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Profiles

  • Second Lieutenant Edward Woollard Penistone Lamb (1892 - 1918)
    July to September 1892 birth index Edward Woollard P. Lamb, Greenwich, volume 1d, page 1075. 1901 Census 7 Barn Street Marlborough, Wiltshire. aged 8 1911 Census 9 Endwell Road, Brockley S.E....
  • Brigadier Sir Richard Gambier-Parry, KCMG (1894 - 1965)
    Brigadier Sir Richard Gambier-Parry, KCMG (20 January 1894 – 19 June 1965) was a British military officer who served in both the army and the air force during World War I. He remained in military ser...
  • Norman Lancelot Ievers (1912 - 1993)
    References: Battle of Britain London Monument Turtle Bunbury Reference: Ancestry Genealogy - SmartCopy : May 21 2018, 11:38:42 UTC
  • Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Thomas Geoffrey Pike, GCB, CBE, DFC & Bar, DL (1906 - 1983)
    Photo: Sir Thomas Pike (right) with the Luftwaffe General Josef Kammhuber in 1956. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Thomas Geoffrey Pike, GCB, CBE, DFC & Bar, DL (29 June 1906 – 1 June 1983) was ...
  • Brian Trubshaw, CBE, MVO (1924 - 2001)
    Ernest Brian Trubshaw, CBE, MVO (29 January 1924 – 25 March 2001) was a leading test pilot, and the first British pilot to fly Concorde, in April 1969. Biography Brian Trubshaw was born in Liverp...

//s3.amazonaws.com/photos.geni.com/p13/50/33/66/0e/5344483f46bd639c/raf_badge_original.jpgRAF Badge//www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif
The Royal Air Force

United Kingdom

Image Right - Royal Airforce Logo

The purpose of this project is to give a short history of the Royal Air Force and to gather together Geni profiles of people who have served in the service.

Please link any RAF profiles to the project regardless of rank. Names with Bold links are to Geni profiles or projects. Other links take you to external biographical web pages.

The Royal Air Force (RAF) is the United Kingdom's aerial warfare force. It was formed toward the end of the First World War on 1 April 1918 and is the oldest independent air force in the world. At the end of the First World War in 1918 the RAF was he largest air force in the world. The RAF has taken a significant role in British military history, playing a large part in the Second World War where it fought its most famous campaign, the Battle of Britain.

Full sizes of the thumbnail images can be seen in the Gallery attached to the project or by clicking the thumbnail image. TIP - Use ctrl+the link to open the image in a separate tab, or use "back" to return to this project page) Sources for the images can be found in the image details as seen in the gallery.

See also

World War II - British Royal Air Force - No. 436 Squadron
World War II - British Royal Air Force - No. 154 Squadron

Geni Projects for Air Forces from other Countries

Please add any others as they are set up!

Polish Air Force in World War 2
United States Air Force

From full list WIKI List of Air Forces

History and Background

An Act of Parliament on 29 November 1917 establishing an Air Force and an Air Council received the Royal Assent. The Royal Air Force was established on 1 April 1918.

On 16 October 1908 Samuel Franklin Cody (an American pioneer of manned flight) made the first officially recognised aeroplane flight in Britain - a distance of 1,390 feet in a bamboo and canvas biplane known as British Army Aeroplane No1. There is lots of information at The early Years of Military Flight from Balloons in the French Revolutionary War to the Wright brothers’ historic achievement at Kitty Hawk in 1903 which paved the way for the "Air Battalion being set up in 1911 - previously called the "Balloon Section". There were two companies -

  1. No. 1 (Airship) Company at Farnborough, Hampshire, with Air Battalion HQ and
  2. No. 2 (Aeroplane) Company at Larkhill, Wiltshire, on Salisbury Plain.

Pilots were required to have practical skills such as good map-reading and sketching ability, be good sailors and have a knowledge of mechanics.

//s3.amazonaws.com/photos.geni.com/p13/77/e0/e5/3f/5344483f46e26697/lt_original.jpgLt. General Sir David Henderson The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) was established on 13 March 1912 when the need for a large organised corp was realised by the government. Lieutenant General Sir David Henderson led the Committee of Imperial Defence and over the following 6 years developed the roles of the RAF. He was described by Lord Trenchard as the 'Father of the RAF'.


The RFC had a military Wing, a Naval Wing, a Central Flying school at Upavon, Salisbury plain, a Reserve and the Royal Aircraft Factory at Farnborough.

In 1908 approval was given to build a rigid airship, resulting in the unsuccessful Naval Airship No.1 ("The Mayfly") being ready in May 1911. The experimental work with airships was abandoned but was re-opened in 1914, controlled by the Navy. In 1911 the first naval flying school was opened, and the first Royal Navy seaplane flew which focused on anti-submarine operations. The Naval Wing becoming known as the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) in July 1914.

World War One

At the outbreak of the First World War the Military Wing of the RFC went to France to support the British Expeditionary Force with 63 aeroplanes, 105 officers and 95 motor transport vehicles, involved largely with reconnaissance work. Air photography and air-to-ground wireless telegraphy were developed by the RFC so that the Army commanders could have fast and accurate information upon which to plan their campaigns.

The RNAS stayed in Britain to defend vulnerable areas against attack by hostile aircraft, particularly concerned with the defence of its dockyards and arsenals against air attack. In 1914 Winston Churchill decided that the RNAS would take over responsibility for home defence. Offensive action was taken against the threat of the Zeppelins which had bombed London in 1915 and 1916, dropping a total of 162 tons of bombs, killing 500 people and forcing the Government to allocate 17,000 officers and men to home air defence. They were initially countered successfully by a combination of aircraft, anti-aircraft guns, accidents and luck. On the night of 2/3 September 1916, Lieutenant Leefe Robinson WIKI Leefe Robinson was the first airman to destroy a Zeppelin over England and he was awarded the first home-based VC.

