. Only at the end of the eighteenth century were German Lutherans, under the leadership of Martin Melck, able to obtain the right to independent worship. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in Strand Street was founded in 1780 and other places of worship followed, such as at Stellenbosch and Wynberg (Wittenberg 2011; Scriba 1997).
   • The language of the Strand Street congregation was Dutch, but at the end of the nineteenth century the British colonial administration brought in many new German settlers to farm on the sandy Cape flats. Due to quarrels about German as the language of worship, a split occurred in the Strand Street congregation and a new Lutheran church was formed in Cape Town in 1853. The church was officially inaugurated in 1861 as the Deutsche Evangelisch Lutherische Gemeinde St. Martini. Other German Lutheran congregations were soon established in the Western Cape (Wittenberg 2011; Scriba and Lislerud 1997:174).
   • During the Crimean War in 1854, Britain had made use of German legionnaires. These men needed to be supported once the war had ended. Because the eastern frontier of the Eastern Cape was about to erupt in another conflagration between the British and the Xhosa, the British War Office suggested to Sir George Grey, the Governor of the Cape Colony, that the German legionnaires should be settled in British Kaffraria. In 1857 2000 German soldiers under Baron von Stutterheim settled in the region and, in time, Lutheran congregations were established in Keiskammahoek (1858), King Williamstown (1866) and East London (1872) (Wittenberg 2011).

Lutheran churches

  • Strand street , Cape Town 1780
  • Stellenbosch 1854
  • Wynberg
  • St Martini , Long street , Cape Town 1853 , building from 1861.
  • Keiskammahoek 1858
  • King Williamstown 1866
  • East London 1872

Reference source : http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95...

REFORMDED CHURCH / Afrikaner Calvinism

' Afrikaner Calvinism (Afrikaans: Calvinisme) is a cultural and religious development among Afrikaners that combined elements of seventeenth-century Calvinist doctrine with a "chosen people" ideology based in the Bible. It had origins in ideas espoused in the Old Testament of the Jews as the chosen people.

A number of modern studies have argued that Boers gathered for the Great Trek inspired by this concept, and they used it to legitimise their subordination of other South African ethnic groups. It is thought to have contributed the religious basis for modern Afrikaner nationalism and apartheid.Dissenting scholars have asserted that Calvinism did not play a significant role in Afrikaner society until after they suffered the trauma of the Second Boer War. Early settlers dwelt in isolated frontier conditions and lived much closer to pseudo-Christian animist beliefs than organised religion

White settlement in South Africa is traced to the 1652 arrival of the Dutch East India Company at the Cape of Good Hope, seeking to establish a supply and refreshment station for its ships and crews bound to and from India.[4][a] From its headquarters in Amsterdam, the Company recruited crew and equipped voyages for the Orient. Most of its Dutch employees were Protestant Calvinists, who were the majority of the population in the region, supplemented by other Protestants: Lutheran Germans, Scandinavians, and numerous French Huguenot refugees who had fled religious persecution in France. Among their Afrikaner descendants, individual religious communities such as the Doppers became known for establishing their own doctrine in rifts with the Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk (Dutch Reformed Church). By the late nineteenth century, the separatist churches of Gereformeerde Kerk had developed in South Africa

Schism between Boer and Cape Calvinists

During the Great Trek, many people, mostly from the eastern part of the Cape Colony, went north, to areas not under control of the British colonies authorities. Because the Cape Dutch Reformed Church was seen by the trekkers as being an agent of the Cape government, they also did not trust its ministers and emissaries, seeing them as attempts by the Cape government to regain political control. There were also religious divisions among the trekkers themselves. A minister from the Netherlands, Dirk Van der Hoff went to the Transvaal in 1853, and became a minister in the Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk, which was constituted in 1856, and in 1860 recognised as the State Church of the South African Republic, separate from the Cape Church.

Meanwhile, back in the Netherlands, the Dutch State church had also been transformed by the Enlightenment, a change represented in the minds of those opposed it, by the loss of any meaningful profession of faith as requisite for adult church members, and the singing of hymns (in addition to psalms) and other innovations in worship and doctrine. In the Netherlands a movement grew in reaction to this perceived dismantlement of Biblical faith. It was called the Afscheiding, in which the Rev. Hendrik de Cock separated himself from the State Church in 1834 in Ulrum, Groningen. There was also a movement called the Reveil (Awakening), supported by those who did not separate from the State Church, like Guillaume Groen van Prinsterer, whose writings became known in South Africa. And much later the leader of another schism called the Doleantie, Abraham Kuyper, began to become known to the Afrikaners. Highly critical of the Enlightenment, the "revolution" as they called it, the Doleantie in the church had counterparts in education and in politics. The timing of this influence was significant, coming on the crest of a wave of evangelical revival, the Reveil in the Dutch Reformed Church which had been led in South Africa by the Scottish preacher, Andrew Murray. The slogan of the Doleantie, which eventually rang with unintended nationalist nuance for the Afrikaners was, "Separation is Strength".

Kaapse predikante tydens die 17de eeu

  1. # Joan van Arckel (ook Johannes), 1665 - 1666
  2. # Johannes de Vooght, 26 Februarie tot 23 November 1666
  3. # Petrus Wachtendorp, November 1666 - Februarie 1667
  4. # Adriaan de Vooght, 1667 - 1674
  5. # Rudolphus Meerlandt, 1674 - 1675
  6. # Petrus Hulsenaar, 1675 - 1677
  7. # Johan Frederick Stumphius, Mei 1678
  8. # Johannes Overney, 1678 - 1687
  9. # Johannes van Andel, 1687 - 1689
  10. # Pierre Simond, 1688 – 1702
  11. # Leonardus Terwoldt, 1689 - 1693
  12. # Hercules van Loon, 1695 - 1697
  13. # Petrus Kalden, 1697 - 1707

Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk / Nederduitse Hervomde Kerk

'

 from 1652 till 1840

Origins in the Cape Colony

The Dutch Reformed Church was introduced to South Africa by the Dutch East India Company's settlement at Cape Town in 1652. The first formal congregation was established in 1665 under the jurisdiction of the classis (presbytery) of Amsterdam. Despite the permanent takeover of the Cape Colony by the UK in 1806, the church remained semi-established with congregations supported from government funds. In 1824 an autonomous synod was established at the Cape, removing the church from control from the Netherlands. This autonomous synod would become the NGK after 1842. The unwillingness of Dutch ministers to serve in a British-controlled colony meant that Scottish Presbyterian ministers with British sympathies were introduced to the church.

The Great Trek (1835-1846)

In the of the 1830s, Boers left the Cape Colony and established republics in the interior of South Africa in what came to be known as the Great Trek.[3] The Voortrekkers in this movement decided to split off from the Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk in the Cape Colony. The Dutch minister, Erasmus Smit,[4] who sent by the Nederlandsch Zendeling Genootschap from The Netherlands became the first NHKA minister on 21 May 1837. Congregations were founded in the colonies of Natal, the Free State (province) and the Transvaal Colony. In 1841 the American missionary Daniel Lindley took over the leadership from Smit who had at that time become very unpopular amongst the Voortrekkers. A Dutch minister, Dirk Van der Hoff, took over the leadership of the church in the Transvaal in 1853. The founding of the oldest South African university (Stellenbosch University) and the establishment of the Theological Seminary of the Dutch Reformed Church in 1859[5] allowed for ministers to be trained locally.[6] While a merger on 7 December 1885 between the NHKA and the NGK seemed succeful initially, an increasing number of church members opposed the merging of the two churches and returned to the former NHKA. Reverend M.J. Goddefroy played a central role in the re-establishment of the church.

