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Chilton Genealogy and Chilton Family History Information

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Profiles

  • Alice Morris (1561 - 1610)
    Family From Stephen Morris, son of John, married Alyce Chilton on June 21 1579 at Canterbury St Paul, Kent, England, Children: Edyth Morris Dorothye Hitchcock (born Morris) Jane Hitome (bo...
  • Anne Chilton (c.1559 - d.)
    Origins The children of Lionel Chilton and his first wife Edith were: i. John Chilton was born in 1557/1558 in Canterbury, Kent, Eng. ii. Anne Chilton was born about [1559]. iii. Alice Chilton...
  • Aylette Haws Chilton (aft.1814 - 1891)
    Reference: MyHeritage Family Trees - SmartCopy : Oct 22 2018, 15:56:34 UTC * Reference: MyHeritage Family Trees - SmartCopy : Oct 22 2018, 16:48:39 UTC
  • Chloë Chilton
    Chloë Chilton is an English artist whose work focuses on cloud formations and animal illustrations. She is based in Surrey.
  • Rev. Claudius L. Chilton (1856 - 1914)
    When Claude was born his father was Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court. At the age of four - in the gallery of the Montgomery capitol - he observed his father bang a gavel and launch the Confed...

About the Chilton surname

English: habitational name from any of the various places called Chilton, for example in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, County Durham, Hampshire, Kent, Shropshire, Somerset, Suffolk, and Wiltshire. The majority are shown by early forms to derive from Old English cild ‘child’ (see Child) + tun ‘enclosure’, ‘settlement’. One place of this name in Somerset possibly gets its first element from Old English cealc ‘chalk’, ‘limestone’, and one on the Isle of Wight from the personal name Ceola (compare Chilcott), or from Old English ceole ‘deep valley’.