The weaknesses in the Britain’s air defence were exposed by the daylight raids by the German Gothas, and later Giants, in 1917. In the first daylight raid on 13 June 1917, 162 people were killed and 432 injured. Seventy-two tons of bombs fell within a one-mile radius of Liverpool Street Station, while others fell at Fenchurch Street and in the east end of London. The aircraft of both the RFC and the RNAS that took off to defend London were barely able to get within striking distance of the bombers which could either outfly or out climb them. When the Gothas returned on 7 July, the defenders made better contact, but only one Gotha was destroyed and the civilian casualty list was still high at 57 killed and 193 injured.

Because the reconnaissance work of the RFC was so effective it became necessary to try to curtail their activities and so aerial fighting became just as important. The fighters task was to destroy reconnaissance aircraft and not other fighters. A year into the war the fighter dominated air operations over the Western Front. The real fighter aircraft was born when the Dutchman, Anthony Fokker, developed the synchronisation gear that enabled bullets from a machine-gun to be fired through rotating propeller blades. The German Fokker Eindekkers (monoplanes), fitted with the synchronisation gear was superior to the slow, almost defenceless BE2s flying reconnaissance missions for the British Army in the winter of 1915-16.

New British fighters became available; firstly, the DH2 with a forward-firing Lewis gun (No 24 Squadron commanded by Major Lanoe Hawker - awarded the first VC for air fighting in July 1915 - became the first unit to be solely equipped with the DH 2s for air fighting in January 1916), and then later the Sopwith Camel, which alone destroyed 1294 enemy aircraft in combat in 1917-1918, and the SE5 fighters. James Thomas Byford McCudden (WIKI James McCudden) and Captain Albert Ball, (WIKI Albert Ball) both VCs, flew the SE5 with No 56 Squadron.

The German Albatross and Halberstadt single-seaters took a heavy toll of the RFC in late 1916 - early 1917 before the Camels and SE5s came into action.

//s3.amazonaws.com/photos.geni.com/p13/bc/0f/1c/72/5344483f46e15cc5/sir_hugh_trenchard_original.jpgMajor General Hugh Trenchard //www.geni.com/images/transparent.gif

Major General Hugh Trenchard took over command of the RFC in France in August 1915 from Sir David Henderson, with a goal of winning air superiority over the Western Front. The offensive use of the aeroplane and the new types of aircraft that eventually became available formed the basis of the RFC’s WW1 success.

Unification

The overlapping of the functions of the RFC and RNAS led to ideas of unification in 1916. General Jan Christian Smuts was asked to solve the air defence problems of Britain. He headed a government committee (the only other member was the Prime Minister) to examine both air defence arrangements and air organisation. His closest adviser Sir David Henderson, the first commander of the RFC in France and the Director-General of Military Aeronautics (from 1915). Smuts recommended an Air Ministry and Air Staff to amalgamate the RFC and the RNAS into a new Air Service that was independent of the Army and the Navy.

“There is absolutely no limit to the scale of its future independent war use. And the day may not be far off when aerial operations with their devastation of enemy lands and destruction of industries and populous centres on a vast scale may become one of the principal operations of war, to which the older forms of military and naval operations may become secondary and subordinate”. Smuts

Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothmere Lord Rothermere, a newspaper owner and brother of Lord Northcliffe (owner of the Daily Mail and The Times), becoming the first Secretary of State for the Royal Air Force (RAF) and President of the Air Council. The RAF came into being on 1 April 1918. Major-General Sir Frederick Sykes, WIKI Frederick Sykes who had been Chief Staff Officer of the RFC when it went to France in 1914, became the next Chief of Air Staff (CAS).

The independent RAF fought effectively from 1 April 1918 over the Western Front supporting the ground forces. The RAF blunted the German offensive and was crucial in the final counter-attacks of the Allied Armies leading up to the surrender of the German forces in November 1918. RAF Communiqué No 1 records that 57 enemy aircraft were brought down, 37 were driven out of control, 7 lost to anti-aircraft fire while RAF losses were 43; and 85 tons of bombs were dropped, 380,173 rounds fired at ground targets and 3302 photographs were taken. in November 1918, the RAF devoted three-quarters of its aircraft to aerial fighting and reconnaissance. As late as 30 October, 67 enemy aircraft were destroyed, 41 RAF aircraft were lost and 29 aircrew were killed or missing. When WW1 came to an end on 11 November 1918 the RAF, established for less than 8 months, had become the most powerful air force in the world. Its strength was 188 combat squadrons and 15 flights with a total of 22,647 aircraft and 291,170 officers and men, compared with the ill-equipped and inexperienced force that went to France 4 years earlier in August 1914.

Post WW1

The RAF expanded prior to and during the Second World War. Under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan of December 1939, the air forces of British Commonwealth countries trained and formed "Article XV squadrons" for service with RAF formations. By the end of the war the Royal Canadian Air Force had contributed more than 30 squadrons to serve in RAF formations; approximately a quarter of Bomber Command's personnel were Canadian. The Royal Australian Air Force represented around nine percent of all RAF personnel who served in the European and Mediterranean theatres.

In the Battle of Britain in 1940, the RAF (supplemented by 2 Fleet Air Arm Squadrons, Polish, Czecho-Slovak and other multinational pilots and ground personnel) defended the skies over Britain against the numerically superior German Luftwaffe. In what is perhaps the most prolonged and complicated air campaign in history, the Battle of Britain contributed significantly to the delay and subsequent indefinite postponement of Hitler's plans for an invasion of the United Kingdom (Operation Sealion).

The largest RAF effort during the war was the strategic bombing campaign against Germany by Bomber Command. While RAF bombing of Germany began almost immediately upon the outbreak of war, under the leadership of Air Chief Marshal Harris, these attacks became increasingly devastating from 1942 onward as new technology and greater numbers of superior aircraft became available. The RAF adopted night-time area bombing on German cities such as Hamburg and Dresden, and developed precision bombing techniques for specific operations, such as the "Dambusters" raid by No. 617 Squadron, or the Amiens prison raid known as Operation Jericho.