The Anglo-Boer War (1988-1902) and the WWII The Anglo Boer War played a major role in South African history and therefore also the history of the NHKA. Many ministers and church members died during the war or were sent as Prisoners of war in British Colonies. The British Scorched earth strategy meant women and children were placed in Concentration camps.It also meant that many churches and archival material was destroyed. After the war, the church was re-established and Dutch ministers (like L.E. Brandt) were once again sent to South Africa. This was a period of immense growth and by 1956 the number of churches had increased from 20 to 183 congregations. The church in South Africa also did not remain immune to the wars raging in the rest of the world. World War II affected many members. Most notably, professor Adrianus van Selms (1906-1984) who served in the NHKA at University of Pretoria became a Prisoner of war in Japan where he wrote numerous theological treatises

Before 1842 one Church using either Nederduitse Hervormde ot Nederduitse Gereformeerde as name. No separation then in 1842 split into two distinct Churches .

Nederduitsche Hervormde Kerk or NH Kerk in ZAR and OFS --- The Dutch Reformed Church in Africa (Dutch: Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk van Afrika, abbreviated NHKA) is a Reformed Christian denomination based in Southern Africa. It also has congregations in Namibia, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Along with the Dutch Reformed Church in South Africa (NGK) and the Reformed Churches in South Africa, the NHKA is one of the three Dutch Reformed sister churches of South Africa. The NHKA retains the old Nomenclature Nederduitsch, the word originally referring to the Dutch language. The word refers to the Low Saxon language today. The Dutch language remained the official language of the church until 1933 when the church started functioning almost exclusively in Afrikaans

n the of the 1830s, Boers left the Cape Colony and established republics in the interior of South Africa in what came to be known as the Great Trek.[3] The Voortrekkers in this movement decided to split off from the Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk in the Cape Colony. The Dutch minister, Erasmus Smit,[4] who sent by the Nederlandsch Zendeling Genootschap from The Netherlands became the first NHKA minister on 21 May 1837.

Congregations were founded in the colonies of Natal, the Orange Free State and the Zuid Afrikaansche Republiek / ZAR In 1841 the American missionary Daniel Lindley took over the leadership from Smit who had at that time become very unpopular amongst the Voortrekkers.

A Dutch minister, Dirk Van der Hoff, took over the leadership of the church in the Transvaal in 1853. The founding of the oldest South African university (Stellenbosch University) and the establishment of the Theological Seminary of the Dutch Reformed Church in 1859 allowed for ministers to be trained locally. 
While a merger on 7 December 1885 between the NHKA and the NGK seemed succeful initially, an increasing number of church members opposed the merging of the two churches and returned to the former NHKA. Reverend M.J. Goddefroy played a central role in the re-establishment of the church. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_Reformed_Church_in_South_Africa_(NHK)

Nederduitse Gereformeerde or NG Kerk in Cape Colony and Natal --- The Cape Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church of 1842 decided explicitly and officially on the name Dutch Reformed ("Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk"). The same synod was associated with the spirit of the Synod of Dordrecht of 1618-1619. In addition, members of Dutch Reformed congregations in the Cape Colony who had emigrated during and after the Great Trek of 1835-1840 to the South African Republic, wished to stay in their church.

The Dutch Reformed Church in South Africa, which has congregations within South Africa as well as beyond South African boundaries, is an offspring of the Reformed Church in the Netherlands of the 17th century. The word "Dutch" in its name indicates a link with the Dutch people, the Dutch language and the Netherlands itself, while "Reformed" refers to the church's spiritual heritage. This being a heritage which can be traced back to the Calvinistic reformation of the 16th century and particularly the National Synod of Dordrecht (1618-1619), where it was established that the Three Formulas of Unity would henceforth be the confessions of churches in this tradition. These decisions taken at the Dordrecht Synod had a major influence on both the character and governance of the church.

In the 19th century, by means of articles 20 and 23 of the Constitution (1855-1858) of the South African Republic, it was determined that the church of the state would be officially known as the Dutch Reformed Church ("Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk"). In the Dutch of those days two words were alternately used for the notion reformed: "hervormd" and "gereformeerd". However, in the 1860's it became clear that some congregations within the church no longer interpreted the two terms as having the same meaning. While in the said constitution the church of the state was called the "Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk", in the church itself "Hervormde Kerk" and "Gereformeerde Kerk" were used as synonyms. But in the church of the 1860's people openly associated the designation "Hervormd" with a changed liberal Reformed or "Hervormde" Church in the Netherlands. A change of which its church law of 1816 was an indication. Generally, this liberal change referred to a church in which the Three Formulas as a whole were no longer regarded to be scriptural nor was the Bible believed to be the authentic Word of God. It became a church, then, with which some sincere reformed congregationists no longer wished to be associated. The name "Dutch Reformed Church" ("Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk") in the constitution of the Republic was formulated without consulting the church, a legal assembly or representative body of the church. Moreover, no notice of its name in the constitution was given to the church. In other words, the state named the church without having sought the latter's consent. Some ministers of the Dutch Reformed Church in the Republic accepted this state of affairs, thereby embracing the fact of a new church in a new state with its own name, while others objected to the ruling unilaterally enforced by the constitution of the Republic. However, the latter group did not opt for a separate church and wanted to maintain the relation with the Dutch Reformed Church of the Cape as well as membership of a Dutch Reformed congregation. The Cape Synod of the Dutch Reformed Church of 1842 decided explicitly and officially on the name Dutch Reformed ("Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk"). The same synod was associated with the spirit of the Synod of Dordrecht of 1618-1619. In addition, members of Dutch Reformed congregations in the Cape Colony who had emigrated during and after the Great Trek of 1835-1840 to the South African Republic, wished to stay in their church. The Dutch Reformed congregation of Utrecht of which Frans Lion Cachet became the minister from 1865-1873, spearheaded this movement during the 1860's. The years 1865-1866, and especially 1866, proved to be decisive for members of the Dutch Reformed or Dutch-Afrikaans Church in the Republic with regard both to their differences about the choice between "hervormd" and "gereformeerd" and the impact of such divisive opinions in the church. In 1865 a general assembly of the "Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk" rejected a proposal by the visiting reverend Cachet to accept the name "Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk", together with the wording of the Dordt Synod in 1619 on the acceptance of the Three Formulas. 

Almost a year later, in December 1866, the first general assembly of the "Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk" was formed and convened in Utrecht, thereby signalling the separation of two Dutch Reformed Churches in the South African Republic.

'

For many years the impression lasted in the latter that the "Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk" did not regard the Three Formulas of (confessional) Unity as totally in accordance with scripture. It was not until the beginning of the 21st century that the two reformed churches agreed to accept each other's ministers and members as if they were their own.

Reference source : http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_abstract&pid=S0041-4...

