Parker Vincent Adkins

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Parker Vincent Adkins

Birthdate:
Birthplace: Mac Humps Creek, Goochland, Goochland County, Virginia, United States
Death: Died in Montgomery County, Virginia, United States
Place of Burial: Perisburg, Giles, Virginia, United States
Immediate Family:

Son of William Vincent Adkins and Elizabeth Adkins
Husband of Mary Polly Adkins and Blue Sky "Mary" Cornstalk
Father of Parker V. Adkins; Littleberry Adkins; Isom Adkins; Hezekiah Adkins, Sr., Revolutionary War soldier; Susan "Susannah" McGriff and 5 others
Brother of Richard Adkins; Jacob Adkins; Henry Hezekiah Adkins, I; William V Adkins, Jr.; Sherrod B Adkins and 4 others

Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Parker Vincent Adkins

Parker V. Adkins married Mary Polly Fry about 1754 in Halifax County, Virginia. He participated in the Battle of Point Pleasant 1773 (where Bluesky and her family lived) and his name along with his sons Hezekiah and Millington is listed on the Revolutionary War Soldiers Monument in Giles County, Perisberg, Virginia. Family history and Indian records indicate that Littleberry & Charity were the only children of Bluesky and Parker. Both children were taken to the home of Parker either shortly before or after the death of Bluesky. Family history is that when the Battle of Point Pleasant ended, Parker took his children by Bluesky, Littleberry and Charity, back home with him and Mary raised them as her own. Parker and Mary Fry had several other children at the time. One has to assumed that Parker and Bluesky were not "married" by white mans law, but Indian law/customs. Apparently he was married to Mary Fry and according to the birth dates of some of their children, he was either still married and had "an Indian marriage" to Bluesky or just had an affair.

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Parker was in the Revolutionary War - Battle of Point Pleasant. Parker in battle of 1773. Name on monument along with his sons Hezekiah and Millington. Also on monument of Revolutionary war soldiers of Gillis County, Persiberg, Virginia.


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the Battle of Point Pleasant, 1774

From "Manufactured History": Re-Fighting the Battle of Point Pleasant1 Volume 56 (1997), pp. 76-87

Lewis was incensed at Poffenbarger's "perversion" of history and was adamant that Point Pleasant was not a battle of the Revolutionary War. His 1909 book, History of the Battle of Point Pleasant, discusses Point Pleasant's place in history but never states outright that it was not a battle of the Revolution. The following is the text of a 1909 speech found in Lewis's collected papers and believed to be his most forthright pronouncement on the subject. It is unknown whether this speech was ever presented publicly.

THE BATTLE OF POINT PLEASANT NOT THE FIRST BATTLE OF THE REVOLUTION IT'S TRUE PLACE IN AMERICAN HISTORY.

CHIEF EVENT OF THE LAST AMERICAN COLONIAL WAR.

State pride-a love for my native State-has for many years, and now prompts me to claim for her all the honors to which she rightfully belongs, but never have I, nor can I now do this, when it means a sacrifice of historic truth. In an address delivered before the Ohio Valley Historical Association, at Marietta, in 1908, I attempted to explain that the battle of Point Pleasant was in nowise the first, nor any other battle of the Revolution. Since then I have done all I could to eliminate from that struggles [sic] the fiction, myths and legends which have gathered around it, that truth alone might be known concerning it. A great monument has now been reared upon this battlefield, and in connection therewith has gone out far and wide the statement that the battle fought thereon between Virginians and Indians, October 10, 1774, was the first in the war for American Independence. Many students of history and school men have asked me if I endorse the statement, to all I say, most certainly not, and as a more complete answer to this I now have in preparation a monograph containing my views as to the proper place in American history to which this battle of Point Pleasant properly belongs. This is in the last American Colonial War.

THE WAR OF 1774

In 1774 there were probably forty thousand white men, women and children, living on the west side of the Blue Ridge, on a frontier stretching from Pittsburg to the source of the Tennessee river. While men were pushing down into the Ohio Valley, the Indian nations northwest of the Ohio had formed a Confederacy and a race war, was at hand. Hostilities began. Messengers bore tidings of the horrors on the border to Williamsburg, and Lord Dunmore, the Colonial Governor by special message, dated May 13, 1774, informed the House of Burgesses, of these. That body the next day by enactment, directed him to prosecute the war against the Indians. This he hastened to do, and leaving Williamsburg, Sunday, July 10, 1774, crossed the Blue Ridge, and having fixed his head-quarters at, "Greenway Court," the home of Lord Fairfax in the Shenandoah Valley, he mustered an army of one thousand men in the counties of Berkeley, Frederick, Hampshire and Dunmore, and at its head proceeded, on foot to the Ohio river. 7

THE SOUTHERN DIVISION OF THE ARMY

Before leaving the Shenandoah Valley, Dunmore issued orders to General Andrew Lewis of Botetourt, to collect as many men as possible in Augusta, Botetourt and Fincastle counties, and join him, the Governor, either at Wheeling or the mouth of the Great Kanawha. Lewis chose the latter, again, August 30th, writing from the mouth of the South Branch of the Potomac, [Dunmore] requested General Lewis to meet him at the mouth of the Little Kanawha-now Parkersburg, West Virginia. Lewis declared to do this, and having collected about fifteen hundred men, at Camp Union-now Lewisburg, West Virginia-proceeded to the mouth of the Great Kanawha-now Point Pleasant, West Virginia, where October 10, 1774, he was attacked by an Indian army and that day there was waged the most desperate battle ever waged between white men and Indians in America.

FOR WHAT THE CONTESTANTS WAGED BATTLE

The Indian warriors of the Confederated nations of the Ohio Wilderness, waged battle at Point Pleasant, not as the allies of England, but to drive back the white invaders from their hunting grounds in the Ohio Valley. On the part of the Virginians, the battle was the crowning event of an offensive movement, not in defense of American liberty or Colonial independence, on their part, but to protect the inhabitants of pioneer homes west of the Blue Ridege [sic],-men, women and children-from the rifle, tomahawk and scalping-knife in the hands of barbarian warriors. The Military movements known as Lord Dunmore's War, would have taken place just they did [sic], and the battle of Point Pleasant, fought just the same, if there had never been an American Revolution. These two wars were entirely distinct, the one from the other.

THE MEN AT POINT PLEASANT NOT PENSIONERS

The Revolution finally closed with evacuation of New York by the British, November 25, 1783. All battles fought between these dates-April 19, 1775 and November 25, 1785 [sic]-one [sic] Revolutionary battles, and all Americans participating therein were classed as Revolutionary soldiers. Ample provision was made for them by bounties, half-pay, land-warrants and pensions for invalids; but in the provisions of these laws no soldier in the battle of Point Pleasant was ever included for services therein ....

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Parker Vincent Adkins's Timeline

1721
June 21, 1721
Goochland, Goochland County, Virginia, United States
1754
1754
Age 32
Halifax County, Virginia
1755
1755
Age 33
Halifax, Virginia, United States
1757
1757
Age 35
Halifax County, Virginia
1759
September 20, 1759
Age 38
Halifax, Virginia
1760
1760
Age 38
Giles,,Virginia,USA
1760
Age 38
Halifax, Virginia, United States
1763
1763
Age 41
Halifax, Virginia, United States
1767
May 10, 1767
Age 45
Pittsyvania, Virginia, United States
1768
1768
Age 46
Cabell, Virginia