RAF Officer Ranks

  • Marshal of the Royal Air Force - MRAF
  • Air Chief Marshal - Air Chf Mshl
  • Air Marshal - Air Mshl
  • Air Vice-Marshal - AVM
  • Air Commodore - Air Cdre
  • Group Captain - Gp Capt
  • Wing Commander - Wg Cdr
  • Squadron Leader - Sqn Ldr
  • Flight Lieutenant - Flt Lt
  • Flying Officer - Fg Off
  • Pilot Officer - Pit Off
  • Acting Pilot Officer - APO
  • Officer Cadet - Odd Cdt


Chiefs of Air Staff

The Chief of the Air Staff (CAS) is the professional head of the Royal Air Force and a member of both the Chiefs of Staff Committee and the Air Force Board. The post was created in 1918.

Arranged in Chronological order Name, Date, Rank, Specialism

  1. 'Major General Hugh Trenchard (1873-1956); 3 January 1918; Major-General; Infantry
  2. Sir Frederick Sykes (1877-1954);13 April 1918; Major-General; Cavalry WIKI Air Vice Marshal Sir Frederick Hugh Sykes GCSI, GCIE, GBE, KCB, CMG
  3. Major General Hugh Trenchard (1873-1956); 31 March 1919; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Infantry
  4. Sir John Salmond (1881-1968); 1 January 1930; Air Chief Marshal; Infantry
  5. Sir Geoffrey Salmond (1878-1933); 1 April 1933; Air Chief Marshal; Artillery
  6. Sir John Salmond (1881-1968); 28 April 1933; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Infantry
  7. Sir Edward Ellington; 22 May 1933; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Artillery WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Edward Leonard Ellington, GCB, CMG, CBE (1877 – 1967)
  8. Sir Cyril Newall (1886-1963); 1 September 1937; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Infantry
  9. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Charles Portal, 1st Viscount Portal of Hungerford (1893-1971); 25 October 1940; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Engineers
  10. Sir Arthur Tedder (1890-1967); 1 January 1946; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Infantry
  11. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir John Slessor GCB, DSO, MC (1897-1979); 1 January 1950; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Fighters (biplanes)
  12. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir William Forster Dickson GCB, KBE, DSO, AFC, (1898-1987); 1 January 1953; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Naval aviation (biplanes) (1898 –1987)
  13. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Dermot Alexander Boyle GCB KCVO KBE AFC (1904 – 1993); 1 January 1956; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Fighters (biplanes)
  14. Sir Thomas Pike; 1 January 1960; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Fighters (biplanes) WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Thomas Geoffrey Pike GCB CBE DFC DL (1906–1983)
  15. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Charles Elworthy, Baron Elworthy, KG, GCB, CBE, DSO, LVO, DFC, AFC (1911-1993); 1 September 1963; Air Chief Marshal; Bombers (biplanes)
  16. Sir John Grandy (1913-2004); 1 April 1967; Air Chief Marshal; Fighters (biplanes) WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir John Grandy GCB, GCVO, KBE, DSO, KStJ
  17. Sir Denis Spotswood (1916-2001); 1 April 1971; Air Chief Marshal; Multirole (monoplane) WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Denis Frank Spotswood GCB CBE DSO DFC
  18. Sir Andrew Humphrey (1921-1977); 1 April 1974; Air Chief Marshal; Fighters (monoplane) WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Andrew Henry Humphrey GCB, OBE, DFC, AFC & Two Bars
  19. Sir Neil Cameron (1920-1985); 7 August 1976; Marshal of the Royal Air Force; Fighters (monoplane) WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Neil Cameron, Baron Cameron of Balhousie KT, GCB, CBE, DSO, DFC
  20. Sir Michael Beetham (1923-2015); 10 August 1977; Air Chief Marshal; Bombers (monoplane) WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Michael James Beetham GCB, CBE, DFC, AFC, DL
  21. Sir Keith Williamson; 15 October 1982; Air Chief Marshal; Fighters (fast jet)
  22. Sir David Craig; 15 October 1985; Air Chief Marshal; Fighters (fast jet)
  23. Sir Peter Harding; 14 November 1988; Air Chief Marshal; Bombers (jet)
  24. Sir Michael Graydon; 6 November 1992; Air Chief Marshal; Fighters (fast jet)
  25. Sir Richard Johns; 10 April 1997; Air Chief Marshal; Fighters (fast jet)
  26. Sir Peter Squire; 21 April 2000; Air Chief Marshal; Fighters (fast jet)
  27. Sir Jock Stirrup; 1 August 2003; Air Chief Marshal; Ground attack /reconnaissance (fast jet)
  28. Sir Glenn Torpy; 13 April 2006; Air Chief Marshal; Ground attack (fast jet)
  29. Sir Stephen Dalton; 31 July 2009; Air Chief Marshal; Ground attack (fast jet)
  30. Sir Andrew Pulford; 31 July 2013; Air Chief Marshal; Helicopters;


Marshal of the Royal Air Force

...the highest rank in the Royal Air Force (MRAF). Marshal of the Royal Air Force is a five-star rank. Instituted in 1919 the first officer to be promoted to MRAF was Sir Hugh Trenchard in 1927.

1927 - Major General Hugh Trenchard (1873-1956)

1933 - Sir John Salmond (1881-1968)

1936 - HM King Edward VIII (1894-1972)

1936 - HM King George VI (1895-1952)

1937 - Sir Edward Ellington (1877-1967 WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Edward Leonard Ellington, GCB, CMG, CBE (1877 – 1967)

1940 - Sir Cyril Newall (1886-1963)

1944 - Marshal of the Royal Air Force Charles Portal, 1st Viscount Portal of Hungerford (1893-1971)

1945 - Sir Arthur Tedder (1890-1967)

1946- Sholto Douglas, 1st Baron Douglas of Kirtleside (1893-1969)

1946- Sir Arthur "Bomber" Harris (1892-1984)

1953 HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh ( 921-... )

1954 - Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir William Forster Dickson GCB, KBE, DSO, AFC, (1898-1987)

1958 - Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Dermot Alexander Boyle GCB KCVO KBE AFC (1904 – 1993)

1958 - HRH Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (1900-1974)