Netherlands Reformed Church

Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk / Nederduitse Hervomde Kerk == from 1652 till 1840

  • Die Nederduitse Hervormde Kerk of Nederduitse Gereformeerde Kerk (afgekort N.H.Kerk of N.G Kerk ) voor 1840 en vanaf 1842 net genaamd Nederduitsche Gereformeerde Kerk is die oudste Kerk in Suid-Afrika en 'n lid van die Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerkfamilie, asook die oudste van die Drie Susterkerke.Not correct as the church split / divided into 3 different Churches starting 1836/1837 . Betwisbaar die NH Kerk sien hulle Kerk as ook vanaf 1652 of 1665 , so ook die Gerformeerde Kerk All 3 churches originate from the Same Church .

Divide first into two different churches 1840 The Nederduitsche Hervormde Kerk --NH Kerk ( The Dutch minister, Erasmus Smit,[4] who sent by the Nederlandsch Zendeling Genootschap from The Netherlands became the first NHKA minister on 21 May 1837 ) and Nederduitsche Gereformeerde Kerk -NG Kerk

1859 the Gerformeerde Kerk broke away forming a 3rd church ; The official name of the church body today is Die Gereformeerde Kerke in Suid-Afrika. --The Reformed Churches in South Africa (Afrikaans: Gereformeerde Kerke in Suid-Afrika) is a Christian denomination in South Africa that was formed in 1859 in Rustenburg. Members of the church are sometimes referred to as Doppers.

Reference : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reformed_Churches_in_South_Africa

so from 1840 2 distinct churches and 1859 a 3rd church

NG Kerk

Utrecht 1854


Ná sy vertrek van Ladysmith word hy op 27 Mei 1865 leraar op Utrecht. In hierdie tyd is die verwarring op kerklike en staatkundige gebied in hierdie geweste groot. Utrecht was ’n nedersetting buite die grense van Natal, maar ook buite die grense van die Transvaalse Republiek. Dit het in 1854 ontstaan, waarna dit in 1858 in die Republiek Lydenburg opgeneem is en in 1860 op sy beurt in die groter Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek. Na ’n hofsaak beslis die Kaapse Hooggeregshof dat niemand buite die Kaapkolonie woonagtig aan die Sinode van die NG Kerk van die Kaap mag behoort nie, wat meebring dat reeds bestaande lede van die NG Kerk hulle eers in afsonderlike gemeentes moes konstitueer. Nadat Utrecht en Lydenburg deur hierdie uitspraak losgemaak is van die Kaapse Kerk, het hulle onder die Ring van Natal geressorteer. Cachet maak van die verwarring op kerklike gebied gebruik deur vervolgens op sterkte van Lydenburg en Utrecht die Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk van Transvaal in 1866 te stig. Hierdie NG kerk is onafhanklik van die Staatskerk van die geografiese gebied waarin hierdie gemeentes geleë is, naamlik die Hervormde Kerk en dit in ’n tyd toe kerk en staat in die Transvaal feitlik een was. Cachet is instrumenteel in die stigting van verdere NG gemeentes in die Transvaal, onder andere in Potchefstroom. Sy brosjure wat in 1866 verskyn, getitel Aan de leden der Ned. Geref. Kerk in de Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek is ’n kwalik bedekte aanval op die Hervormde Kerk, waarteen ds. Van der Hoff van die Hervormde Kerk hom verweer.[1] Hierna kan daar geen sprake wees van toenadering tussen die twee kerkliggame nie. Ds. Frans Lion Cachet Nasaret, ZAR 1866 becomes Witkerk ,Middelburg congregation 1884 / 1885

  • Die NGK het in 2008 'n totaal van 1 162 gemeentes gehad in:
  1. Suid-Afrika
  2. Namibië
  3. Zimbabwe
  4. Zambië
  5. Botswana
  6. Londen geleë. Talle jonger kerke het reeds uit die sendingwerk van die NG Kerk gegroei soos Malawi, Nigerië en Portugal.

http://af.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nederduitse_Gereformeerde_Kerk

NG church .

Lady Grey - 1857 Reverend David Ross, SV/Prog Barkly- Oos - 20 April1873 Middelburg --- 19 May 1852 Cedarville - 1 September 1888 Matatiele - 12 Desember 1945 Elliott - 1890 Rossville ( Rhodes ) - 1893 Dordrecht - 1857 Indwe - 1906 Mmthata - 1890 Maclear - 1916 Ugie - 1903 Philidelphia -1863 --https://ngkerkphiladelphia.org.za/about/

NH Kerk or Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk van Afrika, abbreviated NHKA

The Dutch minister, Erasmus Smit,who sent by the Nederlandsch Zendeling Genootschap from The Netherlands became the first NHKA minister on 21 May 1837

Die Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk van Afrika is een van die drie Susterkerke in Suid-Afrika. Dit was voorheen die staatskerk van die destydse Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek. Dit is 'n Reformatoriese kerk in die Calvinistiese tradisie en werk tradisioneel veral onder Afrikaners. / The Dutch Reformed Church in Africa (Dutch: Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk van Afrika, abbreviated NHKA) is a Reformed Christian denomination based in Southern Africa. It also has congregations in Namibia, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Along with the Dutch Reformed Church in South Africa (NGK) and the Reformed Churches in South Africa, the NHKA is one of the three Dutch Reformed sister churches of South Africa. The NHKA retains the old Nomenclature Nederduitsch, the word originally referring to the Dutch language.The word refers to the Low Saxon language today. The Dutch language remained the official language of the church until 1933 when the church started functioning almost exclusively in Afrikaans.

n Transvaal, die bakermat van die Hervormde Kerk was dit egter 'n ander saak. Steeds sonder 'n predikant, het ouderlinge soos F.G. Wolmarans, P.J. van Staden en andere die leiding geneem. Die eerste gemeente in Transvaal, Potchefstroom waarvan die herboude gebou steeds in gebruik is, is in 1842 gestig, gevolg deur Rustenburg in 1850. Die Kerk in Transvaal wou nie hul selfstandigheid prysgee deur by die Kaapse Kerk ingelyf te word, en daardeur onder die Britse goewerneur se gesag staan nie. Daarom is daar gesoek na 'n predikant uit Nederland. Ds. Dirk van der Hoff het in 1853 predikant van Potchefstroom geword, en daarmee die eerste predikant in Transvaal. In dieselfde jaar het die eerste Algemene Kerkvergadering op Rustenburg plaasgevind. Na agt jaar as enigste predikant vir die hele Transvaal, het hulp in 1861 gekom en is ds. A.J. Begemann as predikant van Pretoria bevestig en ds GW Smits as predikant van Rustenburg. In 1864 is ds NJ van Warmelo ook as predikant bevestig.