1962 - Sir Thomas Pike WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Thomas Geoffrey Pike GCB CBE DFC DL (1906–1983)

1967 - Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Charles Elworthy, Baron Elworthy, KG, GCB, CBE, DSO, LVO, DFC, AFC (1911-1993)

1971 - Sir John Grandy (1913-2004) WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir John Grandy GCB, GCVO, KBE, DSO, KStJ

1974 - Sir Denis Spotswood (1916-2001 WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Denis Frank Spotswood GCB CBE DSO DFC

1976 - Sir Andrew Humphrey (1921-1977)WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Andrew Henry Humphrey GCB, OBE, DFC, AFC & Two Bars

1977 - Sir Neil Cameron (1920-1985);WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Neil Cameron, Baron Cameron of Balhousie KT, GCB, CBE, DSO, DFC

1982 - Sir Michael Beetham (1923-2015)WIKI Marshal of the Royal Air Force Sir Michael James Beetham GCB, CBE, DFC, AFC, DL

1985 - Sir Keith Williamson (1928 - ...)

1988 - Sir David Craig (1929 - ...)

1992 - Sir Peter Harding; (1933 - ...)

2012 - HRH Prince Charles, The Prince of Wales (1948 - ...)

2014 - Sir Jock Stirrup (1949 - ..)


Royal Air Force Air Chief Marshals

...arranged alphabetically

The rank of air chief marshal (Air Chf Mshl) is a four-star officer rank and currently the highest rank to which RAF officers may be promoted to in a professional capacity.

Name; Date rank first held; Time in rank; Date rank last held; Posts held in rank; Notes

  • Sir John Aiken; 8 July 1976; 1 year, 266 days; 31 March 1978; Air Member for Personnel; promoted 8 July 1976, retired 31 March 1978
  • Sir Michael Alcock; 1993; Approx. 3 years; 25 June 1996; AOC-in-C Logistics Command; promoted 1993, retired 25 June 1996
  • Sir John Allison; 8 March 1996; 3 years, 182 days; 6 September 1999; AOC-in-C Logistics Command AOC-in-C, Strike Command; promoted 8 March 1996, retired at own request 6 September 1999
  • Sir Michael Armitage; 1 July 1986; 3 years, 278 days; 5 April 1990; Air Member for Supply and Organisation Commandant Royal College of Defence Studies; promoted 1 July 1986, retired 5 April 1990
  • Sir Anthony Bagnall; 6 April 2000; 5 years, 208 days; 31 October 2005; AOC-in-C Strike Command Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff; promoted 11 April 2000, retired 31 October 2005
  • Sir John Baker; 2 January 1952; 4 years, 350 days; 17 December 1956; Deputy Chief of the Air Staff Vice-Chief of the Air Staff Controller of Aircraft; promoted 2 January 1952, retired 17 December 1956
  • The Earl of Bandon; 1 July 1959; 4 years, 153 days; 1 December 1963; C-in-C Far East Air Force Commander Allied Air Forces Central Europe; promoted 1 July 1959, retired 1 December 1963
  • Sir Denis Barnett; 1 July 1962; 2 years, 149 days; 27 November 1964; AOC-in-C Near East Air Force * Commander British Forces Cyprus * Administrator of the Sovereign Base Areas 5; promoted 1 July 1962, 6 retired 27 November 1964
  • Sir John Barraclough; 3 September 1973; 2 years, 213 days; 3 April 1976; Air Secretary
  • Commandant Royal College of Defence Studies; promoted 3 September 1973, retired 3 April 1976
  • Sir Arthur Barratt; 1 January 1946; 1 year, 85 days; 27 March 1947; Inspector-General of the RAF; promoted 1 January 1946, 0 retired 27 March 1947
  • Sir Michael Beavis; 14 March 1984; 2 years, 295 days; 3 January 1987; DC-in-C Allied Forces Central Europe; acting promotion 14 March 1984, substantive promotion 1 July 1984, retired 3 January 1987
  • Sir Michael Beetham; 21 May 1977; 5 years, 147 days; 15 October 1982; C-in-C RAF Germany Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 21 May 1977, promoted marshal of the RAF 15 October 1982
  • Sir John Boothman; 1 October 1954; 1 year, 215 days; 3 May 1956; AOC-in-C Coastal Command; promoted 1 October 1954, retired 3 May 1956
  • Sir Norman Bottomley; 23 March 1947; 284 days; 1 January 1948; Inspector-General of the RAF; promoted 23 March 1947, retired 1 January 1948
  • Sir Frederick Bowhill; 1 November 1939; 5 years, 148 days; 29 March 1945; AOC-in-C Coastal Command Commander of the RAF's Ferry Organisation AOC Ferry Command
  • AOC-in-C Transport Command; temporary promotion 1 November 1939, acting promotion 1 July 1942, retained the rank on retirement 29 March 1945
  • Sir Dermot Boyle; 1 January 1956; 2 years, 0 days; 1 January 1958; Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 January 1956, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 January 1958
  • Sir Harry Broadhurst; 14 February 1957; 4 years, 15 days; 1 March 1961; AOC-in-C Bomber Command Commander Allied Air Forces Central Europe; promoted 14 February 1957, retired 1 March 1961
  • Sir Robert Brooke-Popham; 1 January 1935; Approx. 4 years, 10 months; May 1942; AOC-in-C, Air Defence of Great Britain Inspector-General of the RAF AOC-in-C RAF Middle East Head of the RAF Training Mission in Canada Head of the RAF Training Mission in South Africa C-in-C Far East Command; promoted 1 January 1935, retired 6 March 1937, restored to active service in 1939, final retirement May 1942
  • Sir Simon Bryant; 18 June 2010; 2 years, 6 days; 24 June 2012; C-in-C Air Command; promoted 18 June 2010 retired 24 June 2012
  • Sir Brian Burnett; 7 October 1967; 4 years, 156 days; 11 March 1972; Air Secretary C-in-C Far East Command; promoted 7 October 1967, retired 11 March 1972
  • Sir Charles Burnett; 1 January 1940; Approx. 2 years, 5 months; June 1942; Chief of the Australian Air Staff; acting promotion 1 January 1940, retired June 1942
  • Sir Brian Burridge; 31 July 2003; 2 years, 171 days; 18 January 2006; AOC-in-C Strike Command; promoted 31 July 2003, retired 18 January 2006
  • Sir Neil Cameron; 1 November 1975; 1 year, 272 days; 31 July 1977; Air Member for Personnel Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 November 1975, promoted marshal of the RAF 31 July 1977
  • Sir John Cheshire; 11 March 1997; Approx. 3 years; 2000; C-in-C Allied Forces North West Europe; promoted 11 March 1997, retired 2000
  • Sir Walter Cheshire; 19 November 1962; 2 years, 138 days; 6 April 1965; Air Member for Personnel; promoted 19 November 1962, retired 6 April 1965
  • The Honourable Sir Ralph Cochrane; 1 March 1949; 3 years, 273 days; 29 November 1952; AOC-in-C Flying Training Command Vice Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 March 1949, retired 29 November 1952
  • Sir Hugh Constantine; 12 September 1961; 2 years, 261 days; 30 May 1964; Commandant of the Imperial Defence College; promoted 12 September 1961, 5 retired 30 May 1964
  • Sir Alec Coryton; 15 May 1950; 1 year, 0 days; 15 May 1951; Chief Executive Guided Weapons at the Ministry of Supply; promoted 15 May 1950, retired 15 May 1951
  • Sir Christopher Courtney; 1 January 1942; 3 years, 312 days; 9 November 1945; Air Member for Supply and Organisation; temporary promotion 1 January 1942, 0 permanent promotion 1 June 1943, retired 9 November 1945
  • Sir David Cousins; 1 August 1997; 1 year, 102 days; 11 November 1998; AOC-in-C Personnel and Training Command; promoted 1 August 1997, retired 11 November 1998
  • Sir David Craig; 20 September 1982; 6 years, 55 days; 14 November 1988; AOC-in-C Strike Command Chief of the Air Staff; acting promotion 20 September 1982, 5 substantive promotion 1 July 1983, promoted marshal of the RAF 14 November 1988
  • Sir Kenneth Cross; 1 October 1965; 1 year, 146 days; 24 February 1967; AOC-in-C Transport Command; promoted 1 October 1965, retired 24 February 1967
  • Sir Stephen Dalton; 31 July 2009; 4 years, 168 days; 15 January 2014; Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 31 July 2009, retired 15 January 2014
  • Sir John Davis; 1 January 1967; 2 years, 171 days; 21 June 1969; AOC-in-C Flying Training Command AOC-in-C Training Command; promoted 1 January 1967, retired 21 June 1969
  • Sir Walter Dawson; 1 June 1956; 3 years, 340 days; 6 May 1960; Inspector-General of the RAF Air Member for Supply and Organisation; promoted 1 June 1956, retired 6 May 1960