  • Potchefstroom Nederduits Hervormde Kerk 1842 -n Transvaal, die bakermat van die Hervormde Kerk was dit egter 'n ander saak. Steeds sonder 'n predikant, het ouderlinge soos F.G. Wolmarans, P.J. van Staden en andere die leiding geneem. Die eerste gemeente in Transvaal, Potchefstroom waarvan die herboude gebou steeds in gebruik is, is in 1842 gestig, gevolg deur Rustenburg in 1850. Die Kerk in Transvaal wou nie hul selfstandigheid prysgee deur by die Kaapse Kerk ingelyf te word, en daardeur onder die Britse goewerneur se gesag staan nie. Daarom is daar gesoek na 'n predikant uit Nederland. Ds. Dirk van der Hoff het in 1853 predikant van Potchefstroom geword, en daarmee die eerste predikant in Transvaal. In dieselfde jaar het die eerste Algemene Kerkvergadering op Rustenburg plaasgevind. Na agt jaar as enigste predikant vir die hele Transvaal, het hulp in 1861 gekom en is ds. A.J. Begemann as predikant van Pretoria bevestig en ds GW Smits as predikant van Rustenburg. In 1864 is ds NJ van Warmelo ook as predikant bevestig.
  • Rustenurg NHKA 1850
  • Pretoria NHKA 1860

It has 130,000 members and about 300 congregations, 38 regional Synods that meet annually and a General Assembly that meets every third year. Sermons take place primarily in Afrikaans.

It has a presbytery in Namibia and congregations in

  • Botswana,
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

The church is a member of the World Communion of Reformed Churches.

https://af.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nederduitsch_Hervormde_Kerk

Gereformeerde Kerk / Doppers

The Reformed Churches in South Africa (Afrikaans: Gereformeerde Kerke in Suid-Afrika) is a Christian denomination in South Africa that was formed in 1859 in Rustenburg. Members of the church are sometimes referred to as Doppers

In the early 19th century a new hymnbook was introduced in the Dutch churches in the Netherlands, which was implemented in the Dutch Reformed Church in the Cape Colony. Many of these songs contradicted the teachings of the three confessions accepted at the Synod of Dort in 1618/1619 (The Heidelberg Catechism, the Belgic Confession and the Canons of Dort). Some of the church members could not accept these doctrines. When they refused to sing the hymns, they were threatened with excommunication. They had the view: In Gods huis Gods lied (In God's house God's songs).

The main founders of the denomination, were particularly concentrated in the vicinity of Rustenburg, in the Transvaal. In 1859, 15 brothers decided to separate them from the Dutch Reformed Church. These 15 members made a meeting on 10 February 1859 convened under a seringboom at Rustenburg. At this meeting, 300 members have enrolled as members of Gereformeerde Kerke.[6] The spot is marked today by the Syringa Tree Monument.

The Gereformeerde Kerke founded a seminary for theological studies as well as teacher training in Burgersdorp in the Eastern Cape. It was moved to Potchefstroom in the early 20th century, where it became the Potchefstroom University College for Higher Christian Education, now the North West University. One of the faculties is the seminary for training their ministers.

Doppers

In the South African Dutch Reformed Church in Transvaal, the more conservative party (known as Doppers) were opposed to singing some hymns in church. They asked the Afgescheiden Gereformeerde Kerk in the Netherlands to provide them with a minister. The Rev. Dirk Postma came from Zwolle to the South African Republic in 1858, and was accepted as a minister of the Hervormde Kerk, but on learning that he and his congregation could be required to sing hymns (rather than the Psalms only), he and the Doppers, numbering about 300 adults, among whom was the South African Republic's President Paul Kruger, broke away from the state church to form the Gereformeerde Kerk in Rustenburg in February 1859. There were thus now three Dutch Reformed Churches in South Africa – the Afrikaner Nederduits Gereformeerde Kerk (the Cape Synod), the Boer Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk, which was the State Church of the South African Republic, and the Boer Gereformeerde Kerk, the smallest of the three, led by Rev. Postma.

The originally contemptuous name, Dopper, may come from the Dutch domp (wick-snuffers) for their opposition to candles and other innovations in worship, perhaps representing their contempt for the Enlightenment; or, Dopper may originate from Dutch dop (and thus drinkers), perhaps on account of their strong opposition to small, individual communion cups.[7]

The separatism of the Doppers, expressed in the severity of their doctrine, the austere puritanism of their worship, and even in their distinctive dress and speech, set them in stark contrast to European influence. Nevertheless, the Doppers were symbolic of resistance to all things English in South Africa, and despite their small size and distinctiveness they were culturally sophisticated and disproportionately influential during and after the Great Trek. It was the Dopper church that established Potchefstroom University.

Boer Republics which arose after the Great Trek needed a comprehensive philosophy upon which to organise a puritanical Boer society. Paul Kruger, first president of the South African Republic upon its reacquired independence after the brief British annexation, adopted the Calvinistic principles in its political form, and formulated a cultural mandate based on the Voortrekkers' conviction that they had a special calling from God, not unlike the people of Israel in the Bible. The Doppers waged an intellectual war against the perceived influx of uitlander culture which was flooding into the Transvaal through the mass settlements of foreign immigrants lured by gold and diamonds.

  • Rustenburg 1859
  • Venterstad 1875

The Reformed Churches in South Africa has a number of growing local congregations. The denomination has local outreaches in Botswana and Mozambique. There are churches that support missionaries in Burundi. The Reformed Church in Rustenburg, South Africa has agreement with Koshin Presbyterian Church in Korea to support evangelism, and establishing new multicultural churches in Rustenburg area. The church cooperates with the Presbyterian Church of Brazil in missions in Angola and Mozambique. It is also involved in a Reformed church plant in Hanoi, Vietnam. Through membership in the World Reformed Fellowship, Gereformeerde Gemeenten collabotates WRF's works, also for example in the International Institute of Islamic Studie

NG or NH Churches Cape before 1840

  1. Kaapstad - Die Grootte Kerk 1665
  2. Stellenbosch -Cape 1686 Nederduitsche Hervormde Gemeente https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKD-WS9N-B?cc=282...
  3. Drakenstein(Paarl) 1691
  4. Roodezand 1743 renamed Tulbagh in 1804 in 1938 a further new NG congregation in Wolseley
  5. Zwartland 1745 renamed Malmesbury 1829
  6. Graaff-Reinett 1792
  7. Swellendam 1798
  8. Caledon 1811
  9. George 1813
  10. Uitenhage 1817
  11. Cradock 1818
  12. Beaufort 1819 then in 1869 called Beaufort West to distinguish it from Fort Beaufort
  13. Somerset-West 1819
  14. Worcester 1821

?? Denominationsf these churches below ?

Cape

  1. Somerset-East 1825
  2. Colesburg 1826
  3. Tijgerberg(Durbanville) 1826
  4. Clanwilliam 1826
  5. Glen Lynden(Bedford) 1829
  6. Wynberg 1829
  7. Albanie(Riebeeck-Oos) 1831
  8. Piketberg 1832
  9. Riversdal 1839
  10. Bredasdorp 1839

Natal

  1. Pietermaritzburg 1839

Cape

  1. Wellington 1840

OVS (Freestate)

  1. Winburg 1841

Transvaal

  1. Potchefstroom 1842

Cape

  1. Prins Albert 1842
  2. Richmond 1843
  3. Victoria Wes 1844
  4. Franschoek 1845
  5. Mosselbaai 1845
  6. Burgersdorp 1846
  7. Calvinia 1847
  8. Napier 1848
  9. Humansdorp 1848

OVS(Free State)