  • Sir John Day; 10 April 2001; 2 years, 144 days; 1 September 2003; AOC-in-C Strike Command; promoted 10 April 2001, retired 1 September 2003
  • Sir William Dickson; 8 January 1951; 3 years, 144 days; 1 June 1954; Air Member for Supply and Organisation Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 18 January 1951, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 June 1954
  • Sir Sholto Douglas; 6 June 1945; 209 days; 1 January 1946; C-in-C British Forces of Occupation, Germany; promoted 6 June 1945, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 January 1946
  • Sir Hugh Dowding; 1 January 1937; 5 years, 195 days; 15 July 1942; AOC-in-C, Fighter Command Head of British Air Commission, Washington; promoted 1 January 1937, last day of paid service 14 July 1942, retired 15 July 1942
  • Sir Alfred Earle; 1 April 1964; 2 years, 66 days; 6 June 1966; Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff; promoted 1 April 1964, retired 6 June 1966
  • Sir Edward Ellington; 1 January 1933; 4 years, 0 days; 1 January 1937; Air Member for Personnel Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 January 1933, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 January 1937
  • Sir William Elliot; 1 April 1951; 3 years, 17 days; 18 April 1954; Chairman of the British Joint Services Mission in Washington; promoted 1 April 1951, retired 18 April 1954
  • Sir Charles Elworthy; 1 September 1962; 4 years, 212 days; 1 April 1967; C-in-C Middle East Command Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 September 1962, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 April 1967
  • Sir Basil Embry; 16 July 1953; 2 years, 225 days; 26 February 1956; C-in-C Allied Air Forces Central Europe; acting promotion 16 July 1953, substantive promotion 1 December 1953, retired 26 February 1956
  • Sir David Evans; 26 March 1977; 6 years, 136 days; 9 August 1983; AOC-in-C, Strike Command Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff; acting promotion 26 March 1977, substantive promotion 31 March 1978, retired 9 August 1983
  • Sir Donald Evans; 1 March 1967; 2 years, 364 days; 28 February 1970; Air Secretary Commandant Royal College of Defence Studies; promoted 1 March 1967, retired 28 February 1970
  • Sir Douglas Evill; 1 January 1946; 1 year, 14 days; 15 January 1947; Vice-Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 January 1946, retired 15 January 1947
  • Sir Peter Fletcher; 1 May 1971; 2 years, 90 days; 30 July 1973; Controller of Aircraft; promoted 1 May 1971, retired 30 July 1973
  • Sir Francis Fogarty; 1 November 1953; 3 years, 89 days; 29 January 1957; Air Member for Personnel; promoted 1 November 1953, retired 29 January 1957
  • Sir Robert Foster; 28 January 1953; 1 year, 4 days; 1 February 1954; C-in-C Second Tactical Air Force; promoted 28 January 1953, retired 1 February 1954
  • Sir Christopher Foxley-Norris; 1 December 1970; 3 years, 142 days; 22 April 1974; C-in-C Second Tactical Air Force Chief of Personnel and Logistics; promoted 1 December 1970, retired 22 April 1974
  • Sir Wilfrid Freeman; 27 May 1940; 2 years, 145 days; 19 October 1942; Air Member for Development and Production Vice-Chief of the Air Staff; temporary promotion 27 May 1940, substantive promotion 14 April 1942 (with seniority backdated to 27 May 1940), retired 19 October 1942
  • Sir Robert Freer; 1 January 1980; 2 years, 92 days; 3 April 1982; Commandant Royal College of Defence Studies; promoted 1 January 1980, retired 3 April 1982
  • Sir Joe French; 13 January 2006; Approx. 1 year; 2007; AOC-in-C Strike Command; promoted 13 January 2006, 1 retired 2007
  • Sir Guy Garrod; 1 January 1946; 2 years, 282 days; 9 October 1948; Permanent RAF Representative on the UN Military Staff Committee Head of the RAF Delegation, Washington; promoted 1 January 1946, retired 9 October 1948
  • Sir Joseph Gilbert; 1 January 1987; 2 years, 220 days; 9 August 1989; Deputy C-in-C Allied Forces Central Europe; promoted 1 January 1987, retired 9 August 1989
  • Sir John Gingell; 7 April 1981; 3 years, 76 days; 22 June 1984; Deputy C-in-C Allied Forces Central Europe; acting promotion 7 April 1981, substantive promotion 1 January 1982 retired 22 June 1984
  • Sir John Grandy; 1 April 1965; 6 years, 0 days; 1 April 1971; C-in-C Far East Command Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 April 1965, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 April 1971
  • Sir Michael Graydon; 31 May 1990; 7 years, 70 days; 9 August 1997; AOC-in-C, RAF Support Command AOC-in-C, Strike Command Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 31 May 1990, retired 9 August 1997
  • Sir David Harcourt-Smith; 1 January 1987; 2 years, 139 days; 20 May 1989; Controller Aircraft; promoted 1 January 1987, 15 retired 20 May 1989
  • Sir Peter Harding; 1 January 1985; 7 years, 310 days; 6 November 1992; AOC-in-C Strike Command Chief of the Air Staff Chief of the Defence Staff; promoted 1 January 1985, promoted marshal of the RAF 6 November 1992
  • Sir Donald Hardman; 1 April 1955; 2 years, 303 days; 29 January 1958; Air Member for Supply and Organisation; promoted 1 April 1955, 27 retired 29 January 1958
  • Sir Arthur Harris; 18 March 1943; 2 years, 289 days; 1 January 1946; AOC-in-C Bomber Command; acting promotion 18 March 1943, temporary promotion 16 August 1944, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 January 1946
  • Sir Anthony Heward; 29 April 1974; 2 years, 62 days; 30 June 1976; Air Member for Supply and Organisation; promoted 29 April 1974, retired 30 June 1976
  • Sir Roderic Hill; 16 January 1947; 1 year, 167 days; 1 July 1948; Air Member for Technical Services; promoted 16 January 1947, retired 1 July 1948
  • Sir Patrick Hine; 1 July 1985; 6 years, 62 days; 1 September 1991; Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff Air Member for Supply and Organisation AOC-in-C Strike Command; promoted 1 July 1985, retired 1 September 1991
  • Sir Lewis Hodges; 1 May 1971; 5 years, 1 day; 2 May 1976; Air Member for Personnel Deputy C-in-C HQ Allied Forces Central Europe; promoted 1 May 1971, retired 2 May 1976
  • Sir Derek Hodgkinson; 22 April 1974; 2 years, 16 days; 8 May 1976; Air Secretary; promoted 22 April 1974, retired 8 May 1976
  • Sir Leslie Hollinghurst; 15 May 1950; 2 years, 226 days; 27 December 1952; Air Member for Personnel; promoted 15 May 1950, retired 27 December 1952