  1. Fauresmith 1848
  2. Smithfield 1848
  3. Bloemfontein 1848
  4. Harrismith 1849

Cape

  1. Namakwaland(Springbok) 1850 -- 1855 Nederduitsche Hervomde Gemeente ?
  2. St. Marks Cathedral 1850

Transvaal

  1. Rustenburg 1850
  2. Lydenburg 1850

Cape

  1. Fraserburg 1851
  2. Knysna 1851
  3. Hopefield 1851
  4. Middelburg 1852
  5. Aliwal North 1852

Transvaal

  1. Pietersburg 1852

Cape

  1. Robertson 1853
  2. Darling 1853
  3. Oudtshoorn 1853
  4. Alexandria 1854
  5. Hopetown 1854
  6. Queenstown 1854
  7. Montagu 1854

Transvaal

  1. Pretoria 1854

Natal

  1. Utrecht 1854
  2. Ladysmith 1854

Cape

  1. Ceres 1855
  2. Jansenville 1855
  3. Sutherland 1855
  4. Aberdeen 1855
  5. Murraysburg 1855
  6. Heidelberg 1855
  7. Vishoek 1855

OVS(Freestate)

  1. Boshoff 1856

Cape

  1. Hanover 1856
  2. Dordrecht 1857
  3. NG Church St Stephens 1857
  4. Riebeeck West 1858
  5. Villiersdorp 1858
  6. Pearston 1859
  7. Gomka 1859

Natal

  1. Greytown 1859
  2. Weenen 1859

OVS(Freestate)

  1. Jacobsdal 1860
  2. Kroonstad 1860

Transvaal

  1. Waterberg(Nylstroom) 1860
  2. Wakkerstroom 1861

Cape

  1. Ladygrey 1861

OVS(Freestate)

  1. Philippolis 1862
  2. Bethulie 1862
  3. Edenburg 1863

Cape

  1. Greykerk(Balfour) 1862
  2. Alice 1863
  3. Tarkastad 1863
  4. Philidelphia 1863
  5. Riebeeck-Kasteel 1863
  6. Willowmore 1864

Transvaal

  1. Witkerk Middelburg 1864
  2. Heidelberg 1865
  3. Middelburg 1866
  4. Hartebeestfontein 1866

Cape

  1. Uniondale 1866

Transvaal

  1. Zeerust 1868

OVS

  1. Bethlehem 1869
  2. Ficksbrug 1869
  3. Rouxville 1870
  4. Wepener 1870
  5. Ladybrand 1870

Transvaal

  1. Bloemhof 1870
  2. Ermelo 1870
  3. Standerton 1870

Cape

  1. Du Toitspan 1872
  2. Kimberley 1872
  3. Calitzdorp 1873
  4. Philipstown 1873
  5. Barkley-East 1873

OVS

  1. Frankfort 1873
  2. Heilbron 1873
  3. Bultfontein 1874

Cape

  1. Noorder-Paarl 1875

OVS

  1. Brandfort 1875
  2. Lindley 1876
  3. Hoopstad 1876

Cape

  1. Steynsburg 1876
  2. Maraisburg(Hofmeyr) 1876
  3. Steytlerville 1876
  4. Vanrhynsdorp 1876
  5. Britstown 1877
  6. Prieska 1878
  7. Williston 1878
  8. Nieu-Bethesda 1878
  9. Porterville 1879
  10. Goudini(Rawsonville) 1879

OVS

  1. Senekal 1879

Cape

  1. Drieankerbaai 1879
  2. Mooreesburg 1880
  3. Barrydale 1880
  4. Molteno 1881
  5. Griekwastad 1881
  6. Petrusville 1881
  7. Warrenton 1882
  8. Venterstad 1882
  9. Laingsburg 1882

Natal

  1. Newcastle 1882

OVS

  1. Dewetsdorp 1882
  2. Vredefort 1882
  3. Vrede 1882

Cape

  1. Reivilo 1883
  2. Vryburg 1883

OVS

  1. Parys 1884

Transvaal

  1. Lichtenburg 1885
  2. Roossenekal 1886

Natal

  1. Vryheid 1886

Cape

  1. Cedarville 1888

Transvaal

  1. Schweizer-Renecke 1888
  2. Piet Retief 1888
  3. Ventersdorp 1889
  4. Amersfoort 1889
  5. Klerksdorp 1889
  6. Bethal 1889
  7. Nelspruit 1889
  8. Carolina 1889

Cape

  1. Kenhardt 1889
  2. Elliot 1890
  3. Adelaide 1890

Transvaal

  1. Krugersdorp 1890

Cape

  1. Umtata 1891
  2. Die Nieuwe Kerk (Kaapstad) 1891
  3. Sterkstroom 1891
  4. Rondebosch 1891
  5. Jamestown 1891

OVS

  1. Ventersburg 1891
  2. Reitz 1891
  3. Bothaville 1891
  4. Thaba Nchu 1891

Cape

  1. Mafeking 1892

Transvaal

  1. Langlaagte 1892

OVS

  1. Petrusburg 1892
  2. Luckhoff 1892
  3. Jagersfontein 1892

Cape

  1. Rossville(Rhodes) 1893
  2. Strydenburg 1893
  3. Upington 1893

Natal

  1. Melmoth 1894

Transvaal

  1. Boksburg 1894

OVS

  1. Zastron 1894
  2. Fouriesburg 1894

Cape

  1. Vosburg 1895
  2. Nieuwoudtville 1897
  3. Douglas 1897
  4. Brandvlei 1897

Transvaal

  1. Johannesburg East 1897
  2. Jeppestown 1897

OVS

  1. Christiana 1898
  2. Trompsburg 1898

Cape

  1. Loxton 1899

Transvaal

  1. Germiston 1899
  2. Belfast 1899

Cape

  1. De Rust 1900
  2. Vredenburg 1902
  3. McGregor 1903
  4. Kuilsrivier 1903
  5. Ugie 1903
  6. Vanwyksdorp 1904
  7. Niekerkshoop 1904
  8. Albertinia 1904
  9. Garies 1904
  10. Merweville 1904

OVS

  1. Koffiefontein 1904
  2. Dealesville 1904
  3. Marquard 1905
  4. Kestell 1905
  5. Odensdaalrus 1905

Cape

  1. Leipoldtville 1905
  2. East London 1905
  3. Murray(De Doorns) 1905

Transvaal

  1. Erasmus(Bronkhorstspruit) 1905
  2. Roodepoort 1905

Tanganyika

  1. Meru 1905

Rhodeasia

  1. Salisbury 1905

Transvaal

  1. Turffontein 1906
  2. Louis Trichardt 1906

Cape

  1. Kareedouw 1906
  2. Paterson 1906
  3. Indwe 1906
  4. Aurora 1906
  5. Redelinghuys 1906
  6. Cathcart 1907
  7. Port Elizabeth 1907
  8. Joubertina 1907

OVS

  1. Odensdaalrus 1907
  2. Villiers 1907

Kenia

  1. Kenia 1907

Transvaal

  1. Vergenoeg(Eldoret) 1907
  2. Eloffsdal 1908

OVS

  1. Koppies 1908

Cape

  1. Deben 1909

Transvaal

  1. Greylingstad 1909

Cape

  1. Grahamstad 1916
  2. Parow 1917
  3. Sondagsrivier(Kirkwood) 1918

Transvaal

  1. Bloemhof 1929

Presbyterian Church

''''''

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF SOUTHERN AFRICA. \J The formation of a Presbyterian community or congregation in South Africa, dates back to the year 1812. During that year a Presbyterian minister from Scotland, the Rev. George Thom, sailed for the Cape en route to India. On his arrival, he found that the 93rd Regiment, or Southern Fencibles, a Scottish Regiment, was without a chaplain, but that on its own initiative it had formed a Calvinist Society with the object of maintaining regular worship. Mr. Thom thereupon proceeded to form a congregation of the Presbyterian Church. Membership consisted of persons of other denominations, as well as Presbyterians, and in view of the diverse nature of the membership, the church was named the Church of Christ, its administration nevertheless being on Presbyterian lines. This congregation had a varied history and after seven years it ceased to have aqy connection with the Presbyterian form of government. In 1824 a fresh movement started for the establishment of a distinctively Presbyterian Church in Gape Town, and in 1829 the Church of St. Andrew was officially opened. Meantime, under a Government scheme, a large number of settlers arrived at Algoa Bay in 1820, and one section of these settlers, under V the leadership of the poet Thomas Pringle, formed a Presbyterian congre­ gation and erected a church building at Glen Lynden in the Eastern Province of the Cape. The co ngregation was composed of both Afrikaans and English speaking Presbyterians. With the development of the country, and particularly with the discovery of diamonds in the Northern Cape, and later the discovery of gold on the WLtwatersrand, extension work was carried out and congregations were established in growing urban communities. At the same time work was pioneered in the Rhodesias, congregations being formed at Bulawayo and Salisbury, the two main centres, and in Northern Rhodesia. In 1897, after negotiations between various Presbyterian bodies through a Federal council, the first General Assembly of the Presbyterian Churcli of South Africa, was held in Durban, and the Presbyterian Church of South Africa was formally constituted. At that time there were three Presbyteries, 22 European and 10 Native congregations. The General Assembly met for the second time in 1898 but on account of the Anglo-Boer war, was prevented from meeting again until 1900. In the interim the Church had grown to 37 European charges with 8 preaching stations, and in addition to the 10 Native congregations, mission work was carried out in various parts of the country. The Presbyteries of Adelaide, King William's Town, and the Orange River, were added to those already in existence. Since those early days, the Church has endeavoured to keep pace vdth the phenomenal economic development of South Africa and the Rhodesias, and has expanded accordingl

Reference : http://www.historicalpapers.wits.ac.za/inventories/inv_pdfo/AD1715/...

The Rhenish Mission in South Africa and Namibia

'

The Beginnings of the Rhenish Mission

The first small Mission Society was founded in Elberfeld on the second day of Pentecost in 1799. It was an ecumenical society right from its very beginnings - pastors and laymen from both the Reformed and Lutheran churches cooperated within the society. There were also close connections to Britisch and Dutch Missionary Societies. Donations were actively collected and potential missionaries were recruited for the Berlin seminary run by Pastor Jänicke.

In those days, the towns of Barmen and Elberfeld lay on opposite sides of the Wupper river (today they have been combined in the city of Wuppertal). In Barmen a Missionary Society started on 8. September 1818 that had close connections to the Basle Mission. This group in Barmen was led by the preacher Wilhelm Leipoldt. Initially the Barmen group sent its applicant missionaries to Basle after they had completed a preparatory course in Barmen. But from 1825 onward, the preparatory program was extended to a fully fledged seminary because the Basle Mission was no longer able to deal with the flood of applicants from Barmen.

South Africa and Namibia

The first missionaries were ordained and sent off to South Africa toward the end of 1828. Close contacts had been established with the London Missionary Society in the past, mainly via Pastor Jänicke in Berlin. This society had been active in Southern Africa for a long time and was prepared to help with the start of the activity of the Rhenish Mission. Other factors that favoured a start at the Cape were the Dutch language and the Protestant administration. Initially the Rhenish missionaries assisted on the stations of the LMS, but very soon they began to establish their own stations. The very first was a mission station located in the Cedarberg which was established in 1829. It was given the name Wuppertal. With that it predates the naming of the German city of the same name by nearly 100 years.

The area of activity very soon expanded northward beyond the borders of the Cape colony. This area was arid and only very sparsely populated and had, until then, escaped colonisation efforts by the colonial powers of the day. But the - often negative - effect of European settlement at the Cape was being felt ever more strongly even in this remote area. The local tribes such as the Herero and the Damara were challenged for control of the land by bands of Nama and people of mixed race (the 'basters') and many wars and skirmishes ensued between the groups. The missionaries often tried to broker peace agreements between the various parties and as a result they were often seen as a political asset by the local tribes. Despite this, the beginnings were very difficult because of the inhospitable climate and the vast distances to be covered. Despite these potential problems, the Rhenish missionaries persevered and were able to win many local people for Christ.

The Rhenish Mission in the 20th Century and beyond

The 20th Century saw the Rhenish Mission refocussing its work out of South Africa. The Rhenish missionary congregations were mostly integrated into the Dutch Reformed Church. Only Wuppertal was an exception and joined the Moravian Church. In contrast to this development, the work in Namibia continued throughout the 20th Century, despite the loss of the territory as a German colony after WWI. Two of the three large Lutheran churches in Nambia, i.e. ELKiN (DELK) and ELKRiN, trace their roots back to the Rhenish Mission.

The two World Wars and also the difficult period between the wars, brought many challenges and losses for the Rhenish Mission. During the Third Reich the Rhenish Mission distanced itself from the Nazi-fied 'German Christian' movement and together with the other missionary societies refused integration into the newly crated Protestant German State church. Instead, it associated itself with the 'Bekennende Kirche'. This meant that the period leading up to WW2 was already very challenging for the Rhenish Mission. But the war years and the total collapse after the war hindered the work to a much larger degree.

In 1971 the Rhenish Mission and the Bethel Mission joined forces to become the Vereinigten Evangelischen Mission (United Protestant Mission). The whole approach to missionisation changed radically in the period after the war, as the missions struggled to make sense of their role in history. The 'Vereinigte Evangelische Mission' therefore emphasises its partnerships with the independent churches that grew out its missionary work nowadays. Exchange and discussion between the various churches around the world are encouraged.

In 1828 the first few candidates of the Barmen seminary were due to complete their courses and the Society needed to decide where to send its missionaries and also how it would finance the missionary activity. On 23 September 1828 the missionary groups from Elberfeld, Barmen and Cologne (Köln) decided to amalgamate to form the Rhenish Mission Society. In later years, this was to become the largest Mission Society in the whole of Germany.