  • Sir Edmund Hudleston; 1 March 1961; 6 years, 96 days; 5 June 1967; AOC-in-C Transport Command Commander Allied Air Forces Central Europe Deputy C-in-C Allied Forces Central Europe; promoted 1 March 1961, retired 5 June 1967
  • Sir Andrew Humphrey; 1 December 1970; 5 years, 249 days; 6 August 1976; AOC-in-C Strike Command Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 December 1970, promoted marshal of the RAF 6 August 1976
  • Sir Ronald Ivelaw-Chapman; 1 November 1953; 3 years, 362 days; 29 October 1957; Vice-Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 November 1953, retired 29 October 1957
  • Sir Brendan Jackson; 1 January 1990; 3 years, 308 days; 5 November 1993; Air Member for Supply and Organisation; promoted 1 January 1990, retired 5 November 1993
  • Sir Richard Johns; 30 June 1994; Approx. 5 years, 10 months; April 2000; C-in-C Allied Forces North West Europe Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 30 June 1994, retired April 2000
  • Sir Philip Joubert de la Ferté; 1 July 1941; 2 years, 145 days; 23 November 1943; temporary promotion 1 July 1941, substantive promotion 14 April 1942 (with seniority backdated to 1 July 1941), rank relinquished 23 November 1943, rank retained on retirement 14 November 1945
  • Sir Thomas Kennedy; 1 July 1983; 2 years, 313 days; 10 May 1986; promoted 1 July 1983, retired 10 May 1986
  • Sir Michael Knight; 1 July 1986; 3 years, 140 days; 18 November 1989; promoted 1 July 1986, retired 18 November 1989
  • Sir Wallace Kyle; 1 January 1964; 4 years, 313 days; 9 November 1968; Vice-Chief of the Air Staff AOC-in-C Bomber Command AOC-in-C Strike Command; promoted 1 January 1964, retired 9 November 1968
  • Sir Peter Le Cheminant; 2 February 1976; 3 years, 206 days; 27 August 1979; promoted 2 February 1976, retired 27 August 1979
  • Sir David Lee; 7 October 1967; 3 years, 163 days; 19 March 1971; promoted 7 October 1967, retired 19 March 1971
  • Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory; 15 December 1943; 335 days; 14 November 1944; C-in-C Allied Expeditionary Air Force; acting promotion 15 December 1943, substantive temporary promotion 16 August 1944, died on active service 14 November 1944
  • Sir Hugh Lloyd; 15 May 1951; 2 years, 20 days; 4 June 1953; AOC-in-C Bomber Command; promoted 15 May 1951 (seniority dated from 1 April 1951), retired 4 June 1953
  • Sir Clive Loader; 30 March 2007; 2 years, 124 days; 1 August 2009; C-in-C Air Command; promoted 30 March 2007, retired 1 August 2009
  • Sir Arthur Longmore; 1 November 1939; 2 years, 120 days; 1 March 1942; AOC-in-C Training Command Member of British Air Mission to Australia and New Zealand AOC-in-C Middle East Command Inspector-General of the RAF; temporary promotion 1 November 1939, rank retained on retirement 1 March 1942, recalled to active service in the rank of air vice-marshal on 1 August 1943, resumed the rank of air chief marshal on final retirement 1 June 1944
  • Sir Douglas Lowe; 3 November 1975; 7 years, 292 days; 22 August 1983; Controller of Aircraft Chief of Defence Procurement; promoted 3 November 1975, retired 22 August 1983
  • Sir Edgar Ludlow-Hewitt; 1 July 1937; 8 years, 141 days; 19 November 1945; AOC-in-C Bomber Command Inspector-General of the RAF; promoted 1 July 1937, retired 19 November 1945
  • Sir William MacDonald; 1 September 1963; 2 years, 344 days; 11 August 1966; promoted 1 September 1963, 70 retired 11 August 1966
  • Sir Nigel Maynard; 8 May 1976; 1 year, 13 days; 21 May 1977; promoted 8 May 1976, retired at own request 21 May 1977
  • Sir Theodore McEvoy; 1 November 1958; 4 years, 18 days; 19 November 1962; promoted 1 November 1958, retired 19 November 1962
  • Sir Charles Medhurst; 1 May 1948; 1 year, 353 days; 19 April 1950; promoted 1 May 1948, retired 19 April 1950
  • Sir Walter Merton; 1 June 1961; 2 years, 89 days; 29 August 1963; promoted 1 June 1961, retired 29 August 1963
  • Sir George Mills; 1 January 1956; 6 years, 260 days; 18 September 1962; Commander ofAllied Air Forces Central Europe Chairman of the NATO Standing Group; acting promotion 1 January 1956, substantive promotion 1 June 1956, retired 18 September 1962
  • Sir William Mitchell; 9 September 1939; 247 days; 13 May 1940; AOC-in-C RAF Middle East Inspector-General of the RAF; acting promotion 9 September 1939, rank relinquished 13 May 1940, retained the rank on retirement 1 October 1941
  • Sir Chris Moran; 3 April 2009; 1 year, 53 days; 26 May 2010; C-in-C Air Command; promoted 3 April 2009, died suddenly while serving 26 May 2010
  • Sir Cyril Newall; 1 April 1937; 3 years, 186 days; 4 October 1940; Air Member for Supply and Organisation Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 April 1937, promoted marshal of the RAF 4 October 1940
  • Sir Roger Palin; 22 April 1991; 2 years, 70 days; 1 July 1993; promoted 22 April 1991, retired 1 July 1993
  • Sir Keith Park; 1 August 1945; 1 year, 141 days; 20 December 1946; acting promotion 1 August 1945, rank retained on retirement 20 December 1946
  • Sir David Parry-Evans; 1 July 1989; 2 years, 243 days; 29 February 1992; promoted 1 July 1989, retired 29 February 1992
  • Sir Hubert Patch; 1 April 1959; 2 years, 58 days; 29 May 1961; promoted 1 April 1959, retired 29 May 1961
  • Sir Stuart Peach; 1 December 2011; 4 years, 72 days; active in rank; Commander ofJoint Forces Command Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff; promoted 1 December 2011
  • Sir Richard Peirse; 1 July 1942; 2 years, 309 days; 6 May 1945; temporary promotion 1 July 1942, retained the rank on retirement 6 May 1945
  • Sir Claude Pelly; 14 February 1957; 2 years, 272 days; 13 November 1959; promoted 14 February 1957, retired 13 November 1959
  • Sir Thomas Pike; 1 November 1957; 4 years, 156 days; 6 April 1962; promoted 1 November 1957, promoted marshal of the RAF 6 April 1962
  • Sir George Pirie; 1 March 1949; 2 years, 228 days; 15 October 1951; promoted 1 March 1949, retired 15 October 1951
  • Sir Malcolm Pledger; 2 September 2002; 2 years, 228 days; 18 April 2005; Chief of Defence Logistics; promoted 2 September 2002, retired 18 April 2005
  • Sir Charles Portal; 14 April 1942; 2 years, 48 days; 1 June 1944; promoted 14 April 1942, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 June 1944
  • Sir Thomas Prickett; 1 May 1969; 1 year, 153 days; 1 October 1970; promoted 1 May 1969, retired at own request 1 October 1970
  • Sir Andrew Pulford; 22 July 2013; 2 years, 204 days; active in rank; Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 22 July 2013