• The Rhenish Mission Society (RMS) began its work in 1829 in the Cape Colony and later expanded to the German colony of South West Africa. During the 1930s the mission stations in the Cape were handed over to the Dutch Reformed Church, with the exception of the first mission station, Wupperthal, that was handed over to the Moravians in the early sixties. In South West Africa (later Namibia) the Rhenish Mission conducted its work among the central and southern Nama and Herero. The Rhenish Mission became independent in 1957 as the Evangelical Lutheran Church in South-West Africa (Rhenish Mission), in 1990 renamed as the Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Republic of Namibia (ELCRIN). This church joined the Federation of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Southern Africa and later the Lutheran Communion in Southern Africa. The LTI Archive holds only one box of material pertaining to the RMS

  • Stellenbosch Cape building from 1823 , congregation about 1830
  • Wupperthal --1830
    Wupperthal (sometimes also spelt Wuppertal) is a small town in the Cederberg mountains in the Western Cape province of South Africa. It was founded in 1830 by two German missionaries of the Rhenish Missionary Society (Rheinische Mission), Theobald von Wurmb and Johann Gottlieb Leipoldt, grandfather of C. Louis Leipoldt – some 100 years before the city of Wuppertal was formally established in Germany. In 1965, after the Rhenish Mission had gradually scaled down their activities in Southern Africa over a period of 40 years, a decision was taken that Wupperthal in future should become part of the Moravian Church, which by that stage had already made the transition from a mission to an autonomous church in South Africa. The town remains a Moravian mission station to this day.
  • Saron -- 1848 -- The Mission Station was established by the Rhenish Missionary Society in 1848 by Johannes Heinrich Kulpmann, it was later taken over by the Dutch Reformed Church in 1945. The name, Afrikaans for Sharon, is of biblical origin (1 Chronicles 27:29, Song of Solomon 2:1), meaning 'flats' or ‘plain
  • Ebenhaezer - 1830 - Rhenish mission station established in 1831 ; on the road between Papendorp and Lutzville.

ref :

http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95...

https://safrika.org/rhenish_en.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wupperthal

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Papendorp

Rhodesia(Zimbabwe)

  1. Enkeldoorn (South-Rhodesia) 1895
  2. Bulawayo (Southern Rhodesia) 1895
  3. Melsetter (South-Rhodesia) 1895
  4. Salisbury (South-Rhodesia) 1901
  5. Fort Victoria (South-Rhodesia) 1936
  6. Gwelo (South-Rhodesia) 1920
  7. Marandellas (South-Rhodesia) 1950

Uniting Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa

' The Uniting Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa (UPCSA) was formed and constituted in 1999 as the outcome of the union between the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa (RPCSA) and the Presbyterian Church of Southern Africa (PCSA).

These two churches shared the same origin dating back to the 19th century when Britain took over the Cape Colony. Their distinctive characters were that the Presbyterian Church in Southern Africa was constituted among soldiers and settlers who arrived in the Cape in 1820, spreading North into Zimbabwe and Zambia. The Reformed Presbyterian Church on the other hand was a product of Scottish missions intended for the indigenous Africans, which started at Lovedale Mission in Alice. It became autonomous in 1923.

In 1896 the first Presbyterian congregation was founded in Rhodesia at Bulawayo, and later in 1903 in Salisbury (now Harare). Now there are 2 Presbyteries in Matabeland and Mashonaland. Currently there are 10 congregations and 5,000-10,000 members.[2]

The motto Nec tamen consumebatur is adapted from the Latin translation of Exodus 3:2 "...The Lord appeared to him in a blazing fire from the midst of a bush; and he looked, and behold, the bush was burning with fire, yet it was not consumed"

  1. Cape Town 1838

Presbyterian Church of Africa

'

The Presbyterian Church of Africa was founded in 1898 by Rev. James Mzimba, who broke from the Church of Scotland. He was born in Ngquakai, and his father was a deacon in the Presbyterian Church. Mzimba become a pastor, and was ordained in 1875. He was sent to Scotland to the anniversary of the Free Church of Scotland, but later severed its ties with the denomination. In 1899 he founded his own independent Presbyterian church. He died in 1911.[1] The first Synod was constituted in Alice, Cape Colony. Mzambi had a dispute with the Free Church of Scotland over land and over the use of money.[2] The Presbyterian Church of Africa is a predominantly black church.[3] It was a small group of churches with 2 presbyteries. The church grew steadily. It is one of the oldest independent churches in Africa.

Churches are located in Malawi, South Africa, Zambia, Zimbabwe. In Zimbabwe the church has one presbytery.[4] The headquarters of the church is in South Africa. It has 9 presbyteries, and church membership is 3,400,000 with 9,000 congregations and 600 house fellowships.[5]

The denomination affirms the Apostles Creed and Westminster Confession of Faith.[6]

It is a member of the World Communion of Reformed Churches.[7]

Roman Catholic Church

''''''

History of the Catholic Church in Southern Africa

The history of the Catholic Church in Southern Africa begins with the arrival of Bartholomew Diaz at Walvis Bay on 8th December 1487. He appropriately called it the gulf of Santa Maria de Conceicao. The first Mass, celebrated perhaps in late December 1487 or early January 1488, was celebrated on the island of the Holy Cross (named as such by Diaz), just off Port Elizabeth. 10 years later Vasco da Gama, on his way to India, would, on Christmas day, sight the land to which he gave the name “Tierra de Natal”. These explorers also brought missionaries with them, but the priests did not concentrate on evangelizing South Africa. Indeed, there is no evidence of any missionary work during these early days.

Between 1652 and 1795, under the Dutch East India Company rule, Catholicism was forbidden in South Africa. Only occasional visits of priests travelling on Portuguese or French boats were allowed. The same attitude prevailed between 1795 and 1802 under the British rule.

In 1804, the Dutch government opted for religious toleration, but two years later, the British rule prohibited again the presence of priests and lost no time in expelling them.

In 1818, Pope Pius VII appointed the Benedictine Dom Edward Bede Slater as the first Vicar Apostolic of the Cape. But he never set foot on South African soil as the Government in London forbade him to go there. He went to Mauritius where he was also the first Vicar Apostolic. Likewise his successor, Dom William Placid Morris also resided in Mauritius, never setting his foot on South African soil.

In 1837, a new dawn came with the appointment of Bishop Raymond Griffith, a Dominican, as a third Vicar Apostolic of the Cape and first bishop of South Africa. The history of the Catholic Church as a visible institution began to take shape.

In 1847, the Eastern Cape Vicariate was created. Father Aidan Devereux became its first Vicar Apostolic. It was him who invited the first religious sisters to South Africa. In 1852, the first missionaries of the newly-founded congregation of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, arrived in South Africa.

After many obstacles in establishing missions in South Africa, in 1861, Bishop Jean-Francois Allard travelled to the Kingdom of Lesotho. He obtained a mission from the King Moshoeshoe, the founder of the Basotho nation. This mission was to become one of the strongest Catholic communities in Africa.

In South Africa very little had been done for the indigenous people. The first significant result came with the Trappists of Mariannhill in the 1880’s, under the leadership of Abbot Francis Pfanner. They developed innovative missionary methods, combining farming, schooling and preaching. These efforts eventually led to conversions, contributing to the growth of Catholicism in Natal.

In 1925, the first South African born bishop, David O’Leary, was consecrated in Johannesburg. But the South African Church still relied heavily on expatriate clergy. It was only in 1948 that a national seminary (for whites) was founded.

In 1951, when Pope Pius XII established the hierarchy in southern Africa, not more than five out of twenty one bishops were born locally. The first four African priests had been ordained at the turn of the century, but it was only in the 1920’s in the diocese of Mariannhill, that the first concerted efforts were made to train a black clergy. This led to the establishment of a national seminary for blacks in 1947.

Despite its late coming on the missionary scene, the Southern African Catholic Church has shown remarkable signs of growth throughout the 20th century. Long seen as a foreign church, it has now gained influence in all sectors of society. At least 8% of the South African population is Catholic, putting it up to the second biggest church in the country after the Dutch Reformed Church. About 80% of its members are black.

Like most Christian Churches, the Catholic Church was relatively slow in opposing apartheid. It labored at the cost of the heritage of segregation that it had shared with the rest of the Church in most pre-liberation colonial situations.

During the first decades of Nationalist rule, the hierarchy often adopted a conciliatory stance towards the government in the hope of maintaining the Church’s network of schools, hospitals and welfare institutions. When in 1953 the government struck at church schools for African children with its Bantu education Act, the Catholic Church fought desperately to retain the educational system seen as its major aid to evangelization.

The Southern African Catholic Bishops’ Conference, created in 1947, made its first pronouncement against racism in 1952 and in 1957, condemned apartheid as “intrinsically evil”. Until the late 1970’s however, there were few acts of defiance against the state. Within the Church itself, a de facto discrimination was practiced at many levels.

In 1970’s, under the influence of the Vatican Council and spurred by protests from black clergy, catholic opposition to apartheid started to intensify. In 1972 a move began to desegregate the seminary. In 1976 the decision was taken with regard to both seminaries and schools. The Soweto uprising of 1976 led to a still greater awareness among Catholics for more active Catholic participation in various manifestations of Christian protest, activated mainly by the South African Council of Churches and the Christian Institute. Since February 1990, priority is given to conflict resolution, education to democracy and development.

The year 2002 saw two Catholic anniversaries take place in South Africa: the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate in Natal and the 50th anniversary of the proclamation of Our Lady of the Assumption as principal patron of South Africa.

The year 2017 saw the Bicentenary Celebration of the Foundation of the Catholic Church in Southern Africa. The official opening of this celebration was held in Cape Town where Southern Africa Catholic Bishops’ Conference Bishops gathered together in the Mother City to honor this special day. From the 25th June 2017, Southern Africa Catholic Bishops Conference (SACBC) set aside a period of a year, allowing all the faithful in the region an opportunity of celebrating the successes of the Catholic Church in Southern Africa. The celebration will officially come to an end on the 24th June 2018, whereby all the Bishops of the 29 SACBC dioceses, Priests and Religious will come together with the people of God to put officially to the end the 200 years celebration of the official foundation of the Catholic Church in Southern Africa.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in South Africa

'

The first Latter-day Saint missionaries to what is now South Africa, Jesse Haven, Leonard I. Smith and William H. Walker, arrived in Cape Colony at Cape Town on 19 April 1853. The first LDS branch was organized at Mowbray on August 16, 1853.[3] When the missionaries tried to organize meetings, mobs would disperse them. Local preachers told their congregations not to feed or house the missionaries and encouraged new LDS converts to leave the LDS church.[3]

In 1855, the original three missionaries went home and encouraged their fellow Latter-day Saints to emigrate to Utah and helped raise funds for them to do so. When local boat captains refused to transport Mormons, John Stock, Thomas Parker, and Charles Roper of Port Elizabeth sold their sheep and bought their own boat. Between 1855 and 1865, some 270 Saints emigrated to the United States from Port Elizabeth. In 1858, only 243 local members remained. Missionaries to Durban and Pietermaritzburg in 1863 experienced harassment similar to the first missionaries, like angry mobs and little protection from local constables. The mission closed in 1865 because of government restrictions, and a lack of knowledge of Afrikaans, isolation from church headquarters, and local opposition to polygamy.[3]

Most early converts were of British descent, and often people born in Britain because proselyting efforts focused on English-speaking individuals of European descent, since blacks were not allowed to hold the priesthood at the time and the missionaries did not know how to speak Afrikaans.[3] In 1905 Lyon baptized a man with the last name of Dunn who was the son of a Scottish father and a Zulu mother. Dunn is believed to be the first black African convert baptized in Africa, though he did not remain an active member for long.[4] Another early convert of African descent was William Paul Daniels, who joined the LDS Church in 1915 while visiting relatives in Utah. He met on multiple occasions with Joseph F. Smith before returning to South Africa.[

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints missionaries started proselyting to white English-speaking people in Cape Town in 1853. Most converts from this time emigrated to the United States. The mission was closed in 1865, but reopened in 1903.The South African government limited the amount of missionaries allowed to enter the country in 1921 and in 1955. Starting around 1930, a man had to trace his genealogy out of Africa to be eligible for the priesthood, since black people were not permitted to be ordained. In 1954 when David O. McKay visited South Africa, he removed the requirement for genealogical research for a priest to be ordained, stipulating only that "there is no evidence of his having Negro blood in his veins".

In 1978, after the 1978 Revelation on Priesthood removed the official prohibition against black priests, local LDS opposition continued. The South African government lifted the restrictions on visiting missionaries. The Book of Mormon was translated into Afrikaans in 1972, to Zulu in 1987, and to Xhosa in 2000. The Transvaal stake was organized in South Africa in 1970 and the Pretoria stake was organized in 1978. At some point between 2000 and 2005, the number of black members of the church in South Africa exceeded fifty percent.

Ref : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Church_of_Jesus_Christ_of_Latter-...

Wesleyan Missionary Society / Church

T H E FOUNDING OF METHODIST MISSIONS I N SOUTH AFRICA

Between 1812  and 1816 Ceylon, Australia, New  Zealand, and South Africa were supplied with missionaries. In 1813  the  Wesleyan  Methodist  Missionary  Society was  formed,  with  local  branches  throughout  Britain;  and  in  1815 the  Society  became an integral part of the Church's organization. The first steps in South African Methodism were propitious  in that they were taken by a layman, and were not due to any  artificial efforts to enlarge the bounds of the growing church.  A fervent Wesleyan soldier amved a t   the Cape of Good  Hope  in  1806  and  shared  his  convictions with  fellow  soldiers  and citizens. His place was later taken by a Sergeant Kenrick who,  in  1812, appealed  t o   London  for  a  minister  to care  for  the  growing interest,  and received his  answer  with  the arrival  of  the Rev.  J. McKenny a t   the Cape in  1814. The recruit, how-  ever, fell foul of the autocratic  Governor,  Lord Charles  Somerset, and finding no legal outlet for his energies, went to  Ceylon.  Two  years  later  a  party  of Wesleyans  reached  the  Cape and explored possible avenues of service, but discovering  that monopoly by the English and Dutch established churches  restricted  their  activities, they turned northwards and, under  the leadership  of Barnabas Shaw, founded their first mission,  Leliefontein, a t   Kamiesberg in Little Namaqualand toward the  end of 1816.
A humble church  was opened in the capital city Cape Town  in  1822,  with  Dr. John  Philip of the London Missionary Society performing the ceremony,  and  a  little  later  an  Anglican  bishop  consecrated  a  second  church  a t   nearby  Simonstown.  

Cape Town - 1822

Leliefontein - 1816

Makwassie - 1822

n 1822 the town was established as a mission station by Samuel Broadbent and Thomas Hodgson of the Wesleyan Missionary Society and the town was laid out in 1907

  • the first Christian mission station north of the Vaal River - built by Wesleyans Samuel Broadbent and Thomas Hogson in 1822.
  • the first White person born - July 1823
  • the first printed matter - a Tswana spelling book and religious tracts
  • the oldest town hall - built in 1910

Simons Town -- 1822

ref :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makwassie
https://digitalcommons.andrews.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1055...

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