  • Sir James Robb; 1 October 1948; 3 years, 56 days; 26 November 1951; promoted 1 October 1948, medically retired 26 November 1951
  • Sir Rex Roe; 1 December 1978; 2 years, 243 days; 1 August 1981; promoted 1 December 1978, retired at own request 1 August 1981
  • Sir John Rogers; 1 January 1984; 2 years, 89 days; 31 March 1986; promoted 1 January 1984, retired 31 March 1986
  • Sir Frederick Rosier; 1 March 1970; 3 years, 186 days; 3 September 1973; Deputy C-in-C Allied Forces Central Europe; promoted 1 March 1970, retired 3 September 1973
  • Sir Geoffrey Salmond; 1 January 1933; 116 days; 27 April 1933; AOC-in-C, Air Defence of Great Britain Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 January 1933, died of natural causes while serving 27 April 1933
  • Sir John Salmond; 1 January 1929; 4 years, 0 days; 1 January 1933; Air Member for Personnel Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 January 1929, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 January 1933
  • Sir Arthur Sanders; 16 October 1951; 4 years, 105 days; 29 January 1956; promoted 16 October 1951, retired 29 January 1956
  • Sir Hugh Saunders; 15 May 1950; 3 years, 130 days; 22 September 1953; promoted 15 May 1950, retired 22 September 1953
  • Sir Anthony Skingsley; 1 May 1989; 3 years, 244 days; 31 December 1992; promoted 1 May 1989, retired 31 December 1992
  • Sir John Slessor; 1 January 1946; 4 years, 158 days; 8 June 1950; promoted 1 January 1946, promoted marshal of the RAF 8 June 1950
  • Sir Denis Smallwood; 30 July 1973; 2 years, 336 days; 30 June 1976; promoted 30 July 1973, retired 30 June 1976
  • Sir Denis Spotswood; 1 November 1968; 5 years, 150 days; 31 March 1974; AOC-in-C, Strike Command Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 November 1968, promoted marshal of the RAF 31 March 1974
  • Sir Peter Squire; 29 March 1999; 4 years, 251 days; 5 December 2003; AOC-in-C Strike Command Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 29 March 1999, retired 5 December 2003
  • Sir John Stacey; 1 June 1979; 1 year, 214 days; 1 January 1981; Deputy Commander-in-Chief Allied Forces Central Europe; promoted 1 June 1979, died suddenly while serving 1 January 1981
  • Sir Neville Stack; 2 May 1976; 1 year, 285 days; 11 February 1978; promoted 2 May 1976, retired at own request 11 February 1978
  • Sir Michael Stear; 27 August 1992; 4 years, 45 days; 11 October 1996; promoted 27 August 1992, retired 11 October 1996
  • Sir Alasdair Steedman; 26 October 1977; 3 years, 90 days; 24 January 1981; promoted 26 October 1977, retired 24 January 1981
  • Sir John Steel; 1 July 1936; 1 year, 73 days; 12 September 1937; AOC-in-C, Air Defence of Great Britain AOC-in-C, Bomber Command; promoted 1 July 1936, retired 12 September 1937, recalled to active service in the rank of air vice-marshal for periods 28 August 1939 to 27 May 1940 and 15 April 1941 to 26 September 1945, resumed the rank of air chief marshal on final retirement (with seniority backdated to 1 July 1936) 26 September 1945
  • Sir Jock Stirrup; 1 August 2003; 7 years, 246 days; 4 April 2011; Chief of the Air Staff
  • Chief of the Defence Staff; promoted 1 August 2003, retired 4 April 2011
  • Sir Arthur Tedder; 1 July 1942; 3 years, 73 days; 12 September 1945; temporary promotion 1 July 1942, substantive promotion 6 June 1945, promoted marshal of the RAF 12 September 1945
  • Sir Peter Terry; 1 March 1981; 3 years, 231 days; 18 October 1984; Deputy C-in-CAllied Forces Central Europe Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe; promoted 1 March 1981, retired 18 October 1984
  • Sir John Thomson; 4 November 1992; 1 year, 248 days; 10 July 1994; AOC-in-C Strike Command C-in-C Allied Forces North West Europe; promoted 4 November 1992, died of natural causes while serving 10 July 1994
  • Sir Glenn Torpy; 13 April 2006; 3 years, 109 days; 31 July 2009; Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 13 April 2006, retired 31 July 2009
  • Sir Hugh Trenchard; 1 April 1922; 4 years, 275 days; 1 January 1927; Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 April 1922, promoted marshal of the RAF 1 January 1927
  • Sir Ruthven Wade; 31 March 1976; 2 years, 0 days; 31 March 1978; promoted 31 March 1976, retired at own request 31 March 1978
  • Sir Augustus Walker; 1 March 1967; 3 years, 128 days; 7 July 1970; Deputy C-in-CAllied Forces Central Europe; promoted 1 March 1967, retired 7 July 1970
  • Sir Neil Wheeler; 11 March 1972; 3 years, 298 days; 3 January 1976; Controller Aircraft; promoted 11 March 1972, retired 3 January 1976
  • Sir John Whitworth-Jones; 28 January 1953; 1 year, 121 days; 29 May 1954; Air Member for Supply and Organisation; promoted 28 January 1953, retired 29 May 1954
  • Sir Keith Williamson; 1 March 1981; 4 years, 228 days; 15 October 1985; AOC-in-C Strike Command Chief of the Air Staff; promoted 1 March 1981, promoted marshal of the RAF 15 October 1985
  • Sir John Willis; 4 April 1995; 2 years, 281 days; 10 January 1998; Vice-Chief of the Defence Staff; promoted 4 April 1995, retired 10 January 1998
  • Sir Andrew Wilson; 16 April 1993; 2 years, 132 days; 26 August 1995; Air Member for Personnel AOC-in-CPersonnel and Training Command; promoted 16 April 1993, retired prematurely 26 August 1995
  • Sir Bill Wratten; 1 September 1994; 3 years, 65 days; 5 November 1997; AOC-in-C, Strike Command; promoted 1 September 1994, retired 5 November 1997


RAF Other Ranks -

  • Warrant officer
  • Flight sergeant
  • Chief technician
  • Sergeant Corporal
  • Lance corporal - RAF Regiment only
  • Senior aircraftman/woman technician
  • Senior aircraftman/woman
  • Leading aircraftman/woman
  • Aircraftman/Woman

RAF Air Crew Ranks

  • Master aircrew
  • Flight sergeant aircrew
  • Sergeant aircrew

But see WIKI Other Ranks for changes etc.

Casualties

There are 3116 WWI casualties listed at CWGC with the United Kingdom and Royal Air Force as filters. For WW2 there are 7960 records.

See

World War One - Casualties
World War II Casualties

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Getting Involved

Free to follow, request to collaborate

 

To join the project use the request link under "actions" at the top right of the page.

Visit

Geni's Project Plaza
Working with Projects
Wicked Wiki
Geni Wikitext, Unicode and images which gives a great deal of assistance.
See the discussion Project Help: How to add Text to a Project - Starter Kit to get you going!

References, Sources and Further Reading

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